Anna (Olsson) Malm
Privacy Level: Private with Public Biography (Orange)

Anna (Olsson) Malm

Anna Malm formerly Olsson aka Olson, Jonsson
Born 1880s.
Died 1980s.
Profile last modified | Created 26 Feb 2012
This page has been accessed 796 times.

Biography

Anna (Olsson) Olson was born April 15, 1883 in Halabeck, Vinslov, Kristianstad, Sweden. She is the daughter of Jons Olsson and Hanna Andersdotter. [1] She was Baptized on May 3, 1883. Her sponsors were her maternal Grandparents Anders Mansson and Anna Svensdotter. [2] [3] [4]

Between April 1883 and 1885, Anna lived with her parents Jons and Hanna and her grandparents Anders Mansson and Anna Svensdotter in Halabeck, Vinslov, Kristianstad, Sweden. On July 11, 1885, her mother gave birth to her sister Marie (Olsson) Olson. In 1885, Anna moved with her parents Jons and Hanna and her sister Marie from Halabeck, Vinslov, Kristianstad, Sweden to Vinslov No. 6 and 7, Kristianstad, Sweden. [5]

Between 1885 and 1890, Anna lived with her parents Jons and Hanna, her sister Marie and her grandparents Anders Mansson and Anna Svensdotter in Vinslov No. 6 and 7, Kristianstad, Sweden. On November 12, 1887, her mother Hanna gave birth to her brother Nils (Olsson) Olson and on July 27, 1890, her mother gave birth to her sister Hilda (Olsson) Olson. [6]

Between 1891 and 1895, Anna lived with her parents Jons and Hanna, her sisters Marie and Hilda, her brother Nils and her grandparents Anders Mansson and Anna Svensdotter in Vinslov No. 6 and 7, Kristianstad, Sweden. On September 18, 1893, her mother Hanna passed away. [7]

Between 1896 and November 1903, Anna lived with her father Jons, her sisters Marie and Hilda, her brother Nils and her grandparents Anders Mansson and Anna Svensdotter in Vinslov No. 6 and 7, Kristianstad, Sweden. On March 7, 1896, her father Jons married second Bengta Mattisdotter. On March 14, 1896, her step-mother Bengta gave birth to her step-brother Ake (Olsson) Espelin, on October 27, 1897, her step-mother Bengta gave birth to her step-sister Sigrid Olsson, and on February 26, 1900, her step-mother Bengta gave birth to her step-sister Hanna Olsson. On November 20, 1899, her step-mother Bengta's mother Sissa Akesdotter moved from Navlinge No. 7, Kristianstad, Sweden and her step-mother's brother Jons Mattisson moved from Roc No. 3, Navlinge, Kristianstad, Sweden to Vinslov No. 6 and 7 to live with them. On December 11, 1900, her step-mother's brother Jons Mattisson moved to Fjalkestad, Kristianstad Sweden. In 1901, her sister Marie moved to Vinslov No. 13, Kristianstad, Sweden and in 1902 returned home to Vinslov No. 6 and 7. On June 25, 1902, her step-mother Bengta gave birth to her step-brother Johan (Olsson) Espelin. On May 11, 1902, her grandfather, Anders Mansson passed away and on October 25, 1903, her grandmother Anna Svensdotter passed away. [8]

On November 5, 1903, Anna moved from Vinslov No. 6 and 7, Kristianstad, Sweden to Ignaberga, Kritianstad, Sweden. [9] On November 19, 1903, Anna arrived in Ignaberga. [10]

Between November 1903 and November 1904, Anna lived in Ignaberga No. 5, Kritianstad, Sweden. [11]

On November 14, 1904, Anna moved from Ignaberga No. 5, Kritianstad, Sweden to Gryt, Kristianstad, Sweden. [12] For some reason, Anna changed her mind and on December 31, 1904, Anna arrived in Knislinge, Kristianstad, Sweden. [13]

Between December 1904 and October 1906, Anna lived in Ostra Olinge No. 4, Knislinge, Kritianstad, Sweden. [14]

On October 26, 1906, Anna left for North America. [15]

In November, 1906, Anna and her brother Nils were scheduled to emigrate to the United States to live with their Uncle Ola (Olsson) Martinson in Topeka, Shawnee, Kansas. Several days before Anna and Nils were to leave for Topeka, Hilda came home from school and discovered that Anna and Nils had packed up her belongings. It had been decided that Hilda was to go in place of her brother, Nils. [16] Anna left her home in Knislinge and Hilda left her home in Vinslov on November 15, 1906 and started the journey with a train ride to the big port of Gothenburg. Anna, age 23 and Hilda, age 16, departed Gothenburg, Vastergotland, Sweden for Hull, Yorkshire, England on November 30, 1906 aboard the British Wilson Line’s S/S Calypso. [17] [18] Hull was located on the North Sea side of England. A train took them west across country to Liverpool, Lancashire on the Irish Sea side of England. On December 5, 1906, the White Star Line’s SS Baltic sailed from Liverpool for New York City. Their final destination was with their cousin John Oscar (Olsson) Martinson, at 413 SW Fillmore Street, Topeka, Shawnee, Kansas. [19]

Anna was seasick most of the trip, while Hilda enjoyed the food and liked to walk about their portion of the deck. The voyage across the North Atlantic was made in very cold weather and the sea was extremely rough. The whole trip from Gothenburg to New York took two weeks. [20]

On December 14, 1906, Anna and Hilda arrived at the Port of New York. [21] Upon arrival in New York City, ships docked at the Hudson or East River piers. First and second class passengers disembarked, passed through Customs at the piers and were free to enter the United States. The steerage and third class passengers were transported from the pier by ferry or barge to Ellis Island Immigration Center and there underwent a medical and legal inspection. The Ellis Island inspection process lasted approximately three to five hours if the immigrant’s papers were in order. [22] However, Hilda had traveled on Nils’ immigration papers which were not acceptable. The Immigration Officer refused to allow Hilda in the United States. After Anna and Hilda spent most of the day at Ellis Island, thankfully, the Immigration Officer decided to send her Uncle Ola a telegram to see if he would vouch for his niece. [23]

Note: Around the turn of the century it became more common to use the term "3rd class" or steerage for the low price accommodation. The accommodation for 3rd class passengers on ships built around the turn of the century were almost as good as for those traveling on 2nd class. However, it was more crowded and the food was of a lesser quality. [24] The RMS Baltic could carry about 2,000 steerage passengers.

This whole inspection process was very confusing because neither Anna nor Hilda spoke or understood a single word of English. Hilda wondered if she was going to be part of the two percent of arriving immigrants who were excluded from entry and had to return to their country of origin. Anna didn’t know what to do. Should she go on to Kansas if Hilda had to go back to Sweden or should she go back to Sweden with Hilda? [25]

Anna and Hilda spent the next day just waiting and watching people who spoke many different languages from a multitude of countries arrive and depart Ellis Island. During this time period about 10,000 immigrants were processed per day through Ellis Island. After an exhausting and frightful day Hilda learned that her Uncle Ola had sent a return telegram saying that he would sponsor Hilda’s entry into the United States. Hilda was now allowed to enter the United States. Anna and Hilda went to a hotel in New York City to spend the night; a hotel where Swedish was spoken. [26]

The next day they started their journey by train from New York City to Topeka via Chicago. On the train Anna and Hilda saw several people eating long yellow things. These people peeled the yellow skin off and ate the inside. These people seemed to enjoy eating them so much that Anna and Hilda bought a bunch of them by pointing at them. Once they tasted them, they didn’t like the taste so gave them to a family sitting behind them. They later learned that they were called bananas. [27]

When they arrived in Topeka, Shawnee, Kansas, they were met at the train station by their sister Marie, their Uncle Ola and two of his two daughters, Hanna "Hattie" Mathilda (Olsdotter) Martinson and Clara Frideborg (Olsdotter) Martinson. It felt good to be able to speak with someone in their native tongue. Uncle Ola didn’t live in Topeka, but on a farm near SW 26th Street and SW Gage Blvd, in Seabrook, Mission Township on the south side of the Kansas River, west of Topeka. [28]

From the time they left Vinslov until they arrived at their Uncle Ola’s farm, Anna and Hilda had been traveling for approximately four weeks. To Anna and Hilda, it was a journey which seemed as if it took forever.

The 1910 Federal Census listed Anna as a servant in the household of A.A. Goddard at 1611 SW Boswell Avenue in Topeka, Shawnee, Kansas. [29]

Anna (Olsson) Olson married Gustaf Leander Malm on October 26, 1910 in Topeka, Shawnee, Kansas.

Anna was a member of the Forsta Svenska Baptist Krylan (First Swedish Baptist Church) located at SW 4th Street and SW Fillmore Street and sang in the choir. In the 1911 Choir Photo, Anna is seated in the bottom row, in the middle.

The 1915 Kansas State Census listed Anna as living with her husband Gustav and her daughter Florence V. Malm at 1220 SW 1st Avenue in Topeka. [30]

The 1920 Federal Census listed Anna as living with her husband Gustav and her daughters Florence V. and Bernice E. Malm at 1220 SW 1st Avenue in Topeka. [31]

In a October 28, 1921 newspaper advertisement, it was stated, "4-ROOM HOUSE, furnished. Inquire 1220 W. 1st. Mrs. Malm." [32]

December 10, 1922 entry in Swedish (Westside) Baptist church bulletin notes: " We are glad to see Brother Lee Malm home again. He has been in Kansas City, Kansas, for a few weeks." [33]

November 4, 1923 entry in Swedish (Westside) Baptist church bulletin notes: "Mr. and Mrs. Lee Malm have sold their house, but Brother Malm, being a carpenter, is busy arranging for the building of a new bungalow." [34]

April 27, 1924 entry in Swedish (Westside) Baptist church bulletin notes: " Mr. and Mrs. Lee Malm are the proud parents of a baby girl, born April 24. Mother and baby are doing nicely. Congratulations." [35]

May 25, 1924 entry in Swedish (Westside) Baptist church bulletin notes: "I want to thank the church for remembering me with beautiful flowers during my sickness. May God bless you all. - Mrs. L. Malm" [36]

September 5, 1924 entry in Swedish (Westside) Baptist church bulletin notes: "Mrs.Lee Malm entertained the Ladies' Missionary Society in church. Quite a number were present." [37]

The 1925 Kansas State Census listed Anna as living with her husband Gustav and her daughters Florence V., Bernice E. and Anna May Malm in in Topeka, Shawnee, Kansas. [38]

January 25, 1925 entry in Swedish (Westside) Baptist church bulletin notes: "Our brother, Lee Malm, has been quite sick the last week. Let us remember him in our prayers." [39]

December 8, 1925 entry in Swedish (Westside) Baptist church bulletin notes: "Mr. and Mrs. Lee Malm are surely good to the young folks of our church. We understand that three parties were given by Mrs. Malm last week, for the young people." [40]

The 1926 Topeka City Directory listed Anna as living with her husband Gustav at 1216 SW Harvey Street in Topeka. [41]

Anna's daughter Bernice Malm Hutchison relates: "You find different variations on traditions. Our family put the tree up the second week of December and took it down about January 12-14th. Jul Tomten, the Christmas elf, was as well known to us as Santa Claus. When we lived in Topeka, Dad and sometimes Mom would go to Jul Otto (I'm not sure of the spelling) the midnight service at the Swedish Baptist Church on 4th Street. Mom made the good Swedish bread that "Lucia" carried. The tradition has her wear a wreath with lighted candles on her head (We never had that) as she goes from one to the other of the family with her Christmas buns early A.M. Sometimes Swedish children put their shoes outside of their bedroom doors for the Jul Tomten to put treats and gifts in, or a piece of coal if they'd been bad. As long as we lived in Topeka, we celebrated Thanksgiving and Christmas with Uncle Nils. If they were with us for Thanksgiving, we were at their place for Christmas. The next year it was switched. We always had Lutfisk. That was dry salted cod which Mom soaked in lye water until it was again soft. She had it in the basement during this - and it smelled to high heaven!! It was cooked and served with a dill sauce-gravy. [42]

December 19, 1926 entry in Swedish (Westside) Baptist church bulletin notes: "The Junior W. W. G.'s had their annual meeting Tuesday at the home of Miss Florence Malm, but no information can be given at this time as to what took place, as the pastor has not been given a report of the meeting." [43]

January 23, 1927 entry in Swedish (Westside) Baptist church bulletin notes: "Mr. and Mrs. Lee Malm have received as their guests two brothers of Mr. Malm, Oscar and Erick Malm, both are from Sweden. We understand Mr. Malm had not seen the younger brother before, he being born since Mr. Malm arrived in this country. We welcome the young men and trust that they will like America and Topeka. We also welcome therm to our church." [44]

February 27, 1927 entry in Swedish (Westside) Baptist church bulletin notes: "The Intermediate B.Y. P. U. held its annual business meeting at Florence Malm's home, and elected the following officers:...." [45]

Bernice Malm Hutchison remembers: "You had asked if Grandma and Grandpa Malm spoke Swedish at home. The answer is yes and no. They spoke Swedish most of the time until World War I. Most Americans couldn't tell the difference between Swedish and German, so Mom and Dad began to speak more English. They subscribed to a Swedish paper and also the Topeka paper. The Swedish paper was published in Chicago. I think reading about the news in both papers had helped their English. The church was called The Swedish Baptist church. The evening service was always in Swedish. The church later was called the Westside Baptist Church. The Swedish community spoke a combination of both languages sometimes laughingly called "Svenglish". For instance, they didn't know the Swedish for sidewalk - it was sometimes called "seedvalken". When Dad's brothers Oscar (21) and Erik (17) came to live with us in 1927, there was a lot of Swedish spoke! Florence already knew a lot and Mom said I picked up Swedish faster than the brothers picked up English. Mom and Dad use to talk Swedish when they didn't really care for us girls to know what they were talking about, but we caught on so they did less of it. I remember the day that boys arrived from Sweden. Dad was so excited he'd be talking Swedish and suddenly switch to English. Oscar would say "Lee!Lee! Ve cahn ints forstor. Sprake Svenska!" This spelling is no doubt wrong but that's what it sounded like. I don't have my Swedish- English handbook handy. That was quite a night and an event that changed our lives and made Florence and I what we became. [46]

Grandpa Malm was a finish carpenter - a master carpenter. He had finished an apprenticeship in Sweden but when he came here he had to serve another one here. He was never out of work. He had been doing some work at the Capper's Home, the orphanage, where he met a couple of young brothers who were up for adoption. He liked them and they liked him. Mom and Dad were thinking about adopting the two, when he made the mistake of writing about it to his parents in Sweden. His parents immediately wrote to tell him that times were very hard for the family in Sweden and that instead of adopting the boys at the orphanage why didn't he send for his two youngest brothers - Eric who was 17 and Ture who was 19. They had been born after Dad came to America. I'm not just sure what happened but Oscar came instead of Ture. Since they had been reared on a farm Dad thought that it would be a good idea for him to buy a farm for them to work on. He would continue to work in Topeka to earn the money that would be needed for the farm. Besides buying the farm he had to buy a team of horses, a wagon and other farm implements, and he bought a Model T Ford to travel to work and back. [47]

Before all of this we had a very comfortable lifestyle. Dad and Mom owned four houses on Harvey Street in Topeka. We lived in one and the others were rented. If a prospective renter preferred the house we were living in to the empty one, we'd moved and let them rent it. Mom and Dad also had money in the bank. I have some happy memories of those days. Sometimes when Mom needed a few things from the store, she'd make a list and Florence and I would walk over to the Swedish grocery to get them. "Uncle Sven" would give us a little candy "because you are so nice". I'm not sure if he was any relative. I think he may have been a cousin. In the Swedish community adults were often called aunt and uncle as a sign of respect. I remember Florence and I walking to the library, browsing, looking for the right books to check out. I can remember times when we had just finished supper and we'd hear the bell for the ice cream man. He had a wagon pulled by a horse. Dad would give us the money, Mom would give us a wide plate or bowl and Florence and I would go down to the corner and buy a scoop of ice cream for each of us in the family. That was a real treat. In those days no one had a gallon of ice cream in the freezer! [48]

All those happy times stopped when we moved to the farm. I think the move was probably harder on Florence than on Anna and I. Ann was only two and hadn't really experience so many good things - you don't miss what you haven't had. Florence was a teenager - 15, in junior high. We moved in March but the folks made arrangements for Florence to stay with some people near the junior high school so she could finish the year. She didn't get to come home every week. One Sunday afternoon some ladies from the church came out. "Annie, Florence wasn't in church this morning! Where do you suppose she was?" Mom didn't know, but they went to town to find out. The people she was staying with went some place interesting. They thought Florence would enjoy it (which she did). Besides they didn't want to leave her home alone. But Mom didn't approve and read everyone the riot act - to Florence's embarrassment! [49]

I think she experienced culture shock when she finally moved out to the farm. You can probably understand what it was like for her - moving from a home where we had running water and electricity to one where you had to run out to get water and to empty it Where once a week you took a bath in a wash tub in the kitchen and you had to run out to the outhouse when you needed to go. Where we had friends in our neighborhood, now the neighborhood was full of strangers who spoke what sometimes seemed like a foreign language. I had a hard time understanding why the Stevens' called their bull "the animal". When I asked why, Esther would say "Because that's what he is - the animal!" I'd say but horses and pigs are animals too, aren't they?" No one ever told me that he was the "poppa" cow. I think Florence was the one who explained that "the animal" was a "nicer" way of referring to him or so they thought. How times change! [50]

March 6, 1927 entry in Swedish (Westside) Baptist church bulletin notes: "The family of Malms have moved into the country. We understand they are going to be real dirt farmers. We surely will miss them. Of course they will be able to come into the city at any time, as they live only ten miles out of the city." [51]

1927 Program for the M.R.S. of the Westside Baptist church Topeka, KS: December 9th - Topic: Christmas Program; Leader - Mrs. A.W.Johnson; Hostesses - Mrs. C. Martinson, Mrs. Lee Malm. [52]

The 1930 Federal Census listed Anna as living with her husband Gustav, her daughters Florence V., Bernice E. and Anna M. and her brother-in-law Erik Adolf Malm on the family farm in Dover Township, Shawnee, Kansas. [53]

Bernice Malm Hutchison writes, "Grandma Malm liked to cook just about everything, especially when she had plenty of food stuff to cook. Sometimes in the 30's she must have had a hard time. Eric and Oscar, and sometimes Dad, would hunt and trap. We ate a lot of rabbit, coon and possum. We always had "lutfisk" (dried cod) for Christmas. Mom like to bake - bread, cinnamon rolls, Swedish tea ring, pies and she made cakes. When she first came to Topeka she worked for a family, that was quite common for girls like her, helped learn our language, and she went to a cooking school there. I have her old cookbook where she copied all of her recipes. Our cakes were made from a World War I cake recipe. In her cookbook it's called "a good cheap cake". Once when Moma and I had fixed a special meal for Dad's birthday we made a birthday cake for him, fancied it up for him. He was very appreciative of our efforts. Ann topped it off by saying "And Daddy, this is a good cheap cake!" Daddy thought that was so funny, but Moma and I thought Ann could have left that out. She just wanted to make him feel good. One time when Dad was sick, Ann wanted to make him feel better. He'd been in bed for several days, hadn't been able to shave and had quite a stubble. Ann patted his face and said "Daddy, your whispers are so pretty!" He thought that was so funny. I think now his laughter helped make him well." [54]

Bernice Malm Hutchison writes, " I do have Grandma Malm's cookbook. It's a brown one similar to the black theme notebooks they have now. Some of her recipes are on scraps of paper but they aren't in Swedish. Some of them are in someone else's handwriting. I recognize mine. Sometimes Mom would have me copy some or write as she told me. The book is coming apart. The paper is so old, with frayed edges. I've been keeping it in a plastic ziplock bag.... The dried cod was soaked in lye water, sometimes wood ashes, for two or three days until it was reconstituted. Then was steamed or baked and served with a mustard or dill sauce. Mom used to do the soaking in the basement - I still remember the smell! It was called lutfisk. ... As for the rye bread - there's a lot of different rye breads. Did you ever have your grammy's limpa? That's really good rye bread. A real Swedish smorgasbord - bread and butter table - is set with so many appetizers that some people eat so much there they don't have room for the dinner. " [55]

Bernice relates that when Harold came courting Florence the girls didn't like it because they had to sleep upstairs in the cold bedroom. It was a three-room house with a living room and another room and a bedroom downstairs and a bedroom upstairs. Harold brought a truckload of brick for a patio but Gustav used it to make an outhouse. [56]

Florence and Roberta Stevens were good friends. Bernie and Esther Stevens were friends. They often had sleepovers there. Harold drove the school bus. Florence worked at Concordia for a year then taught at the Century School house. Then Florence and Harold got married. [57]

Bernice relates that in her young adult years on the farm, she went to the West Union school and later taught there. Florence and Harold lived down the road from Anna and Lee, Bernice and Ann. Florence played softball as a young mom for a year or two. They wore black and white plaid pleated skirts. On the Wabaunsee county line in Willard is the church building that Grandpa and Grandma Malm got going. [58]

One day Grandma and Bernie walked to see Florence. As they came up the drive, Grandma said, "Look at Harold's pig just a rolling in the mud. " It was Steve, who sat up and grinned and said "Hi grandma!" When they got in the house they asked Florence if she knew where her son was. Exasperated she said she'd just cleaned him up and sent him back out! [59]

When Marcia and Connie were little and Steve was a baby they were out in the yard playing with a skunk. They told Florence, "Moma, we're having the most fun with the black and white squirrel." [60]

Bernice relates concerning Florence winning the refrigerator that Florence had tried for two years, that all the neighbors were saving soap wrappers for her because she had to send two soap wrappers with each entry. On the day she got the letter saying she'd won, the cream separator had broke the day before and the combine had broke that morning. When she went out to go to town the pickup was broke and wouldn't start. The mail came and she leafed through it and then ran like crazy to where Gramps was crying and crying. Back in the house she just sat on the floor, rocking and crying, and Connie said "I thought you wanted it!" It was an Electrolux Kerosene Refrigerator. Grandma Malm thought she wasn't on the radio but a cousin came to tell her she heard it on the fourth of July. Harold's reaction was "Oh, good. Now we can have ice cream every day." [61]

"The square mirror that Nina Stevens Oetting has hung above the wash stand is Grandma Malm's. The writing desk she had as long as Bernice could remember." [62]

The 1940 Federal Census listed Anna as a housekeeper for Ocea Mansell and her daughter and son in Alma, Alma Township, Wabaunsee, Kansas. Anna's residence in 1935 was listed as rural Shawnee, Kansas. [63]

Steve Stevens relates that "The house at 1125 S West Union was the one Grandpa Malm built when they moved from town. After they lost the 80 acre place, they bought this place (1125 S West Union) from Johannes Verhage and built that house. They moved to Topeka temporarily when Grandma Malm broke her hip getting out of the car on Old 10 Hwy to go see Grandma Stevens. They took her to the hospital and had to move to town to be close to the doctors. They rented an upstairs apartment on SW 11th Street across from the bus barn a block off Kansas Avenue. Both house and bus barn were since taken out by a tornado. [64]

He built the garage on the house on West Union after he retired for Anna Mae's car. They lived there until Grandpa died and Grandma moved in with Florence and Harold. Their kids went to school at Rossville, Shawnee, Kansas. Grandpa Malm drove a Model A to Topeka to work as a carpent. [65]

The 1946 Topeka City Directory listed Anna as living with her husband Gustav, her daughter Anna and brother-in-law Erik Malm at 201 SW 11th Street in Topeka. [66]

The 1948 Topeka City Directory listed Anna as living with her husband Gustav at 201 SW 11th Street in Topeka. [67]

The 1954 Topeka City Directory listed Anna as living with her husband Gustav at a Postal Address of Silver Lake Rte No. 2 in Topeka. [68]

The 1956 Topeka City Directory listed Anna as living with her husband Gustav at a Postal Address of Silver Lake Rte No. 2 in Topeka. [69]

Beginning in August 1957 Anna and her husband Gustav were living with their daughter Bernice Hutchison in Westminister, Orange, California. [70]

The marriage ended when Gustav passed away in January 1958. Sometime later Anna moved to Missouri.

Anna passed away on March 25, 1981 in Cabool, Texas, Missouri at age 97. [71] She was buried on March 28, 1981 in Penwell-Gabel Cemetery and Mausoleum (Memorial Park Cemetery) in Topeka, Shawnee, Kansas. [72]

No more info is currently available for Anna Olsson. Can you add to her biography?

Sources

  1. ancestry.com - Sweden, Indexed Birth Records, 1880-1920 - data found under Anna Olsson
  2. Entered by Stephen Fritz, secondhand knowledge, Feb 26, 2012
  3. Nina Stevens Oetting, firsthand knowledge
  4. Arkiv Digital AD AB, Vinslov CI:10 Birth and Christening Records (1874-1894) Image 96/page 91 - data found under Anna Olsson
  5. Arkiv Digital AD AB, Vinslov AI:17 Household Records (1879-1890) Image 125/page 127 - data found under Anna Olsson
  6. Arkiv Digital AD AB, Vinslov AI:17 Household Records (1879-1890) Image 36/page 34 - data found under Anna Olsson
  7. Arkiv Digital AD AB, Vinslov AI:18 Household Records (1890-1895) Image 36/page 33 - data found under Anna Olsson
  8. Arkiv Digital AD AB, Vinslov AIIa:1 Congregation Records (1895-1911) Image 2110/page 207 - data found under Anna Olsson
  9. Arkiv Digital AD AB, Vinslov B:6 Moving In and Out Records (1895-1918) Image 590/page 55 - data found under Anna Jonsson
  10. Arkiv Digital AD AB, Ignaberga B:4 Moving In and Out Records (1895-1917) Image 270/page 19 - data found under Anna Jonsson
  11. Arkiv Digital AD AB, Ignaberga AIIa:1 Congregation Records (1900-1910) Image 680/page 56 - data found under Anna Jonsson
  12. Arkiv Digital AD AB, Ignaberga B:4 Moving In and Out Records (1895-1917) Image 290/page 21 - data found under Anna Jonsson
  13. Arkiv Digital AD AB, Knislinge B:3 Moving In and Out Records (1895-1920) Image 420/page 35 - data found under Anna Jonsson
  14. Arkiv Digital AD AB, Knislinge AIIa:1 Congregation Records (1895-1907) Image 1640/page 154 - data found under Anna (Jonsson) Olsson
  15. Arkiv Digital AD AB, Knislinge B:3 Moving In and Out Records (1895-1920) Image 470/page 40 - data found under Anna (Jonsson) Olsson
  16. Diary of a Swedish Immigrant Girl, 1961 by Kathleen Gerheim, a story about her grandmother's (Hilda Olson) trip from Vinslov, Sweden to Topeka, Kansas as told to her by her mother Julia (Fritz) Gerheim
  17. ancestry.com - Swedish Emigration Records, 1783-1951 - data found under Anna Olsson
  18. ancestry.com - Gothenburg, Sweden, Passenger Lists, 1869-1951 - data found under Anna Olsson
  19. ancestry.com - New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 - data found under Anna Olson
  20. Diary of a Swedish Immigrant Girl, 1961 by Kathleen Gerheim, a story about her grandmother's (Hilda Olson) trip from Vinslov, Sweden to Topeka, Kansas as told to her by her mother Julia (Fritz) Gerheim
  21. ancestry.com - New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 - data found under Anna Olson
  22. ellisisland.org - Ellis Island - History
  23. Diary of a Swedish Immigrant Girl, 1961 by Kathleen Gerheim, a story about her grandmother's (Hilda Olson) trip from Vinslov, Sweden to Topeka, Kansas as told to her by her mother Julia (Fritz) Gerheim
  24. norwayheritage.com – The Transatlantic Crossing - Chapter 2 Steerage Passengers - Emigrants Between Decks
  25. Diary of a Swedish Immigrant Girl, 1961 by Kathleen Gerheim, a story about her grandmother's (Hilda Olson) trip from Vinslov, Sweden to Topeka, Kansas as told to her by her mother Julia (Fritz) Gerheim
  26. Diary of a Swedish Immigrant Girl, 1961 by Kathleen Gerheim, a story about her grandmother's (Hilda Olson) trip from Vinslov, Sweden to Topeka, Kansas as told to her by her mother Julia (Fritz) Gerheim
  27. Diary of a Swedish Immigrant Girl, 1961 by Kathleen Gerheim, a story about her grandmother's (Hilda Olson) trip from Vinslov, Sweden to Topeka, Kansas as told to her by her mother Julia (Fritz) Gerheim
  28. Diary of a Swedish Immigrant Girl, 1961 by Kathleen Gerheim, a story about her grandmother's (Hilda Olson) trip from Vinslov, Sweden to Topeka, Kansas as told to her by her mother Julia (Fritz) Gerheim
  29. ancestry.com - 1910 United States Federal Census - data found under Anna Olson
  30. ancestry.com - Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925, Census Date: 1915 - data found under Anna Malm
  31. ancestry.com - 1920 United States Federal Census - data found under Anna Malm
  32. newspapers.com - The Topeka Daily Capital (Topeka, Kansas), Friday, October 28, 1921, Page 15, Column: Residences-Furnished - data found under Mrs. Malm
  33. Bulletin for Swedish Baptist church also known as Westside Baptist church at corner of Fillmore and West Fourth Streets in Topeka, KS. First edition Jan 1922.
  34. Bulletin for Swedish Baptist church also known as Westside Baptist church at corner of Fillmore and West Fourth Streets in Topeka, KS. First edition Jan 1922.
  35. Bulletin for Swedish Baptist church also known as Westside Baptist church at corner of Fillmore and West Fourth Streets in Topeka, KS. First edition Jan 1922.
  36. Bulletin for Swedish Baptist church also known as Westside Baptist church at corner of Fillmore and West Fourth Streets in Topeka, KS. First edition Jan 1922.
  37. Bulletin for Swedish Baptist church also known as Westside Baptist church at corner of Fillmore and West Fourth Streets in Topeka, KS. First edition Jan 1922.
  38. ancestry.com - Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925, Census Date: 1925 - data found under Anna Malm
  39. Bulletin for Swedish Baptist church also known as Westside Baptist church at corner of Fillmore and West Fourth Streets in Topeka, KS. First edition Jan 1922.
  40. Bulletin for Swedish Baptist church also known as Westside Baptist church at corner of Fillmore and West Fourth Streets in Topeka, KS. First edition Jan 1922.
  41. ancestry.com - U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989, Topeka, Kansas, City Directory, 1926 - data found under Anna Malm
  42. Letter from Bernice Malm Hutchison to Nina Oetting dated 1/23/03
  43. Bulletin for Swedish Baptist church also known as Westside Baptist church at corner of Fillmore and West Fourth Streets in Topeka, KS. First edition Jan 1922.
  44. Bulletin for Swedish Baptist church also known as Westside Baptist church at corner of Fillmore and West Fourth Streets in Topeka, KS. First edition Jan 1922.
  45. Bulletin for Swedish Baptist church also known as Westside Baptist church at corner of Fillmore and West Fourth Streets in Topeka, KS. First edition Jan 1922.
  46. Letter from Bernice Malm Hutchison to Nina Oetting dated 4/14/02
  47. Letter from Bernice Malm Hutchison to Nina Oetting dated 4/14/02
  48. Letter from Bernice Malm Hutchison to Nina Oetting dated 4/14/02
  49. Letter from Bernice Malm Hutchison to Nina Oetting dated 4/14/02
  50. Letter from Bernice Malm Hutchison to Nina Oetting dated 4/14/02
  51. Bulletin for Swedish Baptist church also known as Westside Baptist church at corner of Fillmore and West Fourth Streets in Topeka, KS. First edition Jan 1922.
  52. Bulletin for Swedish Baptist church also known as Westside Baptist church at corner of Fillmore and West Fourth Streets in Topeka, KS. First edition Jan 1922.
  53. ancestry.com - 1930 United States Federal Census - data found under Anna Malm
  54. Letter from Bernice Malm Hutchison to Nina Oetting dated 8/11/02
  55. Letter from Bernice Malm Hutchison to Nina Oetting dated 9/02/02
  56. Letter from Bernice Malm Hutchison to Nina Oetting dated 9/02/02
  57. Letter from Bernice Malm Hutchison to Nina Oetting dated 9/02/02
  58. Letter from Bernice Malm Hutchison to Nina Oetting dated 9/02/02
  59. Letter from Bernice Malm Hutchison to Nina Oetting dated 9/02/02
  60. Letter from Bernice Malm Hutchison to Nina Oetting dated 9/02/02
  61. Letter from Bernice Malm Hutchison to Nina Oetting dated 9/02/02
  62. Phone Conversation from Bernice Malm Hutchison to Nina Oetting
  63. FamilySearch.org - United States Census, 1940 - data found under Anna Malm
  64. Steven Stevens story told to Nina Stevens Oetting
  65. Steven Stevens story told to Nina Stevens Oetting
  66. ancestry.com - U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989, Topeka, Kansas, City Directory, 1946 - data found under Anna Malm
  67. ancestry.com - U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989, Topeka, Kansas, City Directory, 1948 - data found under Anna Malm
  68. ancestry.com - U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989, Topeka, Kansas, City Directory, 1954 - data found under Anna Malm
  69. ancestry.com - U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989, Topeka, Kansas, City Directory, 1956 - data found under Anne Malm
  70. findagrave.com - Penwell-Gabel Cemetery and Mausoleum, Topeka, Shawnee, Kansas - data found under Gustave Leander Malm
  71. FamilySearch.org - United States Social Security Death Index - data found under Anna Malm
  72. findagrave.com - Penwell-Gabel Cemetery and Mausoleum, Topeka, Shawnee, Kansas - data found under Anna O. Malm

Ancestry Find A Grave FamilySearch ArkivDigital Newspapers



Only the Trusted List can access the following:
  • Anna's formal name
  • exact birthdate
  • birth location
  • exact deathdate
  • death location
  • images (4)
  • family tree
  • father's name
  • mother's name
  • siblings' names
  • children's names (3)
  • spouse's name and marriage information
  • autosomal DNA test connections
For access to Anna Malm's full information you must be on the Trusted List. Please login.


Sponsored Search




Is Anna your relative? Please don't go away!
 star icon Login to collaborate or comment, or
 star icon contact private message the profile manager, or
 star icon ask our community of genealogists a question.
Comments

Leave a message for others who see this profile. If you prefer to keep it private, send a private message to the profile manager. private message
There are no comments yet.
Login to post a comment.

O  >  Olsson  |  M  >  Malm  >  Anna (Olsson) Malm