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George Martin (1618 - bef. 1686)

George Martin
Born in Englandmap
Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married before 1644 (to before 1646) in Salisbury, Norfolk, Massachusetts Bay Colonymap [uncertain]
Husband of — married 11 Aug 1646 in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colonymap
Descendants descendants
Died before in Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colonymap
Profile last modified | Created 12 Sep 2010
This page has been accessed 8,513 times.
The Puritan Great Migration.
George Martin migrated to New England during the Puritan Great Migration (1620-1640).
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Contents

Disputed Origins

Some online trees claim he was the son of Christopher Martin and Mary Unknown or George Morton and Juliana Carpenter There is no evidence for either set of parents. (See Research Notes)

Biography

George Martin was born about 1618 by his own deposition.[1] And, according to Maj. Robert Pike, “George had come over as a servant to Samuel Winsley about the time that Salisbury was first settled”[2][3][4] …in 1638,[5] and he bought land in Salisbury about 1643.[3] He also received land in Amesbury in 1640.

By 1644, he married first Hannah (Unknown) in Salisbury, Massachusetts Bay. [6]

Child of George Martin and Hannah (Unknown)

  1. Hannah Martin b. 1 Feb 1643/4, Salisbury, Massachusetts Bay [7]

On 11 Aug 1646, he married second, Susanna North in Salisbury, Massachusetts Bay.[8][6]

Children of George Martin and Susannah North

All born in Salisbury, Massachusetts Bay. [7]

  1. Richard Martin, b, 29 Jun 1647; m. Mary Hoyt, aft. 15 Mar 1670; d. abt. 11 Mar 1729, Amesbury
  2. George Martin b. 21 Oct 1648; d. bef. 19 Jan 1684
  3. John Martin, b. 26 Jan 1651; m. Mary Weed, 1675; d. 6 Oct 1693, Amesbury
  4. Hester Martyn, b. 7 Apr 1653; m. John Jameson, 15 Mar 1669, Amesbury; d. 1695, Amesbury
  5. Jane Martin, b. 2 Nov 1656; m. Samuel Hadley, 11 Aug 1676, Amesbury; d. aft. 24 Feb 1704, Amesbury
  6. Abigail Martin, b. 10 Sep 1659, m. James Hadlock, 3 Dec 1679, Salem; d. 2 Jul 1716, Amesbury
  7. William Martin, b. 11 Dec 1662; m. Mary Stone, 1697, Amesbury
  8. Samuel Martyn, b. 29 Sep 1667; d. bef. 1684 in Amesbury

Various sources describe him as a blacksmith, land surveyor, and a frequent buyer and seller of land in Amesbury and Salisbury.[2][9][3] He took oath of fidelity in 1646.[2]

Robert Pike Petition Controversy

The controversy originated as a protest in several towns over General Court punishment of Robert Pike for his outspoken criticism of Quaker Persecutions. In 1673, "George Martin of Salisbury, Massachusetts, was one of 15 out of 47 from 5 Towns who signed a petition to the General Court in 1653 to revoke the sentence against Lieutenant Robert Pike."[10] It later became a contest between the authority of the General Court vs. the right of a British subject to petition the Court. The General Court confirmed its authority by reaffirming Pike’s original fine and also assessing fines to those settlers who refused to withdraw their petition signatures. George Martin was one of the few who defiantly refused to recant.

Court Appearances

Although George and Susannah were frequently involved with the Essex County Court as early as 1647, more serious troubles began after the birth of their last child:

  1. 1669, William Sargent, Jr. accused Susannah of witchcraft. In response, George Martin sued him for slander, adding two counts for saying, (1) Susannah killed her newborn infant, and (2) Martin’s son was a bastard and the other an imp.[11] While a later court dismissed the witchcraft charge, it found Sargent guilty of unproven accusations of " fornication and infanticide.” The court awarded George and Susannah "a white wampam peague or the eighth part of a penny damage.”[12]
  2. Later in 1669, Susannah lost on a charge by Christopher Bartlett that she called him a liar and a thief.[13]
  3. More seriously and still in1669, their son Richard was sentenced to be whipped “for abusing his father,” involving an axe.[14]
  4. In 1671, George, Susannah, and her sister. Mary Jones, engaged in lengthy litigation over the estate of their father, Richard North, and, by 1674, their inheritance was lost when the court found against them.[15]

He died before 23 Nov 1686.[16] Will dates are shown as 19 Jan 1683/4 and probated on 23 Nov 1686.[3][2][17][18]

Witchcraft Execution of His Widow

On 29 Jun 1692, his widow, Susannah North, was found guilty of witchcraft during the Salem Witchcraft Trials and executed 19 Jul 1692.[19] (See her profile for more information.)

Research Notes

  1. George Martin's parents and origins are unknown according to the Great Migration Directory by Robert Charles Anderson, published in 2015.“Martin, George: Unknown; 1639; Salisbury, Amesbury [SJC Case #3231; TAG 56:155-59, 58:193-204, 59:11-22].”[20]
  2. According to a series of articles in The American Genealogist, there is no reason to believe he is related to any other family of the same name in New England. The same series of articles in TAG (56:155-59; 58:193-204; 59:11-22) also conclude that the maiden name of his first wife Hannah was not Green. It is currently unknown.[21]

Sources

  1. The American Genealogist. New Haven, CT: D. L. Jacobus, 1937-. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2009 - .) https://www.americanancestors.org/DB283/i/12608/193/0
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 The pioneers of Massachusetts, a DESCRIPTIVE LIST, drawn from records of the Colonies, towns and churches and other contemporaneous documents : Pope, charles Henry, 1841-1918 : Free Download, borrow, and streaming. (1970, January 01). Retrieved February 09, 2021, from https://archive.org/details/pioneersofmassac00pope/page/303/mode/1up?q=George%2BMartin
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Hoyt, David Webster. The old families of Salisbury AND Amesbury, Massachusetts ; with some related families OF NEWBURY, HAVERHILL, Ipswich and Hampton. (n.d.). Retrieved February 09, 2021, from https://archive.org/stream/cu31924025963772#page/n254/mode/1up/search/George+Martin
  4. Greene, David L. "Salem Witches III: Susanna Martin," The American Genealogist, v. 58, 1982, no. 4, pages 193-204.
  5. Wikipedia: Salisbury, Massachusetts
  6. 6.0 6.1 New England Marriages to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB1568/i/21175/1004/426895727
  7. 7.0 7.1 TAG 59:203-204
  8. Vital records of SALISBURY, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849 : Salisbury (Mass.) : Free Download, borrow, and streaming. (1970, January 01). Retrieved February 09, 2021, from https://archive.org/details/vitalrecordsofsa00sali/page/439/mode/1up?q=Martyn
  9. Great Migration 1634-1635, A-B. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: The Great Migration, Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Volume 1, A-B, by Robert Charles Anderson, George F. Sanborn, Jr., and Melinde Lutz Sanborn. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB114/i/7051/377/235168278
  10. The Essex Antiquarian : Sidney PERLEY : Free Download, borrow, and streaming. (1970, January 01). Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://archive.org/details/essexantiquaria02perlgoog/page/n119/mode/2up
  11. “Imp.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, February 10, 2020. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imp.
  12. “Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts : Essex County (Mass.). Quarterly Courts : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming.” Internet Archive. Salem, Mass. : Essex Institute, January 1, 1970. https://archive.org/details/recordsfilesofqu04esse/page/129/mode/1up.
  13. “Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts : Essex County (Mass.). Quarterly Courts : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming.” Internet Archive. Salem, Mass. : Essex Institute, January 1, 1970. https://archive.org/details/recordsfilesofqu04esse/page/184/mode/1up/search/Martyn.
  14. “Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts : Essex County (Mass.). Quarterly Courts : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming.” Internet Archive. Salem, Mass. : Essex Institute, January 1, 1970. https://archive.org/details/recordsfilesofqu04esse/page/186/mode/1up.
  15. “Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts : Essex County (Mass.). Quarterly Courts : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming.” Internet Archive. Salem, Mass. : Essex Institute, January 1, 1970. https://archive.org/details/recordsfilesofqu05esse/page/297/mode/1up.
  16. History of AMESBURY : MERRILL, Joseph. [FROM old Catalog] : Free Download, borrow, and streaming. (1880, January 01). Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://archive.org/details/historyofamesbur00merr/page/112/mode/1up?q=Martin
  17. Estate of George Martin of Amesbury, Essex Probate Docket # 17890. Probate Records of Essex. Archived at Internet Archive.
  18. Massachusetts, U.S., Wills and Probate Records, 1635-1991 Online at https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/9069/images/004481223_00011?treeid=147090&personid=162170075364&hintid=1042069151770&usePUB=true&_phsrc=vAp3&_phstart=default&usePUBJs=true&pId=3613000
  19. Vital Records from The NEHGS Register. Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014. (Compiled from articles originally published in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register.) https://www.americanancestors.org/DB522/i/14301/342/0
  20. The great Migration Directory: Immigrants to New England, 1620–1640. (2015). p. 396. Retrieved February 12, 2021, from https://shop.americanancestors.org/products/the-great-migration-directory
  21. TAG 56:155-59; 58:193-204; 59:11-22

See also:

  • Find A Grave: Memorial #43226990
  • Delorey, J. I. (1997). A study of George and Susanna Martin. Shrewsbury, Mass. (496 Main St, Shrewsbury) :: J.I. Delorey.
  • George Martin of Salisbury, Mass., and his descendants : Also of the probably related lines of Samuel Martin of FRANCESTOWN, N.H., his brother Jesse Martin of Francestown, n.h.; of Richard Martyn of PORTSMOUTH, N.H., and Ephraim Martin Of Goffstown, N.H., and Bradford, Vt. (n.d.). Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://archive.org/stream/georgemartinofsa00wats#mode/2up


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Comments: 12

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Biography updated; links to wives will be added after merge completions.
posted by Clyde Perkins
Profile Improvement Notice (PGM maintenance - needs gedcom clean up)

I suggest improving this profile in accordance with WikiTree’s Style Guide, https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Category:Styles_and_Standards and, Puritan Great Migration Editing Guidance, https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Space:Puritan_Great_Migration_Editing_Guidance

All this, while carefully preserving the good stuff already there…

Any comments/objections?

posted by Clyde Perkins
I welcome your attention to George's profile, Clyde. Please - have at him. Note that there are multiple merges pending among his family.
posted by Bobbie (Madison) Hall
edited by Bobbie (Madison) Hall
Do we have a strong source for the parental relationship shown here?

Anderson, in his "Great Migration Begins", Volume II. page 1296, has a profile on George Morton, who came with his wife, Juliana and two servants to the Plymouth Colony about 1623 aboard the vessel "Anne", The profile details their five children, none of whom was named George The children appear to have lived and married in Plymouth. Anderson also, in his "Great Migration Dictionary", page 221, shows a George Martin, background unknown, who arrived about 1639 and settled in Salisbury - where this George was married. Unless we have strong source support for this George being the son of George and Juliana Morton, this relationship seems doubtful and the listed parents should be detached.

posted on Martin-63273 (merged) by Hayward Houghton II
Thank you for that very detailed explanation, Hayward. I agree that this George Martin, spouse of Susanna North, is not currently proven as the son of anyone, much less the son of a George Morton. I agree that the parents should be detached before merging with Martin-1109.
posted on Martin-63273 (merged) by Bobbie (Madison) Hall
I second (or third) the motion. George & Susannah are among my 8th ggs, and I'd much prefer they be attached only to their correct, and proven, parents....
posted by Christopher Childs
Martin-63273 and Martin-1109 appear to represent the same person because: Same dates and same wives,
posted by Hayward Houghton II
Parents on -63273 will need to be disconnected before merging.
posted by Bobbie (Madison) Hall
Martyn-197 and Martin-1109 appear to represent the same person because: My GED import did not preserve the family relationships, but Martyn-197 is the husband of Susanna North and the father of Richard and Esther /Hester Martin. I agree with your dates of birth and death, so please ignore the slightly different dates that are shown with Martyn-197.
Is George the same person as Martin-1109?
posted by Connie Mack
Agreed, Roland. I have never found any parents with reliable sources for George.
posted by Bobbie (Madison) Hall
George Marin's parents and origins are unknown according to the Great Migration Directory published by Robert Charles Anderson in 2015. The parents shown should be detached. According to a series of articles in TAG (56:155-59; 58:193-204; 59:11-22) There is no reason to believe he is related to any other family of the same name in New England.
posted by [Living Baker]