Alexander Magruder

Alexander Magruder (abt. 1610 - bef. 1677)

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Alexander Magruder
Born about in Belliclone, Maderty Parish, Perthshire, Scotlandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married 1652 in Marylandmap
Husband of — married about 1672 in Province of Marylandmap
Descendants descendants
Died before in Upper Marlboro, Prince George's, Maryland.map
Profile last modified 8 Aug 2019 | Created 5 May 2011
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Contents

Biography: Alexander McGruder in Scotland

Alexander Magruder is a member of Clan MacGregor.

Name

A number of spelling varieties appear in Scottish records of the family, as well as others in North America, however, the spelling Magruder did not arise on the Scottish side of the Atlantic.

  • Alexander MacGruether, II. [1]
  • Mcgruder
  • McGruder.
  • MacGruder/McGruder/etc. means son of the brewer ('grudair' in Gaelic). Black associates Magruder families with three clans: Drummond in Perthshire (Alexander Magruder 1610-77), Fraiser and MacGregor. [2] [3]

1610 Birth

Alexander was most likely born in Balmaclone (today's Nether Belliclone), Madderty Parish, Perthshire. Margaret Campbell, mother of Alexander, had acquired title to the Balmaclone estate when she married Andrew Drummond, and retained it as her residence when she married Alexander McGruder. One would expect her children to be born there. [4]

An alternate suggestion is that he was born in Cargill, Scotland, 1610, [5][6] [7] [8][3]

Alexander's year of birth is most frequently given as 1610 reflecting his fine in 1622 at age 12 for hunting without a license.

Parentage

Alexander McGruder, born in Scotland in 1610, is believed to be the son of Alexander McGruder, b. 1569 [9] There is a belief that the McGruders were a sept of clan McGregor. [10]

His mother, Lady Margaret (Campbell) Drummond, was the daughter of Nicholas Campbell, 1st Laird of Keithick. [11] [12]

His mother was the widow of Andrew Drummond, Laird of Ballycose." [13]

1617 Death of his father

By 1 May 1617, when a legal document recognized his mother Margaret's third husband, Donald Campbell, Alexander McGruder's own father was dead. The document was an inhibition (injunction) taken by the tutors or guardians of young John Drummond, in his interests, against Margaret Campbell and her third spouse, Donald Campbell. [14]

No documents have been found establishing what became of Lady Margaret's McGruder children at the time of her marriage to Donald Campbell. If it was son Alexander who migrated to Maryland and named one of his properties "Craigneich", one might imagine that young Alexander had developed a fondness for the Craigneich farm of his McGruder relatives in Maderty Parish.

1622 Illegal Hunting

On 22 November 1622, one Alexander McGruder, 12 years old, was fined at Spittalsfield, Caputh Parish, about six miles from Cargill near Dunkeld, for illegally carrying arms and shooting deer and wildfowl. This single record is the source of the 1610 birth year attributed to Alexander McGruder. [5]

Work in Scotland: Factor for Lord Maderty

Alexander may have served as factor for Lord Maderty in Dunblane Parish, Strathallen. [5]

1645 Army of the League and Covenant

An "Allaster Mcgruder" served in Col. Sir Thomas Ruthven's regiment of the Army of the League and Covenant in England in 1645-46. [5] Alaster, or Alestair, is the Scottish variant of the name Alexander.

Was there a marriage and children in Scotland?

By 1645, Alexander McGruder would have been 35 years old, time enough to have married and formed a family. There is speculation that he did so, [15] but there are no records of him actually having done so.

Biography: The Immigration Legend

After 1645 the Scottish Alexander disappears from the records, and in 1651 a Maryland Alexander Magruder appears. Were they one and the same?

Because there is no direct evidence that the Scottish Alexander became the Maryland Alexander, the identity of the two is not accepted as proved. [16]

Bridging the gap of time and space is the legend of Alexander's immigration. The legend has several elements, frequently reported but never documented.

Officer in the Army

The first element of the legend is that Alexander was a military officer on the Scottish side in the Army of Charles II. [11] [17]

Some sources add that he carried the rank of Colonel. [7] [18]

One source gives the names of three McGruders -- James, Alexander and John -- serving in Charles II's Army.[19]

Captured in Battle

The second element of the legend is that he was captured in the Battle of Worcester, September, 1651. "After the execution of King Charles I by the English Puritans under Oliver Cromwell, the Scottish Parliament declared his son Charles II, Prince of Wales, to be king of Scotland. A Scottish Army was formed to support Charles II. At the Battle of Dunbar in , the Scottish Army was defeated by Cromwell, who then swept across the country. Nevertheless, Charles II, who had fled to Scotland, was crowned at Scone, January, 1651. This time Charles' Scottish Army invaded England, where it was defeated at the Battle of Worcester, September, 1651." [8]

In the 1651 Battle of Worcester defeat, it is believed the Alexander McGruder was captured. [5][11] [18]

Mackenzie's account adds that Alexander's brothers James and John also fought at Worcester, James being killed and John being transported. [9] The English magazine 'The Genealogist', 35 (new series):66 </ref> [8][9] Another source states that James, Alexander and John McGruder were among the Scotsman who comprised a large part of Charles II's Army in 1651. The source states that when Charles was defeated at the battle of Worcester by Cromwell that same year, several thousand prisoners were taken. [19]

Kurz cites the timing of the traditional 1651 date implausible and notes one theory that he might have been captured at the Battle of Preston 17 Aug 1648 and arrived before 1651 in MD [20]

There is no documentation of any kind for participation in the conflict, however, and therefore all of these accounts must be considered legendary.

The name MacGregor was proscribed

In the legend, Alexander was sentenced to have his name proscribed from MacGregor to Magruder, [11] In fact, the name MacGregor had been proscribed by the King in 1603, and the proscription was lifted by Charles II [21]

One of the sources that suggest Alexander had an earlier marriage in Scotland also suggests that he had a son Robert MacGregor, educated in Edinburgh, who also came to America afterwards. [11]. In addition to lacking documentation, this account also carries the assumption that Alexander's birth name was MacGregor and passed down to a son Robert. However, there is no evidence Alexander ever used the name MacGregor.

Transported as a prisoner by way of Barbados or Virginia

Continuing the legend, having been captured in battle, Alexander's life is spared and the expense of imprisoning him saved by exiling him across the Atlantic. He is transported to America as a prisoner. [5]

In the legend, he was transported to Virginia[8] in 1651 .[6] Or he was sent as a prisoner of war to Virginia through Barbados. [11][17][9] And he arrived in the Chesapeake in the Spring of 1652. [17][7] with 150 other prisoners. [11] [19]

No supporting records for any of the elements of this legend have been found.[17]

Place Names: Connecting the Scotland and Maryland Alexanders

If the legend does not tie Alexander of Scotland to Alexander of Maryland, what does?

At the time of his death in 1677 Alexander owned about 4000 acres of land known as 'Craignaigh, Dumblane, Good Luck and Anchovie Hills'." [11] Three of these four land parcels were directly tied to the homeland of Alexander McGruder in Scotland:

  • Dunblane is a cathedral town in central Scotland, southwest of Perth and northwest of Edinburgh.
  • Craigneich, was a farm of the McGruders near the mouth of Glen Artney in Maderty Parish and a possible place where Alexander spent his older childhood after his father's death in 1617 . [4] Another farm close by was Meigor, which Alexander's father owned. "James II had two sons, John and Alexander. John became Chamberlain to Patrick, the 3rd Lord Drummond, and made the huge leap from tenant to owner of his own farm, Meigor, in Glen Artney. We do not know if he acquired Meigor through purchase, through marriage, or as a gift from Lord Drummond. Records from that time forward refer to John and his heirs as of Meigor, indicating ownership, rather than in Meigor, which indicates tenancy. [4]
  • Anchovie Hills is a strange name for a land grant in Maryland -- until one realizes that "Anchovie" is simply a mis-spelling of Inchaffray, the name of the Abbey situated by the village of Madderty, midway between Perth and Crieff in Strathearn, Scotland. [22].

Biography: Alexander Magruder in Maryland

Name

Given the spellings of the time, Alexander in Maryland also spells his surname in a variety of ways. The 1923 Yearbook of the American Clan Gregor Society shows the name as McGruder, Macruder, Magruther, MacGruther, McGruther, MacCrouder, McCrouder, McGrudder, and finally Magruder, the latter form being that signed to his will. [19]

A patent issued in 1661 is the first record of the name "Magruder" found in America. On this patent issued by the Second Lord Baltimore, in 1661, this tract is called "Magruder,," while on subsequent records pertaining to the same individual the name is spelled in the different ways shown above.[19]

A deed was executed in 1673 by Alexander McGruder and his wife Sarah in which both sign their names "Magruther," while the body of the instrument shows the spelling "MacGruther" (C. C. M. Jr., Authority).[17]

1650 Servant of John Ashcomb

If Alexander Magruder answers to the name Alexandre Mathoda, he might have been in Maryland as early as 1650: "In a book of warrants, assignments and patents records one finds: "John Ashcomb demanded twelve hundred acres of land for transporting into this province himself, Winifred his wife and John, Charles, Nathaniel and Samuel his sons and six servants viz. Alexandre Mathoda, Will. Gibbons, Will. Ward Guy -- Edward Wood and Joan-- in the years 1650 and 1651" [23]

In the same book on 7 Oct 1653, Charles Steward assigned his right to land for bringing his wife Margaret Steward into MD to Alexander Macruder. Entry for 19 Nov 1653: "I, John Ashcomb, do assign unto Alexander Macruder, my servant, 50 acres of land which will be due to me for the next servant I shall transport into this province of Maryland." Ashcomb signed with his mark and the same day a warrant was issued "to lay out for Alexander Magruder 100 acres of land in any part of the province." [24]

How Alexander Magruder became John Ashcomb's "servant" is not known but Ashcomb could not read nor write and could not give the surnames of two of his servants, so it is no surprise that he and the recording clerk may have mangled the spelling of the Magruder surname [25]

These documents would confirm one element often appearing in the legends of Alexander's arrival -- that he was an indentured servant upon arrival. Still, genealogists such as Kurz adhering to the traditional account more likely place his arrival at 1652. [12] [26][27] [3]

They leave open the question, however, of how the indenture ended. Normally he would have been bound to a colonist for eight years service. [11] as an indentured servant [18][19], but it appears that Magruder had moved from servant to property owner in the space of a year.

1652 Turkey Buzzard Island

Magruder was in Maryland by 1652, where he was granted 500 acres "Turkey Buzzard Island", in Calvert Co. [9] which was near the Patuxent River. [11][8] It was "good land in what was then Calvert, but is now Prince George's, County on the north side of the Patuxent river. [19]

This tract of land was surveyed for Richard Harris and H. Coursey in 1652 and the surveyor's certificate was soon afterwards (probably in 1652) consigned by them to "Alexander Macruder," the assignment being made on the margin of the certificate and not dated.[19][28]

A memorandum in the land office in Washington, D. C., LAHR, Folio 220, states that in 1652 "Alexander MacGregor" settled on 500 acres of land near "Turkey Buzzard Island," in the Patuxent River, Calvert County, Maryland (C. C. Magruder, Jr., Authority). This was afterwards known as the "Magruder Ferry Plantation." So it is more than probable that the "binding out" story is incorrect.[17]

1653 First Marriage to Sarah

A number of land records, from 1663 through March 1671, include a wife named Sarah. Her surname is unknown, but after Alexander’s death the interests of her children were aggressively supported by Ninian Beall and Samuel Taylor. By Sarah Unknown he had three sons, James, Samuel and John. [12]

Son Samuel's established birth year being 1654, the marriage may be estimated at 1653. Edward C. Papenfuse' article on Alexander's son Samuel names Sarah as Samuel's mother, [29]

The first wife of record is a Sarah, perhaps as early as 1653. His will lists Elizabeth Hawkins? or Green? whom he married about 1672 (the "Green" speculation from the fact that wife Sarah claimed land for bringing in "Elizabeth Green" in 1671). Dr. Kurz names Sarah as the mother of three sons - James, Samuel and John (but Clan tradition holds to Margaret Braithewaite as their mother), and last wife Elizabeth as mother of sons Alexander and Nathaniel and daughter Elizabeth (p. 69). [17]

1659 "Success" Land Surveyed

On 29 Sep 1659, a tract was surveyed for Alexander Magruder in Calvert County by a great branch on the north side of the Patuxent River on the "back side" of land laid out for John Hambleton.He used three warrants for 50 acres each which he had received by assignment and another warrant for 50 acres " Magruder transporting Henry, his servant, into this province in Anno 1656. "He aptly named the 200-acre tract "Success." It was patented in 1666. [30]

He purchased rights to Hambleton's adjoining 200-acre tract and a patent was granted him in 1661 (Patents #4, f. 627).Between 1661 and 1668, "Alexander Magruder, planter," had another 1300 acres of land in Calvert Co surveyed and patented [31]

Acquiring hundreds of acres of land which could later be divided or sold was an excellent investment strategy.[17]

He obviously lived up to the name he gave his first property and was a success in acquiring funds to purchase land and pay the annual rent to the Lord Proprietor.[17]

1661-1671 Land Acquisitions

"Between the years 1661 and 1671, Alexander Magruder acquired about 4000 acres of land along the Patuxent River in Maryland, tracts of which he sold from time to time. In 1668 he acquired in Calvert Co., Md., a tract of 200 acres, called Success; Anchovie Hills of 800 acres; Alexander's Hope of 200 acres; and in 1670, Good Luck of 500 acres. In 1671, he acquired in St. Mary's Co. a tract of 200 acres, called Craig Naigh and Dunblane of 250 acres.[8]

1668 Anchovie Hill and other Purchases

Between 1668 and 1671, he made purchases in the part of Calvert Co that later became Prince George's Co, patenting tracts on the west side of the Patuxent River: "Anchovie Hill" 400 acres on Aquasco Creek; "Good Luck" 500 acres, with "Creighnaigh" 200 acres adjoining [later called "Magruder's Delight," Maryland Heritage, Katharine Beall Adams, p. 201]; "Alexandria" 700 acres, with "Dunblane" 250 acres adjoining [32]

1672 Second Marriage to Elizabeth

He married Elizabeth Unknown, and had three children: Alexander II, Nathaniel and Elizabeth. All six children were born in Maryland. [12]

Alexander’s last wife was named Elizabeth, possibly Elizabeth Hawkins or Elizabeth Green.[33] [6]. Elizabeth lived approximately 1630 to1671).

He married about 1672, Elizabeth Hawkins.[8] His third marriage, in 1672, was to Elizabeth (Hawkins or Greene)"[6] By this marriage Alexander had a dau. Elizabeth who married John Pottenger, as his 2nd wife. Samuel Magruder and Elizabeth Pottenger were therefore half-siblings and John Pottenger thus Samuel's brother-in-law, shortened to the 'brother' reference at the time.

The Legend of a third wife: Margaret Braithwaite

Alexander Magruder is often shown with three wives. Sarah and Elizabeth are both documented, although neither has a documented last name. Margaret Braithwaite, on the other hand, appears to be a legend. The references to Margaret Braithwaite all have two things in common: first, they name her father, William Braithwaite (or Brainthwaite). Secondly, they list specific facts about her father -- never about her. [34][9][35]

Traditionally, he is said to have married a Margaret Brathwaite, daughter of a cousin of Lord Baltimore, who once served as a temporary governor of the colony. No record confirms this, and (as Charles Kurz points out) there is no evidence that Alexander received patronage from that family---the Calverts---who were known for generosity to their own. [33]Disputing the Colonial Families record, Brice Clagett believes there is no evidence that Samuel Magruder married someone named Margaret Braithwaite. The tradition of Margaret Braithwaite or Brainwaite as having been a wife of Alexander Magruder cannot be documented). [12]

The "persistent tradition" is that "Alexander Magruder married Margaret Braithwaite, believed to be the daughter of Helenor Stephenson and William Braithwaite, who was the one-time temporary governor of Maryland and a cousin of Lord Baltimore" [36]

There are three main difficulties with the claimed marriage to Margaret Braithwaite: (1) the lack of any documentation of the actual existence of a Margaret Braithwaite; (2) the difficulty in fitting a person into the dates at which her supposed father, William, might have had a child, and the dates at which Alexander Magruder's children needed a mother; and (3) William Brainthwaite family of St. Mary's in southern Maryland was a staunch Roman Catholic, and the Magruders were Presbyterian, adding another difficulty to positing such a relationship.

Religion

"...meager evidence supports the deduction... he was a Presbyterian in affirmation and faith" (The Magruder Family in Its Religious Affiliations, Mrs. Roberta Julia (Magruder) Bukey, 1915 ACGS Year Book, pp 48-57)[17]

1676 Will

In the will of Alexander Magruder, Immigrant, executed February 12, 1676, probated July 25, 1677, [37][38] occur these words:

  • I give & bequeath to my loving Wife, her three children, .... the plantation that I now Live on, to my loving Wife, Eliz Magruder, for her lifetime & after her decease to my Son Alexander Magruder, my Son Nathaniel Magruder to them and their heirs forever.
  • The said Land doth containe by Pattent & conveyance, eight Hundred Acres of Land."

In addition, the will specified:

  • His sons James and John were devised "Alexander" and "Dunblane" containing 900 acres of land.
  • His son Samuel was devised " Good Luck" containing 500 acres of land, and
  • his daughter Elizabeth was devised " Creignight" containing 200 acres of land, in all 2400 acres of land thus being devised. [35]
  • Until his sons were 25 they were not to buy or sell anything above the value of 400 pounds of tobacco without the consent of one of the overseers named in the will: friends Nathaniel Truman, Samuel Taylor and Ninian Beale.[17]
  • Alexander Magruder's will, which he signed as "Magrudr," (20 Feb 1676, proved 25 Jul 1677; [39] left his wife Elizabeth "and her three children" 2/3 of his personal estate and the 800-acre home plantation and 1/3 to sons James, Samuel and John, who was to have his share at age 20, and daughter Elizabeth, at marriage.
  • His widow and sons James and Samuel were named executors.
  • James Magruder, John Lane, John Johnson, James Soulivant and James Guthrey were witnesses. [17]

By codicil made "in extremis" and signed with his mark on 12 Mar 1677 acknowledging two sets of children (the elder James, Samuel, John; and the younger Alexander, Nathaniel and Elizabeth), Alexander provided that inheritances would pass within each set unless all in a set die then the other set would inherit that portion. His two eldest sons, James and Samuel, were to "enter upon the property left them" the 15th of Nov after his death; John was to "enter upon his land" at age 18; and daughter Elizabeth hers at age 14 and receive her portion of the estate on the day of marriage or at 18. John and Samuel were "to work along my servants" on the tobacco and corn crops "this year" for the benefit of all inheritors. The codicil was witnessed by James Soulivant, John Lane and John Berkeley.[17]

There is a copy of his will in its original quaint wording and spelling in the Land Office in Annapolis, Maryland, Liber V, Folio 269, which contains copies of all the wills of all the counties of Maryland (C. C. M., Jr., Authority). [17]

1677 Death and Burial

Alexander Magruder II died between20 Feb 1676/76 and 25 July 1677 in Marlborough, Calvert Co., now Prince George's Co., Maryland - at "Anchovie Hills"; [8] He died in 1677.[12][5][17] his will was probated January 25, 1677. [6][10]

Walters asserts that it has been proved beyond the shadow of a doubt by Caleb Clarke Magruder, Jr., of Upper Marlboro, Maryland, that Alexander Magruder died and was buried on the plantation called "Anchovie Hills" in what was Calvert but is now Prince George's County, Maryland. [17] [35] "Anchovie Hills", was located southeast of what is now Magruder's Ferry and Croom Rd., Brandywine, MD. [3] No headstone has been found and the site is on a private wildlife refuge now. [35] The location is not far from Upper Marlboro, Prince George's County, Maryland [40]

1677 Inventory

The 16 Feb 1677 and 14 Sep 1677 inventory of Alexander Magruder's goods and chattels show he made a comfortable living for his time and place, totaling 48,776 pounds. The items included

  • 3 bibles,
  • silver, brass, copper, pewter, chafing dish,
  • 16 cows, steers, bulls, horses,
  • feather and flock beds, pillows, bedsteads, tables,
  • 12 Russian leather chairs, 3 chairs and 12 stools,
  • looking glass, 5 tablecloths, 2 pair cotton sheets, rugs, a sealskin trunk, desk, warming pan, nails, 3 guns,
  • a Negro man named Lamb,
  • and 4 servants (2 men and 2 women) with from 1 to 7 years to serve [41]

Children

Estimating Children's Birth Years

The following documents are available to estimate children's birth years:

  1. Alexander's 1676 will, which names six living children, the youngest three of whom -- Alexander, Nathaniel, and Elizabeth -- are identified as the children of his current wife, Elizabeth. Elizabeth is specified as under 14 at the time. The other three are also named, with mother unspecified: James, Samuel and John.
  2. A 1677 codicil to the will stating that James, Samuel and John are the elder children and Alexander, Nathaniel and Elizabeth are the younger children. John was to enter upon his property at age 18, and Elizabeth to receive hers at age 14.
  3. March 1671 is the last known document listing wife Sarah, and wife Elizabeth could enter the scene as early as 1672.

A deed executed in 1673 by Alexander McGruder and his wife Sarah is the last known document listing Sarah, [17] and wife Elizabeth could enter the scene as early as 1674.

From this the following estimations may be made:

  1. The three youngest children were born to Elizabeth between 1674 and being named in the will, 1676, a very brief period of time -- Alexander, 1674, Nathaniel, 1675 and Elizabeth, 1676. Alternatively, some have suggested that since sons Alexander and Nathaniel were not identified as being under 18, they were Elizabeth's children were by an unnamed previous husband, and were given Magruder's name as a matter of convenience.
  2. Of the older children, estimate that the youngest, John, was under 18 in 1676, thus born after 1658, and the two older ones were over 18 in 1676, thus born before 1658, so estimate birth years of James, 1655, Samuel 1657, and John 1659. Samuel's birth year is often given as 1656, which fits this scenario.

Other researchers have weighed in:

  1. Alexander's children by Sarah were James Magruder (b about 1658, d Dec. 23, 1685. Samuel Magruder, John Magruder (b 1662, d after 1685.[17]

The elder three children–Samuel (b ~1660), James (b ~1658-61), and John (b 1659 or later)–were the children of Sarah. [33]

Children in order

His children in his different marriages were:

  1. Samuel Magruder, Sr. b: 1654 in Prince George's Co., MD Son of Alexander Magruder and Margaret. Children shown at Saunders site. [8] "Col. Samuel Magruder, born 1660, died 1711, of 'Good Luck,' Prince George's County, Maryland, civil and military officer in Maryland from 1676 to 1705, commissioner 1696, justice of the peace from 1697 to 1705, and 1707, burgess 1704, member of Maryland Assembly from 1704 to 1707, vestryman of St. Paul's parish, county commissioner 1708, [42] Samuel Magruder, b. 1654, d. Prince Georges County 1711. [43] [44] Based on information contained in Colonial Families in the U.S Shirley Middleton-Moller believes that Samuel Magruder is able to call John Pottenger brother. By Alexander's 1676 will, son Samuel and hrs., was to receive 500 acres entitled "Good Luck."[17]
  2. James Magruder b: ABT 1658 Son of Alexander Magruder and Margaret. Children shown at Saunders site. [8]James and John Magruder, sons of Alexander, Immigrant, died without issue [35]By Alexander's 1676 will, sons James and John and hrs., were to receive 900 A. in 2 tracts, viz., "Alexandria" and "Dumblain" on the Patuxent River.[17]
  3. John Magruder b: ABT 1662 or later (under 18 at time of will) Son of Alexander Magruder and Margaret. Children shown at Saunders site. [8]James and John Magruder, sons of Alexander, Immigrant, died without issue [35]By Alexander's 1676 will, sons James and John and hrs., were to receive 900 A. in 2 tracts, viz., "Alexandria" and "Dumblain" on the Patuxent River.[17]
  4. Elizabeth Magruder b: ABT 1664 or later (under 14 at time of will). Daughter of Alexander Magruder and elizabeth. No children shown at Saunders site. [8] Elizabeth Magruder, b. ca 1664, d. prior to 1736, married John Pottenger as his second wife. By Alexander's 1676 will, Elizabeth and her three children, Alexander, Nathaniel and Elizabeth, were to receive the home plantation, Alexander and Nathaniel to receive it upon her death. [17] The home plantation was Anchovy Hills. By Alexander's 1676 will, daughter Eliza: was to receive, when she was 14 yrs. of age, and hrs., 200 acres of "Craighnaigh." [17]
  5. Alexander Magruder b: ABT 1672. Son of Alexander Magruder and Elizabeth. No children shown at Saunders site. [8]By Alexander's 1676 will, Elizabeth and her three children, Alexander, Nathaniel and Elizabeth, were to receive the home plantation, Alexander and Nathaniel to receive it upon her death. [17] The home plantation was Anchovy Hills.
  6. Nathaniel Magruder b: BET 1674 AND 1675. Son of Alexander Magruder and Elizabeth. No children shown at Saunders site. [8]By Alexander's 1676 will, Elizabeth and her three children, Alexander, Nathaniel and Elizabeth, were to receive the home plantation, Alexander and Nathaniel to receive it upon her death. [17] The home plantation was Anchovy Hills.

Notable Descendants

Among his vast descendency are Generals James Longstreet, John Bankhead Magruder, Stephen Drane, and William Beall of the Confederate States Army; Asa Griggs Candler, the founder of Coca-Cola and Emory University; and Jeb Magruder, aide to President Richard Nixon and a figure in the Watergate scandal. [5]

Sources

  1. The Phelps Family--1405 to Present," by Brian T. Phelps.
  2. Black, Surnames of Scotland
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 A narrative on immigrant Alexander Magruder 1610-77, his descendants & ancestors. http://martinrealm.org/gene/magruder.htm Interesting narrative and summary of Magruder families in America and Scotland. Info on former frequently based on wills.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Magruders Landing. https://magruderslanding.com/scotland/the-mcgruthermagruder-heartland/. Accessed August 25, 2016
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 Special Collection, Maryland State Archives. http://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/speccol/sc3500/sc3520/002100/002185/notes/steele.dir/parsonstech/genealogy/trees/jgordon/d363.htm#P1284. Accessed August 21, 2016
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 Frederick A. Virkus., editor. Immigrant Ancestors: A List of 2,500 Immigrants to America before 1750. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1964. 75p. Repr. 1986
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Parran, Alice Norris,. Register of Maryland's heraldic families : period from 1634, March 25th to March 25th, l935, tercentenary of the founding of Maryland. Baltimore, Md.: Printed by H.G. Roebuck & Son, cl935-c1938.
  8. 8.00 8.01 8.02 8.03 8.04 8.05 8.06 8.07 8.08 8.09 8.10 8.11 8.12 8.13 Jan Saunders. Alexander Magruder, II, the Immigrant. Hill - Jordan - Klages Families and Related Lines. Sources: Iola Avenel Hill Kaiser, R.R. #1, Box 39, Freeburg, St. Clair County, Illinois, "Ancestor Charts." "Magruder Family Data" -- Mackenzie's "Colonial Families of the United States," 1:348 ff.; Compiled mainly by Mrs. John H. Williams, with additonal notes added by Robert Barnes. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=cjhill&id=I02414. Accessed August 17, 2016
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 "Magruder Family Data" -- Mackenzie's "Colonial Families of the United States," 1:348 ff, cited by Saunders.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Charles G. Kurz [based on the research and papers of Thomas Garland Magruder, Jr.], "The Ancestral History of Margaret Campbell of Keithick (1571 - c. 1631 )," Yearbook of the American Clan Gregor Society, 62 (1978), 55-65.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 Brian T. Phelps, The Phelps Family -- 1405 to Present. Cited by Saunders
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 12.5 Dr. Charles G. Kurz, Clan Librarian, The Ancestral History of Margaret Campbell of Keithick (1571-1631), based on the research and papers of former Chieftain, Thomas Garland Magruder, Jr. Yearbook of the American Clan Gregor Society, 62 (1978) 55-65. http://www.nltaylor.net/ancestry/royaldescents/Kurz1.pdf. Accessed August 19, 2016
  13. Register of the Privy Council, vol VII, pp. 599-600. Cited by Dr. Charles G. Kurz, Clan Librarian, The Ancestral History of Margaret Campbell of Keithick (1571-1631), based on the research and papers of former Chieftain, Thomas Garland Magruder, Jr. Yearbook of the American Clan Gregor Society, 62 (1978) 55-65. http://www.nltaylor.net/ancestry/royaldescents/Kurz1.pdf. Accessed August 19, 2016
  14. Register of Inhibitions, Perth., vols 8 and 9, Part II, fols 14b-16b, Cited by Dr. Charles G. Kurz, Clan Librarian, The Ancestral History of Margaret Campbell of Keithick (1571-1631), based on the research and papers of former Chieftain, Thomas Garland Magruder, Jr. Yearbook of the American Clan Gregor Society, 62 (1978) 55-65. http://www.nltaylor.net/ancestry/royaldescents/Kurz1.pdf. Accessed August 19, 2016
  15. See, for example, "Tradition and Margaret Braithwaite," W. C. Barrickman, 1945 ACGS Year Book, pp 30-37). Cited by Kevin Howard Walters. My Genealogy Home Page:Information about Alexander Magruder. http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/w/a/l/Kevin-Howard-Walters/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1618.html. Accessed August 25, 2016
  16. See Soc.genealogy.medieval discussion: http://tinyurl.com/jx6t7yd. See also the two Kurz articles.
  17. 17.00 17.01 17.02 17.03 17.04 17.05 17.06 17.07 17.08 17.09 17.10 17.11 17.12 17.13 17.14 17.15 17.16 17.17 17.18 17.19 17.20 17.21 17.22 17.23 17.24 Kevin Howard Walters. My Genealogy Home Page:Information about Alexander Magruder. http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/w/a/l/Kevin-Howard-Walters/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1618.html. Accessed August 25, 2016
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 Henry C. Peden, Jr, MA, Colonial Maryland Soldiers and Sailors, 1634-1734In the book, page 32:
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 19.3 19.4 19.5 19.6 19.7 H. L. M. Cited by Kevin Howard Walters. My Genealogy Home Page:Information about Alexander Magruder. http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/w/a/l/Kevin-Howard-Walters/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1618.html. Accessed August 25, 2016
  20. 1979 ACGS, pp 66-68, Cited by Kevin Howard Walters. My Genealogy Home Page:Information about Alexander Magruder. http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/w/a/l/Kevin-Howard-Walters/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1618.html. Accessed August 25, 2016
  21. Wikipedia, Clan Gregor. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Gregor
  22. Wikipedia, Inchaffray Abbey. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inchaffray_Abbey
  23. Patents AB&H, f. 202. Cited by Kevin Howard Walters. My Genealogy Home Page:Information about Alexander Magruder. http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/w/a/l/Kevin-Howard-Walters/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1618.html. Accessed August 25, 2016
  24. Patents AB&H, f. 352. Cited by Kevin Howard Walters. My Genealogy Home Page:Information about Alexander Magruder. http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/w/a/l/Kevin-Howard-Walters/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1618.html. Accessed August 25, 2016
  25. see Annual Address, Clan Chieftain Dr. Edward May Magruder, 1923 ACGS Year Book, pp 14-15 for "acrobatic performances of letters" evolving into the now-accepted "Magruder" spelling). Cited by Kevin Howard Walters. My Genealogy Home Page:Information about Alexander Magruder. http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/w/a/l/Kevin-Howard-Walters/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1618.html. Accessed August 25, 2016
  26. Marker at St. John's College for Alexander Magruder commemorating the 300th anniversary of his arrival in America, donated by the American Clan Gregor Society. (See photo)
  27. Source: S-2101545842 Repository: #R-2142962141 Filby, P. William, ed.. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s. Farmington Hills, MI, USA: Gale Research, 2009. APID: 1,7486::0
  28. Neither Magruder nor Coursey have entries in Skordas "Early Settlers of Maryland", but Richard Harris has several entries; in 1637 transported as a servant and in 1650 an immigrant who paid his own way, with his wife.
  29. Edward C. Papenfuse, et al. Archives of Maryland: A Biographical Dictionary of the Maryland Legislature 1635-1789 Volume 426, Page 570 http://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/speccol/sc2900/sc2908/000001/000426/html/am426--570.html
  30. Patents #10, f. 200. Cited by Kevin Howard Walters. My Genealogy Home Page:Information about Alexander Magruder. http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/w/a/l/Kevin-Howard-Walters/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1618.html. Accessed August 25, 2016
  31. Patents #5, f. 4, #11, F. 232, 444. Cited by Kevin Howard Walters. My Genealogy Home Page:Information about Alexander Magruder. http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/w/a/l/Kevin-Howard-Walters/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1618.html. Accessed August 25, 2016
  32. Patents #11, f. 288, #12, f. 585, 587, #26, f. 274, 275). Cited by Kevin Howard Walters. My Genealogy Home Page:Information about Alexander Magruder. http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/w/a/l/Kevin-Howard-Walters/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1618.html. Accessed August 25, 2016
  33. 33.0 33.1 33.2 Susan Tichy. Magruders Landing. https://magruderslanding.com/alexander-2/ Accessed August 25, 2016
  34. Wurts' Magna Charta, page 2126, line 248-9, cited by Saunders
  35. 35.0 35.1 35.2 35.3 35.4 35.5
  36. Kurz, p. 68. Cited by Kevin Howard Walters. My Genealogy Home Page:Information about Alexander Magruder. http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/w/a/l/Kevin-Howard-Walters/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1618.html. Accessed August 25, 2016
  37. Will Book, 5A, p.261, Prince George's Co., Md, cited by Saunders.
  38. Year Book of the American Clan Gregor Society http://books.googleusercontent.com/books/content?req=AKW5QacHDzdIRgqmbw8w8gf9t3JGP5HZh7F0dBDNACHdhB6Cz4PTAeT36mh5k7Clx1Tn77016hBp7EmY5YUghnLiIdzAM2uxp0pM0CcrittcFbimULV7mfUh7vtI15QliSouG-bU2g8321Ie8BN96pPDvHgOJjXuyLUwX91Ucsa_pzkZkb10SZxQhDw9_BUZrSPZqE1oL1XKYXkgPb02hwsXrgJ5WLN4mIEYUWoKMxkKh996wgTEuDqjyJaD1fN_ScgKt8l7ND2AbjtPX23IoWSmpne6Qmmpug
  39. PG Wills #5, f. 261; photostat in 1935 ACGS Year Book pp 48, 55 Cited by Kevin Howard Walters. My Genealogy Home Page:Information about Alexander Magruder. http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/w/a/l/Kevin-Howard-Walters/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1618.html. Accessed August 25, 2016
  40. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=89803827
  41. Inv. & Accts. #4, f. 606. Cited by Kevin Howard Walters. My Genealogy Home Page:Information about Alexander Magruder. http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/w/a/l/Kevin-Howard-Walters/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1618.html. Accessed August 25, 2016
  42. Wurts' Magna Charta, page 2126, line 248-8, cited by Saunders
  43. Will WM1:46 Nov 23 1710
  44. Magruder, Kenneth Dann. "First Lieutenant Samuel Brewer Magruder." Yearbook of the American Clan Gregor Society Containing the Proceedings of the 20th Annual Gathering (1930). Print.

See Also

  • See the authoritative "The Magruder Lineage in Scotland to Magruder Family in American, " Dr. Charles G. Kurz, American Clan Gregor Society Librarian, 1979 ACGS Year Book, pp. 67 ff; "Alexander Magruder: Scotch Emigrant, Maryland Planter," The Rev. James Mitchell Magruder, 1935 ACGS Year Book, pp. 42 ff, which includes transcripts of pertinent documents including Alexander Magruder's will; the four-generation chart, 1954 ACGS Year Book, with authorities pp. 64 ff; and "Magruder Family," Eleanor M. V. Cook, Jan 1992, typescript in the extensive Magruder files at the Montgomery Co MD Historical Society.[17]
  • Charles G. Kurz [& Thomas Garland Magruder, Jr.], “The Ancestral History of Margaret Campbell of Keithick,” Yearbook of the American Clan Gregor Society 62 (1978), 55-65.
  • Charles G. Kurz [& Thomas Garland Magruder, Jr.], “The McGruder Lineage in Scotland to Magruder Family in America,” Yearbook … 63 (1979), 53-72.
  • Yearbook of the American Clan Gregor Society, vol. 62 (1978):55-65. The Ancestral History of Margaret Campbell of Keithick (1571- c. 1631), by Charles G. Kurz.

http://www.nltaylor.net/ancestry/royaldescents/Kurz1.pdf

  • Yearbook of the American Clan Gregor Society, vol. 63 (1979):53-72. Charles G. Kurz [& Thomas Garland Magruder, Jr.], “The McGruder Lineage in Scotland to Magruder Family in America,” Yearbook … 63 (1979), 53-72.

http://www.nltaylor.net/ancestry/royaldescents/Kurz2.pdf

  • Parran, Alice Norris,. Register of Maryland's heraldic families : period from 1634, March 25th to March 25th, l935, tercentenary of the founding of Maryland. Baltimore, Md.: Printed by H.G. Roebuck & Son, cl935-c1938.
  • Virkus, Frederik A. editor. Immigrant Ancestors: A List of 2,500 Immigrants to America before 1750. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1964. 75p. Repr. 1986.
  • "Year Book of the American Clan Gregor Society", "The American Clan Gregor Society", Year Book 1944, Pg. 43, 44. "The Chieftain's Request" -
  • Mrs. Uel Stephens, Descent from King Edward III of England and James I of Scotland, from Knights of the Garter, and from Seven Sureties for the Magna Charta of A.D. 1215, Vol. 7, Chapter 248, "Wurts' Magna Charta", (descent goes from youngest generation [child-lower number] to older generation [parent-higher number]; source gave us no further information about the book). Cited by Saunders.
  • Genealogy World Tree Project,, "The Phelps Family--1405 to Present," by Brian T. Phelps, rootsweb@phelpsinc.com; Repository: Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah 84150 USA; Title Ancestral File (R); author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Publication: Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998. Ancestry World Tree Project: "Richard M. Coffey," by Jerry H. Derby, derbyjh@earthlink.net. Cited by Saunders.




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On 10 May 2019 at 20:53 GMT Donna Roberts wrote:

They do sound like sound sources.If you are pre1700 you can edit this page and add sources and where to find them

On 9 May 2019 at 21:58 GMT C. (Rodgers) Bake wrote:

Edit: Thank you Jack for the clarification on Hawkins maybe being from a previous marriage, not her surname, and all the other information.

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 Name Alexander Magruder Gender Male Birth Place St Birth Year 1610 Spouse Name Elizabeth Hawkins Marriage Year 1670 Marriage State MD Number Pages 1 Household Members Name Age Name Alexander Magruder Name Elizabeth Hawkins U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 Name Alexander Macgruether Gender Male Spouse Name Margaret Braithwaite Number Pages 1 Household Members Name Age Name Margaret Braithwaite Name Alexander Macgruether Colonial Families of the USA, 1607-1775 for Alexander MacGruether Colonial Families of the United States of America, Volume I Magruder Family p.348

On 27 Aug 2016 at 11:46 GMT J (Schmeeckle) S wrote:

This profile contains many bald statements that are not backed up by primary sources. In such cases, it is much better to say, "He is said to have done, etc, etc" rather than "He did, etc. etc."

On 24 Aug 2016 at 02:51 GMT Donna Roberts wrote:

As for Royalty Sir Neil (Neil Mac Cailein Mór) Campbell married Lady Mary de Brus . Robert the Bruce's sister. He was 10th Knight of Lochaw. Good job Jack. The source i had for Margaret B. is gone now. Donna

On 23 Aug 2016 at 23:10 GMT Jack Day wrote:

The more research I discover, the more the existence of Margaret Braithwaite becomes doubtful. I am moving toward removing her as a wife of Alexander, although keeping links with the narrative to her. Her profile would then be that of a "legend" where the biography is devoted to documenting the reasons she did not actually exist.

On 5 Feb 2015 at 01:08 GMT Jack Day wrote:

Magruder-25 and Magruder-21 appear to represent the same person because: Same person, dates, places.

On 24 Dec 2014 at 15:53 GMT Karen (Lowe) Tobo wrote:

Magruder-126 and Magruder-25 appear to represent the same person because: These two have the same dates and family members. Let's merge!

Alexander is 16 degrees from Cheryl Hess, 26 degrees from John Lennon and 8 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.