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Benjamin François Mius (abt. 1766 - aft. 1851)

Benjamin François Mius
Born about in Cap-Sable, Shelburne County, Colony of Nova Scotiamap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married 13 Jun 1786 in Eel Brook, Nova Scotiamap
Descendants descendants
Died after [location unknown]
Profile last modified | Created 11 Jul 2015
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Benjamin François Mius is an Acadian.
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Contents

Biography

Born just months before the family came back from exile in Massachusetts. His parents and older siblings had been deported from Cap-Sable in April 1756. Benjamin returned with other Acadians and settled in what would later be Sluice Point. His house still stands at what is now 503 Chemin des Bens. He was alive as of the 1838 census listed as "Benjamin Muse", living with his wife.[1]

Heritage Survey

"Architectural Comment: This house is vernacular in style. It is a one and a half storey house of wood construction with a steeply pitched gable roof. The house has a three bay facade with a central doorway which is enclosed in a built on porch. The gable ends of the house show a wider structure than is normally seen with this style house in this area. The width of the house, in fact, accommodates three symmetrically place windows at the second floor level in each of the gable ends. Two windows only are found at the ground level in the gable ends. An additional window is found centered in the gable at the attic level. The interior of this house is also very interesting with many interior walls, especially at the second floor level being boards rather that plaster. This is probably the oldest post-Deportation Acadian houses in Argyle Municipality. It shares many architectural with the Benoni d'Entremont house at Lower West Pubnico."

"Historical Comment: On 9 June 1801, Benjamin Muise, along with 26 other French Acadian men, was granted 4,824 and 1/2 acres of land on the East side of the Tusket River, in the Township of Argyle. It is supposed that some of these men, including Ben, were already living within those boundaries when it was divided shortly thereafter by Joshua Frost. A family member states that Ben built this house a couple of years before his marriage in 1786 at a location since known as 'Pointe des Bens.' No records have been uncovered to date to substantiate this. In all likelihood, construction of this house would have begun between 1786 and 1796 about the time the first local saw mills were established. Ben Muise was an integral part of the community and surrounding areas. Family history relates that as a respected community leader he directed and organized activities and controlled the finances in Sluice Point. He was instrumental in erection of the first R.C. Church at Ste.-Anne-du-Ruisseau. Ben is shown on the 1850 Tax Assessment. On March 4, 1851, he deeded his homestead to his four sons, Samuel; Edward; Dennis; & George for 400 pounds. Research by this compiler has not revealed how these sons divided this property but Dennis is found assessed for a substantial amount in 1864. It is known by the family that Dennis lived here. Many important and valuable papers found in this old house were sold by one of Ben's descendants in the 1980's. Some of these documents pertain to Dennis as well. This collection is held by the Université de Moncton. By 1878 the Assessments show Dominique, son of Dennis, now the main taxpayer. Further confirmation appears in the 1881 N.S. Census where he is head of the household with his parents living there as well. In 1910 Dominique deeded this homestead to two sons, John C. & Ambroise. After the death of his wife, John moved to the U.S. In a 1934 Deed he turned his share over to Ambroise, who raised John's daughter, Pauline. The house has remained in the family to date. It has undergone many interior changes over the years. The central chimney although no longer functional is still intact. The house and property are well maintained by Pauline Bourque, Benjamin Muise's great, great granddaughter, who resides here."

"Contextual Comment: This house sits at the end of a driveway at the end of the Muise Point Rd. in Sluice Point. The location and orientation of the house suggests it was built before any road were made in this area. It retains many of it original architectural features. It is one the most important houses in the Municipality of Argyle." [2]

Research Notes

Bona Arnsenault doesn't include him with François and Jeanne's family.[3]

Benjamin was born in 1766. He passed away after 1825. [4]

Sources

  1. 1838 Census
  2. Argyle Township Court House & Archives, Heritage Inventory Sluice Point, 25 Nov 1998.
  3. Arsenault, Bona. Histoire et Genealogie des Acadiens Port Royal, 4 vols. Ottawa, Ontario.1988. 4:1601.
  4. Unsourced family tree handed down to Jennifer (Tidd) Thibodeau.


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It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Benjamin François by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. Y-chromosome DNA test-takers in his direct paternal line on WikiTree: Mitochondrial DNA test-takers in the direct maternal line: It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share some percentage of DNA with Benjamin François:

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Muise-374 and Mius-60 appear to represent the same person because: Same person, parents,,bmd dates
posted by Marcel Muise