Redbird  (Moytoy) Brock

Redbird (Moytoy) Brock (abt. 1721 - 1797)

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Chief Redbird "Aaron Brock" Brock formerly Moytoy
Born about in Cumberland, Virginiamap [uncertain]
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died in Taluegue, Clay, Kentucky, United Statesmap
Moytoy-159 created 4 Aug 2014 | Last modified | Last edit: 13 Oct 2017
12:31: Rhitt Garrett edited the Biography for Redbird (Moytoy) Brock. [Thank Rhitt for this]
This page has been accessed 19,574 times.

Categories: Cherokee | Moytoy.

Since its inception, this Profile has mushroomed and has attracted a lot of contentious scrutiny from various sources. The following paragraphs are being added by Garrett-4589 to summarize and give at least one perspective on some of the issues. This probably will be changed and updated as the profile managers work to get a unified product.

...There is sufficient reliable documentation from many sources to confirm the existence of this Cherokee chief Redbird, but there are several areas where known documentation is unavailable, inconclusive, contradictory, or...??? Most of these same issues were being hotly debated on the internet at least as early as 2006....

Some of the issues:

1. There are several Wikitree profiles which appear (perhaps) to be the same person as 1st Redbird and are subject to mergers. Managers are working through the related issues which arise due to conflicts in data or poor quality of data in the un-merged profiles. (This work appears to be almost complete as of 7/21/2017)

2. Another major issue is alignment/reconciliation of birth dates for parents/Redbird/children. Exact dates are not available... only ranges of birth dates. Lacking exact dates for several consecutive generations containing many children inevitably results in conflicts/conundrums often difficult, perhaps impossible to untangle and resolve.

It seems unlikely that these issues will be easily resolved. No immediate action will be taken on any of this, to allow time for anyone having additional information or insight to come forward.

3. Some question whether Redbird and Aaron Brock are the same person, suggesting that Aaron Brock is perhaps a "myth". Others contend that they are indeed the same person having both a Cherokee name, Redbird, and a white man name, Aaron Brock. This is the perspective dominant in the present state of this Profile... A reading of history indicates that many Cherokee did indeed adopt dual names. Lacking smoking gun evidence, this issue likely may not be resolved to every manager's satisfaction.

4. The biographical text below contained several duplications resulting from merges of several Profiles into this one place. Work is in progress to minimize duplicated information (Three edits have been completed 7/21/2017)

5. Excellent work by Jeanie Roberts makes the claimed husband/wife relationship between this Redbird and Susan Priber appear virtually untenable... Jeanie's work is based on analysis of existing biographical information in related WikiTree Profiles, and is summarized in "Disputed Biography" portion of Susan's WikiTree Profile. Any and all interested parties having any other reliable documentation on this relationship should speak up.

Based on recent new information, Redbird's Profile is being revised to remove spousal connection for Susan Priber, replaced by credible information for Susan Caroline Sizemore. This Profile now incorporates the new information. Garrett-4589

There still is an unacceptable conflict, yet to be resolved, in birth dates for Redbird and his father Great Eagle. Their birth dates as shown are only one year apart. From inspection, the (guess/estimated??) birthdates now shown in the WikiTree profiles... for Great Eagle, for his father, and for his grandfather... are all so nebulous and uncertain that the accumulated errors easily can account for the unacceptably short gap now shown between Great Eagle's and Redbird's birth dates. The father/son relationship now shown in (this) Redbird's Profile will be retained. It will be for future genealogists to resolve the apparent conflict. Garrett-4589

{{{image-caption}}}
Redbird (Moytoy) Brock was a Native American and member of the Cherokee tribe.
Join: Native Americans Project
Discuss: native_americans

Member of the AniWadi Clan


Biography

This Biography has been edited into two parts to retain the flavor of various merged profiles. A good deal of information is duplicated ...but some duplicate material is retained to give, in this editor's opinion, relevant continuity to each part.

(later) A third part also has been retained which shows some information confirming or additive to the first two parts.

Part One

Red Bird, took the English name Aaron Brock during marriage until widowed),

The name of Aaron Brock as father of Jesse Brock and his sister Mahala Susanna Brock Callahan was mentioned in two printed family histories: 1. Strong Family, by Mrs. J. C. Hurst, Lexington, KY, 1958. She wrote, "The Strong family of Breathitt and Owsley Cos., KY, was established by William, who was born about the year 1768 in VA and died about the year 1848. He was married about the year 1790 to Jennie Callahan (commonly called Jane), who was born about the year 1779 and died about the year 1815. She was a daughter of Edward and Mahalah Brock Callahan. Mahalah was a daughter of AARON BROCK and a sister of JESSE BROCK, who lived in Harlan County. The Brocks were part Indian." .[1]

Chief RedBird Totsuwha aka Arron Brock


Died: 10 Feb 1797 in Taluegue, Clay, Kentucky[2]


AARON BROCK (Sr.), "Chief Red Bird," is said to've been born 8 Dec 1721 in VA, though no source for the date can be found ~ the same birthday and month as his son JESSE BROCK. Jesse's Revolutionary Pension application gave his date and place of birth as 8 Dec 1751, Cumberland Co., VA. Perhaps someone confused the two. Cherokee did not keep track of birthdates, as Anglos do, but since Chief Red Bird (AARON) Sr. was part-white, he might have. Note: this paragraph is clearly mistaken and incorrect...Garrett-4589'Italic text Chief Red Bird (Aaron Sr.) was murdered 10 Feb 1797 in Taluegue, KY. All known records of Chief Red Bird are listed on Jerry Taylor's website on this page: [1] Nearly 200 years of oral tradition indicates Aaron Brock was the English name of Cherokee treaty-signer Chief Red Bird (Cherokee name Tsalagi' Ugvwiyuhi Totsu'hwa) for whom the Red Bird River was named. Part Cherokee, his parents' names cannot be proven, but circumstantial evidence suggests he was the "unknown son" of Chief Great Eagle and his wife Woman Ani'Wadi, since hereditary chiefs signed treaties, and they had a son whose name was not recorded.

Red Bird was a treaty signer. One can easily follow the genealogy of treaty signers, descending from Amatoy Moytoy, to Moytoy, to Willenawah (Great Eagle), to Sister of Doublehead (Red Paint Clan), to Red Bird; and Wurteh Watts to Sequoyah. Treaty writers went out of their way to track down the most influential Cherokee leaders and kin of those who had signed previous treaties. Dr. Kenneth B. Tankersley was shown as a boy the burial place of Aaron Brock - Chief Red Bird by his great-grandmother Elizabeth Saylor Tankersley, who was shown by her grandmother Elizabeth Brock Saylor, the granddaughter of Jesse Brock's son James C., as a place to be cared for by their family, which has looked after his grave since the murder.[3]

Red Bird spent a good deal of his time with his friend Will in the vicinity of two rock-shelters on the east and west banks of the Kentucky River, a stretch of the upper headwaters, known today as the Red Bird River in Spurlock. The opposing shelters are strategically located in a narrow constriction of the valley overlooking a shallow river crossing where game animals can be easily dispatched. Both shelters are well marked with traditional Cherokee symbols—engraved images of the Wild Potato, Bird, Wolf, and Deer clans. It was in this setting that Red Bird and Will were murdered, brutally and maliciously tomahawked to death by two men from Tennessee, Edward Miller, known as Ned, and John Livingston, known as Jack[4]


Redbird was referenced in Louis-Philippe’s Diary of My Travels in America in the following excerpt, around 1799 after the death of Chief Red Bird: "We must be fair: the whites’ systematic spoilation of the Indians has not even slowed. All the Indians’ neighbors are greedy for their Tennessee territories. The last treaty has aroused serious discontent among the whites, who would like a war with the Indians so a new treaty can strip them of the coveted lands. Four months ago the whites assassinated two Indians (one a chief called Red Bird), hoping the provocation would lead to reprisals and trigger a war. The Indians demanded the surrender of the murderers. This was refused on the pretext that they should not be yielded over to Indian torture, and that according to the treaty they must be judged by American law. The whites promised to conduct an investigation and have the murders punished, but it would seem that nothing of the sort was done. I heard one of the assassins identified, so it would not be hard to find them. In the meantime, as nothing was done, the Cherokees assassinated four whites, and as nothing was said, all has been calm since."[5]



Red Bird River, S.E. Kentucky, named for Chief Red Bird. The boundary between Clay and Leslie Cos. follows in part the Red Bird River. Turkey track is the traditional symbol for the Bird clan (Ani-Tsisqua). Turkey is also the symbol of the trickster.
The rock exhibits symbols for all Cherokee clans. Photos courtesy of Tim Brock, May 2005


Aaron Brock's name as father of Jesse Brock and his sister Mahala Susanna Brock Callahan was mentioned in only one old printed family history (Strong Family, by Mrs. J. C. Hurst, Lexington, KY, 1958).
No evidence is cited for the name of his father to have been Reuben Brock ("British soldier b. 1680"), as found in a few genealogy databases on the Internet, nor that such a Reuben existed.
The mystery of where this Reuben theory came: Apparently it was a theory only of a researcher, then repeated as fact by others.
The Swiss/Germans Rudolph and John Michael Brack/Brock in Augusta Co., VA, had two grandsons named Reuben who served in the Revolution. It is likely one of them was mistaken for a candidate for the father of Aaron Brock, though they were born 150 years too late. See EARLIEST BROCKS IN VA.
Virginia colonists from England received land patents of 50 acres per man, plus 50 acres for persons they transported to Virginia. Bond servants received 50 acres when their 2-7 years of servitude were complete. All patents were preserved and are at the Library Virginia in Richmond, and none exists for Reuben Brock. Abstracts were published by Nell M. Nugent in several volumes, Cavaliers & Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents, beginning with Vol. I, 1623-1666, Richmond, VA, 1963. Patent images are available on-line on the LVA website.
All able-bodied males were required to serve militia duty. All extant county militia lists were published by Lloyd D. Bockstruck, Virginia's Colonial Soldiers, Baltimore, MD, 1988.

Aaron's son Jesse Brock was said in testimony by his grandson Elijah (son of Amon) to be "about 3/4 Indian." This suggests that Jesse was the grand- or great-grand-, or gr-great-grandson (?) of a European immigrant. A Brock DNA Project to determine the Y-chromosome of Aaron Brock is awaiting more test results, but so far three Brock direct-male-line descendants of JesseBrocks's sons Amon, James, and Jesse, Jr., are haplogroup J-12f2.1+, of Mediterranean-Middle East- Ashkenazi Jewish (Jews who went to Northern Europe, primarily to England).
Another Brock man descending from George, believed by descendants to be Jesse's son, shows haplogroup R1B, the most common European admixture, and no similarity to the other two.
Brocks having DNA Prints, as opposed to Y-chromosome testing, all show a percentage of Native American.
There is no telling how far back the Jewish (or Melungeon) ancestor lived; it could have been hundreds or even thousands of years. Elizabeth Caldwell Hirschman, in her book MELUNGEON: THE LAST LOST TRIBE IN AMERICA (2005), wrote, "Not all Jews are Melungeon, but all Melungeons are Jews," and cites numerous landings in the Carolinas and Florida during the 1500s by Spanish and Portuguese Jewish sailors and settlers seeking a new home as refugees from the Inquisition which began in Spain 1492, the year Columbus discovered America. As other English colonists arrived, the earlier Jewish settlers sought isolation in Appalachia.
One European who married a Cherokee was Christian Gottlieb Priber, who immigrated abt 1735 from Zittau, Germany, went quickly to live with the Cherokee which he saw as an idyllic lifestyle. Leaving a wife and children in Germany who he meant to send for, he instead married a daughter of the great Cherokee Chief Moytoy at Tellico (now in SC). Her name is unknown, but their daughter Creat Priber married Chief Doublehead, who may've been Aaron Brock/Red Bird's brother, in the area now Stearns, KY. According to the interview of Felix Begley by Mrs. Annie Walker Burns, Christian Gottlieb Priber and his Moytoy wife had four daughters, names of the other three are not known. It was fairly common in that time and place for siblings to marry siblings.

Erected in Clay Co. in 1966 by Kentucky Dept. of Highways, No. 908, text at Kentucky Historical Society, members.tripod.com/~Sue_1/redbird.html
NOTE by Dr. Kenneth B. Tankersley: The prose about Red Bird was on the original State Marker. It was placed in front of Red Bird's cave, destroyed by SR 66, just south of Spurlock and north of Jack's Creek, in Clay County, and directly across the Red Bird River from his burial site. I have a photo taken the day it was dedicated by the governor. My cousin, Jess Wilson, the Clay County historian, filled in until he arrived. The marker has since been stolen and moved to another county. This site is still on the National Register of Historic Places.
Chief Red Bird - Was a legendary Cherokee Indian for whom this fork of the Kentucky River is named. He and another Indian, Jack, whose name was given the creek to the south, were friendly with early settlers and permitted them to hunt in the area. Allegedly they were killed in battle protecting their furs, and the bodies thrown into the river here. The ledges bear markings attributed to Red Bird."
1966, Kentucky Historical Society, Kentucky Department of Highways #908.

Previous location of Red Bird Rock, the homeplace of Chief Red Bird. The rock broke from this location on 7 Dec 1994 and was taken to Mancester, KY, city park. The rock use to be at ground level until the land was excavated to bring the road through. Photo by Tim Brock. Current location of Red Bird Rock in Manchester (seat of Clay Co., KY), city park, and Tim Brock. In addition to the carvings left by Chief Red Bird are several religious markings attributed to early priest from the Red Bird Mission who found the rock and added his own markings in several ancient languages he knew.

Site of Red Bird's murder, directly across the road from Red Bird Rock. Photo by Tim Brock
Dr. John J. Dickey Diary, Fleming County, Ky. Recorded in the 1870's and beyond. Reprinted in Kentucky Explorer, Volume 11, No March, 1997, p. 107. By permission. Clay County.

RED BIRD ~ The Indian chief for whom Red Bird Creek in Clay County was named was probably a Cherokee from Tennessee or North Carolina. Like others of his race, he was a great hunter and allured by the game in this remote region he finally took up his residence on the creek that bears his name at the mouth of Jack's Creek in this county. He came to his death by the avarice of the "pale face." There lived with him a crippled Indian named Willie. This man dressed the skins which Red Bird brought to their wigwam and looked after the culinary department of their house. Some hunters from North Carolina, greedy and unscrupulous, came to the wigwam and murdered Willie. They then secreted themselves and awaited the return of the brave chief who had long before buried his tomahawk and for years had been living in peace with the white man, and as he approached his crude castle the bullet of an assassin laid him in the dust. They threw his body into a hole of water nearby which is still called "Willie's Hole," and from which John Gilbert and others took him and buried him. One tradition is that he was sitting on the bank of a creek fishing when he was shot and that he fell into the creek.


NOTE: It was Jake, not Jack, according to Jake's descendant.

Native people in the past traveled and made seasonal moves. Robert Benge, for example, ranged in war and peace from Canada to Florida. By the time of Red Bird, people lived in cabins, rode horses, and drove wagons. Sequoyah moved back and forth from Georgia to Kentucky, from Washington to Arkansas.

Cherokee people who served in the Revolution, as well as African Americans who served, were permitted to be land owners and were encouraged by the newly formed government to acculturate into American society as civilized people.

Gist, father of Sequoyah, led an entire militia of Cherokee during the Revolution. He was brought up for treason and tried by Washington, who found him not guilty and thanked him for rallying the Cherokee for the American cause.
Aaron Brock migrated to Red Bird, Harlan Co., KY, when his son Jesse was granted land for his Revolutionary service. It is said that at first Aaron and his wife lived in a sycamore tree near what is now Red Bird, Kentucky, which is named for him. Sycamore trees were sacred to the Cherokee. It is where the Creator gave the Cherokee people fire. The stump of that sycamore tree is almost within eye sight of Ken Tankersley's family's home at Cranks, Harlan Co., Kentucky. Jesse Brock was the first settler at Wallins Creek in what was then Knox Co. and is now Harlan.
Aaron Brock, Chief Red Bird, was a friend of Dillon Asher, who maintained a tollgate on the border of Cherokee Treaty land, near present-day Pineville. Pineville was on the Cherokee Boundary Line by the Treaties of 1785, 1792, and 1798. Dillon Asher married Henrietta Bolling, a Powhatan descendant of Pocohantas and John Rolfe. Asher fought in favor of the Cherokee against Evan Shelby, brother of Isaac Shelby, first governor of Kentucky and a commissioner to relinquish Cherokee land claims along the Cumberland River. Red Bird warned Asher that Evan Shelby was going to have him killed, and he fled to present-day Harlan County, and named the new settlement after his Cherokee friend, Red Bird.

About 1798 Chief Red Bird (Redbird 2nd, son of first Redbird?? ) made a personal treaty with Dillon Asher (1777-1844), who kept the first tollgate on the Cumberland Pass, at Pineville, KY. Historical marker designating Asher's cabin was missing and has been replaced:

A historical marker reads, "LOG CABIN PRE-1800. On these grounds of the Red Bird River Community Hospital of the Evangelical United Brethren Church Center is log cabin built before 1800. Erected by Dillon Asher. Born 1774, died 1844. Buried near log house. Asher was keeper of first tollgate in Kentucky near Pineville. Established by legislature, 1795; fees paid for improvements on Wilderness Road."



Aaron "Chief Red Bird" 's daughter Mahala Brock who md. Edward Callahan had two daughters marry Cornetts ~ Zelphia to Roger Cornett b. 1786, and Charlotte Callahan to Robert Cornett b. 1780, son of Nathaniel Cornett. There were numerous other Brock-Cornett-Bolling marriages but I haven't linked them all back to an original ancestor.

Yahoo Falls, Cleary Co., KY, where Cherokee men, women, and children were massacred in 1810 while Red Bird (Redbird II, son of first Redbird) was helping escort them to safety at the Red Bird mission.

HISTORY
EARLIEST BROCKS IN VA
Following pages used by permission of Kenneth B. Tankersley, Ph.D., anthropologist, Natural History Unit, BBC, Northern Kentucky University, is a research associate of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History; Executive Board Member, Kentucky Native American Heritage Commission; and Executive Board Member, Kentucky Center for Native American Art and Culture:
CHIEF RED BIRD ~ Excerpt from his book-in-progress, Kentucky Cherokee: People of the Cave
Yahoo Falls by Kenneth B. Tankersley
Kentucky's Native Past, by Kenneth B. Tankersley
Kinship Notes, by Kenneth B. Tankersley
NOTES: Kentucky Treaties, by Kenneth B. Tankersley
Cherokee Syllabary, by Dr. Tankersley  <div style="margin: 10px 0; padding: 8px 8px 8px 32px; background: #e2ecf8 url(http://l.yimg.com/g/images/icon_info.gif) no-repeat 8px 8px;"> To take full advantage of Flickr, you should use a JavaScript-enabled browser and<br> <a href="http://www.macromedia.com/shockwave/download/download.cgi?P1_Prod_Version=ShockwaveFlash&quot;>install the latest version of the Macromedia Flash Player</a>. </div>

Part Two Chief RedBird Totsuwha aka Arron Brock Born: December 8, 1721 in Cumberland Co, VA[6]

Died: 10 Feb 1797 in Taluegue, Clay, Kentucky[7]

RedBird Totsuwha's father Willenawah Great Grey Eagle Moytoy

RedBird Totsuwha's mother Woman Ani Wadi Wadi

RedBird Totsuwha's daughter Mahala (Brock) Callahan

RedBird Totsuwha's son Jesse Brock


The movements of Chief Red Bird's village bet 1772-1810 can be tracked by the documents left behind from the white captive, Stephan Tuders, born in Virginia in 1770. Found in Red Bird's village in then Virginia, present-day Clay Co., KY, in 1772, Tuders moved with the village to North and South Carolina in 1778. In 1793, Tuders married a Chicamaugan woman from the village in South Carolina. In 1795 his daughter Leathy was born and in 1800 his daughter Polly was born, both in South Carolina.[8]



Red Bird River, S.E. Kentucky, named for Chief Red Bird. The boundary between Clay and Leslie Cos. follows in part the Red Bird River. Turkey track is the traditional symbol for the Bird clan (Ani-Tsisqua). Turkey is also the symbol of the trickster.
The rock exhibits symbols for all Cherokee clans. Photos courtesy of Tim Brock, May 2005

Nearly 200 years of oral tradition indicates Aaron Brock the English name of Cherokee treaty-signer Chief Red Bird (Cherokee name Tsalagi' Ugvwiyuhi Totsu'hwa) for whom the Red Bird River was named. Circumstantial evidence indicates but cannot prove he was the son of Chief Great Eagle and Woman Ani-Wadi. Dr. Kenneth B. Tankersley was shown the burial place of Aaron Brock - Chief Red Bird as a boy by his great-grandmother Elizabeth Saylor Tankersley, who was shown by her grandmother Elizabeth Brock Saylor, the granddaughter of Jesse Brock's son James C., as a place to be cared for by their family, which has looked after his grave since the murder.
Aaron Brock's name as father of Jesse Brock and his sister Mahala Susanna Brock Callahan was mentioned in only one old printed family history (Strong Family, by Mrs. J. C. Hurst, Lexington, KY, 1958).
No evidence is cited for the name of his father to have been Reuben Brock ("British soldier b. 1680"), as found in a few genealogy databases on the Internet, nor that such a Reuben existed.
The mystery of where this Reuben theory came: Apparently it was a theory only of a researcher, then repeated as fact by others.
The Swiss/Germans Rudolph and John Michael Brack/Brock in Augusta Co., VA, had two grandsons named Reuben who served in the Revolution. It is likely one of them was mistaken for a candidate for the father of Aaron Brock, though they were born 150 years too late. See EARLIEST BROCKS IN VA.
Virginia colonists from England received land patents of 50 acres per man, plus 50 acres for persons they transported to Virginia. Bond servants received 50 acres when their 2-7 years of servitude were complete. All patents were preserved and are at the Library Virginia in Richmond, and none exists for Reuben Brock. Abstracts were published by Nell M. Nugent in several volumes, Cavaliers & Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents, beginning with Vol. I, 1623-1666, Richmond, VA, 1963. Patent images are available on-line on the LVA website.
All able-bodied males were required to serve militia duty. All extant county militia lists were published by Lloyd D. Bockstruck, Virginia's Colonial Soldiers, Baltimore, MD, 1988.

Aaron's son Jesse Brock was said in testimony by his grandson Elijah (son of Amon) to be "about 3/4 Indian." This suggests that Jesse was the grand- or great-grand-, or gr-great-grandson (?) of a European immigrant. A Brock DNA Project to determine the Y-chromosome of Aaron Brock is awaiting more test results, but so far three Brock direct-male-line descendants of JesseBrocks's sons Amon, James, and Jesse, Jr., are haplogroup J-12f2.1+, of Mediterranean-Middle East- Ashkenazi Jewish (Jews who went to Northern Europe, primarily to England).
Another Brock man descending from George, believed by descendants to be Jesse's son, shows haplogroup R1B, the most common European admixture, and no similarity to the other two.
Brocks having DNA Prints, as opposed to Y-chromosome testing, all show a percentage of Native American.
There is no telling how far back the Jewish (or Melungeon) ancestor lived; it could have been hundreds or even thousands of years. Elizabeth Caldwell Hirschman, in her book MELUNGEON: THE LAST LOST TRIBE IN AMERICA (2005), wrote, "Not all Jews are Melungeon, but all Melungeons are Jews," and cites numerous landings in the Carolinas and Florida during the 1500s by Spanish and Portuguese Jewish sailors and settlers seeking a new home as refugees from the Inquisition which began in Spain 1492, the year Columbus discovered America. As other English colonists arrived, the earlier Jewish settlers sought isolation in Appalachia.
One European who married a Cherokee was Christian Gottlieb Priber, who immigrated abt 1735 from Zittau, Germany, went quickly to live with the Cherokee which he saw as an idyllic lifestyle. Leaving a wife and children in Germany who he meant to send for, he instead married a daughter of the great Cherokee Chief Moytoy at Tellico (now in SC). Her name is unknown, but their daughter Creat Priber married Chief Doublehead, who may've been Aaron Brock/Red Bird's brother, in the area now Stearns, KY. According to the interview of Felix Begley by Mrs. Annie Walker Burns, Christian Gottlieb Priber and his Moytoy wife had four daughters, names of the other three are not known. It was fairly common in that time and place for siblings to marry siblings.

Site of Red Bird's murder, directly across the road from Red Bird Rock. Photo by Tim Brock
Dr. John J. Dickey Diary, Fleming County, Ky. Recorded in the 1870's and beyond. Reprinted in Kentucky Explorer, Volume 11, No March, 1997, p. 107. By permission. Clay County.

RED BIRD ~ The Indian chief for whom Red Bird Creek in Clay County was named was probably a Cherokee from Tennessee or North Carolina. Like others of his race, he was a great hunter and allured by the game in this remote region he finally took up his residence on the creek that bears his name at the mouth of Jack's Creek in this county. He came to his death by the avarice of the "pale face." There lived with him a crippled Indian named Willie. This man dressed the skins which Red Bird brought to their wigwam and looked after the culinary department of their house. Some hunters from North Carolina, greedy and unscrupulous, came to the wigwam and murdered Willie. They then secreted themselves and awaited the return of the brave chief who had long before buried his tomahawk and for years had been living in peace with the white man, and as he approached his crude castle the bullet of an assassin laid him in the dust. They threw his body into a hole of water nearby which is still called "Willie's Hole," and from which John Gilbert and others took him and buried him. One tradition is that he was sitting on the bank of a creek fishing when he was shot and that he fell into the creek.


NOTE: It was Jake, not Jack, according to Jake's descendant.

Native people in the past traveled and made seasonal moves. Robert Benge, for example, ranged in war and peace from Canada to Florida. By the time of Red Bird, people lived in cabins, rode horses, and drove wagons. Sequoyah moved back and forth from Georgia to Kentucky, from Washington to Arkansas.

Cherokee people who served in the Revolution, as well as African Americans who served, were permitted to be land owners and were encouraged by the newly formed government to acculturate into American society as civilized people.

Gist, father of Sequoyah, led an entire militia of Cherokee during the Revolution. He was brought up for treason and tried by Washington, who found him not guilty and thanked him for rallying the Cherokee for the American cause.
Aaron Brock migrated to Red Bird, Harlan Co., KY, when his son Jesse was granted land for his Revolutionary service. It is said that at first Aaron and his wife lived in a sycamore tree near what is now Red Bird, Kentucky, which is named for him. Sycamore trees were sacred to the Cherokee. It is where the Creator gave the Cherokee people fire. The stump of that sycamore tree is almost within eye sight of Ken Tankersley's family's home at Cranks, Harlan Co., Kentucky. Jesse Brock was the first settler at Wallins Creek in what was then Knox Co. and is now Harlan.
Aaron Brock, Chief Red Bird, was a friend of Dillon Asher, who maintained a tollgate on the border of Cherokee Treaty land, near present-day Pineville. Pineville was on the Cherokee Boundary Line by the Treaties of 1785, 1792, and 1798. Dillon Asher married Henrietta Bolling, a Powhatan descendant of Pocohantas and John Rolfe. Asher fought in favor of the Cherokee against Evan Shelby, brother of Isaac Shelby, first governor of Kentucky and a commissioner to relinquish Cherokee land claims along the Cumberland River. Red Bird warned Asher that Evan Shelby was going to have him killed, and he fled to present-day Harlan County, and named the new settlement after his Cherokee friend, Red Bird.

About 1798 Chief Red Bird made a personal treaty with Dillon Asher (1777-1844), who kept the first tollgate on the Cumberland Pass, at Pineville, KY. Historical marker designating Asher's cabin was missing and has been replaced:

A historical marker reads, "LOG CABIN PRE-1800. On these grounds of the Red Bird River Community Hospital of the Evangelical United Brethren Church Center is log cabin built before 1800. Erected by Dillon Asher. Born 1774, died 1844. Buried near log house. Asher was keeper of first tollgate in Kentucky near Pineville. Established by legislature, 1795; fees paid for improvements on Wilderness Road."



Aaron "Chief Red Bird" 's daughter Mahala Brock who md. Edward Callahan had two daughters marry Cornetts ~ Zelphia to Roger Cornett b. 1786, and Charlotte Callahan to Robert Cornett b. 1780, son of Nathaniel Cornett. There were numerous other Brock-Cornett-Bolling marriages but I haven't linked them all back to an original ancestor



Sources


Part 3

In 1764 after his wife Susanna Christian Priber died giving birth to son number five, Redbird removed his children from Taluegue village then located in the southeastern part of Kentucky, and returned with them to the Great Tellico. Redbird wanted his children to fully understand the White man ways in order to enable a better chance for their survival. His oldest son, Aaron (Tsisquaya), was sixteen, but James was only five. Robert McLemore suggested he and Redbird take the younger children to some of Robert’s relatives, who he was sure would raise them properly, and allow Redbird the right to visit as often as he wanted. They first went to Bertie County, and Charles sent them on to his nephew John who was then living in Granville County. Once there John and his wife agreed to keep the three youngest children, John, Mary, and James. John believed his brother Burrell would care for Jesse and Mahala because some of his own children were already married.

Sources



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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Redbird by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with Redbird:

Have you taken a DNA test for genealogy? If so, login to add it. If not, see our friends at Family Tree DNA.



Images: 11
Aaron Brock Image 1
Aaron Brock Image 1

Aaron Brock "Chief Red Bird"
Aaron Brock

Aaron Brock Image 3
Aaron Brock Image 3

Arron Brock Image 1
Arron Brock Image 1

RedBird Totsuwha Brock Image 2
RedBird Totsuwha Brock Image 2

view all


Collaboration

On 15 Jul 2017 at 17:57 GMT Jeanie (Thornton) Roberts wrote:

Rhitt what should we do with Brock-1660? Do you want to merge and if so, in what direction? I think we should go with Brock as a LNAB.

On 30 Jun 2017 at 20:46 GMT Jeanie (Thornton) Roberts wrote:

Rhitt: I corrected the link to Jerry Taylor's Brock website. However, she has removed all Redbird information. She does not believe it to be true and has taken it all off her page.

On 30 Jun 2017 at 18:48 GMT Rhitt Garrett wrote:

Excellent work by Jeanie Roberts shows that the presently claimed husband/wife relationship between Redbird/Aaron Brock and Susan Priber is virtually untenable. (See Jeanie's work in the Disputed Biography section of Susan's current Profile. Before taking further action on this, I'm posting this comment to invite any/all interested parties to offer comment.

On 20 Jun 2017 at 14:47 GMT George Kewin wrote:

Agreed. As an early manager I am happy to delegate coordination to others on this profile. My interest four years ago had been in verification of Ocuma Melton's linkage.

On 20 Jun 2017 at 13:46 GMT Rhitt Garrett wrote:

There are several seriously questionable issues with some data in this profile which some of the managers are beginning to wrestle with. The amount of work required is substantial, and some of the inconsistencies may prove intractable.

On 19 Jun 2017 at 16:11 GMT Jeanie (Thornton) Roberts wrote:

Hey managers! Did you see the G2G question about this profile. Can you help merge these profiles and sort out fact from fiction.

On 11 Jun 2017 at 00:16 GMT Jeanie (Thornton) Roberts wrote:

Brock-1660 and Moytoy-159 appear to represent the same person because: seem to represent the same man.

On 11 Jun 2017 at 00:14 GMT Jeanie (Thornton) Roberts wrote:

Brock-3534 and Brock-1660 appear to represent the same person because: these two profile represent the same unsourced man, please merge.

On 22 Mar 2017 at 21:51 GMT Jeanie (Thornton) Roberts wrote:

Tsalagi' Ugvwiyuhi Totsu'hwa-1 and Moytoy-159 appear to represent the same person because: these profiles seem to represent the same man. Differences need to be worked out.

On 14 Aug 2016 at 19:31 GMT Dawn (Brown) Mckenna wrote:

My great great grand mother was Martha caldwell. Her mother was Rebecca Howard and solomon caldwell.

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