John (Plantagenet) of England

John (Plantagenet) of England (1166 - 1216)

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John "Lackland, King of England, Soft Sword" of England formerly Plantagenet
Born in Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Englandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Husband of — married 29 Aug 1189 (to before 30 Aug 1199) in Marlborough Castle, Englandmap
Husband of — married 24 Aug 1200 in Bordeaux, Francemap
Descendants descendants
Died in Newark, Nottinghamshire, Englandmap
Profile last modified 7 Nov 2019 | Created 1 Feb 2011 | Last significant change: 7 Nov 2019
00:03: Andrew Lancaster edited the Biography for John (Plantagenet) of England (1166-1216). [Thank Andrew for this]
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British Aristocracy
John (Plantagenet) of England was a member of aristocracy in the British Isles.
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Preceded by
Richard I
King of England
6 April 1199 – 19 October 1216
Succeeded by
Henry III

Contents

Early Life: Birth and Parents

Name

The House of Plantagenet crest.
John (Plantagenet) of England is a member of the House of Plantagenet.
  • John
  • Richardson refers to him as "John of England" [1]
  • Nicknamed "Lackland" [1]

Titles

  • King of England
  • Lord of Ireland
  • Duke of Normandy and Aquitaine
  • Count of Anjou [1]

Birth

He was born at Oxford about 27 December 1166, the youngest son of his parents, [1] King Henry II and his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine.

John was born 24 December 1166 or 1167 in Newark Castle, Lincolnshire, the son of Henry II, King of England and his wife Eléonore Dutchess of Aquitaine. Cawley notes that the primary sources are contradictory regarding John´s year of birth. [2]

Siblings

John had three brothers and three sisters:

  1. Henry the Young King (1155–1183),
  2. Geoffrey, Duke of Brittany (1158–1186)
  3. Richard the Lionheart.
  4. Matilda, Duchess of Saxony (1156–1189),
  5. Leonora of England (1161–1214)
  6. Joan Plantagenet (1165–1199)

Timeline of John's Reign

1177 John was designated King of Ireland in 1177 at the age of 11. [2]
1183 Jun: Dysentery kills the Young King. Richard's heir.
1184 Philip de Winchester was made Governor & Earl John, the son of King Henry, was made Lord of Ireland [3]
1185 Mar: His father knighted him and sent him to govern Ireland. He treated the Irishmen with such insolence they deserted the English cause. His father recalled him from Ireland in September.[1]
1186 Jul: Geoffrey dies in tournament.
1187 Saladin captures Jerusalem.
1189 ♦ Marriage to Isabel of Gloucester

♦ 06 Jul: Henry II dies at Chateau Chinon &diams: Richard is king.
♦ King Richard titles John: Count of Mortain[2] and Lord of Ireland (formerly king of Ireland under Henry II).[4] Orders him to stay out of England for 3 years.
♦ Richard names Arthur of Brittany, eldest son of brother Geoffrey as heir.

1190 4th of July: Richard goes on Third Crusade
1192 Going home, Richard shipwrecks off Adriatic coast. Duke of Austria imprisons him for ransom.
1190 - 1194♦ Tries to overthrow William Longchamp, Bishop of Ely and take the throne.
♦ Legend of Robin Hood is born.
1194 04 Feb: Richard's ransomed and released.
1199 ♦ 06 Apr: Lionheart dies. John takes throne.

♦ May 27, 1199: Coronation. 27 May 1199
♦ Marriage to Isabel of Gloucester annulled.

1200 24 Aug: Marries Isabelle of Angouleme. Issue:

♦ Henry (King Henry III)
♦ Richard, Earl of Cornwall
♦ Joan of England
♦ Isabella of England
♦ Eleanor of England

1202 Fourth Crusade

♦ 28 Apr: Declared a rebel, forfeits Aquitaine, Poitou and Anjou to Philippe of France.

1203 03 Apr: Rumors say John murdered Arthur of Brittany.[4]
1205 Dispute with Pope Innocent III.
1207 Rejects Stephen Langton as Archbishop of Canterbury.[4]
1208Papacy puts interdict on England. All church services stop.[4]
1209 Pope Innocent III excommunicates John. Lackland confiscates church revenue to finance military. Comes to enjoy wealth excommunication brings.[4] Ban later lifted.
1211 Defeats Llywelyn the Great.[4]
1214 27 Jul: Defeat at Battle of Bouvines: forced to accept unfavorable peace with France.
1212 Imposes taxes on Barons to regain Aquitaine, Poitou and Anjou.
1215 15 Jun: Barons force John to sign Magna Carta.
1215 - 1217 First Baron's War: Rebel barons support Prince Louis, son of the French king.
1216 ♦ 21 May: Louis invades England. Marches to London. With support, proclaimed and accepted as England's king (not crowned). John flees to Winchester.

♦ 14 Jun: Louis captures Winchester. Conquers over half the kingdom.
Seige of Dover Castle 25 Jul: Louis fails to capture castle.
♦ 19 Oct: John dies at Newark. Buried in Worcester Cathedral.
♦ 28 Oct: Barons turn on Louis and support John's nine year old son ... Henry III.

Marriages and Mistresses

1173 Alice of Maurienne, a Fiancee

In 1173 he was contracted to marry Alice of Maurienne, eldest daughter of Humbert III, Count of Maurienne and Savoy, Marquis of Italy. The marriage did not take place due to a dispute about castles. [1]

1187 Clemence, a Mistress

Clemence was most likely the mother of Joan FitzJohn who was born, probably in 1188, quite possibly in France, and who subsequently married Llywelyn the Great (Llywelyn Fawr). See full discussion of Joan's possible mothers on her profile.

The Annals of Tewkesbury name Clemencia as the mother of Llewelyn's wife Johanna when recording Johanna's death. [2]

Cawley reports that Clementia's husband is identified as "Henry Pinel" by Weir, but without identification of a primary source. [2]

Agatha de Ferrers, a Mistress

Agatha de Ferrers was well known as a mistress of John's over time. She never married. She is thought in some circles to be the mother of Joan. See full discussion of Joan's possible mothers on her profile. But there are numerous Agathas. Which one was John's mistress?

  • Agatha de Ferrers, b. 1168. d/o William, 3rd Earl + Sybil Braose. Sister of millicent and Wm 4th. On Pedigree form as concubine.
  • Agatha de Ferrers, b. 1192. d/o wm, 4th earl. Empty profile.
  • Agatha de Ferrers, b. 1232. d/o Wm 5th ry earl. Populate profile but no mention of mistress.
  • Agatha Pinel. The profile conflates Agatha and Clemence and a marriage to Henry Pinel.

1189 Isabel of Gloucester, a Wife

John married first at Marlborough, Wiltshire, 29 August 1189 Isabel of Gloucester, youngest daughter and co-heiress of William Fitz Robert, Earl of Gloucester. Baldwin, Archbishop of Canterbury, protested against the marriage, John and Isabel being related. They had no issue. Upon becoming king in 1199, John obtained a divorce on grounds of consanguinity. She was then kept a state prisoner until 1214. [1]

1200 Isabel of Angouleme, a Wife

At Bordeaux on 24 August 1200 John then married Isabelle (Angoulême) de Lusignan, born Angouleme, Charente, Poitou, France. Isabel of Angouleme. They had five children. [1]

Unknown de Warenne, a Mistress

Sometimes she was assumed to be Ela (Warenne) de Newburgh, born in Surry, England, 1166, but only verified as an unknown daughter of her father.

Isabella Fitz Robert, a Mistress

Isabella FitzRobert born Fylingdale, Yorkshire, England, 1160

1216 Death and Burial of King John

John died 18/19 Oct 1216 and was buried at Worcester Cathedral. [2]

King John died suddenly from dysentery at the Bishop of Lincoln's castle at Newark in Nottinghamshire, on October 19, 1216. [5]

He was buried in the Abbey Church of St. Peter in Worcester later that year in the choir before the high altar between the shrine of Wulfstan (d.1095), to the north, and another Worcester bishop-saint Oswald (d.992), to the south. In 1232 his remains were interred in a new tomb before the Worcester high altar in the presence of his son, King Henry III. His tomb was opened in 1529 and again in 1797. In 1529 the king's stone coffin and low-lying effigy slab were incorporated into a contemporary tomb-chest. King John's tomb today comprises a Purbeck marble effigy most likely dating from the 1232 reburial, and the sixteenth-century tomb-chest. His Worcester monument is important in several ways - it is the earliest surviving royal effigy in England, and the only example of an English royal effigy executed in Purbeck marble. [5]

Tomb note: King John's tomb is intact and the effigy is chipped. King John's facial likeness on the effigy is believed to be based on fact. [5]

The heart burial of King John at Croxton Abbey in Leicestershire:[5] [6]

His heart (and some say his bowels ("viscera")) was interred in Croxton Abbey in Croxton Kerrial in Leicestershire, in recognition of the services of the Croxton abbot who was King John's deathbed confessor at Newark. Little remains of the Abbey, which was dissolved by Henry VIII in 1538.[6]

Croxton Abbey was also the burial place of Henry VIII's elder brother Prince Arthur who died in 1502, having been Katherine of Aragon's first husband, with Henry VIII being her second. Katherine was the first of Henry's six wives.[6]

Issue

Many of John's illegitimate children were born prior to his marriage in 1189. Since he was born in 1166, one would not expect his children to be born much before 1184, providing a five year window for the birth of many of his illegitimate children. Legitimate children are displayed below in bold.

  1. Joan FitzJohn born London, Middlesex, 1189 [7] Joan, Lady of Wales[8] Joan of England married Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, Prince of North Wales, Prince of Aberffraw, Lord of Snowden. [9]
  2. Richard (FitzRoy) FitzJohn , born 1186 Chilham Castle, Kent [7] Richard Fitz Roy[10] Child of Unknown de Warenne, daughter of Hamelin, 5th Earl of Surrey. [9]
  3. Oliver (Plantagenet) FitzRoy, born 1187, Westminster, Middlesex [7] Oliver FitzRoy[11]. Child of John and Hawise Fitzwarin, daughter of Fulk Fitswarin, by Hawise, daughter and heiress of Jose de Dinan. [9] October 1215 given a tun of wine by his father the king. 1218 went on crusade with papel legate, died at Damietta. [9]
  4. Geofrey (Plantagenet) FitzRoy, born England 1192[7] Geoffrey FitzRoy[12] Child of King John by an unknown mistress. [9]
  5. John (Plantagenet) FitzRoy, born 1180, Hutt, Lancashire [7] John FitzRoy[13] Child of King John by an unknown mistress. [9]
  6. Henry FitzRoy, born Lancashire, 1207[7] Henry FitzRoy (d. 1245) Child of King John by an unknown mistress. [9]
  7. Osbert (Plantagenet) Gifford, born Oxfordshire, 1205 [7] Osbert Gifford [14] (living 1216)[15]Child of King John by an unknown mistress. [9]
  8. Eudo (Plantagenet) FitzRoy, born 1192, Essex [7] Eudes FitzRoy, who accompanied his half-brother Richard on Crusade and died in the Holy Land in 1241. Richard says is the same person as Ives or Ivo. Ivo (Plantagenet) FitzRoy, born Essex 1194 [7] Child of King John by an unknown mistress. [9]
  9. Bartholomew FitzRoy[16]Child of King John by an unknown mistress. [9]
  10. Unknown daughter FitzRoy, married Unknown Meulan, parents of Roger de Meulan. Child of King John by an unknown mistress. [9]
  11. Maud FitzRoy, Abbess of Barking (d.1252)Child of King John by an unknown mistress. [9]
  12. Isabel (FitzRoy) FitzIves, born 1186 [7] Isabel FitzRoy m. Richard Fitz Ives. Alleged child of King John by an unknown mistress. [9]
  13. Philip FitzRoy[17][18] Possible child of King John by an unknown mistress. [9]
  14. Henry (Plantagenet) of England, born Winchester Castle, Winchester, Hampshire, Oct 1, 1207[7] Henry III (1207-1272), Child of John and his wife Isabel of Angouleme.
  15. Richard (Plantagenet) of England, born Winchesteter Castle, Winchster, Hampshire, Jan 5, 1209[7] Richard (1209-1272), 1st Earl of Cornwall. Child of John and his wife Isabel of Angouleme.
  16. Joan (Plantagenet) of Scotland born Gloucester, Gloucesteshire, England, Jul 22, 1210 [7] Joan (1210-1238), m. Alexander II of Scotland. Child of John and his wife Isabel of Angouleme. Probably the same person as Johanna (Plantagenet) Colepepper, born Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England, Jul 22, 1210 [7]
  17. Isabella (Plantagenet) Hohenstaufen , born Gloucester, 1214 [7] Isabella (1214-1241), m. Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor. Child of John and his wife Isabel of Angouleme.
  18. Eleanor (Plantagenet) Montfort , born Winchester, 1215. [7] Eleanor (1215-1275) m.1 William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke; m.2 Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester. Child of John and his wife Isabel of Angouleme.

FMG

[2]

His lands were placed under interdict by Baldwin Archbishop of Canterbury because of his first marriage[557].

He succeeded his brother Richard I in 1199 as JOHN King of England, crowned London 27 May 1199[558] and again 8 Oct 1200 with his second wife at Westminster Abbey[559].

The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the coronation "VI Kal Jul" at Westminster Abbey in [1199] of "Johannes dominus Hiberniæ"[560]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the death "XV Kal Nov" [1216] of King John and his burial "Wignorniæ"[561].

The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “apud Newerk in crastino Sanctæ Luciæ virginis” in 1216 of “Johannes rex Angliæ”[562].

Betrothed (Auvergne 1173 before 2 Feb) to ALIX de Maurienne, daughter of HUMBERT III Comte de Maurienne & his third wife Klementia von Zähringen ([1166]-1174).

The marriage contract between "Johanni filio Henrici…regis Angliæ" and "Humbertus comes Mauriensis et marchio Italiæ…filia…primogenita…Aalis" is dated 1173[563]. Ralph de Diceto´s Ymagines Historiarum record in 1173 the betrothal of “Henricus rex Angliæ, Johanni filio suo cognomento sine terra” and “septenni filiam primogenitam Humberti comitis de Moriana...ex relicta Henrici Saxonis ducis”[564]. Her parentage is specified by Matthew Paris when he records this betrothal. Although he does not give her first name, he calls her "filia primogenita"[565]. Benedict of Peterborough records the betrothal of "Humbertus comes de Mauriana…Aalis filiam suam majoram" and "rex…Johannis filii sui iunioris" at "Alvernium…Montem Ferratum" in 1173 before 2 Feb, and the agreement whereby John would inherit the county of Maurienne if Humbert had no sons by his wife[566].

m firstly (Betrothed 1176, Marlborough Castle 29 Aug 1189, divorced before 30 Aug 1199) as her first husband, ISABEL [Avise] Countess of Gloucester, daughter of WILLIAM FitzRobert Earl of Gloucester & his wife Havise de Beaumont ([before 1176]-14 Oct or [18 Nov] 1217, bur Canterbury Cathedral Church).

An anonymous continuation of the Chronicle of Robert of Mont-Saint-Michel records (in order) "Comitissa Ebroicensis…uxor Guillelmi Comitis de Clara, tertia…in manu Dei et domini Regis" as the three daughters left by "Guillelmus Comes Glocestriæ" when he died[567]. The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey names “Mabiliam comiti de Evereis in Normannia nuptam…Amiciam…Isabellam” as the three daughters of “comes Willielmus” and his wife, adding that Isabel married “Henricus rex…Johanni filio suo”[568]. Benedict of Peterborough records the betrothal in 1176 of "Johannem filium regis minimum" and "Willelmus filius Roberti filii regis Henrici primi comes Gloucestriæ…filiam ipsius comitis" and the agreement whereby John would inherit the county of Gloucester[569].

Her marriage is recorded by Matthew Paris, who specifies that it took place despite the prohibition of Baldwin Archbishop of Canterbury on the grounds of consanguinity, although he does not name her[570]. Benedict of Peterborough records the marriage in 1189 of "Johannes frater ducis [Normanniæ]" and "filiam comitis Gloucestriæ" at "Marlebegam IV Kal Sep"[571]. The Chronicle of Ralph of Coggeshall records that "comes Johannes frater eius [rege Ricardo]" married "filiam comitis Glocestriæ"[572].

The primary source which confirms her name as Isabelle has not yet been identified. She was recognised as Ctss of Gloucester in her own right from her marriage in [1189]. Matthew Paris records that the king divorced "uxorem suam Hawisam comitis Gloverniæ filiæ" [in 1200 from the context] because “affines erant in tertio gradu consanguinitatis”[573].

The Annales Londonienses record the divorce in 1200 of King John and "Hawysiam filiam comitis Gloverniæ", stating that they were "in tertio gradu consanguinitatis"[574]. King John appears to have kept her as a state prisoner after their divorce, but retained her title even after her nephew Amaury de Montfort was installed as Earl of Gloucester in 1199[575].

The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records the second marriage of “Isabellam” and “Galfrido de Mandevile comiti Essexiæ”, and her third marriage to “Huberto de Burgo justiciario Angliæ”[576]. Her lands and title were confiscated on the death of her second husband, who died a rebel.

She married secondly ([16/26] Jan 1214) as his second wife, Geoffrey de Mandeville Earl of Essex, and thirdly ([Sep] 1217) as his second wife, Hubert de Burgh, who was created Earl of Kent in 1227. The Annals of Waverley record the death in 1217 of “Isabel comitissa Gloucestriæ”[577]. The Annals of Dunstable record that “Johannam comitissam Gloucestriæ” died “paucos dies” after her marriage to “Hubertus de Burgo justiciarius Angliæ” and was buried “apud Cantuarium”[578].

Betrothed (early 1193) to ALIX de France, daughter of LOUIS VII King of France & his second wife Infanta doña Constanza de Castilla ([4 Oct] 1160-after 1200). Kerrebrouck states that Richard I King of England arranged the betrothal of Alix, to whom he had earlier been betrothed himself, to his younger brother John in early 1193[579], but the primary source which confirms this information has not been identified. She returned to France in Aug 1195.

m secondly (Bordeaux Cathedral 24 Aug 1200) as her first husband, ISABELLE d’Angoulême, daughter of AYMAR “Taillefer” Comte d’Angoulême & his wife Alix de Courtenay ([1187]-Fontevrault Abbey 31 May 1246, bur Fontevrault Abbey). The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "IX Kal Sep" [1200] of King John and "Isabellam filiam Engolisimi comitis" and their coronation together "VIII Id Oct" in London[580]. Matthew Paris records that the king "consilio regis Francorum" married “Isabel filiam comitis Engolismi...Hugo cognomento Brunus comes Marchiæ” in 1200 and her consecration as queen “dominica proxima ante festum Sancti Dionisii apud Westmonasterium” [8 Oct], in a later passage specifying that King John arrived at Dover from France “VIII Id Oct” before their joint coronation at Westminster[581]. She succeeded her father in 1202 as Ctss d’Angoulême, but was not formally recognised as such until Nov 1206.

She married secondly (10 Mar/22 May 1220) Hugues [XI] de Lusignan Comte de la Marche. Her origin is confirmed in the charter dated 1224 under which "Ugo de Leziniaco comes Marchiæ et Engolismæ et Ysabella uxor eius…regina Angliæ" confirmed rights granted by "bonæ memoriæ Ademaro comite Engolismæ patre eiusdem dominæ Ysabellæ" to Vindelle[582]. Matthew Paris records her death, when he specifies that she was the wife of Hugues Comte de la Marche[583].

Mistress (1): --- de Warenne, daughter of HAMELIN d´Anjou Earl of Surrey & his [second] wife Isabel de Warenne of Surrey (-[killed 1200]). According to Given-Wilson & Curteis[584], one of the mistresses of King John was the "sister of William de Warenne" but the authors do not specify which sister she was. The Chronicle of Robert of Gloucester names "Richard fiz le rei…Ion" and "the erles daughter of Wareine" his mother[585]. The Annales Cestrienses record in 1200 that “W. de Waren meunch fil Regis” was killed[586]. Christie suggests that one possibility is that “meunch” in this source may represent a contraction of “mater Richardi”, another possibility being that it represents “avunculus” and that the entry refers to the death of William de Warenne (although if that is correct, the date makes little sense)[587].


Mistress (3): HAWISE, daughter of ---.

Given-Wilson & Curteis name “Hawise” as the mother of King John´s son Oliver, adding that “she had some claim to land in Kent and it is possible that she was a Tracy”[590]. The primary source which confirms this information has not been identified.

Mistress (4): SUSANNA, daughter of ---. Given-Wilson & Curteis record that she was given a "tunic and super-tunic" in 1213[591]. The primary source which confirms her name and relationship with King John has not yet been identified.

Mistresses (5) - (12): ---. The names of the other mistresses of King John are not known.

King John & his second wife had five children:

1. HENRY (Winchester Castle 1 Oct 1207-Palace of Westminster 16 Nov 1272, bur Westminster Abbey). Matthew Paris records that "Isabel Anglorum regina" gave birth “in die sancti Remigii” 1207 to “Johanni regi filium suum primogenitum...Henricus”[592]. He succeeded his father 28 Oct 1216 as HENRY III King of England. - see below.

2. RICHARD (Winchester Castle 5 Jan 1209-Berkhamstead Castle, Herts 2 Apr 1272, bur Hayles Abbey, Gloucestershire). The Chronicle of Ralph of Coggeshall records the birth in 1209 of "Ricardus secundus filius regis"[593]. Matthew Paris records that "Isabel Anglorum regina" gave birth in 1208 to “Johanni regi filium legitimum...Ricardum”[594]. He was designated Comte de Ponthieu before 14 Aug 1225, and created Earl of Cornwall 30 May 1227. - EARLS of CORNWALL.

3. JOAN of England (22 Jul 1210-Havering-atte-Bower, Essex 4 Mar 1238, bur Tarrant Crawford Abbey, Dorset[595]). The Annals of Worcester record the birth “die Sanctæ Mariæ Magdalenæ” in 1210 of “regi filia Johanna”[596]. King John confirmed the proposed marriage of "Johannam filiam suam genitam de Ysabell uxore sua, filia com Engolism" to "Hugonis de Lysuinan fil H com Marchie" by charter dated 29 Sep 1214[597]. Matthew Paris records her marriage, specifying that she was the sister of King Henry III[598]. The Annals of Dunstable record that “regi Scotiæ” married “rege…sororem suam” in 1221, specifying that she was eleven years old at the time and had previously been betrothed to “Hugoni Brun”[599]. The marriage contract between “Alexando...Regi Scotiæ” and “Rex...Johannam primogenitam sororem nostram” is dated 15 Jun 1220[600]. The Annales Londonienses record the death in 1238 of "Johanna regina regis Scotiæ, soror regis Anglorum" while on a visit to her brother in England and her burial "IV Non Mar"[601]. The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “apud Haveringes III Non Mar” of “regina Scotiæ soror regis Angliæ” and her burial “apud Tarentune monialium”[602]. Betrothed (29 Sep 1214) to HUGUES [XI] de Lusignan Comte de la Marche, son of HUGUES [X] "le Brun" Sire de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche & his first wife --- (-1249 after 15 Jan, bur Abbaye de Valence). He succeeded in 1220 as Comte d'Angoulême. m (contract 15 Jun 1220, York Minster 18 or 25 Jun 1221) as his first wife, ALEXANDER II King of Scotland, son of WILLIAM I “the Lion” King of Scotland & his wife Ermengarde de Beaumont (Haddington, East Lothian 24 Aug 1198-Isle of Kerrara, Bay of Oban 6 Jul 1249, bur Melrose Abbey, Roxburghshire).

4. ISABELLA of England (1214-Foggia near Naples 1 Dec 1241, bur Bari). Matthew Paris records her marriage, specifying that she was the sister of King Henry III[603]. The Annals of Dunstable record that “Fredericus imperator Alemanniæ” married “Ysabellam filiam Johannis regis Angliæ” in 1235, her dowry being 30,000 marcs of silver[604]. The Annales Erphordenses record the marriage "1235 XVII Kal Aug" at Worms of "sororem Regis Anglie" and the emperor[605].

Her marriage was arranged by her future husband to drive a wedge between England and the Welf faction in Germany, long time allies[606]. She was granted the castle of Monte Sant'Angelo by her husband on her marriage, and crowned empress 20 Jul 1235 at Worms Cathedral.

After her marriage, her husband confined her to one of his castles in Sicily where she was guarded by eunuchs. The Annales Londonienses record the death in 1241 of "Isabella imperatrix, soror regis Angliæ"[607].

The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “circa festum sancti Nicholai” in 1241 of “Johanna imperatrix” and her burial “apud Barensem urbem”[608].

She died in childbirth[609]. m (Betrothed London Feb 1235, Worms Cathedral 15 or 20 Jul 1235) as his third wife, Emperor FRIEDRICH II, son of Emperor HEINRICH VI & his wife Constanza of Sicily (Iesi, Ancona 26 Dec 1194-Castel Fiorentino near Lucera, Foggia 13 Dec 1250, bur 25 Feb 1251 Palermo cathedral).

5. ELEANOR of England (1215-convent of the sisters of St Dominic, near Montargis 13 Apr 1275).

The Annals of Dunstable record that “Willelmus Marscallus junior” married “sororem Henrici regis Angliæ” in 1225, recorded as the first event in that year[610]. The Annals of Tewkesbury record the marriage in 1224 of “soror regis Henrici” and “juveni Marescallo”[611]. She is recorded as "Pembrocensis comitissa" (not named), sister of Isabella, by Matthew Paris[612]. He names her as daughter of King John in a later passage which records her second marriage with "Simon de Monteforti", specifying that she was "relictam Willelmi Marescalli comitis de Penbrochia"[613]. The Annals of Tewkesbury record the marriage “XIX Kal Feb in parvula capella regis apud Westmonasterium” of “soror regis Angliæ uxor quondam junioris Marscalli” and “Symoni de Monteforti”[614]. The Annales Cambriæ record that "Simon de Monteforti" married "Alienoram comitissam Penbrok" in 1238[615].

She became a nun after the death of her first husband, taking a vow of perpetual celibacy. This was not a canonical impediment to her second marriage, her second husband obtaining Papal absolution in Rome for the marriage[616].

She retired once more as a nun at Montargis (a cell of the abbey of Fontevraud) after her second husband was killed[617]. A writ dated 3 Jun "3 Edw I", following the death of "Eleanor countess of Leicester late the wife of William Marescal earl of Pembroke" related to "Kemesing manor...Neubiri manor" held in dower by the deceased from her first husband, adjudged to “Roger le Bygot earl of Norfolk and marshal of England one of the heirs of Walter le Marescal brother and heir of the said William...Roger de Mortuo Mari and Maud his wife, Eudo la Zuche and Milicent his wife, John de Hastingges and Humphrey de Boun heirs of Eva de Breuhus a sister and heir of the said Walter...Agnes de Vescy, Emery de Rupe Cauardi and Maud his wife, William de Mohun, John de Mohun, Agatha de Mortuo Mari and John de Boun heirs of Sibyl de Ferrariis another sister and heir of the said Walter...William de Valencia and Joan his wife an heir of the said Walter”[618]. m firstly (23 Apr 1224) as his second wife, WILLIAM Marshal Earl of Pembroke, son of WILLIAM Marshal Earl of Pembroke & his wife Isabel de Clare Ctss of Pembroke (Normandy [1190]-6 Apr 1231, bur 15 Apr 1231 Temple Church, London). No children.

m secondly (King’s Chapel, Palace of Westminster 7 Jan 1238525) SIMON de Montfort, son of SIMON de Montfort Earl of Leicester & his wife Alice de Montmorency (1208-killed in battle Evesham 4 Aug 1265, bur Evesham). He left in England for Rome in 1238, while his wife remained at Kenilworth[619].

King John had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1): 6. RICHARD FitzJohn [Fitzroy] (-[1245/46]). The Chronicle of Robert of Gloucester names "Richard fiz le rei…Ion" and "the erles daughter of Wareine" his mother[620]. King John granted "terram…Roes de Dover uxorem suam…castro illo de Chilleha" to "Ric filio nostro" by order dated 11 Jul 1214[621]. "William Briwere" was ordered to deliver to "Richard the king´s son all the lands which fell to Rose his wife hereditarily"[622]. He was a captain in King John's army during the baronial revolt. He fought the invasion of Louis de France in 1217[623]. Lord of Chilham, Kent, de iure uxoris. Henry III King of England granted exemptions to "Ricardo filio Regis" in respect of "castrum suum de Chileham" dated 21 Jun 1217[624]. Bracton notes a claim, dated 1227, by "Ricardus filius Reg et Roysia uxor eius" against "Robertum filium Walteri" for land "in Lesnes" of which "Roysia de Douera avia ipsius Roysie" was seised[625]. Henry III King of England granted "to Richard de Dovor his cousin…the custody of the lands which belonged to Geoffrey de Costentyn in Ireland" by charter dated 11 Jun 1244[626]. Matthew Paris records the deaths of "Ricardi filii Rogeri [maybe error for "Regii"] de Chilham, Ricardi de Dover filii eius" among those who died in 1245[627]. m (before 11 Jul 1214) as her first husband, ROHESE de Dover, daughter and heiress of FULBERT de Dover of Chilham, Kent & his wife Isabel Briwere ([1204/05]-[1264/65]). King John granted "terram…Roes de Dover uxorem suam…castro illo de Chilleha" to "Ric filio nostro" by order dated 11 Jul 1214[628]. Bracton records a claim, dated 1230, by "Matillis de Lucy, Ricardus filius Reginaldi [error for "Regis", probably incorrectly extended to Reginaldi from Regi?] et Roysa uxor eius" against "Robertum Yellestede" concerning "terre…in Neutona", which records the claimants´ ancestry "Galfrido…filio et heredi suo…et de predicto Galfrido…Herberto…filio et heredi suo et de predicto Herberto Matillidi et Royse sororibus" and "de predicta Roysa…Foberto filio suo et de predicto Foberto isti Royse…filie et heredi suo"[629]. She married secondly (after 14 Jul 1250) William de Wilton. The Pipe Rolls record in 1258 that "Willelmus de Wilton" married "Roesiam de Douor que fuit uxor Ricardi de Chileham"[630]. A writ following the death of "Richard de Dovor and Rose his wife" names "Richard son of Richard de Dovor, aged 21 on the eve of the Purification" as heir[631]. Richard & his wife had three children: a) RICHARD of Chilham (-after 2 Dec 1247). Matthew Paris records the deaths of "Ricardi filii Rogeri de Chilham, Ricardi de Dover filii eius" among those who died in 1245[632]. Lord of Chilham. m (before 2 Dec 1247) as her third husband, MATILDA Ctss of Angus, widow firstly of JOHN Comyn Earl of Angus, secondly of GILBERT de Umfreville Earl of Angus, daughter and heiress of MALCOLM Earl of Angus & his wife Mary Berkeley. Her third marriage is confirmed by letters close dated 2 Dec 1247 under which Henry III King of England granted four bucks from Eleham Park to "the countess of Angus, the wife of Richard of Dover"[633]. Lord Richard & his wife had two children: i) RICHARD of Chilham (1 Feb [1246/47]-[1265/66]). A writ following the death of "Richard de Dovor and Rose his wife" names "Richard son of Richard de Dovor, aged 21 on the eve of the Purification next" as heir[634]. Lord of Chilham. m as her first husband, JOAN de Grey, daughter of SIMON de Grey & his wife ---. She married secondly as his second wife, Gilbert de Pecche. ii) ISABEL of Chilham (after 1245-18 Mar 1292). The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not yet been identified. She was heiress of her brother at Chilham. "Alexander de Balliol and Isabella his wife…going to Scotland" appointed attorneys for their affairs in England[635]. Leland quotes a manuscript which records the death "XV Kal Apr…apud Chilham" in 1292 of "Domina Isabella de Dovora comitissa de Assele" and her burial "Cantuar: in ecclesia Christi"[636]. A charter dated 1 May 1292 ordered the valuation of the assets of "the late Isabella countess of Athol to her husband Alexander de Balliol"[637]. m firstly (before 1265) as his second wife, DAVID of Strathbogie Earl of Atholl, son of JOHN of Strathbogie Earl of Atholl & his wife Ada Hastings Ctss of Atholl (-Carthage 6 Aug 1270). He died while on Crusade in Tunisia. m secondly (shortly after 7 Nov 1270) ALEXANDER Balliol of Cavers, co Roxburgh, son of HENRY Balliol & his wife Lora [Lauretta] de Valoignes (-[19 Apr 1310/Jun 1311]). Lord of Chilham, by right of his wife. b) ISABEL (-7 Jul [1276/77], bur Abbey of St Augustine, Bristol). The Chronicle of Robert of Gloucester names "Richard fiz le rei…Ion" and "the erles daughter of Wareine" his mother, adding that "Sire Morisse of Berkeleye" married his daughter[638]. The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified. King Henry III granted her certain manors 10 Aug 1264 "out of compassion for the poverty of his niece"[639]. m (before 12 Jul 1247) MAURICE de Berkeley "the Resolute" feudal Lord of Berkeley, son of THOMAS Lord of Berkeley & his wife Joan de Somery (1218-4 Apr 1281, bur Bristol St Augustine). c) LORETTE (-after 1248). In the Complete Peerage, she is described as the daughter of "Royce, daughter and heiress of Robert of Dover" who granted the manor of Luddington in 1248 to her daughter and son-in-law[640]. An assize of last presentation brought by the king in 1261 against "William Marmion and Lauretta" shows that "Lauretta was the daughter of Richard FitzRoy"[641]. m (1248) WILLIAM Marmion, son of ROBERT Marmion & his wife Avice de Tanfield (-27 Jul 1275).] King John had one illegitimate daughter by Mistress (2):

7. JOAN (-30 Mar 1237). King John confirmed "castrum de Ellesmara" to "Lewelino principi Norwallie in maritagium cum Johanna filia nostra" by charter dated 16 Apr 1205[642].

Her husband sent her to make peace with the king her father in 1211 when the latter was attacking North Wales.

She was legitimated in 1226: Pope Honorius III gave dispensation to “Joan wife of Leuwelin prince of North Wales, daughter of king John declaring her legitimate, but without prejudice to the king or realm of England”, dated 29 Apr 1226[643].

She and her son David did homage to King Henry III in 1229[644].

The Chronicle of the Princes of Wales records that "William Bruse was hanged by Llywelyn son of Iorewerth, having been caught in the chamber of the prince with the princess Jannet, daughter of King John and wife of the prince" in 1230[645].

The Annales Cambriæ record the death in 1237 of "domina Johanna filia regis Angliæ et uxor Lewilini principis Walliæ" and her burial "apud Haber"[646].

The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “III Kal Apr” in 1236 of “domina Johanna Walliæ, uxor Lewelini, filia regis Johannis et reginæ Clemenciæ”[647].

The Chronicle of the Princes of Wales records that "Dame Joan daughter of king John and the wife of Llywelyn son of Iorwerth" died in Feb 1237 "at the court of Aber and was buried in a new cemetery on the side of the strand which Howel bishop of Llanelwy had consecrated"[648].

m (1205) as his second wife, LLYWELLYN ap Iorwerth Fawr ("the Great") Prince of North Wales, son of IORWERTH Drwyndwyn ("flat nose") Prince of Gwynedd & his wife Marared of Powys ([1173]-1240).

King John had one illegitimate son by Mistress (3): 8. OLIVER (-killed at siege of Damietta 1219, bur Westminster Abbey). The 13th century Histoire des ducs de Normandie et des rois d´Angleterre names "Oliviers li fils le roi Jehan de bas"[649]. He fought against Louis of France during the latter's invasion in 1216/17. He was granted the castle of Tonge, the manor of Erdington and the estate of Hamedon by his half-brother King Henry III. Henry III King of England granted "terris Petri filii Herberti" to "fratri nostro Olivero filio Regis" dated 20 Mar 1217[650]. He joined the Fifth Crusade in 1218[651]. Matthew Paris records, in 1218, the arrival at Damieta in Egypt of “...Olivero filio regis Angliæ”[652]. The Historia Damiatina by Oliverus Scholasticus records the deaths in 1218 at Damieta of "comes de Marcha et comes de Bar et filius eius, frater Guillelmus de Carnoto magister militiæ templi, Herveus de Virsione, Iterius de Tacci, Oliverus filius regis Anglie"[653].

King John had [eleven] illegitimate children by unknown mistresses:

9. GEOFFREY FitzRoy (-1205). An order of King John dated 14 Oct 1200 names "Gaufr filii nostri"[654]. He held the honour of Perche. He headed a band of mercenaries who were embarking for Poitou from Dartmouth in 1205[655]. King John issued an order dated 26 Apr 1205 to "filius noster Gaufredus et Sauarci de Maloleon et Martin Algeis señ ñr Wascoñ"[656].

10. [OSBERT Giffard . Given-Wilson & Curteis name “Osbert Giffard” as an illegitimate son of King John, adding that he “is easily confused with a contemporary of the same name and goes almost unrecorded”[657]. Wrottesley quotes Sandford´s Genealogical History of the Kings and Queens of England which names “Osbert Giffard another base son of King John, to whom his said father in the 17th year of his reign commanded the Sheriff of Oxfordshire to deliver 20 of land of the estate of Thomas de Arden in that county”[658]. The corresponding document which records the command has not been found (it may be in the Close Rolls for the reign of King John, which have not yet been consulted) so it has not been possible to verify whether it specifies the king´s relationship to Osbert Giffard. Without that document, the proof of Osbert´s existence is therefore sparse. Wrottesley assumes that the following document refers to the king´s illegitimate son: "Osbto Giffard" witnessed the charter dated 4 Jul 1216 under which King John granted land to "Salom fil Lesholm de Dovr"[659]. Numerous other documents from King John´s reign name an Osbert Giffard and there appears to be no basis for assuming that the 4 Jul 1216 refers to a different person who was the king´s son. Matthew Paris records the death in 1245 of "Osberti Giffard", without specifying his parentage[660]. Presumably this entry refers to the other Osbert Giffard (see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY).]

11. [GILBERT de Bolum (-after 1245). Matthew Paris records the death in 1245 of "Osberti Giffard, Walteri filii Gilberti de Bolum, fratris eius"[661]. This text suggests that Gilbert de Bolum was the brother of Osbert Giffard. If Osbert´s parentage is correctly stated in the present document, Gilbert could have been another illegitimate son of King John (unless they were uterine brothers only). However, it is possible that this document refers to the other Osbert Giffard who was a member of the main Giffard family (see UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY).] m ---. The name of Gilbert´s wife is not known. Gilbert & his wife had one child: a) WALTER (-1245). Matthew Paris records the death in 1245 of "Osberti Giffard, Walteri filii Gilberti de Bolum, fratris eius"[662].

12. JOHN (-[1242]). Given-Wilson & Curteis name John as an illegitimate son of King John and add that he was “perhaps a clerk at Lincoln, where he was being supported by the custodians of that see in 1201”[663]. The primary source which confirms this information has not been identified. Weir names him “John FitzJohn or Courcy...a knight” and states that he died in 1242[664]. King John sent "fidelem nostrum Regin de Pontibus" to “abbati Belli Loci fri Alan Martell et Magro Arii” to return “de equis nostris de Ricardo filio nostro et de Johanna filia nostra...cum Andr et Elya de Bello Campo et de filio nostro Johe” by charter dated 19 Jun 1214[665].

13. EUDO FitzRoy (-after 1240). King Henry III granted “terram...in Audebir que fuit Willelmi de Abrincis” to “Eudoni filio regis” dated 21 Apr 1233[666].

14. HENRY Fitzroy (-after 16 Sep 1242). Henry III King of England conscripted "…Henricus filius Regis…" for service "in Wasconiam" dated 17 Mar 1226[667]. He received land in Cornwall and married a minor heiress[668]. "Henry the king´s brother" was granted "land late of Henry de la Vaugoz, a Norman…in the soke of Waltham", dated 16 Jul 1230[669]. King Henry III forgave "Henrico filio Regis" scutage from "honore de Gloucestrie de comitatu Devonensi" held "in dotem Eve uxoris sue", dated 16 Sep 1242[670]. m EVE, daughter of --- (-after 16 Sep 1242). King Henry III forgave "Henrico filio Regis" scutage from "honore de Gloucestrie de comitatu Devonensi" held "in dotem Eve uxoris sue", dated 16 Sep 1242[671].

15. BARTHOLOMEW (-after 28 May 1253). Pope Innocent IV granted dispensation to “Bartholomew of the order of Friars Preachers, papal chaplain, brother of King Henry, being an illegitimate son of King John to minister in orders”, dated 28 Dec 1252[672]. Pope Innocent IV appointed “Bartholomew a Friar Preacher, the king´s kinsman to be a papal chaplain”, dated 28 May 1253[673].

16. [RICHARD . Constable of Wallingford Castle 1216. Given-Wilson & Curteis say that he "might possibly have been a different man from the lord of Dover"[674]. On the other hand, he may have been the same person as Richard Earl of Cornwall who was later frequently associated with Wallingford Castle. Henry III King of England issued a notice to "Ricardo filio Regis, fratri suo et Engelardo de Cigony" respecting a grant to "Radulfo Harang" dated 10 May 1217[675]. It is not known whether this entry relates to Richard of Chilham or to this Richard.]

17. [MATILDA (-after 1247, bur Barking). Dugdale´s Monasticon names "Maud natural daughter of King John" was appointed abbess of Barking in 1247[676]. A manuscript (presumably dated to the 15th century) which lists the abbesses of Barking "depuis la fundacion del Hospital de Illeford" names “Matildis filia regis” as successor of “Mabilia de Bosham”[677]. An earlier primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. Abbess of Barking, Essex. A manuscript (presumably dated to the 15th century) records the burials of the abbesses of Barking and includes "Dame Maud la file le Roy John qe gist en la chapele de Salue”[678].]

18. [ISABELLA la Blanche . Given-Wilson & Curteis name “Isabel la Blanche” as a “doubtful” illegitimate child of King John[679]. The primary source which confirms her possiible parentage has not yet been identified.]

19. [--- . Assuming that “nepos” in the source quoted below can be translated as “nephew”, one of Andrew´s parents was an illegitimate child of King John.] m ---. One child: a) ANDREW . Henry III King of England ordered "albiorum austurcum...de Swathed et leporariam...apud Lenn", donated to the king by "Andreas nepos regis" [in forgiveness of debts], to be granted to “Rannulfo Britoni”, dated 6 Aug 1231[680].

20. [son . The precise parentage of Roger, named below, has not been traced. It is assumed that “nephew” in the extract quoted below is a translation of “nepos”. Although the imprecision of that term is notorious, the mention of both King Henry and of his brother Richard in order to define the relationship does suggest that one of his parents may have been their sibling, presumably illegitimate, otherwise the mention of both would seem superfluous in the document. As Roger himself is recorded as being illegitimate, it appears more likely that his relationship with the royal family was on his father´s side of the family as the king´s sister having an illegitimate child would surely have been an event of such scandalous proportions at the time as to have justified reporting in chronicles. Mistress (1) ---. The name of this mistress is not known. --- had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1): a) ROGER de Meulan (-16 Dec 1295, bur Lichfield Cathedral). Pope Gregory IX granted dispensation to “Roger clerk nephew of the king and of Richard earl of Cornwall, already dispensed on account of illegitimacy, to be promoted to a bishopric if he be canonically elected thereto”, dated 24 Dec 1240[681]. Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield [1256/57]. The Annals of Burton record the election “II Kal Feb” 1256 of “dominum Rogerum de Meuleng Lichfeldensis canonicum et domini regis nepotem” as bishop of Coventry and Lichfield[682]. Matthew Paris records the election in 1257 of "magistrum Rogerum de Molend domini regis nepotem" as bishop of Lichfield[683]. The Annals of Dunstable record the death in 1295 of “Rogerus Coventrensis episcopus” and his confirmation to Dunstable of “ecclesiam de Bradeburne” in 1296[684].

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 Douglas Richardson. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. Edited by Kamball G. Everingham. Salt Lake City, Utah: 2013. Volume 1, pages 43-46
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 Charles Cawley. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy. Medieval Lands Database. England Kings Accessed July 8, 2017. jhd
  3. The Present State of Great-Britain and Ireland: In Three Parts ... by Guy Miege pub: 1718
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Mark Duffy, Royal Tombs of Medieval England Mark Duffy, 2003 p. 22, 60-65
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Wikipedia. Croxton Abbey
  7. 7.00 7.01 7.02 7.03 7.04 7.05 7.06 7.07 7.08 7.09 7.10 7.11 7.12 7.13 7.14 7.15 data from linked profile, pending verification
  8. married Llywelyn the Great Welsh name Llywelyn Fawr, (by a woman named Clemence)
  9. 9.00 9.01 9.02 9.03 9.04 9.05 9.06 9.07 9.08 9.09 9.10 9.11 9.12 9.13 Douglas Richardson, Illegitimate children of King John, Royal Ancestry. Volume I, pages 52-57.
  10. by Adela dau. of John's uncle Hamelin de Warenne
  11. by mistress named Hawise who accompanied the papal legate Pelayo to Damietta in 1218, and never returned.
  12. Mother unknown; went on expedition to Poitou in 1205 and died there.
  13. a clerk in 1201.
  14. given lands in Oxfordshire, Norfolk, Suffolk, and Sussex
  15. Last seen at this time.
  16. member of the order of Friars Preachers.
  17. found living in 1263.
  18. FitzRoy is Norman-French for son of the king.
  • "Royal Ancestry" Douglas Richardson, 2013 Vol. I page 85, and 88,vi.
page 85: Children of Edward III of England, by Philippe of Hainault:
page 88.vi.: John Of Gaunt, K.G., Duke of Aquitaine and Lancaster, Earl of Derby, Lincoln, and Leicester, married (1st) Blanche Of Lancaster; (2nd) Constance Of Castile-Leon; (3rd) Katherine De Roet (or Ruet).
  • "Royal Ancestry" 2013 Douglas Richardson Vol. I. page 159
  • "Royal Ancestry" 2013 Douglas Richardson Vol. I. page 197
  • "Royal Ancestry" 2013 Douglas Richardson Vol. I. page 479
  • "Royal Ancestry" 2013 Douglas Richardson Vol. II. page 126
  • "Royal Ancestry" Douglas Richardson, 2013 Vol. V. p. 310
  • Worcester Cathedral King John
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  • Wikipedia: John, King of England Wikipedia John, King of England
  • The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant (1910), Cokayne, George Edward (main author) and Vicary Gibbs (added author), (New edition. 13 volumes in 14. London: St. Catherine Press,1910-), vol. 1 p. 22, 146, 305.
  • [7th edition, 1992] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, Who Came to America Before 1700 (7th edition, 1992), Weis, Frederick Lewis, (7th edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, c1992), FHL book 974 D2w 1992., p. 3 line 1:26, p. 31 line 29A:26, p. 106 line 117:27, p. 234 line 260:29.
  • Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-century Colonists: the Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, Edward II, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies Before 1701 (2nd ed., 1999), Faris, David, (2nd edition. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), FHL book 973 D2fp., p. 278 PLANTAGENET:17, p. 279 PLANTAGENET:16.
  • The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant (1910), Cokayne, George Edward (main author) and Vicary Gibbs (added author), (New edition. 13 volumes in 14. London: St. Catherine Press,1910-), vol. 2 p. 126 fn. (b), 127; vol. 3 p. 430, vol. 4 p. 316; vol. 4 appndx. H chart III; vol. 5 pedigree between p. 116 and 117, 127; vol. 14 p. 60 [BALLIOL].
  • Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families (2004), Richardson, Douglas, edited by Kamball G. Everingham, (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004), FHL book 942 D5rd., p. xxviii.
  • The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant (1910), Cokayne, George Edward (main author) and Vicary Gibbs (added author), (New edition. 13 volumes in 14. London: St. Catherine Press,1910-), vol. 4 p. 316.
  • The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant (1910), Cokayne, George Edward (main author) and Vicary Gibbs (added author), (New edition. 13 volumes in 14. London: St. Catherine Press,1910-), vol. 3 p. 429.
  • Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-century Colonists: the Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, Edward II, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies Before 1701 (2nd ed., 1999), Faris, David, (2nd edition. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), FHL book 973 D2fp., p. 279 PLANTAGENET:16.
  • [7th edition, 1992] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, Who Came to America Before 1700 (7th edition, 1992), Weis, Frederick Lewis, (7th edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, c1992), FHL book 974 D2w 1992., p. 106 line 117:27, p. 134 line 153:28.
  • Welsh Genealogies, AD 300-1400 (1980), Bartrum, Peter C. (Peter Clement), (25 volumes, with supplements containing additions and corrections. [Wales]: University of Wales Press, 1980), FHL book 942.9 D2bp; FHL microfiche 6025561., vol. 7 p. 446.
  • British Chronology, E. B. Fryde Greenway, S. Porter, and I. Roy, (London. Offices of the Royal Historical Society. University College. 1986.), FHL 942 C4rg., p. 51.
  • Heraldic Visitations of Wales and Part of the Marches Between the Years 1586 and 1613 by Lewys Dwnn (1846), Dwnn, Lewys; transcribed and edited with notes by Sir Samuel Rush Meyrick, (2 volumes. Llandovery: William Rees, 1846), FHL book 942.9 D23d; FHL microfilm 176,668., vol. 2 p. 10, 54, 55.
  • Pedigrees of Anglesey and Carnarvonshire Families: with Their Collateral Branches in Denbighshire, Merionethshire (1914), Griffith, John Edwards, (Horncastle, England: W.K. Morton, 1914), FHL book Folio 942.9 D2gr; FHL microfilm 468,334., p. I, 178, 309.
  • The Genealogist (1980-), Association for the Promotion of Scholarship in Genealogy, (New York: Organization for the Promotion of Scholarship in Genealogy, 1980-), FHL book 929.105 G286n., Spring 1980, vol. 1 no. 1 p. 80, 81.
  • British Genealogy (filmed 1950), Evans, Alcwyn Caryni, (Books A to H. National Library of Wales MSS 12359-12360D. Manuscript filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1950), FHL microfilms 104,355 and 104,390 item 2., book 5 p. E52; book 6 p. F2*.
  • The Golden Grove books of pedigrees (filmed 1970), (Manuscript, National Library of Wales manuscript number Castell Gorfod 7. Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1950), FHL microfilms 104,349-104,351., book 5 p. C623.
  • Genealogy of Shropshire [by Joseph Morris] (filmed 1966), Morris, Joseph, (10 volumes. Manuscript filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1966), vol. 1-2 FHL microfilm 504,551; vol.3-4 FHL microf., vol. 4 p. 1882*, 1883*.
  • Pedigrees of Anglesey and Carnarvonshire Families: with Their Collateral Branches in Denbighshire, Merionethshire (1914), Griffith, John Edwards, (Horncastle, England: W.K. Morton, 1914), FHL book Folio 942.9 D2gr; FHL microfilm 468,334., p. I.
  • [S2411] #11915 British Genealogy (filmed 1950), Evans, Alcwyn Caryni, (Books A to H. National Library of Wales MSS 12359-12360D. Manuscript filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1950), FHL microfilms 104,355 and 104,390 item 2., book 6 p. F2.
  • The Genealogist (1980-), Association for the Promotion of Scholarship in Genealogy, (New York: Organization for the Promotion of Scholarship in Genealogy, 1980-), FHL book 929.105 G286n., Spring 1980, vol. 1 no. 1 p. 80.
  • Heraldic Visitations of Wales and Part of the Marches Between the Years 1586 and 1613 by Lewys Dwnn (1846), Dwnn, Lewys; transcribed and edited with notes by Sir Samuel Rush Meyrick, (2 volumes. Llandovery: William Rees, 1846), FHL book 942.9 D23d; FHL microfilm 176,668., vol. 2 p. 10.
  • Genealogy of Shropshire [by Joseph Morris] (filmed 1966), Morris, Joseph, (10 volumes. Manuscript filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1966), vol. 1-2 FHL microfilm 504,551; vol.3-4 FHL microf., vol. 4 p. 1882, 1883.
  • The Genealogist (1877-1922), (Old Series, 7 volumes, 1877-1883. New Series, 38 volumes, 1884-1922. London: George Bell, 1877-1922), FHL book 942 B2gqm; see FHL catalog for list of vo., Spring 1980, vol. 1 no. 1 p. 91 fn. 21.
  • Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-century Colonists: the Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, Edward II, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies Before 1701 (2nd ed., 1999), Faris, David, (2nd edition. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), FHL book 973 D2fp., p. 279
  • Records of the Borough of Nottingham (London, 1882) Vol. 1, Page 6-10: "Charter of John, Earl of Mortain, confirming the Charter of his father, King Henry II. [Circa 1189]"
  • Deering, Charles. Nottinghamia Vetus et Nova (George Ayscough & Thomas Willington, Nottingham, 1751) Page 237


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Memories: 2

On 27 Jan 2018 Vicki (McCrory) Kennedy wrote:

In August of 1200 John swept into Angoulême and stole 12 year old Isabella, the young bride to be of Hugh de Lusignan. John took the girl to Bordeaux and married her. (Information taken from “The Plantagenets, The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England,” by Dan Jones.)


On 3 Dec 2011 Roger Wehr wrote:

Name: King John

Born: December 24, 1166 at Beaumont Palace : Oxford Parents: Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine Relation to Elizabeth II: 21st great-grandfather House of: Angevin Ascended to the throne: April 6, 1199 aged 32 years Crowned: May 27, 1199 at Westminster Abbey Married: 1) Isabella of Gloucester, (annulled 1199), (2) Isabella, Daughter of Count of Angouleme Children: Two sons including Henry III, three daughters and several illegitimate children Died: October 18, 1216 at Newark Castle, aged 49 years, 9 months, and 24 days Buried at: Worcester Reigned for: 17 years, 6 months, and 13 days Succeeded by: his son Henry III

John was nicknamed Lackland, probably because, as the youngest of Henry II's five sons, it was difficult to find a portion of his father's French possessions for him to inherit. He was acting king from 1189 during his brother Richard the Lion-Heart's absence on the Third Crusade. The legend of Robin Hood dates from this time in which John is portrayed as Bad King John. He was involved in intrigues against his absent brother, but became king in 1199 when Richard was killed in battle in France.

Most of his reign was dominated by war with France. Following the peace treaty of Le Goulet there was a brief peace, but fighting resumed again in 1202. John had lost Normandy and almost all the other English possessions in France to Philip II of France by 1204. He spent the next decade trying to regain these without success and was finally defeated by Philip Augustus at the Battle of Bouvines in 1214. He was also in conflict with the Church. In 1205 he disputed the pope's choice of Stephen Langton as archbishop of Canterbury, and Pope Innocent III placed England under an interdict, suspending all religious services, including baptisms, marriages, and burials. John retaliated by seizing church revenues, and in 1209 was excommunicated. Eventually, John submitted, accepting the papal nominee, and agreed to hold the kingdom as a fief of the papacy; an annual monetary tribute was paid to the popes for the next 150 years by successive English monarchs.

His repressive policies and ruthless taxation to fund the warin France brought him into conflict with his barons which became known as the Barons War. In 1215 rebel baron leaders marched on London where they were welcomed by an increasing band of defectors from John’s royalist supporters. Their demands were drawn up in a document which became the known as the Magna Carta. John sort peace and met them at Runnymede where on 15th June 1215 he agreed to their demands and sealed the Magna Carta. It was a remarkable document which set limits on the powers of the king, laid out the feudal obligations of the barons, confirmed the liberties of the Church, and granted rights to all freemen of the realm and their heirs for ever. It was the first written constitution. Read and view the Magna Carta.

His concessions did not buy peace for long and the Barons War continued. The barons sought French aid and Prince Louis of France landed in England supported by attacks from the North by Alexander II of Scotland. John fled and according to legend lost most of his baggage and the crown jewels when crossing the tidal estuaries of the Wash. He became ill with dysentery and died at Newark Castle in October 1216.




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On 25 Jun 2019 at 08:24 GMT Madelaine (Bates) Kirke MA wrote:

A number of the images are duplicates.

On 31 May 2019 at 15:48 GMT William Catambay wrote:

FitzRoy is Norman/French for Son of the King, but was it really the LNAB for most of his children? Why wouldn't their LNAB be Plantagenet? Assuming someone does have a good answer for that, I think it would be helpful to have that reasoning somewhere in the profile, otherwise it's confusing.

On 28 Apr 2019 at 03:47 GMT Marty (Lenover) Acks wrote:

<ref name=Ashley/> has no anchor reference.

On 2 Dec 2018 at 13:15 GMT RJ Horace wrote:

His alleged mistress "Isabella FitzRobert" seems to be the same person as his 1st wife, Isabel of Gloucester.

The FitzWarin mistress, Oliver's mother, is FitzWarin-22.

On 27 Jan 2018 at 14:49 GMT Vicki (McCrory) Kennedy wrote:

In August of 1200 John swept into Angoulême and stole 12 year old Isabella, the young bride to be of Hugh de Lusignan. John took the girl to Bordeaux and married her. (Information taken from “The Plantagenets, The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England,” by Dan Jones.)

On 7 Jul 2017 at 01:04 GMT John Atkinson wrote:

Joan, Lady of Wales is on WikiTree as FitzJohn-120 but maybe you have already realised that?

On 6 Jul 2017 at 18:04 GMT Jack Day wrote:

I've taken on reviewing, documenting and enhancing this profile under Euroaristo's Conquer the Conquerer subproject. If anyone has suggestions, recommendations or warnings for me as I look at this profile, please let me know!

On 5 May 2017 at 14:17 GMT Andrew Lancaster wrote:

"Legend of Robin Hood is born." :)

On 5 May 2017 at 14:12 GMT Andrew Lancaster wrote:

Why call him "I" is there was no "II"?

On 5 Apr 2017 at 05:27 GMT Andrea (Stawski) Pack wrote:

Need to look at this please

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John is 23 degrees from Carroll Shelby, 31 degrees from Joan Whitaker and 10 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.