Charlotte (Perkins) Gilman

Charlotte Perkins (Perkins) Gilman (1860 - 1935)

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Charlotte Perkins Gilman formerly Perkins
Born in Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticutmap
Ancestors ancestors
Wife of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
[children unknown]
Died in Pasadena, Los Angeles County, Californiamap
Profile manager: Brian Stump private message [send private message]
Profile last modified | Created 6 Oct 2015 | Last significant change: 3 Dec 2018
13:18: Colleen (Rodgers) Bake edited the Biography for Charlotte Perkins (Perkins) Gilman (1860-1935). (source) [Thank Colleen for this]
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Categories: American Authors | American Notables.

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Contents

Biography

Charlotte Perkins Gilman was born on July 3, 1860, in Hartford, Connecticut. She published her best-known short story "The Yellow Wall-Paper" in 1892. One of her greatest works of non-fiction, Women and Economics, was published in 1898. Along with writing books, she established a magazine, The Forerunner, which was published from 1909 to 1916. Gilman committed suicide on August 17, 1935, in Pasadena, California.

Early Life

Writer and social reformer Charlotte Perkins Gilman was born on July 3, 1860, in Hartford, Connecticut. Gilman was a writer and social activist during the late 1800s and early 1900s. She had a difficult childhood. Her father, Frederick Beecher Perkins was a relative of well-known and influential Beecher family, including the writer Harriet Beecher Stowe. But he abandoned the family, leaving Charlotte's mother to raise two children on her own. Gilman moved around a lot as a result and her education suffered greatly for it.

Marriage and Inspiration

Gilman married artist Charles Stetson in 1884. The couple had a daughter named Katherine. Sometime during her decade-long marriage to Stetson, Gilman experienced a severe depression and underwent a series of unusual treatments for it. This experience is believed to have inspired her best-known short story "The Yellow Wall-Paper" (1892).

Women's Rights Activism

While she is best known for her fiction, Gilman was also a successful lecturer and intellectual. One of her greatest works of nonfiction, Women and Economics, was published in 1898. A feminist, she called for women to gain economic independence, and the work helped cement her standing as a social theorist. It was even used as a textbook at one time. Other important nonfiction works followed, such as The Home: Its Work and Influence (1903) and Does a Man Support His Wife? (1915).

Along with writing books, Charlotte Perkins Gilman established The Forerunner, a magazine that allowed her to express her ideas on women's issues and on social reform. It was published from 1909 to 1916 and included essays, opinion pieces, fiction, poetry and excerpts from novels.

Suicide

In 1900, Gilman had married for the second time. She wed her cousin George Gilman, and the two stayed together until his death in 1934. The next year she discovered that she had inoperable breast cancer. Charlotte Perkins Gilman committed suicide on August 17, 1935.[1]

Sources

  1. http://www.biography.com/people/charlotte-perkins-gilman-9311669
  • The Works of Charlotte Perkins Gilman on Project Gutenberg

https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/author/27



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DNA
No known carriers of Charlotte's ancestors' mitochondrial DNA have taken an mtDNA test and no close relatives have taken a 23andMe, AncestryDNA, or Family Tree DNA "Family Finder" test.

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Images: 1
Charlotte Perkins Gilman
Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Collaboration

On 6 Jun 2017 at 19:01 GMT Dana Burns wrote:

<ref name=NYPL>Template:Cite web |author=Digital Collections, The New York Public Library |accessdate=June 6, 2017 |publisher=The New York Public Library, Astor, Lennox, and Tilden Foundation}}</ref>

On 6 Jun 2017 at 19:01 GMT Dana Burns wrote:

<ref name=NYPL>Template:Cite web |author=Digital Collections, The New York Public Library |accessdate=June 6, 2017 |publisher=The New York Public Library, Astor, Lennox, and Tilden Foundation}}</ref>



Charlotte is 27 degrees from Rosa Parks, 24 degrees from Anne Tichborne and 16 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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