Solomon Osborne
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Solomon Osborne (abt. 1803 - abt. 1880)

Solomon "Sock" Osborne
Born about in Ashe, North Carolina, United Statesmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married [date unknown] in Tazewell, Virginia, United Statesmap
Descendants descendants
Died about at about age 77 in Holcomb Memorial Gardens, Bickmore, Clay, West Virginia, United Statesmap
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Profile last modified | Created 4 Aug 2019
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Biography

Solomon was born about 1803. He passed away about 1880.

Sources

  • Solomon Osborne, a son of Elias and Sally Ann (Sizemore) Osborne, was born in NC in 1803 and died in Clay County WV in 1880. He married Seaberry Arms in NC. Solomon and Seaberry left NC sometime before 1845 and were married in Tazewell County VA. Since Seaberry was a Cherokee and Solomon was three quarters

Indian, they may have been married in Indian rites in NC. In 1838, U.S. troops were pushing the Cherokees from their ancestral lands in the hills of western North Carolina. They were to be relocated to Oklahoma to make room for white settlers. By then, Solomon and Seaberry, were fleeing north, choosing the northern Cherokee hunting ground over the dusty West. (In all, about 1,000 Cherokees escaped the Trail of Tears. Today, their descendants are known as the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, which is headquartered in Cherokee, N.C.) Solomon and Seaberry, who took the white name Martha Arms, first settled in Tazewell, Va., where their cabin still stands and is on the National Historic Register. But the constant fear of being found out by the government and its anti-Indian policies kept them on the move. They next settled in what is now Wyoming County WV, then Nicholas County WV, where Seaberry died in 1866. Solomon and Seaberry (listed as Martha) appear in the 1860 Nicholas County VA (WV) census. Solomon is listed as a widower in the 1870 Nicholas County WV census. Solomon married Susan Moore about 1870. Susan was born in VA about 1842. The family is listed in the 1880 Clay County WV census. Solomon died in Clay County in 1880. All Solomon’s children were given English sounding names as the family continued to try to conceal its past. After all, Solomon could remember the days when anyone who was half Indian was not allowed to own property or vote.

Children of Solomon and Seaberry (Arms) Osborne.

11. (1). Ephriam b.c. 1834

12. (2). Wilburn b. Jul 1837 m. Amelia Dunford m. Isabel -----

13. (3). Thomas Jefferson b.c. 1840 m. Mary E. ------

14. (4). Franklin b.c. 1844

15. (5). John Henry b. 1845 d.May 9 1912 m.Luanna Keith May 4 1872

16. (6). James b.c. 1846 m. Nancy E. -----

17. (7). Sarah Ann "Sally" b.c. 1848

18. (8). Lotty

19. (9). Noah

20. (10). Jane b.c. 1858

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/46821558/solomon-osborne

https://www.wvgazettemail.com/news/special_reports/secret-society/article_4b0371d4-fe48-5858-bd03-11421667b799.html


. Soloman "Sock" OSBORNE (Elias ) was born about 1813 in Ashe Co., NC. He died 1880 in Clay Co., WV and was buried in Holcomb Cem., Clay Co., WV.

Children and birth data taken from the Wyoming Co.VA 1850 census. This county is part of present day WV. Solomon owned a grist mill in Bearhole Fork, Wyoming Co., WV. Later lived in Nicholas Co. for a while before moving on to Clay Co. WV. Died in 1880 while on his way home from a shooting match. Buried in Holcomb Cemetery, Clay Co. WV. Ref. "How the Osbornes came to West Virginia" by The Solomon and Seaberry Osborne Family of Clay County West Virginia; and from data posted to New River Valley Historical Notes by Neva Jane STOUT BRYANT.

Soloman married (1) Martha Seaberry ARMS, daughter of Robert ARMS and Martha ARMS. Martha was born about 1815 in NC. She died 1866.

Solomon's first wife, Seaberry Arms was the daughter of Chief Running Bear Arms, a full blooded Cherokee. After their marriage, they lived in the mountains of North Carolina where it borders Tennessee, along the Ocunaloftee River, until the year 1837. In the beginning of a very dark and trying time for the Cherokee people, the government intended to move all Eastern Indian bands to reservations in the West. Solomon Osborne avoided this march by movng his family north before removal. They traveled over three states and remained fugitives on the run. They suffered many hardships and disappointments as they traveled on their own trail of tears. They settled for a short while in Tazewell Co.,VA where Solomon built a cabin on Thompson Mountain which is on the south side of Clinch Mountain near Broadford, VA. This is the same area where several of Solomon's brothers also settled after coming out of NC to VA. The cabin still stands on Thompson Mountain and has been designated a historical home of VA. Solomon gave the cabin to a brother and moved on to Wyoming County VA, now WV, where he and his family were listed in the 1850 census.

The heritage of this family is now presented in a drama titled "Solomon's Secret" in Clay Co.,WV each year. Almost all the members of the cast and crew are descendents of the Osborne family. Ref. "How the Osbornes came to West Virginia", by The Solomon and Seaberry Osborne Family of Clay County, West Virginia

Note:It is not likely that Solomon gave the cabin to his brother Jesse. There is no evidence that this Jesse was ever in Virginia. This Jesse and family are listed in the 1850 Ashe County census. However, Solomon's brothers Ezekial and Ephriam were living in this area of Virginia at the time. Ezekial died in 1848, so it is possible the cabin was given to Ezekial's family or to Ephraim. Ezekial had a son named Jesse. rmo

They had the following children:

52 M i Ephraim OSBORNE was born about 1835 in Ashe County, NC. He died 1862.

Ephraim married Cordelia BROWN on 1 Nov 1860 in Clay Co., (W)V. + 53 M ii Wilburn OSBORNE was born 18 Jul 1837 and died 31 Mar 1904. + 54 M iii Thomas Jefferson OSBORNE was born about 1839 and died Jul 1884. 55 M iv Franklin OSBORNE "Frank" was born about 1841 in VA. He died 1865. 56 M v James H. OSBORNE was born 15 Apr 1843 in VA.

James married Nancy Ellen DORSEY, daughter of James DORSEY and Margaret DORSEY. + 57 M vi John Henry OSBORNE was born 5 Aug 1845 and died 9 May 1912. 58 F vii Sarah Ann OSBORNE "Sally" was born 21 Nov 1849 in Wyoming Co., (W)V.

Sally married Abraham KEITH, son of Guy KEITH and Rachel KEITH. 59 M viii Noah OSBORNE. 60 F ix Jane L. OSBORNE was born 1858 in Nicholas Co., (W)V. She died 1880 in Clay Co., WV and was buried in Osborne Cem., Clay Co., WV.

Jane married Clark M. JARRETT on 12 Feb 1874 in Clay Co., WV. Soloman also married (2) Susanna NICHOLS "Susan", daughter of William NICHOLS and Elizabeth BOGGS. Susan was born 1842 in Nicholas Co., (W)V. She died 1884 in Clay Co., WV and was buried in Osborne Cem., Clay Co..

They had the following children:

61 F x Charity OSBORNE was born about 1869 in Nicholas Co., WV. 62 F xi Cordelia OSBORNE was born about 1871 in WV. She died 1887.

Cordelia married James L. SIMPSON, son of J.R. SIMPSON and Annie SIMPSON. 63 F xii Formelia Ellen OSBORNE "Melia" was born 29 Jun 1872. She died 25 Aug 1922 in Clay Co., WV and was buried in Rodgers Family Cem., Clay Co., WV.

Melia married Cornelius RODGERS on 25 Sep 1887 in Clay Co., WV. 64 F xiii Mary Alice OSBORNE was born about 1873 in Nicholas Co., WV.

Mary married Jonathan BACKUS on 12 Jul 1888 in Nicholas Co., WV. 65 F xiv Charlotte OSBORNE "Lottie" was born 24 Jun 1876 in Nicholas Co., WV.

Lottie married Alexander BACKUS on 12 Apr 1891 in Nicholas Co., WV. 66 F xv Lucy OSBORNE was born 24 Jun 1876 in WV. 67 F xvi Charlotte OSBORNE. 68 M xvii Solomon OSBORNE Jr. was born 11 Nov 1878 in Clay Co., WV.

Solomon married (1) Francis BROWN on 2 Jul 1896 in Clay Co., WV.

Solomon also married (2) Amanda JARRETT on 7 Mar 1903 in Clay Co., WV. 69 M xviii George OSBORNE was born 18 Dec 1880 in Clay Co., WV.

http://www.angelfire.com/va3/rmosborne/hteg02.htm

Solomon was one quarter English and three quarters Cherokee. He was born on the Cherokee Reservation in North Carolina. He was the son of Elias Osborne and Sarah Ann Sizemore, daughter of Chief Edward "Ned" Sizemore. Socks traveled to Clay County, Virgina, later West Virginia, in the later part of the 1840's to hide from the government and escape the Trail of Tears. At that time, his wife was Seaberry, full blooded Cherokee and the daughter of Chief Running Bear of the Wolf Clan. Seaberry died at the age of 49, and is now buried somewhere on Twentymile Creek, Clay County, West Virginia. Socks then married Susan Moore Nicholas between 1859-1866. According to Lois Teitloff at LCT_PIG@bellsouth.net this information was featured in the magazine, "Wonderful West Virgina", January 2001, Volume 65.

The following was found in a rootsweb submission by James Osborne at: canopies@skybest.com:

"Solomon's first wife, Seaberry Arms was the daughter of Chief Running Bear Arms, a full blooded Cherokee. After their marriage, they lived in the mountains of North Carolina where it borders Tennessee, along the Ocunaloftee River, until the year 1837. In the beginning of a very dark and trying time for the Cherokee people, the government intended to move all Eastern Indian bands to reservations in the West. Solomon Osborne avoided this march by moving his family north before removal. They traveled over three states and remained fugitives on the run. They suffered many hardships and disappointments as they traveled on their own trail of tears. They settled for a short while in Tazewell Co., VA where Solomon built a cabin on Thompson Mountain which is on the south side of Clinch Mountain near Broadford, VA. This is the same area where several of Solomon's brothers also settled after coming out of NC to VA. The cabin still stands on Thompson Mountain and has been designated a historical home of VA. Solomon gave the cabin to a brother and moved on to Wyoming County VA, now WV, where he and is family were listed in the 1850 census.

"The heritage of this family is now presented in a drama titled "Solomon's Secret" in Clay Co., WV each year. Almost all members of the cast and crew are descendents of the Osborne family. Ref. "How the Osbornes came to West Virginia", by the Solomon and Seaberry Osborne Family of Clay County, West Virginia."

From the "Flight to Freedom" by Sheila McEntee:

"In the spring of 1838, in what has been called one of the darkest chapters in American history, the United States government removed some 17,000 Cherokee Indians from their homelands in the Southeast, forcing them to march to the designated Indian Territory in Oklahoma. Travelling mostly on foot with few supplies and little clothing, the Cherokee suffered from exposure and were ravaged by disease en route. What these Native Americns called "nuna dat shun'yin,' "The place Were They Cried," and what history books would later call "The Trail of Tears," resulted in an estimated 4,000 Cherokee deaths along the 1,200-mile route.

"What follows is the story of one courageous couple who escaped The Trail of Tears, leaving family and the land of their ancestors to flee north through the mountains of North Carolina and Virginia. Forced to hide their Chrerokee heritage and live for years in constant fear of discovery, they would ultimately come to live free and peacefully with their children in a place much like their homeland: the rugged, untamed hills of what is now Clay County, West Virginia.

"It is the late summer of 1837. Solomon Osborne, a young man of mostly Cherokee and some English descent, stands quitely and alone on the banks of the Oconalufte River, which flows through the Cherokee Nation of Western North Carolina. A former soldier in the United States Cavalry, he has heard rumors of the harsh and ever-increasing removal of Native American tribes from their homelands by the federal government. He has heard of villages being torched and Native American people being captured and killed. Troubled in mind and heart, Solomon has come to believe what Cherokee people have stubbornly refused to believe for the last several years: there is no choice but to flee his homeland or be forcibly removed by the government to a faraway place.

"When Solomon's wife, Seaberry Arms, a full-blooded Cherokee and the daughter of Chief Running Bear of the Wolf Clan, joins him by the river, Solomon tells her of his fears. Together they make the difficult decision to leave other family members and the land of their birth, in order to preserve their freedom. Soon thereafter, they pack up their belongings and, under the pretense of joining a hunting party, leave their beloved homeland, never to return.....

"After their departure from their homeland, it is thought that Solomon and Seaberry stayed with the hunting party, which would have included other families, moving north and living for a time in the wilderness of the North Carolina mountains. Some time later, with their first child Ephraim, in tow and another child on the way, they traversed Grandfather Mountain near Linville, North Carolina - nearly 6,000 feet in elivation - and traveled until they reached the Yadkin River. Soon thereafter, they reached their next destination - a small community of Cherokee on Prather Creek off Bakar's Ridge in Ashe County, North Carolina.

"Solomon and Seaberry settled into the community on Prather Creek for a time. Records show that their sons Wilburn and Jesse were born there and that Seaberry helped establish the Little Elk Primitive Baptist Church.

"Because they were fugitives from the federal government, Solomon and Seaberry, like many other Native Americans, attempted to hide their bloodlines and blend into wite culture. Seaberry took the Christian name Martha Ann. As they continued to travel and settle for periods along the way, it is assumed that they talked little of their heritage and found security living in relative isolation. As a result of the need to keep their heritage secret, it seems that later generations developed a reluctance to openly discuss their Cherokee ancestry. This reticence has taken many generations to overcome.

"While they lived on Prather Creek, it is likely that Solomon and Seaberry periodically heard of the continued destruction of Native American villages and the takeover of lands from the nomadic Cherokee bands that stopped in their village. After several years on Prather creek, they moved further north, continuing to seek security. They traveled over Clinch Mountain and dropped down into the Thompson Valley near Tazewell, Virginia. The valley, too, was known to be a refuge for fleeing Native Americans.

"Here, on a remote hillside high above the valley, Solomon built his family a sturdy log cabin with a fireplace and a loft. As reminders of their heritage, he carved the face of a Cherokee chief and the figure of a wolf into two stones on the hearth. On this isolated mountain land, the Osbornes hunted, farmed, gathered medicinal herbs from the woodlands, and occsionally traveled to town to attend church and to trade tobacco and ginseng. In these peaceful years, four more children were added to the family: Frank, James, Henry and Sarah.

"While the period in the Tazewell cabin was a tranquil one for Solomon and Seaberry and their growing family, they continued to hear of trouble and the persecution of their people. In the latter part of the 1840s, when a caravan of settlers led by Edward Sizemore, Solomon's uncle, came through Tazewell, the Osborne family joined it. Hearing of good soil, unlimited hunting and further isolation, the family traveled to Logan County, Virginia, which later became Wyoming County, West Virginia. They settled on Bearhole Fork, where Solomon operated a gristmill. Records show that he owned at least 1,000 acres of property in this area, which he likely acquired for a small price through a state patent, or land grant. Here their eighth child, Jane, was born.

"It is not long, however, before they moved further north to Nicholas County, Virginia where hunting parties had reported harsh but fertile lands that would also provide abundant game for a large family. The Osbornes settled for the last time along Twenty Mile Creek in what would become Clay County, West Virginia. Here they thrived, as many of their descendants still do today.

"Some years later, Seaberry died at age 49, never having returned to the land of her birth, and never having learned of the fate of her loved ones in North Carolina. The cause of her death is unknown. According to family legend, Solomon carried out her last request, which was to be buried in a secret place somewhere along the waters of Twenty Mile Creek. Solomon died many years later and is buried in the Holcomb Cemetery at Bickmore.

"Though to this day no one knows for sure where Seaberry is buried, family members recently erected a granite marker in her memory along Twenty Mile Creek. Near the marker a large rock was discovered with old carvings of a cross (perhaps for Christianity), an arrow (for American Indian), and the letter "A" (for Arms). Some family members feel that Solomon carved these symbols to discreetly mark the area of his beloved's grave. Others are not so sure."

In 2003, the West Virginia Division of Archives and History installed a historical marker to the memory of Seaberry Arms Osborne, along Route 16, between Belva and Dixie, West Virginia near the road that leads to Twenty Mile Creek.

Father: Elias Osborne b: 1776 in Ashe County, North Carolina Mother: Sarah Ann "Sally" Sizemore b: 1776 in Ashe County, North Carolina

Marriage 1 Martha Ann "Seaberry" Arms b: 1815 in Cherokee Nation, North Carolina Married: 1837 in Cherokee, North Carolina Children Has No Children Lotty Osborne b: BET 1825 AND 1852 in Unknown Has No Children Ephriam Osborne b: 1834 in Ashe County, North Carolina Has Children Wilburn Osborne b: 18 JUL 1837 in Panther Creek, Ashe County, North Carolina Has Children Thomas Jefferson Osborne b: ABT 1839 in Panther Creek, Ashe County, North Carolina Has No Children Franklin "Frank" Osborne b: 1840 in Thompson Valley, Tazewell County, Virginia Has Children James W. Osborne b: 1841 in Thompson Valley, Tazewell County, Virginia Has Children John Henry Osborne b: 1842 in Thompson Valley, Tazewell County, Virginia Has Children Jane L. Osborne b: 1844 in Bearhole Fork, Wyoming County, Virginia Has Children Sarah Ann "Sally" Osborne b: 21 NOV 1849 in Thompson Valley, Tazewell County, Virginia Has Children Noah Osborne b: UNKNOWN in North Carolina

Marriage 2 Susan Nicholas b: 1842 in Nicholas County, Virginia Married: 29 APR 1869 in Clay County, West Virginia Children Has No Children Charity Osborne b: 1869 Has No Children Cordelia Osborne b: 1871 Has Children Formelia Ellen Osborne b: 29 JAN 1872 in Unknown Has Children Mary Alice Osborne b: 28 JUN 1874 in Nicholas County, West Virginia Has Children Charlotte "Lottie" Osborne b: 24 JUN 1876 in Nicholas County, West Virginia Has No Children Lucy Osborne b: 24 JUN 1876 in Nicholas County, West Virginia Has No Children Solomon Osborne , Jr. b: 11 NOV 1878 Has No Children George Osborne b: 1880 in Clay County, West Virginia Has No Children Unnamed Son Osborne b: 27 FEB 1875 in Nicholas County, West Virginia

About Solomon Osborne Solomon Osborne was born ca. 1814 on a Cherokee reservation in North Carolina. Served as a guard on the "Trail of Tears," and fell in love with Seaberry (Martha Arms), daughter of Chief Running Bear (Robert Arms). They escaped and were married in Tazewell County, Va. Later moved to current Wyoming and Clay counties. He died ca. 1884 and was the first interment in the Holcomb Cemetery.

- Inscription on West Virginia Highway Marker, located in Clay County, State Route 16, south of Bickmore

http://www.osborneonline.net/

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=46821558

http://osborneonline.net/smfboard/index.php?topic=28.0

http://www.wvculture.org/history/wvmemory/hmresults.aspx?County=Clay&..

https://www.wvgazettemail.com/news/special_reports/secret-society/article_4b0371d4-fe48-5858-bd03-11421667b799.html

Title: Solomon Osborne County: Clay Inscription: Solomon Osborne was born ca. 1814 on a Cherokee reservation in North Carolina. Served as a guard on the "Trail of Tears," and fell in love with Seaberry (Martha Arms), daughter of Chief Running Bear (Robert Arms). They escaped and were married in Tazewell County, Va. Later moved to current Wyoming and Clay counties. He died ca. 1884 and was the first interment in the Holcomb Cemetery.

Location: State Route 16, south of Bickmore, Historical marker

http://www.wvculture.org/history/wvmemory/hmresults.aspx?County=Clay&


https://osborneonline.net/gallery/

https://www.geni.com/photo/view/-1?album_type=project&end=&photo_id=6000000078395013935&project_id=9819&start=&tagged_profiles=



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It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Solomon by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share some percentage of DNA with Solomon:

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