Levy Piner
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Levy H. Piner (abt. 1842 - 1880)

Landsman Levy H. "Levi, Levie" Piner
Born about in New York, United Statesmap
Son of [uncertain] and [uncertain]
[spouse(s) unknown]
[children unknown]
Died in Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United Statesmap
Profile manager: K Raymoure private message [send private message]
Profile last modified | Created 8 Mar 2018 | Last significant change: 18 Jun 2021
07:03: EditBot WikiTree edited the Biography for Levy H. Piner (abt.1842-1880). (Renaming category: Free Persons of Color in New York) [Thank EditBot for this]
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Contents

Biography

Levy[1] (also Levi[2], Levie[3]) H. Piner was born about 1840[4]-1842[1] in New York[1]. He and his (presumed) Piner siblings were orphaned by the time he was about ten. He was the brother of Civil War veteran Philip Piner of the famous 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He served as a landsman in the US Navy during the American Civil War.

Education

He was educated at the Colored Orphan Asylum when he was a child by women of color and white Quaker women.[1]

Religion

  • 1876[3]: Methodist

Occupations

Residences

In 1850, he was living in the Colored Orphan Asylum in New York with four other Piners: Philip, Anna M., Sarah L., and Ann E.[1] During the Civil War, he was often at sea, serving as a landsman in the US Navy.

  • 1880: 120 1/2 Gwynnett Street, Brooklyn, New York with Hannah and Edward Mathew[5][4]
  • 1876: Sing Sing Correctional Facility, New York (grand larceny, sentence 28 September 1876 to four years)[3]
  • May 1865 - August 1866: USS Mohongo[2]
  • September 1862 - October 1863: USS Courier[2]
  • 1850: Colored Orphan Asylum, New York, New York[1]

Military Service

He served as a landsman on the USS Mohongo and the USS Courier during the American Civil War.[2]

Race

Death

He passed away at 102 1/2 Gwynnett Street in Brooklyn, New York in 1880 from tuberculosis and exhaustion and is buried at Evergreen Cemetery [sic] (presumably The Evergreens Cemetery in Brooklyn.)[4]

Research Notes

Raymoure-1 23:35, 17 May 2020 (UTC): Assuming for now the other orphaned Piner children are his siblings.

Raymoure-1 01:16, 18 May 2020 (UTC): In his prison admission record, Williamsburg and Long Island both seem to be mentioned, but the record is a bit of a mess and I'm not sure if the location relates to his arrest or his residence. The address 5-674 W 126 can also be seen and Google's best guess for that is in Harlem.

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1850 federal census
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Naval rendezvous reports
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Sing Sing Inmate Admission Register
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 New York death certificate transcription
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 1880 federal census
  • 1850 United States Federal Census Year: 1850; Census Place: New York Ward 19, New York, New York; Roll: M432_559; Page: 147A; Image: 299
  • 1880 United States Federal Census Year: 1880; Census Place: Brooklyn, Kings, New York; Roll: 852; Page: 340D; Enumeration District: 182
  • Find A Grave: Memorial #210257549
  • National Archives. NARA T1099. An index to rendezvous reports during the Civil War, 1861-1865.
  • New York City Department of Records & Information Services. New York City Death Certificates; Borough: Brooklyn; Year: 1880. New York City, New York.
  • New York State Archives. Sing Sing Prison. Inmate admission registers, 1842–1852, 1865–1971 (bulk 1865–1971). New York (State). Dept. of Correctional Services, Series B0143. Albany, New York.


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