Jacob Prickett Sr.

Jacob Prickett Sr. (abt. 1722 - aft. 1797)

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Capt. Jacob "Jake" Prickett Sr.
Born about in Burlington County, Province of New Jerseymap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married (to ) in Mount Holly, Burlington County, Province of New Jerseymap
Descendants descendants
Died after in , Hamilton County, Northwest Territory, United States of Americamap
Profile last modified | Created 6 Aug 2010 | Last significant change: 12 Oct 2018
18:26: Patricia (Prickett) Hickin edited the Biography for Jacob Prickett Sr.. [Thank Patricia for this]
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Categories: Virginia Colony | American Revolution | Monongalia County, West Virginia | Prickett Fort Cemetery, Marion County, West Virginia | Prickett's Fort, Marion County, West Virginia | French and Indian War | US Pioneers and Settlers | Mount Holly, New Jersey.

Capt. Jacob Prickett Sr. served during the American Revolution
Service started:
Unit(s):
Service ended:
This profile is part of the Monongalia County, West Virginia One Place Study.

Contents

Biography

English flag
Jacob Prickett Sr. has English ancestors.
Flag of New Jersey
Jacob Prickett Sr. migrated from New Jersey to Virginia.
Flag of Virginia
For Prickett family resources click here.
For information on New Jersey Friends' meetings, click here.
N.B. The profile for Jacob Prickett (Prickett-484) (which has been merged with Prickett-2) originally showed Jacob's father as John Wales Prickett and I see no evidence that there ever was any such person. It also showed Jacob's mother as Rachel Elizabeth Robinson Prickett whereas we have some evidence showing that his mother's given name was Martha.
It showed his siblings as:
  1. Isaac Prickett, b1714
  2. Abraham A Prickett, b1716
  3. Mary (Prickett) Foster, b1718
  4. Martha Prickett, b1719
  5. Hannah Prickett, b1720
  6. Sarah Prickett, b1721
  7. John Prickett, b1723
  8. Elias Prickett, b1730.
N.B. There is a joint tombstone for Jacob and Dorothy Springer Prickett in Prickett Fort Cemetery, but Jacob himself, who died on the Ohio -- probably in Hamilton County, Northwest Territory (present-day Brown County, Ohio) -- is not buried in the Prickett Fort Cemetery. His place of burial, in fact, is not known.[1]
Jacob ("Jake") was born about 1722 in Burlington County, New Jersey, perhaps the seventh of ten known children and perhaps the youngest of four sons of John and Martha Unknown Prickett.
On 11 May1745, when he was in his earlier twenties, he married Dorothy Springer in Mount Holly, Burlington County, and they had eleven children, six sons and five daughters:
  1. Josiah Prickett
  2. John Prickett
  3. Mary (Prickett) Lucas
  4. Isaac Prickett
  5. Mary Drusilla (Prickett) Morgan
  6. Martha (Prickett) Parker
  7. Isaiah Prickett
  8. Jacob Prickett Jr.
  9. Dorothy (Prickett) Dunn
  10. Nancy Ann (Prickett) Bunner
  11. James Prickett Sr.
Jacob died of unknown causes after October 1797, probably in Hamilton County, Northwest Territory (now Brown County, Ohio, He was in his later seventies.
Prickett's Fort - inside
With the help of two brothers, Jacob and his friend David Morgan built Prickett's Fort near the Monongahela River in 1774 in present-day West Virginia. It provided protection against the Indians for many families in the area before it fell into disuse at the end of the eighteenth century. A fancy version was constructed as a state park for the Bicentennial of American independence and is located near the site of the original fort.
Interior view of reconstructed Prickett's Fort

by Patricia Prickett Hickin, a 4x great-granddaughter

Special note

!!N.B. Among Jacob's siblings was Isaac Prickett (1715-1785), whom you can find here. There is a good deal of uncertainty as to who the parents of Jacob and his siblings were and therefore some of them appear in Wikitree more than once. If you have any conclusive proof, please get in touch!!. Prickett-120 11:34, 23 September 2017 (EDT).

Youth

Jacob "Jake" Prickett was born in 1722 in Burlington County, New Jersey, (about 20 miles northeast of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) to John Prickett, II, and Martha, whose maiden name is unknown. He was descended from English Quakers who had migrated to New Jersey in the early days of the colony. (Some researchers say Jacob "Jake" Prickett was the son of John and Sarah Prickett, but there is documentation for his mother's name being Martha (though her maiden name is unknown). And his place of birth is sometimes given as Wilmington, Delaware, but that is probably a mistake as well.)
Jacob’s first known ancestor, his great-grandfather John Prickett, I, was by trade a London “cordwainer” (a cordwainer is one who makes shoes from soft leather). One of George Fox’s early converts to what became the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), John was taken to court on more than one occasion for attending their meetings.

(John had a hard life: although perhaps born in Gloucester, England, he was living in London when the Great Plague of 1665-66 killed 15% of the city's residents; only to be followed by the Great Fire of London in February 1666, which destroyed seven-eighths of the city’s residences, probably including his own home, and that same month he himself was sentenced to be transported to Jamaica for seven years for attending yet another Quaker meeting.)

But by 1671 he was somehow back in London in time to father a son named Josiah (probably Jacob's grand-father), who was born in May 1672 -- or perhaps with all the catastrophes, he managed to avoid being sent away in the first place. A decade or more later he probably migrated to New Jersey with his wife, (name unknown), and their two sons, Josiah and Zachariah (b1674). They are sometimes said to have arrived via the ship Amity from Bristol to Pennsylvania but there is no proof. There is no record of their migration and the first evidence we have of their being in America is in 1693 when "The marriage betweene Thomas Wilson & Anne Silver was solemnized the Sixth day of July, 1693, at the House of Joseph [i.e., Josiah] Prickett, in Burlington, before Tho: Revell, Secry. & Regr . . . .”
Josiah was a butcher and baker and, apparently, an impecunious sort as he is mentioned as a debtor in several New Jersey wills in the early 1700s. Although we are told by a Haines family historian that Zachariah, on the other hand, "is said to have brought with him a large estate, and invested largely in real estate," this is unlikely as he would have been too young. Nevertheless both brothers owned property in the 1690s and Zachariah, unlike Josiah, does seem to have prospered. Both brothers had a son named John and the only reason we think that Jacob's father, John, was the son of Josiah is that none of “our” John’s descendants was named Zachariah.
Thus we think that "our John" was the son of Josiah, and thus it was "our John" who was apprenticed to serve his “uncle, Zachariah Prickett until he shall reach the age of twenty years” (though we don’t know the trade that he was apprenticed in). However, upon completion of his training he was to be given “one breeding mare and the increase thereof, plus £20 at age 20,” which suggests he was apprenticed in some form of husbandry. John was later described as a “yeoman farmer.” (However, there is also a John Prickett who became a shoemaker who would seem to be of the right age). In any case, “our” John married a Martha (maiden name unknown) and became the father of our Jacob (and, yes, not surprisingly, there were other Jacobs).
John and Martha, parents of "our Jacob," had a dozen or so children, and Jacob was probably the eighth of thirteen; his brothers and sisters were named Isaac, Abraham, John, Elias, and Josiah, Ann, Hannah, Sarah, Mary, Drusilla, and Martha. And there was possibly (though I think not probably) an Isobel, who is said to have been male, whose birth date is not given and who is said to have died in 1721.[2]
We know nothing of Jacob’s early life except that It has been said that he served as a spy for the Virginia militia before he came of age. If that is true, it would mean that he was in Virginia by the early 1740s.
In appearance and temperament, Jacob has been described as 5' 10" in height (fairly tall for that date), about 180 pounds in weight, with stiff black hair and "snappy black eyes." He was of "even temperament -- slow to anger but sometimes very stubborn." Perhaps he looked a little like another Jacob, who lived about a hundred years later and whose relationship to "our Jacob" (who was probably clean-shaven) is unknown. See Jacob Prickett, 1813-1903.
He may have lived in Virginia before his 1745 marriage in his early 20s to Dorothy Springer, whose parents are unknown but who was probably the sister of Jacob’s brother-in-law Dennis Springer, who had married Ann Prickett (thought to have been Jacob's sister although there is no documentary proof) almost a decade earlier.
Jacob’s father, a yeoman farmer, signed a customary marriage bond for £500. Dorothy may have been older than Jacob. Some family historians say she was born in 1716,[3] though her tombstone gives a date of 1726.
At one time, there were Springer genealogies claiming a royal lineage for Dorothy and her forebears and giving that as the reason for the bond. That story, however, has since been proven false.
Actually, a £500 marriage bond was standard fare in colonial New Jersey. "It was secured by the prospective groom, (& co-signer) to insure that the marriage was on the up & up, (nobody already married, underage, etc.). No money changed hands, but the groom and co-signer were liable for that amount if a problem arose." (See [NJGF] Digest Number 3428, 27 Nov 2014.)
It now seems likely that Dorothy was descended from a Dennis Springer of Connecticut. More will be upcoming about that within the next few months in her Wikitree biography. PPH 11/25/2014
Jacob and Dorothy were married on May 11, 1745, at Evesham Monthly Meeting, Burlington, New Jersey.
It has been said that Jacob loved children and children loved him. He must have been happy that Dorothy was soon pregnant with their first child: Josiah was born in October 1746. During the decade that followed his marriage, Jacob fathered six of his eventual eleven children, three boys and three girls. As we shall see, he was to have a remarkably healthy family.

A story illustrative of Jacob’s love of children as told by Glenn Lough in Now and Long Ago, p116:

A local history enthusiast in the 19th century interviewed a Mrs. Keziah Batten Shearer, born at the site of Rivesville (near Prickett’s Fort) in 1776, speaking of the “old days, when she was growing up, when the country was all Indians, showed him a button on a leather string (he had seen it many times before); she said that Jacob Prickett had given it to her at a party when she was ten years old, and said it was off the warmus (heavy jacket) that he wore when he was a little boy in Delaware, and that it had fallen off his warmus when he went to the ocean with his uncle, which was not many miles from his uncle's home. The button was of carved sea-shell, blue and white, with three holes in it, and about the size of a dime. Mrs. Shearer told how, when she was little, Mr. Prickett would hold her on his lap when he came to visit, and laugh and tell her and the other children about "Sillybub-ketchie-boo" that lived in a cave in the mountains and would give her a trinket if she could "slip up onto it and sprinkle some salt on its tail."

Early career

For a larger, clearer view of the map below, click here.

Jacob lived near his sister, who lived at Hog Bottom
It is usually thought that Jacob and Dorothy moved to Virginia in the spring of 1747, a few months after Josiah's birth. They settled on Back Creek less than a half-mile north of present-day

Glengary, Berkeley County, West Virginia, about a dozen miles north of Winchester, Virginia. Jacob's brother Abraham and two sisters Ann Prickett Springer and Mary Prickett Chenoweth also moved with their growing families to the Back Creek area; the order in which they arrived is unknown. A number of other settlers from New Jersey also arrived in the area in the same decades. For a larger, clearer view of the plat below, click here.

Plat showing locations of Prickett and Springer land on Back Creek in present-day Berkeley County, WV.
  • For the Wikipedia article on Back Creek, click here.
  • For a short video of a 19th century bridge that spans the creek, with some nice views of the swollen creek, click here.


Dennis and Ann Prickett Springer lived at Hog Bottom in the lower left, to the right of the bulge in the road and to the left of the bulge in the creek. The area was so-named for the droves of wild hogs that came to feast on the wild pea vines that grew in abundance there. Jacob seems to have lived on adjoining land.


Plat of Dennis Springer's Hog Bottom land, with north to the right
A photograph made about 2005 of Hog Bottom, looking east.

Expedition to the Monongahela

It is obvious that Jacob was an adventurous young man. Like a number of other Quakers, he was an Indian trader, and he was interested in the frontier.
Among Jacob’s Virginia friends was a Nathaniel Springer, probably his wife’s cousin. In late April 1747 the two of them joined several other men on an expedition for George Washington’s half-brother Lawrence Washington,
Lawrence Washington, 1718-1752
who was interested in obtaining a claim to western lands. The expedition was led by one Michael Cresap, a son of the noted explorer Col. Thomas Cresap.
An interesting incident occurred on the journey, when one of the men was bitten by a rattlesnake. It was recounted in a deposition by Nathaniel Springer:
"[Pharoah] Ryley was snake-bit and thought he would die, . . . people did pray day and night for Ryley's recovery though he [was delirious] at times, when [Evan] Morgan would hold him and sooth[e] him with songs and prayers to prevent his hurting himself. And . . . this Deponent cut open and suckled the wound and doctored it with herbs and Ryley recovered, he sayeth, Thanks be to God, as was most remarkable, as the rattlesnake was old and wrothy and the sting was high on poor Ryley's thigh.” (For more details of their expedition, click here.)
Gov. Thomas Lee
The expedition must have brought back a favorable report for in 1748, Lawrence and Augustine Washington and Thomas Lee (of the prominent Lee family in Virginia) organized the Ohio Company of Virginia to represent investors eager to profit from the settlement of the Ohio River area and trade with the natives. The Company obtained a land grant of half a million acres from the Crown and in 1752 made a treaty with the main tribes of Indians in the area.
(It has been said that Jacob and other members of the original expedition lived near what is now Rivesville, on the Monongahela, in the 1740s. It is conceivable that Jacob hoped to be among the first one hundred families the company promised to settle on the lands of their 200,000-acre grant.) ) As we shall see, Jacob seems to have been in the area and “keeping up” with Winchester prices as early as 1750.
It is also said that in 1752 Jacob again explored the Ohio/Monongahela area, this time with the famed explorer Christopher Gist, a surveyor chosen by the Ohio Company to head the expedition. And it is also reported that in 1753, just before the French and Indian War, Jacob was recruited by twenty-two year old Lt. Colonel George Washington to go with him to the Forks of the Ohio (the location of present-day Pittsburgh) at the time when Washington delivered a letter from Governor Dinwiddie requesting the French to vacate the Ohio Valley.)
Washington's map, accompanying his Journal to the Ohio (1753–1754)
With both the English and the French intent on fortifying at the forks of the Ohio, they soon clashed and fighting broke out in western Pennsylvania in 1754. The formation of the Ohio Company had thus led directly to the outbreak of the French and Indian War. For additional background information about the conflict, click here.
To what extent, if any, Jacob in those days honored his Quaker pacifist heritage is unknown but he apparently had left it behind him by the time the war was in full swing. It has been said that he was at
Fort Necessity, Fayette County, PA
Fort Necessity in 1754, but his name does not appear on the muster roll of the Virginia Regiment serving under George Washington during the Fort Necessity campaign.
It has also been said that Jacob and his good friend David Morgan both fought under Gen. Edward Braddock in the disastrous march on Fort Duquesne in July 1755, and fought in other battles of the war. (Click here for Morgan’s Wikitree profile]
We do have documentary proof that Jacob served in the Frederick County militia as a private under the command of a Captain Thomas Speak and that at some point in the war, he began serving as a sergeant in Zackquill Morgan’s Company. (Zackquill was David Morgan’s younger brother. In 1765 Zackquil married Jacob’s niece Drusilla Springer.) And it is also said that Jacob was at Fort Pitt with Morgan in 1760.
Statue of Col. Zackquill Morgan,
recently erected in Morgantown
Despite his military activities – or perhaps in conjunction with them--, Jacob apparently found time in 1759 to operate an Indian trading post at the mouth of what became known as Pricketts Creek, on the Monongahela River about 10 miles southwest of present-day Morgantown, WV.
Apparently there are papers that show Jacob was "keeping up" on Winchester prices as early as 1750. Glenn Lough, in his Now and Long Ago wrote: "In 1909, Fernando Prickett, of Rivesville, made inquiry--by mail--

of William Twyman Williams, a theologian and Frederick County, Virginia, genealogist (see Cartmell's History of Frederick County, Virginia, p. 505), concerning his ancestor, Jacob Prickett, Sr., who, in the 1750's, was a resident of Frederick County, Virginia, which resulted in the acquirement by Prickett of certain informative papers which Williams titled 'Mercantile Reports of Winchester, Virginia.'

"This writer [Glenn Lough] made copies of these papers, which show that Jacob Prickett, Sr., served, at various times, in the French and Indian War, and, in 1759, was engaged in the Indian trade, on the Monongahela River. During this while he exchanged furs and skins received from the Indians on the Monongahela and Ohio rivers for trade-goods and money, dealing with various merchants at Winchester, Virginia—Robert Rutherford, James Wood (Col. James Wood, founder of Winchester), and others. The accounts show that he was trading principally on the upper Monongahela, and had 'a post' here. . . Col. James Wood died November 6, 1759, but 'the firm' must have continued doing business under his name for some time afterwards. . . . Other traders, doing business in the 1740's-1750's, and later, on the Monongahela River, and in the Ohio Valley, were: Josiah Springer, . . . Evan Morgan, Nathaniel Springer, . . ., etc. . . (Mercantile Reports of Winchester, Virginia.)
"In a survey of Pricketts Creek land (Meadowdale tract) made by David Morgan for Nathan Springer in 1772, a corner is designated as 'Pricketts Post.' As Pricketts Fort was not built until 1774, this writer assumes that this corner was the location of Jacob Prickett’s trading post in 1759."
Here are two lists found among [the effects of Henry Prickett] (These lists were found with other papers in a small chest which belonged, first, to Jacob Prickett, Sr., and later became the property of his daughter-in-law, Charity Taylor Prickett, who after the death of her first husband, Josiah Prickett, became the wife of William Jolliffe. They were 'handed down’ in the family, and finally became the property of Henry Prickett, who, in his old age, gave them to Fernando Prickett.
  • (Dollars and cents have been substituted for pence, shilings, and pounds, in the proper equivalents.)

Arithmetic, 67 cents; Saddle, $4.17; I stand of bees, 1.00; 3 Pots, 52 cents; Axe, 79 cents; Musket, $2.00; Crosscut saw, $2.21; Wool, a pound, 11 cents; Wagon, $28.00; Cow, $4.00; Horse, $10.00; Hog, right for butchering, 50 ants; 12 glass bottles, 231/2 cents; Coat and breeches, fine road cloth, $20.00; Calico, a yard, 33 cents; Deerskin, hair n, 50 cents; 1,000 feet boards, $50.00; Indenture slave, bite, to serve five years, $101.00; Nails, a pound, 10 cents; Handkerchief, 27 cents; Labor, a day, 25 cents; Carpenter, a day, 42 cents; Whiskey, a quart, 25 cents; Peach brandy, a gallon, 25 cents; lead, a pound, 111/2 cents; Coffin, for slave, white or black, 25 cents; Coffin, for Mr. Booth, $2.00; Gazette, a year, $5.00; Courthouse rent a year, $15.00; Shoes, fairly made, $3.00; School tuition, a quarter (about 3 months), $1.00; A speller (spelling book), $1.00; A year of shaves at O'rett's shop, $3.00; Rent of house a year, $15.00; 2 slaves, black, girls about 2 years of age, $50.00, with mother, past 25 years of age, $200.00; Butter, a pound, 5 cents; pork, a pound, 2 cents; Gunpowder, Spanish, a pound, 45 1/2 cents; Corn, a barrel, $1.00; Raisins, a pound, 25 cents; Tea, a pound, $1.25; Town lot, $35.50; Salt, a bushel, 30 &40 cents...

From Glenn Lough, Now and Long Ago, pp102-103.

"The most that can be determined about the Indians that [Jacob] traded with are that they most likely were of Algonquin, Iroquois, or Appalachian stock. That is to say, they could have been Delaware, Shawnee, Mohawk, Senecas etc. and there is substantial evidence of several major Indian Villages, or campsites within a few miles of Jacob's trading post."
The war ended in 1763 with the British victorious and their possession of all North America east of the Mississippi (except Florida) formally acknowledged by the French. But there were problems with the Indians. In 1764, as an Indian uprising under the leadership of Pontiac raged, the British decided to take the fight directly to the Indians by marching an army against the Shawnee and Delaware towns located immediately west of the Ohio River.
Col. Henry Bouquet, 1719-1765
Leading the fifteen hundred-man force was Colonel Henry Bouquet, a Swiss born veteran of the French and Indian War who had become commander of Fort Pitt. When Jacob, now a militia sergeant, learned of the proposed campaign, he along with twenty other members of the Frederick county militia decided to enlist. Problems arose when their former commanding officer, Colonel Adam Stephen, learned what Prickett and the others had in mind. Stephen tried to convince the men not to enlist by describing Bouquet's plan as a "very foolish scheme." When persuasion failed to dissuade the men from joining Bouquet, Stephen threatened to withhold their militia pay. Late in September 1764, several groups of volunteers from Virginia joined Bouquet's army on an expedition into central Ohio, but whether Jacob was among them is unknown to me.
Deposition: in regard to Zackquill Morgan's attempt to join Col. Bouquet and Adam Stephen's opposition to same, 17 Aug 1764, Frederick County, VA.

“This day came Jacob Prickett before me[,] One of his Majesty’s Justices of the peace for the said County[,] and made Oath that he was a sergeant of Frederick militia lately under the Command of Captain Zaquet [sic., i.e., Zackquill] Morgan, from the time they were Raised till Disbanded[.] that upon their being Disbanded, Capt. Morgan made use of his Interest with the men to go with him to Col. John [sic., i.e., Henry??] Bouquet & had prevailed upon Twenty odd to enlist themselves under him for that purpose, that the day after they were Discharged Capt. Morgan & most of the Men were at a public place where they mett with Col: Stephen, who understanding the Design Capt[.] Morgan had of Joyning Col: Bouquet endeavoured to perswade them of[f?] from it by representing that it was a very foolish scheme, but when he found that it had no effect he publickly Declared that if any Man or Officer should Join Col. Bouquet contrary to his Inclination they should never bear a Commission or be employed by him. And that if it lay in his power they should Receive no pay for the services they had done & further saith not.“ Given under my Hand this 17th day of August 1764[.] Tho Rutherford

Moving west

It is clear that Jacob liked what he saw of the west, and after the French and Indian War he moved his family into the new country. They lived there in two known locations after leaving Frederick County.
One was on George’s Creek about 20 miles northeast of present-day Morgantown, and the other was south of Morgantown about 12 miles up the Monongahela. There are deeds and several depositions in regard to these settlements, but the time sequence of their residence is nevertheless a bit murky.
According to a deposition made by Indian martyr Col. William Crawford a few years later (Click here for Crawford’s Wikitree profile) Jacob, in 1766, together with Zackquill Morgan (the founder of present-day Morgantown, West Virginia), and James Chew (the younger son of Thomas and Martha Taylor Chew of the prominent Thomas Chew family of Orange County, Virginia) settled on the Monongahela.
Chart showing Capt. Jacob Prickett's family connections with Lt. Col. William Crawford
Jacob's nephew Uriah married Crawford's daughter Sarah

(Click on the chart to see an enlarged version.)

And Glenn Lough, in his history of Marion County, WV, Now and Long Ago, writes, "James Chew . . sold to Joseph Tomlinson . . . on the dividing ridge between the West Fork River and Buffalo Creek . . .[his] original settlement-right, claimed by Chew in 1766. Dennis Springer, Sr. is known to have had a prior claim here, which he relinquished to James Chew, Zackwell Morgan, and Jacob Prickett. Here on the old Springer Claim, Chew, Morgan, and Prickett first lived in the upper Monongahela Valley, while they sought out lands on which to make more advantageous settlements. From here, Chew, Morgan, and Prickett, moved onto lands at now Rivesville, the present Morgan settlement, and the old Pricketts Fort settlement."
The West Fork is at the bottom; Buffalo Creek is just north of Fairmont. The forks of the Monongahela River can be seen at the bottom center left.
But there is also evidence that in 1766, Jacob moved his family to George’s Creek (between present-day Uniontown, Pennsylvania, and, Morgantown, West Virginia).

An early 20th-century postcard showing George's Creek.

He made no official claim of settlement, however, probably because the move violated the Royal Proclamation of 1763, which forbade settlement west of the Allegheny Mountains, and was therefore illegal. Not until the fall of 1768 was the proclamation line adjusted westward to the Ohio River. Jacob received a grant for his George’s Creek land about 1771.
John Boback, a leading authority on the West Virginia frontier writes that "Jacob Prickett’s 1766 land claim was in present Fayette County, Pennsylvania. I can point out where it was located. Captain William Crawford had it wrong in his deposition."
Below, William Crawford’s deposition in regard to settlements in the area:
Date of deposition 10 Mar 1777}
([In the Fall of 1765 Captain (afterwards Colonel) William Crawford settled on the west bank of the Youghiogheny at Stewart's Crossings, PA. A deposition sworn by him, and having reference to his settlement there and some other matters is as follows:
"Colonel William Crawford, Deposeth and saith, that his first acquaintance with the Country on the Ohio was in the year 1758, he then being an officer in the Virginia Service. That between that time and the year 1765, a number of Settlements were made on the Public Roads in that Country by Permi[ss]ion of the Several Commanding Officers at Fort Pitt. That in the Fall of the Year 1765 he made some Improvements on the West Side of the Alleghany [sic.] Mountains, in the Spring of the year following he setled and has continued to live out here ever since. That, before that time, and in that year, a Considerable number of Settlements were made, he thinks near three hundred, without Permission from any Commanding Officer, some of which settlements were made within the Limits of the Indiana Company's Claim, and some others within Col: Croghan's. From that time to the present, the people continued to emigrate to this Country very fast. The Deponent being ask'd by Mr Morgan, if he knows the names of those who settled on the Indiana Claim, in the year 1766 ? and on what Waters ? Answers that Zachel [sic.] Morgan, James Chew, and Jacob Prickett, came out in that year, and was inform'd by them, that they settled up the Monongahala [sic.], that he has since seen Zachel Morgan[‘]s plantation, which is on the South side of the line, run by Mason and Dixon, and that he believes that to be the first settlement he made in this Country, and always understood the before mentioned Persons lived in his Neighborhood but that he himself was never within the Limits of the Indiana Claim, untill the year 1771, or about that time. The Deponant being asked by W Morgan, if he knew or ever heard of any Settlements besides those before mentioned being made in the Indiana Claim, prior to the Treaty at Fort Stanwix Answers, that he understood James Booth set[t]led there before that time, but does not know of any others. "Being farther ask'd if those settlements were not made contrary to orders of Government Answers, that all the Settlements made to the westward of the Allegheny Mountains at that time, were contrary to the Orders of Government."*9*
We also know that Jacob was in Frederick County, at least temporarily, in the spring of 1766 because on 8 May he was a “Chain carrier: with Josiah Springer for John Neavill grant on drains of Back Creek adjoining Aaron Jenkins & Rich'd Stephenson.” Although Jacob never obtained a deed for his Back Creek land, it is referred to on 06 August 1766 as being next to Abraham Sutton’s “adjoining Philip Dorset, now Sutton's and Springer's land and Jacob Prickett's.” [4]
And two years later, for some unspecified reason having to do with the military, the Virginia General Assembly granted “Jacob Pricket” and other Frederick County men 4 shillings each on one occasion and 9 shillings on another (though it did not specify when or for what purpose the services were rendered).
In the mid 1760s, during those years when Jacob settled on George's Creek, he seems to have been carrying on his Indian trade on the Monongahela, probably in conjunction with his older brother Isaac (1714-1785). Glenn Lough has written, "In 1766, the Shawnee clan . . . maintained a hunting and trading camp in present Union District, Marion County, between Burnt Cabin Run and Glady Creek [about a dozen miles south of the spot where Pricketts Fort would later be located] . . . . These Shawnees and other Indians had been living here during the summer months for many years, and were on friendly terms with the few white settlers and traders, among them Jacob and Isaac Prickett, Nathaniel Springer, , , , etc., who lived and traded in the area."
We know that on Christmas Eve, 1771, Jacob sold his Georges Creek homestead to Philip Pierce of Hampshire County, Virginia, and that in February 1772, the Prickett family moved south, up the Monongahela River to the mouth of a clear-flowing creek which would soon bear their family name. Somewhere near the mouth of Pricketts Creek, Jacob built his cabin.
Jacob was thus one of the first permanent settlers of present-day Marion County. As the decade of the 1770s opened, his friend David Morgan also established himself on the Monongahela north of present-day Fairmont. Among others settling nearby “were families by the names of Ice, Hall, Cochran, Hayes, Cunningham, Hartley, Barns, Haymond, Fleming, and Springer, whose descendants” together with the Pricketts and Morgans came to comprise a large proportion of the later population of the surrounding area.
The area was disputed territory: both Virginia and Pennsylvania laid claim to it. In 1774 Virginia formed the District of West Augusta and two years later divided the district into three counties: Monongalia, Ohio County, and Yohogania.
We know the date because in 1777 "Capt. Jacob Prickett appeared before James Chew, one of the Justices of the said [Monongalia] county and made oath that in February in the year One Thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy-Two, He first settled and improved his land where he now lives. The said land lying on the east side of the Monnongahila [sic.] River about six miles below the mouth of the same -- Sworn to this 26th day of June, 1777. "James Chew"

Click here for a larger, clearer view of the image of Jacob's deposition below.

Jacob's 1777 deposition in regard to his 1772 settlement at Prickett's Creek
In 1772, Samuel Hanaway, a surveyor, "Surveyed for Jacob Prickett 324 acres [or 384?] of land in the District of West Augusta (part of which became Monongalia County, Virginia, in 1776), on Prickett's Creek, including his settlement made in the year 1772." In 1777, an act of the General Assembly made settlement legal in the Monongahela valley. Perhaps it was land he had seen and liked on his 1747 expedition to the area – it seems to have been across the river from the scene of Pharaoh Ryley’s snakebite – and on the site of his old trading post.

Conflict


Cayuga/Mingo Indian chief Logan

It was not a good time to be moving to the area. In April 1774, about thirty-five miles north of present-day Wheeling, West Virginia, a group of frontiersmen slaughtered several Mingo Indians who were relatives of the Mingo/Cayuga leader Logan, who had been friendly to the colonists. Logan vowed revenge. Several parties of mixed Mingo and Shawnee warriors soon struck the frontier. In July 1774, at Dunkard’s Bottom, about 25 miles east of Prickett’s Fort, Jacob’s nephew Elias was wounded and his nephew Josiah, Elias’s older brother, was killed in an Indian attack.
Jacob Prickett, David Morgan, and other men in the neighborhood responded by building a stockade around Jacob’s cabin, near the mouth of Prickett's Creek. It became known as Prickett's Fort. (At that time the Monongahela valley was thickly covered with huge oaks and chestnut trees. “Much of the land was covered with an immense forest, allowing very little sunshine to reach the forest floor. One account of the forest at that time described the trees as so massive, thick, and tall, with matted branches, that even at noon on the clearest day, it was still dim and cool.” It was a Herculean task to clear enough land for a crude cabin and garden, much less a stockade fort. Wagons were not used because of the forest, so settlers carried what little they could on pack animals and on themselves.) The area became known as the "Big Shade."
Evidence suggests that the fort was completed by July 1774. It was never directly attacked by Indians, but Logan’s followers were attacking settlers in several other frontier regions, both killing and taking captives. Although there were at this time larger settlements at Morgan's Town and at Clarksburg, tradition states that some eighty families from up to seventeen miles away took refuge at Prickett’s Fort at times in fear of the Indians.
Jacob’s own family was not immune to the killing. Alexander Withers, in his Chronicles of Border Warfare, wrote, that because “the season was fast approaching, when the savages might be expected to commence depredations, [the settlers] determined on remaining in the fort, of a night, and yet prosecute the business of their farms as usual during the day.” On September 3, 1774, 17-year-old Isaiah, Jacob’s fourth son, and a Mrs. Susan Oxx left the fort to bring in cows from pasture.
Another nineteenth-century historian told the story vividly: ”As soon as the news of the depredations committed by Logan and his band became known in the settlements of this vicinity, the inhabitants very much alarmed for their safety, retired immediately into the forts and other places of refuge. Strolling parties of savages were heard of occasionally; but no acts of violence took place in our settlements until the month of September. One day during that month [Isa]iah Prickett and Mrs. Susan Ox left Prickett's fort, near Newport, for the purpose of driving up their cows. A party of Indians, attracted by the tinkling of the cow-bells, waylaid them on their return to the fort and succeeded in killing and scalping Prickett and taking Mrs. Ox prisoner. It may be a matter of astonishment to the reader, that the settlers could thus recklessly expose themselves, by leaving the fort, knowing that Indians were lurking in the vicinity. . . . Often, for weeks not a hostile sound would disturb the peaceful quiet reigning over the surrounding hills and valleys, until some settlers, deceived by the quiet stillness, ventured from his retreat, only to meet [their] death at the hands of the wily savage, who had awaited all this time for an unguarded moment in which to spring upon his deluded victim. . . . This latter fact, coupled with the necessity of procuring the necessaries of life, would cause many to brave even death itself.”
Many years later, when she was an old woman, Jacob’s daughter-in-law Charity (the wife of his oldest son, Josiah) said that Isaiah’s body and his scalp were found almost immediately and that a distraught Jacob asked her and another woman to sew the scalp back on Isaiah’s head before he was buried and that they had done so.
Jacob and four of his sons served in Zackquill Morgan's regiment in Lord Dunmore's War, as the 1774 hostilities were called, Jacob’s third son, Isaac, as a sergeant, the rest as privates. The war ended soon after with Virginia's victory in the Battle of Point Pleasant on the Ohio River on October 10, 1774.
But by this time the American Revolution was in the offing. The British government in February 1775 declared Massachusetts to be in a state of rebellion, and the famous battles of Lexington and Concord took place on April 17. As the war broke out, Prickett’s Fort afforded protection to many of the settlers in that part of the Monongahela Valley. That same month, before they knew of the battle, Zackquill Morgan formed the first known company in the area and Jacob and a number of other Prickett men joined. At first Jacob served as a private, In November 1777 he was paid 54.10.-.for being a Spy in "Monongohala" County, and later he was a captain commanding a detachment at Scott's Mill, about five miles northwest of present-day Morgantown in Monongalia County. It is possible that this was in Lt. Col. Thomas Gaddis’s command for an expedition in 1778 against Indian towns west of the Ohio, which lasted 3 months. The return is not dated, but shows that men out of Capt. Pricket's company were drafted. The men listed by Gwathmey include Pricket, Josiah, Pitts; Pricket, Isaiah, Pitts; Pricket, Jacob [Jr.?], Pitts; Prickett, Jacob, Captain, Monongalia Militia E; Pricket, Thomas, Sgt.
Book excerpt showing some of the Pricketts who fought in the American Revolution
Gaddis's sister's husband was Jacob's nephew.

There was a family connection between Jacob and Gaddis – Jacob’s nephew Levi Springer had married Gaddis’s sister Anna in 1768.

From DAR records

 ::: PRICKETT, JACOB SR , Ancestor #: A093133

Service:  VIRGINIA    Rank(s): PATRIOTIC SERVICE
Birth:  CIRCA 1720    BURLINGTON CO NEW JERSEY
Death:  POST 1796     NORTHWEST TERRITORY
Service Description:  1) PAID FOR SUPPLIES
Service Source:  Abercrombie & Slatten, Va Rev Pub Claims, Vol 2, P 682
Residence: County: MONONGALIA CO - State: VIRGINIA
Spouse: Number Name: 1) DOROTHY SPRINGER.[5]

Latter years


A modern re-enactment at reconstructed Prickett's Fort. We can be sure that the Revolutionary Pricketts never dressed so spiffily

No more is known of Jacob’s activities in the war, except that by about 1780 he had a mill near Prickett’s Fort. Payment for grinding grain was in grain; payment for sawing lumber was in lumber.
On 2 April 1782 he executed a deed for the land on George's Creek that he had sold some years before to Philip Pierce on the occasion of his move to Prickett's Creek.
Jacob's locations on the Monongahela
In 1782 he is shown on the Monongalia tax lists with five free white males over 16 years of age (which would have been Jacob himself and all his sons except Josiah, who was married).
In the 1780s he appears on the tax lists with 2 to 4 horses and 3-10 head of cattle. The (reconstructed?) 1790 census showing heads of families from early and mid-1780s. It shows Jacob of Monongalia County (Prichet) with 5 free white males 16 and up and 0 under 16;
Just before Christmas of 1785, Jacob’s wife of forty years died and was buried in what became known as Prickett Cemetery. On October 19, 1786, Jacob received a land grant of 385 acres on the Monongahela River that included the settlement he had made in 1772. Eight years later he received another 120 acres adjoining the land he already owned.
One of the more interesting things to occur in Jacob’s declining years had to do with the marriage of his daughter Martha. In 1791, she is shown as marrying two different men within six weeks or so. The first man was Young Phillips. According to a family story, Jacob insisted she marry him, and a Justice of the Peace who was a close friend of Jacob’s performed the ceremony. But that same evening while everybody was celebrating Martha slipped out of a window and fled, with the marriage having never been consummated. She was in love with another man, and a few weeks later she married him – Peter Parker, a 45-year-old widower with seven children. Her first marriage was eventually annulled and she bore Parker six more children.
In the mid1790s a number of Jacob’s children began migrating westward.
Jacob and some of his children moved to Mason Co., KY, and to present-day Brown Co., OH, in the 1790s and early 1800s.
Jacob’s love of adventure and hunger for the frontier seems to have been unabated because we soon find him in Mason County, Kentucky, where his youngest son, James, newly married to his cousin Mary Rice Springer, was living as well as Jacob’s sister Mary Chenoweth and their mother (though whether either was still alive by that time is not known). Several other children moved just across the river to what was then Adams County, Northwest Territory (Adams County, Ohio, after 1803) but became Brown County, Ohio.
Perhaps Jacob had a dispute with his oldest son, Josiah, because in September 1796 he gave a power of attorney to his youngest son, James Prickett, Sr., of Mason County, KY, to “ask, demand, recover, and receive of and from Josiah Prickett of Monongalia the sum or sums of money received by him for me . . . to make deeds or give deeds, to settle accounts . . . [and] to follow such legal courses” as necessary.

Full text of 9 September 1796 power of attorney

Know all men by these present whereas I Jacob Prickett of Kentucky County of Mason appoint my son James Prickett of the County and State aforesaid my true and lawfull attorney for me in my name and to my use to ask demand recover and receive from Josiah of the state of Virginia and County of Monongalia the sum or sums of money received by him for me. Furthermore I impower the said James Prickett to recover and to settle with the said Josiah all and every account and to do in every particular about my affairs as if I was there myself either to sell land or tenements or any other property, to make deeds or give deeds or settle accounts with the said Josiah Prickett or any other person in the county and state aforesaid and by these present grant to my said attorney my sole and full power and authority to take, pursue, and follow such legal courses for the necessary recovery receiving and obtaining the same as l myself might or could do were I personally present and upon receipt the service ( ?) or other office and discharge for me in my name to make seal and deliver and also one or more attornies under him to substitute and appoint and again at his pleasure revoke and further to do perform and finish for me in my name all singular thing or things which shall or may be necessary touching or conserning the promises as thoroughly and entirely as I the said Jacob Prickett in my own person might or could do or about the same ratifying, allowing and confirming whatsoever my said attorney shall do or cause to he done in and about the execution of the promises by vertue of these present. In witness thereof I have here unto set my hand and seal this ninth day of Sept. One Thousand Seven Hundred and Ninety Six.
Jacob Prickett
Witt
Obediah Walker
Her
Mary X Walker
mark
Two months later, on 15 December 1796, he gave an indenture to James Morgan for “120 acres adjoining Josiah Prickett, Joseph Heartley[sic.], Jacob Prickett,Junr, and others. The indenture was delivered on 15 March 1804.
On 15 October 1797, still in Kentucky, Jacob gave a power of attorney to Morgan Morgan, Sr., of Monongalia County, probably his son-in-law. By this time Jacob may have been in poor health. He signed the document with an “X” and we know that he was ordinarily able to write his own name.
A family letter says that he died on 3 March 1799 at the home of his son Isaac in , Brown County, Ohio[6] (then Hamilton County, Northwest Territory),

Signature of Jacob Prickit (Jacob Prickett

Seven of his children migrated westward, five to Ohio, one to Indiana, one to Illinois. Two sons, Josiah and Jacob, Jr., and one daughter, Mary Drusilla Morgan Prickett, remained in Monongalia.
Jacob's children and grand children proved to be remarkably healthy. Of his eleven children, all were still living at the time of his death in his late seventies, except for one --Isaiah, who had been killed and scalped by Indians at the age of seventeen. Of Jacob's eventual 130 grandchildren, about ninety had been born before he died and of those ninety all but five or six were still living. And of those five or six, four or five were all the children of one daughter -- but she had borne nineteen!!
Chart containing information about Capt. Jacob Prickett's children
Click here for a clearer, larger version of the same chart.

From FamilySearch.org

Actually, Jacob is not buried there; his place of burial is unknown. There is a memorial stone there and his wife, who died about a dozen years before he did, is buried there, but Jacob's place of burial is unknown. Patricia Prickett Hickin, 4 April 2017.

from Findagrave.com

Jacob Prickett
Birth: 1722, Wilmington, New Castle County, Delaware; Death: Apr. 14, 1797, Marion County, West Virginia, USA.
JACOB "JAKE" PRICKETT, b. 1722 Wilmington, Delaware, d. 14 Apr 1797 in Prickett's Fort Cem.,W. Va., Prickett's Fort in Monongalia, WV, m: DOROTHY SPRINGER on 11 May 1745 Mount Holly,Burlington Co. N.J. Dorothy was born 4 june 1726 Evesham, Burlington Co., New Jersey and died 21 jan 1785 Prickett's Fort, WV.
ISSUE: DRUSILLA PRICKETT b. 1 Mar 1752 m: CAPT. MORGAN MORGAN d. 2 April 1817
JACOB's father filed a $500. marriage bond for his marriage to DOROTHY.
Jacob stood 5'10, and weighed 180 pounds. He had "stiff" black hair, and "snapping" black eyes. He was fierce in the defense of others, but was soft hearted and gentle with children.
The following is taken from the booklet "Pricketts Fort" by William J. Wilcox:
In 1759, Jacob was operating an Indian Trading Post at the mouth of Pricketts Creek. There is substantial evidence of several major Indian Villages, or campsites within a few miles of Jacob's Trading Post. The most that can be determined about the Indians that he traded with are that they most likely were of Algonquin, Iroquois, or Appalachain stock. That is to say, they could have been Delaware, Shawnee etc... or Mohawk, Senecas etc... During the Revolutionary war, the Wyandots (aka Hurons) came to the area and were extremely aggressive.
Nathaniel Springer deposed that he, Jacob Prickett, David Morgan, John Snodgrass and Pharoah Ryley, assembled on C'Capon River to await word from Lawrence Washington, Esq., (brother to George). What they were waiting for was to be informed of the terms for an expedition to Cheat River to scout lands for Lawrence Washington and Co. They set out on either the 28th or 29th of April in 1747. Nathaniel said that his uncle Evan Morgan kept a camp and did trading at the forks of the Cheat River. (Now called the Monongahela) He also said that the group explored Tygart River and Buckhannon, as well as the Monongahela. Nathaniel goes on to say that he and his group returned to their homes on the Opeckon, Fredrick County, in August 1747, there they gave to L. Washington, Esq., maps and other papers drafted by them during the expedition.
It is said that Jacob and other members of the original expedition lived near what is now Rivesville in the 1740's. In 1763, King George III, decreed that all lands west of the Allegheny mountains were Indian Lands, and not for settlement. This was decreed because of the Delaware and Iroquois complaints to the encroachment of their lands. This is why Jacob makes no claim of settlement until 1772. In that year, Samuel Hanaway, a Surveyor, "Surveyed for Jacob Prickett 324 acres of land in Monongalia County, on Prickett's Creek, including his settlement made in the year 1772." In 1777, an act of the General Assembly made settlement legal in the Monongahela valley. They also granted 400 acres of land to each family who had settled on the "western waters" prior to 24 June 1778.
In 1774, Prickett's Fort was built. Tradition states that there was some eighty families living at the Prickett Settlement in fear of the Indians. There was at this time a larger settlement at Morgan's Town and at Clarksburg. The Monongahela valley was thickly covered with huge oaks and chestnut trees. It was a Herculean task to clear enough land for a crude cabin and garden. Wagons were not used because of the forest, so settlers carried what little they could on pack animals and on themselves.
Around 1780, Jacob built a mill near the fort. Payment for grinding grain was in grain; payment for sawing lumber was in lumber. Gathering ginseng paid between 30 and 35 cents a pound. Women and children gathered the dried roots for export to China. Money was scarce and when had, it could be of almost any origin. Spanish, British and French coins jangled together. Two hard days labor could get you a deer hide with the hair left on; or the promise of two days hard work at your bidding. Later in the 1700's, rye was exported as whiskey in large quantities.
The description of Prickett's Fort by Dr. Doddridge in 1822, follows:
There were sixteen cabins, a range of four on each wall. Large storage bins divided the cabins from each other. The outside walls, with sidewalls sloping inward, were ten feet high. At first the cabins had earthen floors later, some were fitted with puncheons. The pickets for the stockade were hewn seventeen feet and set in the ground five feet, which gave a stockade wall of twelve feet. The bastions were larger than the cabins, and were set one at each of the four angles of the stockade. Their outer parts projected two feet beyond the stockade walls. These overhanging sections had slatted floors, so enemies making a lodgment against the stockade might be fired upon, straight downward. The bastions were eight feet higher than the walls,were twelve feet square, and made of large hickory logs, with ample gun-spaces, or loopholes in and in between.
Within the stockade at the forward center of the grounds were two large buildings, each forty feet long and twenty feet wide and eight feet high. There were two gates, the main gate in the center of the northern wall, facing the river, and by the big spring, and the stock gate, in the center of the west wall of the stockade, near the little spring. The stables and stock-pens were all at the far southern end of the stockade. Both gates were made of logs and thick slabs, and hinged so that they would fold inward.
From [Glenn Lough], Now and Long Ago:
DAVID MORGAN used to tell a story about "JAKE PRICKETT and the bean-shot Brave." The story was told to his nephew's "Chunk" and James, sons of Col. Zackwell Morgan. Chunk had a hunting camp on a dreen of Little Paw Paw Creek. Chunk had just married, and he and his brother built a cabin for the newlyweds to set up housekeeping in. Uncle Dave & Henry Batten came by, and were there to share the first fire and first meal, that was made in that cabin.
In the evening a "soiree" was held. David got to telling funny but true stories of his and JACOB PRICKETT'S adventures.
One story told that night was about the time that he and Jacob captured an Indian Brave. (The story, as printed, does not relate the whole particulars, as related by David Morgan.) The two men were out of lead, so Jacob loaded his musket with beans. Jacob shot the brave in the rump, and as the brave "was dancing around and yelping Prickett hit him with his fist and knocked him out, and they tied him and turned him in at Fort Rogers and later was exchanged for the Ramsey boy, who had been with the Indians for a year." It was a good story and everybody laughed hearing Uncle Dave tell about that Indian with beans in his bottom."
From the book "THE ROSS FAMILY BRANCH OF THE PRICKETT FAMILY" by Nora Ross (1989), found in the Marion County Library, West Virginia, we learn:
"JACOB PRICKETT served as a spy for the Virginia Militia before he came of age, and later, was Captain of the Monongalia County, Virginia troops in the Revolutionary war. After his marriage to DOROTHY, Captain JACOB (JAKE) again offered his services to the state of Virginia Militia, serving under General George Washington in Braddock's 1758 campaign against the Indians of the Monongahela River region. In 1759, JACOB moved his family to Monongalia County, (West) Virginia, where he had a trading post and built what is assumed to be the first mill in that area. By 1774, he, along with his brothers, Josiah and Isaiah, built Pricketts Fort...."
Issue: Josiah Prickett b. 1746 m: Charity Taylor (3 Aug 1808 she m: Wm.Jolliffe), John Prickett b. 1748 m: Elizabeth Hays, Isaac Prickett b. 1 March 1752 m: Mary Campbell (He was paid 54.10.-. in Nov. 1777 For being a Spy in "Monongohala" [sic.] Co., WVA, (pp.505 VIRGINIA MILITARY RECORDS), TWINS DRUSILLA PRICKETT b.1 Mar 1752 m: CAPT. MORGAN MORGAN d. 2 April 1817, Isaiah Prickett b. 1757 d. 2 Oct 1774 (Murdered & scalped by Indians), Jacob Prickett, Jr. b. 1 April 1758 m: Jemimah Pindle, Nancy Ann Prickett b. 1762 m: Reuben Bunner (Boner), James Prickett b. 8 Mar 1765 m: Mary Springer, Dorothy Prickett m: Sergeant James Dunn, Mary Prickett m: Jacob Lucas, Martha Prickett m: Peter Parker, Thomas Prickett (?) m: Ann Wyatt (A Thomas Prickett marries Evan's dau. Elizabeth Morgan on 9 Oct 1809).
Written by: Kelley Ward
Family links: Parents: John Prickett (1693 - ____), Elizabeth Rachel Robinson Prickett (1698 - 1758); Spouse: Dorothy Springer Prickett (1726 - 1785); Children: Josiah Prickett (1746 - 1807), Isaac Prickett (1751 - 1827), Mary Drucilla Prickett Morgan (1752 - 1817), Martha Prickett Parker (1756 - 1820), Isaiah Prickett (1757 - 1774), Jacob Prickett (1758 - 1826), Dorothy Prickett Dunn (1760 - 1836), Nancy Ann Prickett Bunner (1762 - 1842).
Burial: Prickett Cemetery, Marion County, West Virginia, USA.[7]

From Findagrave.com 2

(added on 8 Feb 2018)
Jacob Prickett
Birth: 1722 Wilmington, New Castle County, Delaware, USA; Death: 14 Apr 1797 Marion County, West Virginia, USA; Burial: Prickett CemeteryMarion County, West Virginia, USA. Memorial #: 7067106.
Bio: JACOB "JAKE" PRICKETT b. 1722 Wilmington, Delawared. 14 Apr 1797 in Prickett's Fort Cem.,W. Va. Prickett's Fort in Monongalia, WVm: DOROTHY SPRINGER on 11 May 1745 Mount Holly,Burlington Co. N.J. Dorothy was born 4 june 1726 Evesham, Burlington Co., New Jersey and died 21 jan 1785 Prickett's Fort, WVISSUE: DRUSILLA PRICKETT b. 1 Mar 1752 m: CAPT. MORGAN MORGAN d. 2 April 1817. JACOB's father filed a $500. marriage bond for his marriage to DOROTHY.Jacob stood 5'10, and weighed 180 pounds. He had "stiff" black hair, and "snapping" black eyes. He was fierce in the defense of others, but was soft hearted and gentle with children.The following is taken from the booklet "Pricketts Fort" by William J. Wilcox: In 1759, Jacob was operating an Indian Trading Post at the mouth of Pricketts Creek. There is substantial evidence of several major Indian Villages, or campsites within a few miles of Jacob's Trading Post. The most that can be determined about the Indians that he traded with are that they most likely were of Algonquin, Iroquois, or Appalachain stock.That is to say, they could have been Delaware, Shawnee etc... or Mohawk, Senecas etc... During the Revolutionary war, the Wyandots (aka Hurons) came to the area and were extremely aggressive.Nathaniel Springer deposed that he, Jacob Prickett, David Morgan, John Snodgrass and Pharoah Ryley, assembled on C'Capon River to await word from Lawrence Washington, Esq., (brother to George). What they were waiting for was to be informed of the terms for an expedition to Cheat River to scout lands for Lawrence Washington and Co. They set out on either the 28th or 29th of April in 1747. Nathaniel said that his uncle Evan Morgan kept a camp and did trading at the forks of the Cheat River. (Now called the Monongahela) He also said that the group explored Tygart River and Buckhannon, as well as the Monongahela. Nathaniel goes on to say that he and his group returned to their homes on the Opeckon, Fredrick County, in August 1747, there they gave to L. Washington, Esq., maps and other papers drafted by them during the expedition. It is said that Jacob and other members of the original expedition lived near what is now Rivesville in the 1740's. In 1763, King George III, decreed that all lands west of the Allegheny mountains were Indian Lands, and not for settlement. This was decreed because of the Delaware and Iroquois complaints to the encroachment of their lands.This is why Jacob makes no claim of settlement until 1772. In that year, Samuel Hanaway, a Surveyor, "Surveyed for Jacob Prickett 324 acres of land in Monongalia County, on Prickett's Creek, including his settlement made in the year 1772." In 1777, an act of the General Assembly made settlement legal in the Monongahela valley. They also granted 400 acres of land to each family who had settled on the "western waters" prior to 24 June 1778.In 1774, Prickett's Fort was built. Tradition states that there was some eighty families living at the Prickett Settlement in fear of the Indians. There was at this time a larger settlement at Morgan's Town and at Clarksburg. The Monongahela valley was thickly covered with huge oaks and chestnut trees. It was a Herculean task to clear enough land for a crude cabin and garden. Wagons were not used because of the forest, so settlers carried what little they could on pack animals and on themselves. Around 1780, Jacob built a mill near the fort. Payment for grinding grain was in grain; payment for sawing lumber was in lumber. Gathering ginseng paid between 30 and 35 cents a pound. Women and children gathered the dried roots for export to China. Money was scarce and when had, it could be of almost any origin. Spanish, British and French coins jangled together. Two hard days labor could get you a deer hide with the hair left on; or the promise of two days hard work at your bidding. Later in the 1700's, rye was exported as whiskey in large quantities. The description of Prickett's Fort by Dr. Doddridge in 1822, follows:There were sixteen cabins, a range of four on each wall. Large storage bins divided the cabins from each other. The outside walls, with sidewalls sloping inward, were ten feet high. At first the cabins had earthen floors later, some were fitted with puncheons. The pickets for the stockade were hewn seventeen feet and set in the ground five feet, which gave a stockade wall of twelve feet. The bastions were larger than the cabins, and were set one at each of the four angles of the stockade. Their outer parts projected two feet beyond the stockade walls. These overhanging sections had slatted floors, so enemies making a lodgment against the stockade might be fired upon, straight downward. The bastions were eight feet higher than the walls,were twelve feet square, and made of large hickory logs, with ample gun-spaces, or loopholes in and in between.Within the stockade at the forward center of the grounds were two large buildings, each forty feet long and twenty feet wide and eight feet high. There were two gates, the main gate in the center of the northern wall, facing the river, and by the big spring, and the stock gate, in the center of the west wall of the stockade, near the little spring. The stables and stock-pens were all at the far southern end of the stockade. Both gates were made of logs and thick slabs, and hinged so that they would fold inward.From Now and Long Ago:DAVID MORGAN used to tell a story about "JAKE PRICKETT and the bean-shot Brave." The story was told to his nephew's "Chunk" and James, sons of Col. Zackwell Morgan. Chunk had a hunting camp on a dreen of Little Paw Paw Creek. Chunk had just married, and he and his brother built a cabin for the newlyweds to set up housekeeping in. Uncle Dave & Henry Batten came by, and were there to share the first fire and first meal, that was made in that cabin.In the evening a "soiree" was held. David got to telling funny but true stories of his and JACOB PRICKETT'S adventures.One story told that night was about the time that he and Jacob captured an Indian Brave. (The story, as printed, does not relate the whole particulars, as related by David Morgan.) The two men were out of lead, so Jacob loaded his musket with beans. Jacob shot the brave in the rump, and as the brave "was dancing around and yelping Prickett hit him with his fist and knocked him out, and they tied him and turned him in at Fort Rogers and later was exchanged for the Ramsey boy, who had been with the Indians for a year." It was a good story and everybody laughed hearing Uncle Dave tell about that Indian with beans in his bottom."From the book "THE ROSS FAMILY BRANCH OF THE PRICKETT FAMILY" by Nora Ross (1989), found in the Marion County Library, West Virginia, we learn:"JACOB PRICKETT served as a spy for the Virginia Militia before he came of age, and later, was Captain of the Monongalia County, Virginia troops in the Revolutionary war. After his marriage to DOROTHY, Captain JACOB (JAKE) again offered his services to the state of Virginia Militia, serving under General George Washington in Braddock's 1758 campaign against the Indians of the Monongahela River region. In 1759, JACOB moved his family to Monongalia County, (West) Virginia, where he had a trading post and built what is assumed to be the first mill in that area. By 1774, he, along with his brothers, Josiah and Isaiah, built Pricketts Fort...." Issue: Josiah Prickett b. 1746 m: Charity Taylor (3 Aug 1808 she m: Wm.Jolliffe) John Prickett b. 1748 m: Elizabeth Hays Isaac Prickett b. 1 March 1752 m: Mary Campbell He was paid 54.10.-. in Nov. 1777 For being a Spy in "Monongohala" Co., WVA (pp.505 VIRGINIA MILITARY RECORDS) TWINS DRUSILLA PRICKETT b.1 Mar 1752 m: CAPT. MORGAN MORGAN d. 2 April 1817 Isaiah Prickett b. 1757 d. 2 Oct 1774 Murdered & scalped by Indians. Jacob Prickett, Jr. b. 1 April 1758 m: Jemimah Pindle Nancy Ann Prickett b. 1762 m: Reuben Bunner (Boner) James Prickett b. 8 Mar 1765 m: Mary Springer Dorothy Prickett m: Sergeant James Dunn Mary Prickett m: Jacob Lucas Martha Prickett m: Peter Parker Thomas Prickett (?) m: Ann Wyatt (A Thomas Prickett marries Evan's dau. Elizabeth Morgan on 9 Oct 1809)Written by: Kelley Ward
Family Members: Parents: John Prickett (1693-Unknown), Elizabeth Rachel Robinson Prickett (1698-1758); Spouse: Dorothy Springer Prickett (1726-1785); Children: Josiah Prickett (1746-1807), Isaac Prickett (1751-1830), Mary Drucilla Prickett Morgan (1752-1817), Martha Prickett Parker (1756-1820), Isaiah Prickett (1757-1774), Jacob Prickett (1758-1826), Dorothy Prickett Dunn (1760-1836), Nancy Ann Prickett Bunner (1762-1842).[8]

Citations

  1. Entered by Patricia Prickett Hickin on 15 February 2017.
  2. Anon., "Isobel Prickett," d1721, MyRootsPlace.com Date accessed 29 Nov 2016. URL: http://myrootsplace.com/getperson.php?personID=I105639&tree=MRP
  3. Kimberlee Miller, email to Patricia Hickin
  4. Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants, vol. 2, 1742-75: N-93.)
  5. Anon., "PRICKETT, JACOB SR , Ancestor #: A093133," Revolutionary Era Ancestors, Daughters of the American Revolution. URL: http://services.dar.org/Public/DAR_Research/search_adb/?action=full&p_id=A093133. Accessed 15 June 2017 by Patricia Prickett Hickin.
  6. Kimberlee Miller, "RE:Capt Jacob's death," email to Patricia Prickett Hickin, 6 July 2017. "Hi Pat, His second power of attorney was [executed in] Oct 1797 but a family letter stated he [died] 3 March 1799 at his son Isaac's home in [present-day] Brown County Ohio."
  7. Ken Childers, "Jacob Prickett," Findagrave.com Record added: Jan 09, 2003. URL: www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=7067106. Accessed 24 Sept 2017 by Patricia Prickett Hickin.
  8. Ken Childers (46560872), "Jacob Prickett," Findagrave.com. Record added 9 Jan 2003, URL: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/7067106/jacob-prickett. Accessed 08 February 2018

Acknowledgments

Sources

here.

Acknowledgments



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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Jacob by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with Jacob:

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Images: 48
Jacob Prickett Commemorative Plate
Jacob Prickett Commemorative Plate

Jacob Prickett deposition before James Chew, 26 June 1777
Jacob Prickett deposition before James Chew, 26 June 1777

Jacob Prickett settled on a bend of the Monongahela River.
Jacob Prickett settled on a bend of the Monongahela River.

Prickett's Fort - outside
Prickett's Fort - outside

Prickett's Fort - inside
Prickett's Fort - inside

view all


Collaboration

On 14 Mar 2018 at 14:19 GMT Sharon (Hardman) West wrote:

Quite and extensive biograpyhy.

Hardman-759

On 14 Mar 2018 at 01:04 GMT Liz (Noland) Shifflett wrote:

Hi! I changed {US History-2} with the project box - the US History-2 template is about to be deleted (it was retired last year).

However, this profile has too many project boxes (WikiTree guidelines say no more than two). I think of all the project boxes, you should probably deleted the Virginia one - {US History|sub-project=Virginia|category=Frederick County, Virginia}

Whatever project boxes you retain, you need to have the project account as a manager.

See more information at https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Help:Project-Managed_Profiles

Cheers, Liz

On 24 Dec 2016 at 18:43 GMT David Scott Morgan wrote:

Prickett-2 and Prickett-603 appear to represent the same person because: You can reject my contributions, but I'd like to merge them into your Jacob Prickett. I'm related to David Morgan. Jacob is my 5th Great Grandfather.

On 16 Dec 2015 at 14:56 GMT Patricia (Prickett) Hickin wrote:

Pritchett-437 and Prickett-2 appear to represent the same person because: same spouse, approx. dates, daughter

On 26 Jan 2015 at 19:33 GMT Patricia (Prickett) Hickin wrote:

Prickett-407 and Prickett-2 appear to represent the same person because: Hi, Iris, I hope you'll approve this merge -- both married to Dorothy Springer.

Pat



Jacob is 17 degrees from Claude Monet, 16 degrees from Gigi Tanksley and 15 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

P  >  Prickett  >  Jacob Prickett Sr.