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Andronikos (Palaiologos) Byzantium (1259 - 1332)

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Andronikos (Andronikos II) "Emperor Byzantine Empire" Byzantium formerly Palaiologos
Born in Constantinople, Byzantine Empiremap
Ancestors ancestors
Son of and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married in Of Buda, Pest, Hungarymap
Husband of — married about in Of, Sahoniki, Makedhonia, Greecemap
Descendants descendants
Died in Constantinople, Byzantine Empiremap
Profile last modified | Created 19 Aug 2011
This page has been accessed 543 times.

Contents

Biography

This biography is a rough draft. It was auto-generated by a GEDCOM import and needs to be edited.

Name

Name: Andronikos II /Palaiologos/ Byzantine Emperor
Given Name: Andronikos II
Surname: Palaiologos
Name Suffix: Byzantine Emperor
MAR Palaiologos
Nickname:  ????????? ???????? II ????????
Nickname: Andronikos II Palaiologos

The suffix Byzantine Emperor is non-traditional and may be too long for the WikiTree suffix.

Birth

Birth:
Date: 25 MAR 1259
Place: Constantinople, Byzantine Empire
WT_REMOVED_FOR_PRIVACY
Note: {geni:place_name} Constantinople, Byzantine Empire

Death

Death:
Date: 13 FEB 1332
Place: Constantinople, Byzantine Empire
WT_REMOVED_FOR_PRIVACY
Note: {geni:place_name} Constantinople, Byzantine Empire

Burial

Burial:

Note

Note: {geni:occupation} Kejsare i Byzan
Note: {geni:about_me} http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andronikos_II_Palaiologos
Andronikos II Palaiologos (Greek: ?????????? ?' ???????????) (25 March 1259, Nicaea ? February 13, 1332, Constantinople) ? also Andronicus II Palaeologus ? reigned as Byzantine emperor from 1282 to 1328. He was the eldest surviving son of Michael VIII Palaiologos and Theodora Doukaina Vatatzina, grandniece of John III Doukas Vatatzes. On 8 November 1273, Andronikos II married Anne of Hungary (1260?1281), daughter of King Stephen V of Hungary.
Andronikos II Palaiologos was acclaimed co-emperor in 1261, after his father Michael VIII recovered Constantinople from the Latin Empire, but he was crowned only in 1272. Sole emperor from 1282, Andronikos II immediately repudiated his father's unpopular Church union with the Papacy (which he had been forced to support while his father was still alive), but was unable to resolve the related schism within the Orthodox clergy until 1310. Andronikos II was also plagued by economic difficulties and during his reign the value of the Byzantine hyperpyron depreciated precipitously while the state treasury accumulated less than one seventh the revenue (in nominal coins) that it had done previously. Seeking to increase revenue and reduce expenses, Andronikos II raised taxes and reduced tax exemptions, and dismantled the Byzantine fleet (80 ships) in 1285, thereby making the Empire increasingly dependent on the rivalrepublics of Venice and Genoa. In 1291, he hired 50?60 Genoese ships. Later, in 1320, he tried to resurrect the navy by constructing 20 galleys, but failed.
Andronikos II Palaiologos sought to resolve some of the problems facing the Byzantine Empire through diplomacy. After the death of his first wife Anne of Hungary, he married Yolanda (renamed Eirene) of Montferrat, putting an end to the Montferrat claim to the Kingdom of Thessalonica. Andronikos II also attempted to marry off his son and co-emperor Michael IX Palaiologos to the Latin Empress Catherine I of Courtenay, thus seeking to eliminate Western agitation for a restoration of the Latin Empire. Another marriage alliance attempted to resolve the potential conflict with Serbia in Macedonia, as Andronikos II married off his five-year old daughter Simonis to King Stefan Milutin in 1298.
In spite of the resolution of problems in Europe, Andronikos II was faced with the collapse of the Byzantine frontier in Asia Minor. After the failure of the co-emperor Michael IX to stem the Turkish advance in Asia Minor in 1302 and the disastrous Battle of Bapheus, the Byzantine government hired the Catalan Company of Almogavars (adventurers from Aragon and Catalonia) led by Roger de Flor to clear Byzantine Asia Minor of the enemy. In spite of some successes, the Catalans were unable to secure lasting gains. They quarreled with Michael IX, and eventually turned on their Byzantine employers after the murder of Roger de Flor in 1305, devastating Thrace, Macedonia, and Thessaly on their road to Latin Greece. There they conquered the Duchy of Athens and Thebes. The Turks continued to penetrate the Byzantine possessions, and Prusa fell in 1326. By the end of Andronikos II's reign, much of Bithynia was in the hands of the Ottoman Turks of Osman I and his son and heir Orhan. Also, Karesi conquered Mysia region with Paleokastron after 1296, Germiyan conquered Simav in 1328, Saruhan captured Magnesia in 1313 and Ayd?no?lu captured Symirna in 1310.
The Empire's problems were exploited by Theodore Svetoslav of Bulgaria, who defeated Michael IX and conquered much of northeastern Thrace in c. 1305?1307. The conflict ended with yet another dynastic marriage, between Michael IX'sdaughter Theodora and the Bulgarian emperor. The dissolute behavior of Michael IX's son Andronikos III Palaiologos led to a rift in the family, and after Michael IX's death in 1320, Andronikos II disowned his grandson, prompting a civil war that raged, with interruptions, until 1328. The conflict precipitated Bulgarian involvement, and Michael Asen III of Bulgaria attempted to capture Andronikos II under the guise of sending him military support. In 1328 Andronikos III entered Constantinople in triumph and Andronikos II was forced to abdicate. He died as a monk in 1332.
Family
In 1274 Andronikos II married as his first wife Anna of Hungary, a daughter of King Stephen V of Hungary and Elizabeth the Cuman, with whom he had two sons:
Michael IX Palaiologos
Constantine Palaiologos, despotes
After Anna died in 1281, in 1284 Andronikos II then married Yolanda (renamed Eirene), a daughter of Marquis William VII of Montferrat, with whom he had:
John Palaiologos (c. 1286?1308), despotes, married Eirene Choumnaina, no issue.
Theodore I, Marquis of Montferrat (1291?1338)
Demetrios Palaiologos (d. after 1343), despotes. Father of Irene Palaiologina.
Simonis Palaiologina (1294-after 1336), who married King Stefan Milutin of Serbia
Andronikos II also had at least two illegitimate daughters:
Eirene, who married John II Doukas, ruler of Thessaly
Maria, who married Toqta, Khan of the Golden Horde
--------------------
Andronikos II Palaiologos
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Andronikos II Palaiologos or Andronicus II Palaeologus (Greek: ?????????? ?' ???????????) (25 March 1259, Constantinople ? February 13, 1332, Constantinople), reigned as Byzantine emperor 1282?1328. Andronikos II Palaiologos was the eldest surviving son of Michael VIII Palaiologos and Theodora Doukaina Vatatzina, grandniece of John III Doukas Vatatzes.
Life
Andronikos II Palaiologos was acclaimed co-emperor in 1261, after his father Michael VIII recovered Constantinople from the Latin Empire, but he was crowned only in 1272. Sole emperor from 1282, Andronikos II immediately repudiated his father's unpopular Church union with the Papacy (which he had been forced to support while his father was still alive), but was unable to resolve the related schism within the Orthodox clergy until 1310. Andronikos II was also plagued by economic difficulties and during his reign the value of the Byzantine hyperpyron depreciated precipitously while the state treasury accumulated less than one seventh the revenue (in nominal coins) that it had done previously. Seeking to increase revenue and reduce expenses, Andronikos II raised taxes and reduced tax exemptions, and dismantled the Byzantine fleet (80 ships) in 1285, thereby making the Empire increasingly dependent on the rivalrepublics of Venice and Genoa. In 1291, he hired 50-60 Genoese ships. Later, in 1320, he tried to resurrect the navy by constructing 20 galleys, but unfortunately he failed.
Andronikos II Palaiologos sought to resolve some of the problems facing the Byzantine Empire through diplomacy. After the death of his first wife, he married Yolanda (renamed Eirene) of Montferrat, putting an end to the Montferratclaim to the Kingdom of Thessalonica. Andronikos II also attempted to marry off his son and co-emperor Michael IX Palaiologos to the Latin Empress Catherine I of Courtenay, thus seeking to eliminate Western agitation for a restoration of the Latin Empire. Another marriage alliance attempted to resolve the potential conflict with Serbia in Macedonia, as Andronikos II married off his five-year old daughter Simonis to King Stefan Milutin in 1298.
In spite of the resolution of problems in Europe, Andronikos II was faced with the collapse of the Byzantine frontier in Asia Minor. After the failure of the co-emperor Michael IX to stem the Turkish advance in Asia Minor in 1300,the Byzantine government hired the Catalan Company of Almogavars (adventurers from Aragon and Catalonia) led by Roger de Flor to clear Byzantine Asia Minor of the enemy. In spite of some successes, the Catalans were unable to secure lasting gains. They quarreled with Michael IX, and eventually turned on their Byzantine employers after the murder of Roger de Flor in 1305, devastating Thrace, Macedonia, and Thessaly on their road to Latin Greece. There theyconquered the Duchy of Athens and Thebes. The Turks continued to penetrate the Byzantine possessions, and Bursa fell in 1326. By the end of Andronikos II's reign, much of Bithynia was in the hands of the Ottoman Turks of Osman I and his son and heir Orhan.
The Empire's problems were exploited by Theodore Svetoslav of Bulgaria, who defeated Michael IX and conquered much of northeastern Thrace in c. 1305-1307. The conflict ended with yet another dynastic marriage, between Michael IX'sdaughter Theodora and the Bulgarian emperor. The dissolute behavior of Michael IX's son Andronikos III Palaiologos led to a rift in the family, and after Michael IX's death in 1320, Andronikos II disowned his grandson, prompting a civil war that raged, with interruptions, until 1328. The conflict precipitated Bulgarian involvement, and Michael Asen III of Bulgaria attempted to capture Andronikos II under the guise of sending him military support. In 1328 Andronikos III entered Constantinople in triumph and Andronikos II was forced to abdicate. He died as a monk in 1332.
[edit]Family
In 1274 Andronikos II married as his first wife Anna of Hungary, a daughter of King Stephen V of Hungary and Elizabeth the Cuman, with whom he had two sons:
Michael IX Palaiologos
Constantine Palaiologos, despotes
After Anna died in 1281, in 1284 Andronikos II then married Yolanda (renamed Eirene), a daughter of Marquis William VII of Montferrat, with whom he had:
John Palaiologos (c. 1286-1308), despotes
Theodore I, Marquis of Montferrat (1291-1338)
Demetrios Palaiologos (d. after 1343), despotes. Father of Irene Palaiologina.
Simonis Palaiologina (1294-after 1336), who married King Stefan Milutin of Serbia
Andronikos II also had at least two illegitimate daughters:
Eirene, who married John II Doukas, ruler of Thessaly
Maria, who married Toqta, khan of the Golden Horde
--------------------
Andronikos II Palaiologos (Greek: ?????????? ?' ???????????) (25 March 1259, Nicaea ? February 13, 1332, Constantinople) ? also Andronicus II Palaeologus ? reigned as Byzantine emperor from 1282 to 1328. He was the eldest surviving son of Michael VIII Palaiologos and Theodora Doukaina Vatatzina, grandniece of John III Doukas Vatatzes.
Andronikos II Palaiologos was acclaimed co-emperor in 1261, after his father Michael VIII recovered Constantinople from the Latin Empire, but he was crowned only in 1272. Sole emperor from 1282, Andronikos II immediately repudiated his father's unpopular Church union with the Papacy (which he had been forced to support while his father was still alive), but was unable to resolve the related schism within the Orthodox clergy until 1310. Andronikos II was also plagued by economic difficulties and during his reign the value of the Byzantine hyperpyron depreciated precipitously while the state treasury accumulated less than one seventh the revenue (in nominal coins) that it had done previously. Seeking to increase revenue and reduce expenses, Andronikos II raised taxes and reduced tax exemptions, and dismantled the Byzantine fleet (80 ships) in 1285, thereby making the Empire increasingly dependent on the rivalrepublics of Venice and Genoa. In 1291, he hired 50-60 Genoese ships. Later, in 1320, he tried to resurrect the navy by constructing 20 galleys, but unfortunately he failed.
Andronikos II Palaiologos sought to resolve some of the problems facing the Byzantine Empire through diplomacy. After the death of his first wife, he married Yolanda (renamed Eirene) of Montferrat, putting an end to the Montferratclaim to the Kingdom of Thessalonica. Andronikos II also attempted to marry off his son and co-emperor Michael IX Palaiologos to the Latin Empress Catherine I of Courtenay, thus seeking to eliminate Western agitation for a restoration of the Latin Empire. Another marriage alliance attempted to resolve the potential conflict with Serbia in Macedonia, as Andronikos II married off his five-year old daughter Simonis to King Stefan Milutin in 1298.
Andronikos II and Michael IX Palaeologus (Silver basilikon).
In spite of the resolution of problems in Europe, Andronikos II was faced with the collapse of the Byzantine frontier in Asia Minor. After the failure of the co-emperor Michael IX to stem the Turkish advance in Asia Minor in 1300,the Byzantine government hired the Catalan Company of Almogavars (adventurers from Aragon and Catalonia) led by Roger de Flor to clear Byzantine Asia Minor of the enemy. In spite of some successes, the Catalans were unable to secure lasting gains. They quarreled with Michael IX, and eventually turned on their Byzantine employers after the murder of Roger de Flor in 1305, devastating Thrace, Macedonia, and Thessaly on their road to Latin Greece. There theyconquered the Duchy of Athens and Thebes. The Turks continued to penetrate the Byzantine possessions, and Prusa fell in 1326. By the end of Andronikos II's reign, much of Bithynia was in the hands of the Ottoman Turks of Osman I and his son and heir Orhan. Also, Karesi conquered Mysia region with Paleokastron after 1296, Germiyan conquered Simav in 1328, Saruhan captured Magnesia in 1313 and Ayd?no?lu captured Symirna in 1310.
The Empire's problems were exploited by Theodore Svetoslav of Bulgaria, who defeated Michael IX and conquered much of northeastern Thrace in c. 1305-1307. The conflict ended with yet another dynastic marriage, between Michael IX'sdaughter Theodora and the Bulgarian emperor. The dissolute behavior of Michael IX's son Andronikos III Palaiologos led to a rift in the family, and after Michael IX's death in 1320, Andronikos II disowned his grandson, prompting a civil war that raged, with interruptions, until 1328. The conflict precipitated Bulgarian involvement, and Michael Asen III of Bulgaria attempted to capture Andronikos II under the guise of sending him military support. In 1328 Andronikos III entered Constantinople in triumph and Andronikos II was forced to abdicate. He died as a monk in 1332.
Family
In 1274 Andronikos II married as his first wife Anna of Hungary, a daughter of King Stephen V of Hungary and Elizabeth the Cuman, with whom he had two sons:
Michael IX Palaiologos
Constantine Palaiologos, despotes
After Anna died in 1281, in 1284 Andronikos II then married Yolanda (renamed Eirene), a daughter of Marquis William VII of Montferrat, with whom he had:
John Palaiologos (c. 1286-1308), despotes, married Eirene Choumnaina, no issue.
Theodore I, Marquis of Montferrat (1291-1338)
Demetrios Palaiologos (d. after 1343), despotes. Father of Irene Palaiologina.
Simonis Palaiologina (1294-after 1336), who married King Stefan Milutin of Serbia
Andronikos II also had at least two illegitimate daughters:
Eirene, who married John II Doukas, ruler of Thessaly
Maria, who married Toqta, khan of the Golden Horde
A.E. Laiou, Constantinople and the Latins: The Foreign Policy of Andronicus II, 1282-1328, Harvard University Press, 1972
Donald M. Nicol, The Last Centuries of Byzantium, 12061-1453, Cambridge University Press, 1993, 2nd edition, pp. 93-147
Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, Oxford University Press, 1991.
This article incorporates text from the article "Andronicus II" in the Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
Note: was the elder son of Michael VIII Palaeologus, whom he succeeded in 1282. He ruled until 1328. He allowed the fleet, which his father had organized, to fall into decay; and the empire was thus less able than ever to resist the exacting demands of the rival powers of Venice and Genoa. During his reign the Ottoman Turks under Osman conquered nearly the whole of Bithynia; and to resist them the emperor called in the aid of the Catalan Roger de Flor, who commanded a body of Aragonese and Catalan adventurers known as Almogavars. The Turks were defeated, but Roger was found to be nearly as formidable an enemy to the imperial power. He was assassinated by Andronicus`s son and colleague (sometimes referred to as emperor Michael IX, though he never ruled in his own name
Data Changed:
Date: 04 JAN 2011
Time: 13:54:31
Note: EMPORER OF BYZANTIUM 1282-1328
Data Changed:
Date: 04 NOV 2010
Time: 11:48:00
Note: #N6000000002188002318

Original profile has birth as 1118 which is not plausible. Sources I found indicate birth of 25 March 1259 and list his name as Andronikos Doukas Angelos Komnenos Palaiologos born in Nicea

Name

Name: Andronikos II // [1][2][3] this is from original profile.

I found these sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andronikos_II_Palaiologos Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Andronicus II". Encyclopædia Britannica. 1 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 976. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803095412666 which all point to birth of 1259 or 1260. I changed it to 1259. .

Marriage

updated info from Wikipedia: On 8 November 1273 Andronikos II married as his first wife Anna of Hungary, daughter of Stephen V of Hungary and Elizabeth the Cuman, with whom he had two sons:

Michael IX Palaiologos (17 April 1277 – 12 October 1320). Constantine Palaiologos, despotes (c. 1278 – 1335). Constantine was forced to become a monk by his nephew Andronikos III Palaiologos.

Anna died in 1281, and in 1284 Andronikos married Yolanda (renamed Irene), a daughter of William VII of Montferrat, with whom he had:

John Palaiologos (c. 1286–1308), despotes. Bartholomaios Palaiologos (born 1289), died young. Theodore I, Marquis of Montferrat (1291–1338). Simonis Palaiologina (1294–after 1336), who married King Stefan Milutin of Serbia. Theodora Palaiologina (born 1295), died young. Demetrios Palaiologos (1297–1343), despotēs. Isaakios Palaiologos (born 1299), died young.

Andronikos II also had at least two illegitimate daughters: Irene, who married John II Doukas, ruler of Thessaly Maria, who married Toqta, Khan of the Golden Horde

Original info:

Husband: Andronikos II UNKNOWN
Wife: Anna UNKNOWN
Marriage:
Date: 08 NOV 1273
Place: Of Buda, Pest, Hungary[4]

Sources

  1. Source: #S2
  2. Source: #S3
  3. Source: #S4
  4. Source: #S4

updated sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andronikos_II_Palaiologos Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Andronicus II". Encyclopædia Britannica. 1 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 976. http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803095412666

Original sources:

  • WikiTree profile UNKNOWN-78476 created through the import of FAMILY 6162011.GED on Jun 20, 2011 by Michael Stephenson. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Michael and others.
  • Source: S2 Title: Pedigree Resource File CD 49 Abbreviation: Pedigree Resource File CD 49 Publication: (Salt Lake City, UT: Intellectual Reserve, Inc., 2002)
  • Source: S3 Title: Ancestral File (TM) Abbreviation: Ancestral File (TM) Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day SAINTS Publication: June 1998 (c), data as of 5 JAN 1998 Repository: #R1
  • Repository: R1 Name: Unknown
  • Source: S4 Title: hofundssonAnces.ged Abbreviation: hofundssonAnces.ged Repository: #R1


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On 7 Jan 2018 at 00:56 GMT Laura (Pennie) Bozzay wrote:

John you will need to change LNAB in the bio I gave you his full name.

On 7 Jan 2018 at 00:39 GMT Laura (Pennie) Bozzay wrote:

Hi John assuming you adopted this one to fix it. I found several sources that point to workable dates. So I am fixing this but leaving you this note.

On 12 Dec 2017 at 14:20 GMT Mindy Silva wrote:

His dates are unlikely: born 155 years before marriage, born 141 years before spouse. Is his birth year a typo?

On 25 Nov 2016 at 03:05 GMT Paul Gierszewski wrote:

There are inconsistent dates in this profile. If he was born in 1118, he would have been over 150 years old when he married in 1273.



Andronikos II is 31 degrees from Rosa Parks, 28 degrees from Anne Tichborne and 17 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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