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Edmund Quincy I (1602 - 1636)

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Edmund "Edmond" Quincy I
Born in Wigsthorpe, Northamptonshire, Englandmap
Ancestors ancestors
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married 14 Jul 1623 in Lilford, County Northampton, Englandmap
Descendants descendants
Died [location unknown]
Profile last modified 3 Feb 2020 | Created 15 Dec 2008
This page has been accessed 2,365 times.
  • *See Chauncey Page
    The Puritan Great Migration.
    Edmund Quincy I migrated to New England during the Puritan Great Migration (1620-1640).
    Join: Puritan Great Migration Project
    Discuss: pgm

    Edmund Quincy (1602-1636) was an ancestor of Abigail Adams, wife of second U.S. president John Adams, and of Dorothy Scott, wife of the statesman John Hancock. [1]

    Biography

    Born 1602 in Wigsthorpe, Northamptonshire, England, One descendant named Eliza Susan Quincy wrote in 1844 that ," His parents were almost certainly Edmund Quincy (baptised 1559, died 1627) and Anne Palmer (married 1529).[2]

    Edmund Quincy I was baptized May 30, 1602 in Lilford, County Northampton, England, son of Edmond Quincy.[3][4]

    He is known to have lived in Thorpe in Achurch, Northamptonshire on an estate inherited from his father.[5]

    He married July 14, 1623 at Lilford, County Northampton, England to Judith Pares of Bythorpe, County Huntingdon.[6][7]

    They had two children: Judith, born in 1626, and Edmund, born in 1628.[8]

    He appears to have converted to Puritanism by the time of the birth of his son.[9][10]

    Edmund Quincy and his wife came to New England with the Rev. John Cotton, arriving in Boston on September 4, 1633. He was made a freeman and deputy March 4, 1633/34. In December 1635 he received jointly with William Coddington a large grant of land at Mount Wollaston, then part of Boston and now in Quincy, MA. His share was about 400 acres. His farmhouse that stood on what is now the southeast corner of Hancock Street and Butler Road was demolished about 1897. The site is marked by a granite monument.[11]

    He died shortly thereafter, in 1636 or 1637.

    His widow, Judith married (2nd) Moses Paine by 1643. After his death she married (3rd) Robert Hull toward the end of 1646. She died at Boston on March 29, 1654.[12]

    Sources

    1. Family Records of Mary Atkins.
    2. The Quincy Family. The Quincy Family.
    3. Holly, H. Hobart. Descendants of Edmund Quincy 1602-1637 who settled in what is now Quincy, Massachusetts in 1635. Quincy, Massachusetts; Quincy Historical Society; 1977. pg 2.
    4. Lilford Parish Register image 22 by subscription at: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/9198/101382382_00018?pid=9189292 accessed 3 Feb2020.
    5. Adams, Charles Francis (1892). Three Episodes of Massachusetts History. Houghton, Mifflin. p. 700.
    6. Holly, H. Hobart. Descendants of Edmund Quincy 1602-1637 who settled in what is now Quincy, Massachusetts in 1635. Quincy, Massachusetts; Quincy Historical Society; 1977. pg 2.
    7. Lilford Parish Register image 38 by subscription at: https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/9198/101382382_00018?pid=9189292 accessed 3 Feb 2020.
    8. Quincy, Wendell, Holmes, and Upham Family Papers, 1633-1910. Massachusetts Historical Society.
    9. "Quincy Political Family" Wikipedia.
    10. Joiner, Rev. Darrell and Sallyann (carver@ime.net); Cary Family History.
    11. Holly, H. Hobart. Descendants of Edmund Quincy 1602-1637 who settled in what is now Quincy, Massachusetts in 1635. Quincy, Massachusetts; Quincy Historical Society; 1977. pg 2.
    12. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633
    • The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III. (Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2010), (Originally Published as: New England Historic Genealogical Society. Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III, 3 vols., 1995). featured name.subscription site
    • Adams, Charles Francis (1892). Three Episodes of Massachusetts History. Houghton, Mifflin. p. 700.
    • Holly, H. Hobart. Descendants of Edmund Quincy 1602-1637 who settled in what is now Quincy, Massachusetts in 1635. Quincy, Massachusetts; Quincy Historical Society; 1977. pg 2.
    • Joiner, Rev. Darrell and Sallyann (carver@ime.net); Cary Family History.
    • Quincy, Wendell, Holmes, and Upham Family Papers, 1633-1910. Massachusetts Historical Society.
    • "Quincy Political Family." Wikipedia.
    • The Quincy Family. The Quincy Family.

    Sources obtained by Mary Atkins:

    • "Joseph Atkins: the story of a family; By: Francis Higginson Atkins"
    • "Quincy Political Family"


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There is an entire duplicate line with a variation of Chancy or Chauncey. I'm working on identifying the duplicates. See Edmund Chancey
Hi Mary,

I discovered that Edmund Quincy has a featured article in R. C. Anderson's "Great Migration Begins." He is eligible to be in WikiTree's Puritan Great Migration Project.

I will add the project box.


Unmerged matches › Edmund Chancey (1602-1637)
Rejected matches › Edmund Quincy (1559-bef.1628)

Edmund is 20 degrees from Greg Clarke, 13 degrees from George Hull and 12 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

Q  >  Quincy  >  Edmund Quincy I

Categories: Puritan Great Migration