Joan (Plantagenet) of Kent LG

Joan (Plantagenet) of Kent LG (1328 - 1385)

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Joan "Princess of Wales, Fair Maid of Kent" of Kent LG formerly Plantagenet
Born in Woodstock Palace, Oxfordshire, Englandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Wife of — married [location unknown]
Wife of — married in of, Donyatt, Somersetshire, Englandmap
Wife of — married in Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, Englandmap
Descendants descendants
Died in Wallingford Castle, Wallingford, Berkshire, Englandmap
Profile last modified | Created 21 Oct 2010
This page has been accessed 8,284 times.

Categories: House of Plantagenet | Ladies Companion of the Garter.

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Joan (Plantagenet) of Kent LG is a member of the House of Plantagenet.
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Joan (Plantagenet) of Kent LG was a member of aristocracy in the British Isles.
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Contents

Biography

Titles of Joan of Kent:

Princess of Wales
Princess of Aquitaine
Countess of Salisbury
Countess of Kent
Baroness Wake of Liddell

Joan, Countess of Kent (29 September 1328 – 7 August 1385) is known to history as The Fair Maid of Kent. French chronicler Jean Froissart called her "the most beautiful woman in all the realm of England, and the most loving."

Joan is often identified as the countess of Salisbury who, legend says, inspired Edward III's founding of the Order of the Garter. It is just as possible, though, that that countess was her mother-in-law, Catherine Montacute, Countess of Salisbury.

Family •Father: Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent •Mother: Margaret Wake, 3rd Baroness Wake of Liddell •Spouses: 1) Thomas Holland, 1st Earl of Kent, 2) William Montacute, 2nd Earl of Salisbury, 3) Edward, Prince of Wales

Issue 1.Edmund Holland 2.Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent 3.John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter 4.Joan Holland, Duchess of Brittany 5.Maud Holland, Countess of Ligny 6.Edward of Angoulême 7.Richard II of England

Vitals

b. 19 Sep 1328[1]
d. 7 August 1385[1]
burial: 29 Jan 1385-1386 Grey Friars Church, Stamford, Lincolnshire

Early Life

p. Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent, and Margaret Wake, 3rd Baroness Wake of Liddell.

Family

m.1 1340 Thomas de Holland, 1st Earl of Kent, KG. Issue:[1]
1. Edmund De HOLAND (b. anti.1352)[2]
2. Thomas De HOLAND, 2nd Earl of Kent, K.G.[3]
3. John HOLAND, Duke of Exeter[4]
4. Joan[5]
5. Maud[6]
m.2 Abt 1340/41 William de MONTAGU, Earl of Salisbury.[7] Anulled 1349.[1]
m.3 10 Oct 1361 Edward "The Black" Prince[8]

Death and burial of Joan of Kent, Princess of Wales

(Royal Tombs of Medieval England) The daughter of Edmund of Woodstock, Earl of Kent, Joan married Edward, Prince of Wales in 1360. She died in 1385 at Wallingford Castle, Berkshire (now Oxfordshire), adjacent to the River Thames. She was buried in the church of the Franciscan priory (Greyfriars) at Stamford (in Lincolnshire) as instructed by her will dated the same year. Stamford was the burial-place of Joan's first husband Thomas Holland (or Holand) (d.1360), but had no tradition of royal burial. Her husband Edward's instructions for his Canterbury burial and tomb contained in his will of 1376 made no mention of his wife. Joan's Stamford tomb stood beside that of Thomas Holand in a chantry chapel commissioned during her own lifetime, recorded in the seventeenth century as a 'sumptuous chapel recently built next to the choir'. No records of her tomb presently exist. Stamford priory surrendered to the crown in 1538 and no longer exists. And all that has ever been found of her tomb may have been the stone bust of a woman recorded in the outer church wall in the eighteenth century which was thought to be a fragment of Joan's tomb effigy.

Sources

Links

Footnotes

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Wikipedia: Joan of Kent
  2. b. Upholland, Lancashire
  3. b. Abt 1354, Upholand, Lancashire - d. 25 Apr 1397, of Woodstock, Kent
  4. b. Abt 1355 Upholland, Lancashire - d. 9 Jan 1399-1400, Castle, Pleshey, Essex
  5. b. Abt 1356 Upholand, Lancashire - bur. 27 Nov 1384
  6. b. Abt 1356 Upholand, Lancashire d. 8 Jan 1390-1391
  7. m. Donyatt, Somerset
  8. m. Old Windsor, Berkshire

- http://www.zipworld.com.au/~lnbdds/home/quaker.htm -------------------- She was called "The Fair Maid of Kent" because of her extraordinary beauty. She was celebrated as one of the most beautiful women of her time and was probably the heroine upon which the "Order of the Garter" was founded. The French chronicler Froissart called Joan "the most beautiful woman in all the realm of England, and the most loving." She was much loved by the people of England and by her family.

Joan of Kent was born in 1328 to Edmund of Woodstock Plantagenet, 1st Earl of Kent, son of King Edward I of England, and Margaret Wake, 3rd Baroness Wake of Liddell. She was the third of four children. Her father, the Earl of Kent, was executed for political reasons when Joan was only a toddler. Her cousin, King Edward III, took responsibility for the family, and brought them to live at the royal court with him.

When Joan was twelve years old, she fell in love with a soldier named Thomas Holland. They married in secret, without the approval of Joan's parents. However, that same year, Thomas was sent overseas to fight in the Hundred Years' War, and that winter, Joan's parents married her to William Montague, son of the 1st Earl of Salisbury. Joan did not disclose her previous marriage to Thomas because she feared that he would be executed for treason.

Several years later, Thomas returned to England and discovered that his wife had been married to another man. Now, Thomas confessed his secret marriage to Joan in the hopes that her marriage to Montague would be declared invalid. When Montague discovered that Joan supported Thomas's case, he became very angry and locked Joan in their home as a prisoner. The marriage between Joan and Montague was eventually annulled in 1349, when Joan was twenty-one. Joan then went to live with Thomas, and the happily reunited couple had several children before Thomas's death in 1360.

Their children were: Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent, born 1350; John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter, born circa 1352; Joan Holland, born 1356, who married John V, Duke of Brittany; and Maud Holland, born 1359, who married Waleran III of Luxembourg, Count of Ligny. Some sources also list a fifth child, Edmund Holland, born 1354, who died young.

Joan inherited the titles of Countess of Kent and Lady Wake of Liddell in 1352 with the death of the last of her siblings.

Joan's 3rd marriage in 1361 was to her first cousin once removed, Edward the Black Prince, the eldest son of King Edward III. Though their marriage would have been forbidden because they were closely related, Pope Innocent VI intervened and granted a dispensation which allowed the couple to be married.

When Edward was invested Prince of Aquitaine, the couple moved to France, where they had their two children, Edward, born 1365, and Richard, born 1367.

She requested in her will she be buried with her first husband, Sir Thomas, at Grefriars Church, which is now the site of a hospital.

Bio by Charlotte, #47579980



From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_of_Kent

Princess Joan, LG, suo jure 4th Countess of Kent, 5th Baroness Wake of Liddell (19 September 1328 – 7 August 1385), known to history as The Fair Maid of Kent, was the first post-conquest Princess of Wales as wife to Edward, the Black Prince, son and heir of King Edward III. Although the French chronicler Jean Froissart called her "the most beautiful woman in all the realm of England, and the most loving", the appellation "Fair Maid of Kent" does not appear to be contemporary.[1] Joan assumed the title of 4th Countess of Kent and 5th Baroness Wake of Liddell after the death of her brother, John, in 1352.

Joan was the daughter of Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent, and Margaret Wake, 3rd Baroness Wake of Liddell.[2] Her father Edmund was the son of King Edward I and his second wife, Margaret of France, daughter of Philip III of France. Edmund's support of his older half-brother, King Edward II of England, placed him in conflict with the queen, Isabella of France, and her lover Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March. Edmund was executed after Edward II's deposition, and Joan's mother, along with her children, was placed under house arrest in Arundel Castle when Joan was only two years old. Early life

The Earl's widow, Margaret, was left with four children for whom to care. Joan's first cousin, the new King Edward III, took on the responsibility for the family, and looked after them well. His wife, Queen Philippa, was Joan's second cousin. Marriages

In 1340, at the age of twelve, Joan entered into a clandestine marriage with Thomas Holland of Upholland, Lancashire without first gaining the royal consent necessary for couples of their rank.[3] The following winter (1340 or 1341), while Holland was overseas, her family forced her to marry William Montacute, son and heir of the first Earl of Salisbury. Joan later averred that she did not disclose her existing marriage with Thomas Holland because she had been afraid that disclosing it would lead to Thomas's execution for treason upon his return. She may also have become convinced that the earlier marriage was invalid.[4]

Several years later, Thomas Holland returned from the Crusades, having made his fortune, and the full story of his earlier relationship with Joan came out. He appealed to the Pope for the return of his wife and confessed the secret marriage to the king. When the Earl of Salisbury discovered that Joan supported Holland’s case, he kept her a prisoner in her own home.[5] In 1349, Pope Clement VI annulled Joan’s marriage to the Earl and sent her back to Thomas Holland, with whom she lived for the next eleven years. They had four known children (though some sources list five), before Holland died in 1360.[citation needed]

Their children were:

Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter Lady Joan Holland (1356–1384), who married John V, Duke of Brittany (1339–1399). Lady Maud Holland (1359–1391), who married firstly to Hugh Courtenay and secondly to Waleran III of Luxembourg, Count of Ligny (1355–1415). Edmund Holland (c. 1354), who died young. He was buried in the church of Austin Friars, London.[6]

When the last of Joan's siblings died in 1352, she became the 4th Countess of Kent and 5th Lady Wake of Liddell. Descendants of Lady Joan and Thomas Holland include Lady Margaret Beaufort (mother of King Henry VII) and queen consorts Anne Neville, Elizabeth of York, and Catherine Parr.[citation n -------------------- From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_of_Kent

Princess Joan, LG, suo jure 4th Countess of Kent, 5th Baroness Wake of Liddell (19 September 1328 – 7 August 1385), known to history as The Fair Maid of Kent, was the first post-conquest Princess of Wales as wife to Edward, the Black Prince, son and heir of King Edward III. Although the French chronicler Jean Froissart called her "the most beautiful woman in all the realm of England, and the most loving", the appellation "Fair Maid of Kent" does not appear to be contemporary.[1] Joan assumed the title of 4th Countess of Kent and 5th Baroness Wake of Liddell after the death of her brother, John, in 1352.

In 1340, at the age of twelve, Joan entered into a clandestine marriage with Thomas Holland of Upholland, Lancashire without first gaining the royal consent necessary for couples of their rank.[3] The following winter (1340 or 1341), while Holland was overseas, her family forced her to marry William Montacute, son and heir of the first Earl of Salisbury. Joan later averred that she did not disclose her existing marriage with Thomas Holland because she had been afraid that disclosing it would lead to Thomas's execution for treason upon his return. She may also have become convinced that the earlier marriage was invalid.[4]

Several years later, Thomas Holland returned from the Crusades, having made his fortune, and the full story of his earlier relationship with Joan came out. He appealed to the Pope for the return of his wife and confessed the secret marriage to the king. When the Earl of Salisbury discovered that Joan supported Holland’s case, he kept her a prisoner in her own home.[5] In 1349, Pope Clement VI annulled Joan’s marriage to the Earl and sent her back to Thomas Holland, with whom she lived for the next eleven years. They had four known children (though some sources list five), before Holland died in 1360.[citation needed]


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Images: 2
Joan, Fair Maid of Kent
Joan, Fair Maid of Kent

Joan Plantagenet Image 1
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Collaboration

On 1 May 2017 at 11:21 GMT Andrew Lancaster wrote:

Plantagenet-125 and UNKNOWN-45553 appear to represent the same person because: Although the UKNOWN profile is representing a marriage which was annulled, it seems worth keeping because it did exist? Anyway, it is obviously the same person.

On 7 Oct 2016 at 07:34 GMT C (Sälgö) S wrote:

.



Joan is 23 degrees from Robin Helstrom, 22 degrees from Katy Jurado and 15 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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