Daniel Perrin
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Daniel Perrin (abt. 1642 - aft. 1719)

Daniel Perrin aka Perrine, Perreine [uncertain]
Born about in Rouen, Normandie (Seine-Maritime), Francemap [uncertain]
Ancestors ancestors
Brother of [half]
Husband of — married 18 Feb 1666 (to about 1686) in ElizabethTowne Plantation, Province of New Jerseymap
Husband of — married about 1688 in Staten Island, Richmond, Province of New Yorkmap [uncertain]
Descendants descendants
Died after in Staten Island, Richmond, Province of New Yorkmap
Profile last modified | Created 30 Aug 2010
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Daniel Perrin was a Huguenot emigrant.
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Daniel Perrin was a New Netherland settler.
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Contents

Biography

Daniel Perrin (1642–1719) was famous as one of the first permanent European inhabitants of Staten Island, New York. Known as "The Huguenot," he arrived in New York Harbor from the Isle of Jersey on July 29, 1665 aboard the ship Philip, under the command of the famous first colonial governor of New Jersey, Philip Carteret.

Birth

About 1642 in Rouen, Normandie, France[1]

Emigration

April 1665, Departure: the Isle of Jersey, aboard the ship Philip, under the command of Philip Carteret.[2]
29 Jul 1665 Arrival: New York[3]

Marriages

His first marriage was to Maria Thorel, born 1649 in Rouen, Normandie, France; she had also emigrated on the Philip in 1665. They were married on 18 February 1666 in Elizabethtown, Province of New Jersey, by James Bollen, Peace Justice.[4]

6 Children:
  1. Peter Perrin ("Peroyne"), b. 1667; d. about 1740.
  2. Henry Perrin, b. 1669 in Staten Island, Richmond, New York
  3. James Perrin, b. 1670 in Staten Island, Richmond, New York.
  4. Daniel Perrin ("Pareyn"), b. 1672; d. 1740s.
  5. William Perrin, b. 1673 in Staten Island, Richmond, New York.
  6. Francine Perrin ("Parian"), b. 1675; d. 1730s

His second marriage was to Elizabeth (last name unknown). Married: After 1687[1]

3 Children:
  1. Sara Perrin ("Pareyn, Parein, Pereine"), b. 1689 ; d. ca. 1735
  2. Elizabeth Perrin ("Parein"), b. ca. 1692, Staten Island, NY
  3. Mary Perrin ("Perine"), b. ca. 1695; d. after 1723

Death

He died after 6 September 1719.[5] We know he was present at the baptismal of his twin grandsons, William and Daniel Stilwell as sponsor, for their father had died the same year. He died at his home on Staten Island, Richmond, New York Province.

Research Notes

From "Genealogical and Memorial history of the state of New Jersey " 1910:[6]

"The Perrine family of New Jersey is of old French Huguenot extraction, and belongs among the earliest of the old French colonists who came to this country. They traced their lineage back to the group of refuges who were brought over to East Jersey by Sir Philip Carteret in 1665, when he came over to take charge of the government of that province."
"Daniel Perrine, the emigrant ancestor of the family in this country, reached New York Harbor on the ship "Philip," July 29, 1665. It is said that he was a descendant of Pierre Perrine, of Lower Charente, France, who had fled from the persecution consequent on the revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis Quatorze in October 1685 [sic - the Perrin(e) family fled in the 1660s, 20 years before the Revocation but religious persecution of Huguenots under Louis XIV had begun by 1650]; carrying with them only the wealth that they could conceal about their persons, Pierre and his family embarked at La Rochelle, and by the way of the Netherlands, found their way to England, from whence Pierre's descendant Daniel came over to America."
"Daniel was married in the year following his arrival in East Jersey, and removed to Staten Island where his children were born. February 12, 1666, Governor Carteret issued the marriage license to Daniel Perrine, of Elizabethtown, and Marie Thorel, a French girl who had come over in the same ship with Daniel. This marriage is said to have been the marriage celebrated in the Elizabeth plantation. She bore her husband six children. He married again after 1687, and his second wife, Elizabeth, bore him three more children."

It is not clear if Daniel was born on the Isle of Jersey or in Normandie. The Perrin and Carteret families were friendly on Jersey and may have intermarried.

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 Perrine, Howland D. Daniel Perrin "The Huguenot" and His Descendants in America, page 33.
  2. Perrine, Howland D. Daniel Perrin "The Huguenot" and His Descendants in America, page 15
  3. Perrine, Howland D. Daniel Perrin "The Huguenot" and His Descendants in America, page 23
  4. Perrine, Howland D. Daniel Perrin "The Huguenot" and His Descendants in America, page 25
  5. Perrine, Howland D. Daniel Perrin "The Huguenot" and His Descendants in America, pages 33-34
  6. Genealogical and memorial history of the state of New Jersey : a book of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the founding of a nation. New York, Lewis Historical Publishing Co., 1910. p. 1203. (Needs Volume #!)
  • Daniel & Maria Marriage data: RE: East Jersey Records. Liber III, fol. 6. Sec'y of State. Trenton; New Jersey Archives, 1st series. Vol. 22, lXXVII.
  • Genealogical and memorial history of the state of New Jersey : a book of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the founding of a nation. New York, Lewis Historical Publishing Co., 1910
  • Hornor, William S. This Old Monmouth of Ours. Moreau Brothers of Freehold New Jersey, 1932. page 117.

Acknowledgements

  • This person was created through the import of Latest Sheldon Hart.GED on 30 August 2010.
  • This person was created through the import of Wilson.ged on 14 September 2010.
  • Brett Buckley, firsthand knowledge.


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From History of Elizabeth, New Jersey: including the early history of Union County, by Edwin Francis Hatfield, 1868, page 117. Hatfield's source for this appears to be East Jersey Records, III, [page?]6

License of Marriage.

Whereas I have recd Information of a mutual Interest and agreement betwene Daniel Perrin of Elizabeth Towne in the province of New Jarsey and Maria Thorel of the same Towne Spinster to solemnize Mariage together for which they have Requested my Lycense and there appearing no Lawfull Impediment for ye Obstruction thereof These are to Require You or Eyther of you to Joyne the said Daniel Perrin and Marie Thorel in Matrimony and them to pronounce man and Wife, and to make record thereof according to the Lawes in that behalfe provided, for the doing Whereof this shall be to you or Eyther of you a sufficient Warrant. Given under my hand and seale the Twelft day of february Ane 1665 and in the 18th Yeare of his Maties Raign King Charles the Second.

To any of the Justices of the Peace

or Ministers W'hin the Government Ph Carterett

of the province of New Jarsey

These Couple Where Joyned together in Matrimony the 18 feb. 1665/66 by me J Bollen* The following is of interest because it states (I've underlined it) the reason Daniel is believed to have married a second time. From Genealogical and Personal History of the Allegheny Valley, Volume 2, by John Woolf Jordan:

Of Daniel Perrin, progenitor of the family by that name in America, little is known prior to his arrival in this country beyond that he was a son of Pierre Perrin, and was of Norman French descent, a Protestant, and a Huguenot. He came over in the ship "Philip," which sailed from a port of the Isle of Jersey under Governor Philip Carteret, in 1665, and arrived at New York harbor, July 29, 1665. In the same ship came Maria Thorel. After reaching New York bay, Daniel Perrin, with his other fellow voyagers took up his abode in the capital of the new possessions, which Governor Carteret called the Elizabethtowne Plantations. The site of the present Elizabeth, New Jersey, is now located on the site of part of the old Plantations. In February, 1666, Daniel Perrin married Maria Thorel, one of his fellow passengers. This is said to be the first marriage solemnized under this new government. Maria Thorel was of French lineage, her family having been settled in the vicinity of the ancient city of Rouen. After his marriage Daniel Perrin moved across to Staten Island and there established his home on a tract of land that was subsequently granted to him by the English governor, Benjamin Fletcher. This was on the western shore of Staten Island, at a place called Smoking Point. His homestead here was apparently a vacant piece of land of upwards of eighty acres in extent. From the official records in the county of Richmond and in the secretary-of-state's office at Albany, New York, it is found that on March i, 1687-88, Daniel Perrin gave a mortgage on this tract of eighty acres for the sum of £50. On March 18, 1696, is found the record of a conveyance of this same tract of eighty acres by Daniel Perrin and Elizabeth, his wife, to one Requea Pepane Le Flore. After this, Daniel Perrin does not appear on the records of Richmond county. It is probable after selling his farm he being then about fifty-six years of age, took up his abode with some of his sons or daughters and continued to dwell with them until his death, about 1719. After the death of his first wife, Maria (Thorel) Perrin, he married (second) about 1687, Elizabeth.

posted 4 Dec 2012 by Brett Buckley   [thank Brett]
The so-called old Perine Homestead on Staten Island was built about 1713 by Joseph Homes, and at his death it passed to his only child Ann, who, in 1758, had married Edward Perine, and it has since remained in and been occupied continuously by one of that branch of the family.

Daniel Perrin married twice, first Maria Thorel, second Elizabeth. By his first wife he had, Joshua, Peter, Henry, James, Daniel, William and Francyntje. By his second wife he had, Sara, Elizabeth, and Maria S. From The New Jersey coast in three centuries, volume 2, by Peter Ross, Fenwick Y. Hedley, 1902

page 211 Of the French refugees who fled to England in the sixteenth century were the families of du Bois and Perriri--or Perrine--Antoine du Bois as early as 1583. His descendant, Louis du Bois, settled at New Platz, New York, and his son Louis, marrying Catherine Van Brunt, settled upon Staten Island. Their son Benjamin became the pastor of the Reformed Dutch Churches of "Freehold and Middletown" in 1764. Count Perrin, a prominent Huguenot refugee from Nouere, fled to England. Daniel Perrin, descended from him, came to New Jersey in 1675 as a servant of Sir George and Philip Cartaret, and settled upon Staten Island. His descendants later settled in Monmouth county. page 400 From French ancestry [David V Perrine] is descended, the line being traced back to Daniel Perrine, who came to America with Philip Carteret on the ship Philip, as chronicled in Hatfield's History of Elizabeth. Anchor was dropped in New York harbor on the 29th of July, 1665, and since that time the Perrine family has been widely and favorably known in this portion of the country. Daniel Perrine was married on the 18th of February, 1666, to Maria Thorel, who had also been a passenger on the Philip when he made the voyage. Theirs is said to have been the first marriage celebrated on Elizabeth plantation. They removed to Staten Island and unto them were born seven children, the third in number being Henry Perrine, whose son John became a resident of Monmouth county. New Jersey, settling at Perrineville. His will was probated April 19, 17/9. He had ten children. From Ship Passenger Lists: New York and New Jersey 1600-1825, by Carl Boyer:

Daniel Perrin, a son of Pierre, was of Norman French descent, a Protestant and a Huguenot. He was brought over in the ship "Philip" by Governor Philip Carteret and landed in Nieu Amsterdam July 29, 1665. He took up his abode in Elizabethtown Plantation and in February 1666 married Maria Thorrel of Rouen, France.

Daniel and Maria Perrin had sons Peter, James, Daniel, William. Peter Perrin in 1713 bought a tract of 400 acres of land on the Raritan River, then in Monmouth County. Henry bought 200 acres in Middlesex County. He lived and died there.

posted 4 Dec 2012 by Brett Buckley   [thank Brett]
From The New York Genealogical and Biographical, Volume XX., 1889, No. i. "Notes and Queries":

Next to the John Perrin who came to Braintree, Mass., 1635-40, from England, was Daniel Perrin, the first refugee of our branch of the family, who came over in the ship "Philip." sailing from the Island of Jersey, and arriving in New York Harbor July 29. 1665. Daniel Perrin took up his residence on the Elizabethtown Plantations, and on February 18, 1666, he was married to Maria Thorel, a fellow passenger of his on the "Philip." This was said to have been the first marriage solemnized on that plantation.

Daniel afterwards removed to and settled on Staten Island, where all his children were born. From what place in France he came is not now known, but it is believed that the family fled from that country in the early part of the seventeenth century, some going to England, Ireland and elsewhere. This part of the family record is very obscure, but authentic records show that Daniel Perrin set sail for America, from the Isle of Jersey, in the ship "Philip," in the spring of 1665, and it is from that year that the Penin, Perrine, or Ferine family in America dates, although fragmentary items are in my possession carrying the family record back many more generations. The old tradition so long extant in the family about the first ancestor coming to America in the ship "Caledonia," has been proved to be false by evidence in the Colonial Records which shows conclusively that such could not have been the case.


posted 4 Dec 2012 by Brett Buckley   [thank Brett]
Birth: 1640, France

Death: Sep. 6, 1719 New Jersey, USA

He came to the New World on the ship "Philip" setting sail Apr 1665 from the Port of Jersey under command of Governor Philip Carteret, arriving in New York Harbor July 29, 1665. Tradition says that Daniel was of genteel birth, of Norman descent, and a Huguenot. Governor Carteret brought over with him in the ship eighteen male servants, a portion of whom were Frencemen--Daniel Perrin, one of the eighteen. They came under the guise of servants as a matter of safety & protection and "were a distinct class in a very inferior station". These "servants" all came with monies and later became land owners. Also on board was a young girl of French descent by the name of Maria Thorel born in 1640. On the 12th Feb. 1666 a marraige license was signed by Gov. Philip Carteret for their marriage. Some years after their marriage, tney moved to Staten Island and established their home on a tract of land granted in 1695 by the English Governor, Ben'j Fletcher. We find that Daniel married a 2nd time, Elizabeth prior to 1696. Daniel died on Staten Island, grave unknown.

A bronze tablet to the memory of Daniel Perrin & Marie Thorel, his first wife, hangs in the French Episcopal Church in New York City, having been placed there in 1903.



posted 28 Feb 2012 by Brett Buckley   [thank Brett]
In 1664 James II of England granted patent to territory "New Caesarea" (the present state of New Jersey) to Sir George Carteret, John Lord Berkley, and Lord Stratton. Setting out on the ship "Philip," Philip Carteret, representing his cousin Sir George, set out as appointed first governor of this territory in April 1665. The "Philip" eventually arrived in New York harbor on July 29, 1665, after first landing at Chesapeake Bay for repairs following a very difficult crossing. A painting of the landing was done by Howard Pyle and now rests in the Circuit Court in Newark, New Jersey.

The thirty French and English passengers on the "Philip" included the emigres Daniel Perrin , probably an administrator for the governor, and Maria Thorel. Both of them are in the painting by Pyle.

Daniel was from the Isle of Jersey and "was of gentle birth, of Norman descent, and a Huguenot." (H.D.Perrine) The Perrins, originally from the French mainland, had apparently lived in Jersey a long time as an ancient tower on the island bears the name. The family name appears as early as 1440 in old pedigree charts of families on the Isles of Jersey and Guernsey. These islands have at various times been in the possession of both France and England, finally coming under English rule about 1500, where they have since remained (though Jersey has retained its French influence and culture). However, Daniel's father, Pierre, seems to have come from La Rochelle, France. It is not documented where either were born.

Maria Thorel's family was originally from Rouen, France. Whether Daniel and Maria knew each other before the voyage is unknown. They were married the year following the landing, on February 18, 1666, in what is believed to be the first marriage licensed by Governor Carteret in the new settlement. Daniel and Maria were granted an 80 acre tract on the western shore of what is now Staten Island, called Smoking Point (later included in the boundaries of the current area of Rossville). Their stone house, built in 1688 on Richmond Road, still exists.

On this farm, Daniel and Maria raised six children - five sons and a daughter. Maria died some time before 1687. Daniel later remarried a woman named Elizabeth, with whom he had three daughters.

Though it is unknown where Daniel and Maria are buried, a bronze tablet commemorates them in the French Episcopal Church in New York City: "Ile de Jersey - 1665 - Nova Caesarea Pour Honorer la memoire de DANIEL PERRIN et de MARIE THOREL son epouse Refugies pour motif de conscience Maries a Elizabethtowne la 18 Fevrier 1666 Certains de leurs descendants ont places ici cette inscriptions A.D. 1903"


posted 28 Sep 2011 by Brett Buckley
From the Register of Qualified Huguenot Ancestors of the National Huguenot Society 4th Ed. 1995 pg 196......Pierre Perrin/Perrine from lower Chalfant, France to Staten Island, NY 1685

Immigrated after Daniel in 1665, Pierre and son Henry = possibly other children came to America to flee religious persecution. They settled on Staten Island, NY and Ocean City, NJ

Old Families of Staten Island by J J Clute - pg 79 "The original orthography of the name was Perrin. Count Perrin was a Huguenot refugee from Nouere; the American family are not descended from him, but the original emigrant was akin to him. The first occurrence of the name in this county was in 1687, where Daniel Perine sold land, and he was probably the progenitor of the Perines of the present day. Like many other old families in the county, they have a family record, but very imperfect, except perhaps for the last two or three generations. The branch which we are able to trace, lived for a century and a half, or more, in the same house, which is still standing, and occupied by them, on the Richmond road, a short distance north of Garrison's Station, on the Staten Island Railroad. It is probably the oldest dwelling house in the county occupied by the family who built it....... Information taken Andrienne Jubril etc... from http://www.my-ged.com/db/page/verhaal/4080 )

"This Old Monmouth of Ours Freehold, Moreau Brothers, 1932 William S. Horner Pierre of Lower Chalfont, France with a large number of Huguenots fled intolerable religious prosecution in their own country and came to America. He immigrated at the instigation of his son Daniel who had come several years before and settled at Elizabeth, New Jersey in 1665 The Staten Island Perrines proceeded from Pierre Perrine. The story is told that they came in the Caledonia and that they were shipwrecked on that Island. They were kindly treated and made it their home. From here they spread into Long Island, NY and in some cases among their brethern in New Jersey.

Pierre Perrine, b. in Lower Chalfont, France, d. NY. fled from persecution that followed revocation of Edict of Nantes in 1685 by Louis 14th & went west to Netherlands, then to America. Found passage on ship “Caldonia,” which wrecked on the SE shore of Staten Is., NY where he made his home. Taken from Egbert Family History


posted 7 Aug 2011 by Brett Buckley
Pierre Perrin was born in 1615 at Rhone, Lyons, France. He was the son of the Comte Du Perrin and Lady Du Perrin. Pierre died at Richmond, Staten Island, NY in 1698.

Pierre Perrin was a Huguenot Norman of French descent, a Protestant, born in La Rochelle, France. He presumably was induced by his son to come to America. He settled on Staten Island in 1685 and died there in 1698. He was the father of Daniel who came to America on the ship "Philip" in the year 1665.

About 1638 on the Isle of Jersey, Pierre married Andrienne Jubril, born 25 Jan. 1618 in Ardennis, Vendrisse, France. She was the daughter of Jean Jubril and Juvine Lombard. She died at Richmond, Staten Island, NY, in 1698.

Pierre died 26 April 1675.

Children of Pierre and Andrienne were:

Jean b abt 1639 Isle of Jersey, Channel Islands, France John b 1640 sle of Jersey, Channel Islands, France Henry b 1742 sle of Jersey, Channel Islands, France Daniel b 1642 sle of Jersey, Channel Islands, France Pierre ca 1644 sle of Jersey, Channel Islands, France Poncette b ca 1644 sle of Jersey, Channel Islands, France Elizabeth b ca 1648 sle of Jersey, Channel Islands, France


posted 7 Aug 2011 by Brett Buckley
According to Howland Delano Perrine in his book Daniel Perrin "The Huguenot" And His Descendants in America, of the Surnames Perrine, Perine, and Prine, 1665-1910 (South Orange, New Jersey: 1910), Piere Perrin was a Huguenot Norman of French descent, a Protestant born in La Rochelle, France. At the time of his immigration after 1685, he was from the Isle of Jersey. (The Isle of Jersey is part of the Channel Islands, located just off the westernmost point of France.)

In the book This Old Monmouth of Ours, Pierre Perrine was described as, "of Lower Chalfont, France, of the large number of Huguenots who, fleeing intolerable religious prosecution in their own country, so enriched the American blood-stream that every community in which they settled still shows the beneficial cultural and industrial effects of their coming.

"He appears to have immigrated at the instigation of his son Daniel, who had come some years before and settled at Elizabeth. Pierre, accompanied by a son, Henry, and probably by other children, fixed his habitation on Staten Island, where the family have ever been powerful and influential, planting offshoots in Long Island, New York, and in Ocean County, New Jersey." (p. 117)

An account of Pierre's arrival in this country is written in the History of Monmouth and Ocean Counties:

"He and family fled for their lives from the persecutions that followed the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, 1685, by Louis 14th. They carried with them only what wealth they could conceal about their persons. They embarked at Rochelle in France, and by way of the Netherlands came to this country.

"It is said that they found passage on the ship Caledonia and that there were seventy refugees on board. They were wrecked and beached on the southeastern shore of Staten Island, where the family found a home." (p. xlv)

Pierre Perrine had at least two children:

  • i Daniel, b. 1640, m. Maria Thorel on Feb 18, 1665/6, d. Sep 6, 1719

ii Henry

posted 18 Jul 2011 by Brett Buckley
Daniel Perrin was born in 1640 and died on Sep 6, 1719 about the age of 79. He was from Sieur de Blenville et Rochelle, France.

He married Maria Thorel on Feb 18, 1665 (old style) or 1666 (new style) on Elizabethtown Plantation, Providence, New Jersey. Maria was born in 1649 in France, and died before 1687. Daniel's second wife was Elizabeth --. He had another wife, Marie -

According to Daniel Perrin, The Huguenot, "We see him as one of the newcomers on board the ship Phillip, in the year 1665. Historical account say that this ship set sail in April, 1665, from a port of the Isle of Jersey, under the command of Governor Philip Carteret, and arrived at New York harbor on Jul 29, 1665.

"Governor Carteret brought over with him in the ship Phillip eighteen male servants, belonging to Sir George and himself, a portion of whom were Frenchmen, - probably, from the Isle of Jersey, - John de Jardin, Doctr rowland, Claude Vallotte, Richd Pewtinger, Richard Mitchell, Richard Skinner, Wm. Hill, Henry Hill, Erasmus House, John Taylor, John Clarck, Wm. --, Claude Barbour, Charles Seggin, Danl. Perrin, John Mittius, Robert Wallis, John, alias Peter, besides several others, the same time imported, and many others since." (East Jersey Records by Whitehead, iii e o 30, N. J. Archives, 1st Series, Vol 21, p 47)

"In the first importation were included some female servants, Maria Thorell, Susannah Pourlain, and Ellen Prou (all French), being of the number." (History of Union and Middlesex Counties, N. J. by Clayton, p. 21)

Daniel Perrin settled on an 80 acre tract at Elizabethtown Plantation in southern Staten Island, at the present site of Rossville, where he married Maria Thorel. This was said to have been the first marriage solemnized on that plantation. Governor Phillip Carteret granted their marriage license and directed that the ceremony be performed by a justice of the peace. Their marriage document read:

"Whereas I have Received Information of a mutuall Intent and agreement between Daniel Perrin of Elizabethtowne in the province of New Jersey and Maria Thorel - of the same towne, Spinster, to solemnize marriage together for which they have requested my lycensce and there apearing no Lawfull Impediment for y.l Obstruction thereof

"These are to require you or Either of you to Joyne the said Daniel Perrin and Marie Thorel in Matrimony and then to pronounce man and wife, and to make record thereof according to the laws in that behalfe - provided for the doing whereof this shal be to you or Eyther of you a sufficient warrant, given unto my hand and seale. the twelft day of february AD 1665 and in the 18th Yeare of his Maty. Raign King Charles the Second . . . (signed) Phi. Carteret

"To any of the Justices of the Peace, or Ministers within the govt of the province of New Jersey

"Thise couple were Joyned together in Matriniony the 18th feb 1665 by me J. Bollen" (East Jersey Records, Liber III, fol. 6. Sec'y of State. Trenton: New Jersey Archives, 1st series. Vol 22, lxxvii)

According to Daniel Perrin, "The Huguenot And His Descendants in America, of the Surnames Perrine, Perine, and Prine, 1665-1910, by Howland Delano Perrine (South Orange, New Jersey: 1910): "After his marriage, Daniel Perrin removed across to Staten Island and there established his home on a tract of land that was subsequently granted to him by the English governor, Benjamin Fletcher. That was on the western shore of Staten Island, opposite Elizabethtowne, at a place then called Smoking Point. Smoking Point was the first point of land extending out into Staten Island Sound, southwesterly from the place now known as Rossville.

His homestead here was apparently a vacant piece of land of upwards of 80 acres in extent, consisting of both upland and meadow.

"Other than the Grant from Governor Benjamin Fletcher in 1695, we find no record of any conveyance of this land to Daniel Perrin, and it is now safe to assume that in locating thereon, Daniel Perrin was the first occupant thereof, after the Indians, and subsequently confirmed his occupancy of this land through this grant from the Crown.

"From the official records, in the County of Richmond, which includes all of Staten Island, and in the Secretary of State's office at Albany, N. Y., we see that on March 1st, 1687-8, Daniel Perrin made a mortgage on this tract of 80 acres of land for the sum of 50 pounds:

"The following morgage was Recorded for Pauli Richards, of the Citty of New York, merchant, the 12th day of March Ano dom 1687.

"Know all Men by these Presents: That I, Daniell Perrin, of Smoaking Point, on Staten Island, in the County of Richmond, Yeoman, for and in consideration of the sum of fifty pounds, currtt moneys of New York, to me in hand paid by Pauli Richards, of the said Citty, merchant, at & before the ensealing and delivery hereof wherewith I confess myself to be fully satisfyed, contented & paid, Have Bargained and Sold, and by these presents do fully, clearly, and absolutely Bargain & Sell unto the said Pauli Richards one Lott of land lyeing & being on Smoaking Point, on Staten Island aforesaid, in the Countyafforesaid, containing about eighty acres, be itt more or less, also eight acres of meadow ground bellonging to the same, wth all the buildings and improvemts whatever, that is or hath been done done the same,

"Being bounded on the Ease side by the land of Clauss Smith, & on the West by the land formerly bellonging to Martin Hardwin, fronting to ye waterside North, & said rangeth backward into the woods, South. To Have and to Hold the said Lott of land, meadow ground, wth all the buildings and improvements on the same & all and singular ye . . . & Appurtenances to the same bellonging, to the said Pauli Richards, his heirs, executors, administrators & assigns to his and their own proper uses and Behoffs forever, and I, the said Daniell Perrin, my heirs, executors & administrators & every of us, the said Lott of land, meadow ground wth all the buildings & improvemts on the same & all & singular the . . . appurtenances to the same bellonging unto the said Pauli Richards, his heirs, executors, administrators & assigns against all the People, shall and will Warrant, acquitt & forever defend by these presents,

"Provided always that if I, the said Daniell Perrin, my heirs, executors, administrators, or any of us, do well & truly pay or cause to be paid, unto the said Pauli Richards, his heirs, executors, administrators or assigns the full sum of fifty pounds currtt moneys of New York aforesaid, on the first day of March, that shall be in the year of oe Lord, One thousand six hundred eighty & nine, without fraud or further delay, that then this present Bill l& the Bargain & Sale of the said Lott of land, meadow ground, wth all the Buildings & improvemts on the same & all other the premises shall be utterly voyd & of none effect, or else to stand & stand & abide in full force & vertue.

"In Wittness whereof I, the said Daniell Perrin have hereunto sett my hand and seal, in New York the first day of March, in the fourth year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord, James, the Second, over England &c, King, Defender of the faith &c, Anno qu. d'm 1687-8.

"Sealed and Delivered in the Presence of Jarvis Marshall, Theophelos Jurfon. The mark of Danielle Perrin _____

"Acknowledged before me in New York, this first day of March Annoq dom 1687-8. N. Nicolls."

On May 16, 1695, the Crown granted Daniel Perrin this same 80 acres:

"Recorded for Daniell Perrin.

"William, the third, by the Grace of God, King of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, Defender of the faith &c.:

"To all to whom these Presents shall come Sendeth Greeting:

"Whereof our Loving Subject Daniell Perrin,. of our County of Richmond, Planter, hath by his Petition Presented to Bemjamin Fletcher, our Captain Genil and Gouvenour in Chiefe of our Province of New Yorke, and Territoryes Depending thereon, in America &c, Prayed our Grant and Confirmacon of a Certaine Lott of Land now in his Possession, and formerly Surveyed for him Scituate, Lyeing and being upon the West side of the fresh Kill at Staten Island, within our County of Richmond aforesaid, Bounded Northwardly upon the sea or Meadow, Eastwardly upon Claus Smith, Southwardly upon the Concon Range, and Westwardly upon Martin Hadoway (Hardwin).

"Containing in the whole Eighty Acres, which Request we being Willing to Graunt; Know Yeee, that of our Speciall grace, Certaine Knowledge, and meer mocon, we have Given, Granted, Ratifyed and Confirmed, and by these Presents for us, or Heirs and Successors, do Give, Grant Ratify and Confirme unto the said Daniel Perrin, all that Lott of Land now in his Possession Scituate within our said County of Richmond, and Limited and bounded as aforesaid, together with all and Singular the Buildings, Improvements, Woods, Underwoods, Trees, Timber fields, feedings, Pastures, Marshes, Swamps, Meadows, Ponds, Pools, Waters, Water Courses, Rivers, Rivoletts, fishing, fowling, hunting and hawking, and all other Priviledges, Proites, benefites, Comoditys, Advantages, Hereditaments and Appurtenances whatsoever to the said Lott of Land Limited and Bounded as aforesaid belonging or in Any wayes Appertaining:

"To Have and To Hold all the aforerecited Lott of Ground, together with all and Singular the Buildings, Improvements, Woods, Underwoods, Trees, Timber fields, feedings, Pastures, Marshes, Swamps, Meadows, Ponds, Pools, Water, Water Courses, Rivers, Rivolets, fishing, fowling, hunting & hawking, and all other Priviledges, Profites, benefites, Commodityes, Advantages, Hereditements, and Appurtenances whatsoever to the said Lott of Ground Limited and Bounded as aforesaid belonging, or in any wayes Appertaining, unto the said Daniel Perrin, his heirs and Assignes forever.

"To be Holden of us, our Heirs and Successors in free and Comon Soccage according to the Tenure of our Mannour of East Greenwich, in our County of Kent, within our Realme of England, Yielding, Rendring and Paying therefore Yearly, and every Year forever, on the feast Day of Annunciation of our Blessed Virgin Mary, at our City of New Yorke, unto us, our Heirs and Successors the Annual Rent of Sume of four shillings, Currant Money of our said Province, in Lieu and Steade of all Rents, Services, Dues, Dutyes and Demands whatsoever for the said Lott of Ground and premises.

"Witnesse, Benjamin Fletcher, our Captain generall, and Governour in Chiefe of our Province in New York aforesaid, and the Territoryes and Tracts of Land Depending thereon in America, and Vice Admiral of the Same, our Lieutenant and Commander in Chiefe of the Militia, and of all the forces by Sea and Land within our Colony of Connecticut, and of all the forts and Places of Strength within the same, at fort William Henry, in Councill, the Sixteenth day of May, in the Seaventh Year of our reigne, Annoq Domini 1695. Ben Fletcher. By his excell' Command David Jamison D: Secry. (Liber 6, Patents, p. 537, Office Secretary of State, Albany, N.Y.)

"On March 19, 1696, we find the record of a conveyance of this same tract of 80 acres by Daniel Perrin and Elizabeth, his wife, to one Rquea Pepane La flore:

"Thie following deed of saale was recorded for Rquea Pepane La flore, of the Countey of Richmond, the 11th day of feb 1695, o. s. (1696).

"To all Christiane peopell to whome this present writing shall come:

"Daniell Pering, of Statonds Island, in the Countey of Richmond, in the Province of New Yorke, Yeoman, & Elizabeth, his wife, sendeth Greeting in our Lord God Everlasting:

"Whereas, they, the said Daniell Pering, and Elizabeth, his wife stands posesed of a serton pese of Land and medow to be Laid out proporshonatelley . . . for a certon some of moneys To them in hand payd att & before the ensaling & deliverey heare of by Rquea Pepane Le flore, his heirs, excekitores, admint, & assignes for eaver . . . etc.

"In witnes wheare of the said Daniell Pering, and Elizabeth, his wife, have heare unto sett their hands & seals this nintenth day of March, in the eighth Yeare of the reigne of our souvring Lord, William, the Third, over England, Scotland, France & Ireland, King, Defender of the faith, anno dom one thousand six hundred nintey & six.

"Sealed & delivered in the presents of Jacob Corbett, John Casien. The mark of Daniell Pering _______. The mark of Elizabeth Pering _____________

"After this last record Daniel Perrin does not again appear as a land owner in the records of Richmond County, or in the Secretary of State's office at Albany, N.Y.

". . . The last record we find wherein the name of Daniel Perrin appears is in the baptismal records of the Reformed Dutch Church at Port Richmond, Staten Island, which show that on September 6 1719, Daniel Perrin and Elizabeth Perrin were witnesses or sponsors at the baptism of their grandchildren Willem and Daniel Stilwell, the children of their daughter Sarah." (pp 25-27)

There is a bronze tablet to the memory of Daniel Perrin and Marie Thorel in the French Episcopal Church, New York City (ref: Reformed Dutch Church, Port Richmond, Staten Island, New York).

All his children were born on Staten Island.

The children of Daniel Perrin and Maria Thorel were:

i Joshua ii Peter, b. 1667, m. Anna Holmes on Oct 16, 1704, d. 1740

  • iii Henry, b. 1669, m. Anne Fountaine and Marie --, d. 1734

iv James, b. 1670, m. Anita Anneppe v Daniel, b. 1672, m. Mary Martin in 1699, d. 1745 vi William, b. 1673 vii Francyntje, b. 1675, m. 1st, Abraham Egbertson, 2nd, Hendrik Janszen in 1725, d. 1730

The children of Daniel Perrin and Elizabeth -- were:

viii Sarah, b. ca. 168-, m. 1st, Willem Stilwell in 1718; 2nd, James Bosler ix Elizabeth, b. 169-, m. Jan Stilwell ca. 1719 x Maria S., b. 169-, m. Johannes Sweems ca. 1719

posted 18 Jul 2011 by Brett Buckley
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It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Daniel by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share some percentage (beta) of DNA with Daniel:

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Comments: 2

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How could the revocation of the Edict of Nantes play a role in the family's relocation to North America when it occurred about twenty years after their arrival?

Also, Rouen was located in the historical province of Normandie (Anglicized Normandy). I'm not sure what the "Perdy" in the location field above is supposed to reference.

posted by Greg Lavoie
Perrin-669 and Perrin-11 appear to represent the same person because: All same data
posted by James Luper III