Joris (Rapalje) de Rapalje

George Jans (Rapalje) de Rapalje (1604 - 1662)

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George Jans (Joris) "Jorge" de Rapalje formerly Rapalje aka Jansen, Rapelje, Rapareillet, Rapareilliet, Raparlie
Born in Valenciennes, Hainaut, Walsant, Spanish Netherlands ( Nord, France)map
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married in Walloon Church, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, Netherlandsmap
Descendants descendants
Died in Breuckelen, Long Island, Nieuw-Nederlandmap
Profile last modified | Created 30 Dec 2010
This page has been accessed 8,197 times.

Categories: New Netherland Settlers Project Needs Paraphrasing | Famous People of the 17th Century | De Eendracht, sailed Jan 1624 | French Immigrants to New Netherland | New Netherland Huguenots | Council of Twelve Men | Huguenot Migration | New Netherland Settlers | New Netherland Main Profile.

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Joris (Rapalje) de Rapalje was a Huguenot emigrant.
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Joris (Rapalje) de Rapalje was a New Netherland settler.
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Contents

Biography

Georges Rapareillet (pronounced Raparlie) was baptized April 28, 1604, as entered in the Register of St. Nicholaes Roman Catholic Church of Valenciennes.[1] Valenciennes, a town in what is now Northern France, had long been a Protestant stronghold in the province of Hainaut, Spanish Netherlands.
Joris was the youngest child of Jean Rapareilliet, probably born to a woman other than Jean's wife, Elizabeth Baudoin, but possibly adopted by her. And we also have to keep in mind it was not unusual for Walloon and Huguenot parents to take their children to Roman Catholic priests to be baptized in the absence of Protestant clergy or to escape persecution. Similarly, it was not uncommon for the priests to refuse to recognize the validity of Protestant marriages, recording the children of such marriages as "illegitimate".
One way or the other, Joris probably did not know or remember his father very well, since his father, Jean, died when he was less than 2 years old. He also would not have known Elizabeth, since she also died in 1606. It is not known if he ever knew his genetic mother, but it seems possible that his father would have employed the services of some woman, perhaps a mistress, perhaps Joris' genetic mother, to raise his family. [2][3]
Georges (Joris) was probably a proscribed Huguenot who took refuge in Holland. Holland, a Protestant country, welcomed religious refugees from France, Belgium, and other countries. French-speaking refugees founded churches in the Netherlands and held services in French. All Huguenots in those days may have been known by the general title of Walloons in Holland.
Int. Marriage 13 January, 1624 Joris Raparlie and Catharina Triko [4]
Joris Repalje was living in Amsterdam in 1623 and, with his prospective bride, Catalina Trico, was recruited with a number of other families, probably mostly Walloons, to go as colonists for the West India Company's venture in America. Catalina Trico and Joris Rapalje agreed to take part in the wildly hazardous enterprise on the condition that the company first marry them. This necessitated the publication of the intent to marry and the actual marriage, a process which then usually required at least 3 weeks. The banns for Joris and Catalina were published on Saturday, January 13, 1624 [5]. and their marriage took place on Sunday, January 21, 1624.[6]
Espouse le 21 de Janvier, the clerk of the Walloon Church of Amsterdam recorded, without wasting too much time getting the names right, Joris Raporbie de Valencenne, et Caterine triko. Being illiterate, both made their marks on the page.[7]
The newlyweds were aboard when De Eendracht (Unity) sailed for New Netherland from Amsterdam on January 25, 1624.
The variations of the spelling of Rapareillet/Rapalje suggests that, although born in the Spanish-occupied Hainaut Province of France, he may have spent some time in Walloonia, Flanders, now a part of Belgium. Once in America at New Amsterdam, he was said to have come from La Rochelle, France, indicating that he may have lived there as well, or at least had some trade in La Rochelle (possibly through Catalyntie's father). He also adopted Jansen in America, following the Dutch naming convention that indicates your father - Jansen, son of Jan (in Dutch) or Jean (in French).
Joris Jansen Rapalje, a French Huguenot, emigrated with his wife to America in 1624 aboard the Unity, a ship of the West India Company, Adrian Foriszen Tienpont,[8][9] skipper. The West India Company had recruited families to settle New Netherland and transported them aboard two ships: De Eendracht (Unity), which sailed January 25, and Nieuw Nederland, which sailed two months later. Known to be passengers of the Unity with Joris and his wife were Sebastian Janszen Krol, John Monfort and his wife, Jacqueline Moreau, and about a dozen other families with marriageable daughters and sons, with 30 unaccompanied men. Some were undoubtedly Walloons. The ship arrived in New Netherlands in late March or early April of 1624, and after a stay of just a few days, sailed up the Hudson River to Fort Orange (now Albany, New York). The Rapaljes were among 18 families that remained on-board Unity to go to Fort Orangie (Now Albany), when it came to the "Mannatans".[10] These emigrants were the advance party for the colonization planned by the West India Company.
The Rapaljes were one of "only four of the identified families aboard these two ships known to have left descendants in the colony". The four families were Walloons, from Valenciennes, Roubaix, and other towns, all now in France's Département du Nord, but then part of the Netherlands under the rule of Spain. They were Protestants, and in order to worship as they pleased they had fled north to Amsterdam and Leiden, where the Spanish were no longer in control. When the West India Company sought settlers for its new colony, these recent refugees were ready to move once again.
In 1625, Jorge (George) Jansen Rappelje, Teunis Guysbert Bogart, and Jeremiah Remse Vanderbeeck - farmers from Waael in the Netherlands - were the first men to began farming in New Netherland, at Wallabout.
Soon after the harvest of 1626, and after Gov. Peter Minuit purchased Manhattan Island from the Indians in May, the Company resettled the eight families living at Fort Orange in New Amsterdam on the island of Manhattan, which then became the center of operations for New Netherland. This included the Rapelje household which now included their first daughter, Sarah, born June 9, 1625 - the first white child to be born in New Netherlands.
There were only 270 white inhabitants of Manhattan at that time, and sufficient land so that the families brought down river could support themselves and have sufficient left over for supplying the ships which would put into the port of trade.
Since Joris could not ply his trade of weaving under the regulations of the West India Company, he found it expedient to support his family in other ways. He opened the first tavern shortly after arriving in Manhattan. He was a tavern keeper as late as March 16, 1648, when he and 11 other tavern keepers promised as true men to live up to the newly imposed rules in every way and as best they could. The extensive rules were designed to control "unreasonable and intemperate drinking" at night and on Sundays, and the owners of taverns were required to have some other legitimate occupation. Joris chose farming at first and went in for cattle breeding. In 1641, he was elected by the people as one of 12 men to advise the Council regarding Indian policy.
On June 16, 1637, Joris had bought land from the Indians, a tract of 335 acres the Indians called Rennagaconck (Rennegaconock) (now included within the town of Brooklyn, Long Island, New York), at the cove which the Dutch named Wallabought (Waele-Boght/Wale bocht)[11][12]). Until the farm was well established and showing a good profit, and until he had satisfactory buildings on it, Joris and his family continued to live on Pearl Street which extended to Bridge Street where the Manhattan tavern flourished. His name appeared as late as March 16, 1648, on the records in the book of the burgomasters court, among the inn keepers and tapsters, inhabitants who promised to observe the proclamation of Gov. Stuyvesant of March 10th, 1648, in relation to the regulation of such houses. In 1644, Joris and his son-in-law Hans were in partnership in hiring out some cattle.[13]
Joris had obtained the house and lot on Pearl Street from the West India Company Street;[14] the Pearl Street lot grant was confirmed to him with a deed dated March 13, 1647.[15] He sold the lot with its house that he had built-up on June 22, 1654 to Hendrick Hendricksen. He occupied the house and lot on the north side of the present Pearl Street, abutting the New Amsterdam fort, for more than two decades (he sold the property in 1654, so on the 1660 map, house number 8 in section G shows Hendrick Hendricksen as the owner).[16]
After selling his New Amsterdam home, Joris moved his family to the farm in 1655, becoming a Long Island resident. He was a leading citizen, acted a prominent part of public affairs of the colony, and served in the magistracy of Brooklyn.
One record has that Joris died on February 21, 1662 at age 57 in Breuckelen (Brooklyn), New Netherland. Another says Joris died sometime before 1680, since from that point onward Catalyntie was known as the "old widow from Valenciennes" as she continued to raise her large extended family and grow vegetables on her farm in Brooklyn.
In 1671, a patent was granted to "Cathaline, widow of Jores Rapalje," for a lot in New Amsterdam.
She was seventy-four years of age at the time (1679) that Jasper Dankers and Peter Sluyter, the Labodists, visited her at the Brooklyn farm, and described her in their journals as follows:
M. de la Grange came with his wife to invite me to accompany them in their boat to the Wale Bocht, a place situated on Long Island, almost an hour's distance below the city, directly opposite Correlaer's Hoeck, etc. This is a bay, tolerably wide, where the water rises and falls much, and at low water, is very shallow and much of it dry, etc. The aunt of de la Grange (Catalyntie Trico), is an old Walloon from Valenciennes (her husband not her), seventy-four years old. She is worldly minded, living with her whole heart, as well as body, among her progeny, which now number 145, and will soon reach 150. Nevertheless, she lived alone by herself, a little apart from the others, having her little garden and other conveniences, with which she helped herself." She and Joris became the ancesters of over a million North Americans.[17]
Joris's widow, Catalyentie, daughter of Joris Trico, died in Wallabout, New York, on September 11, 1689 at age 84.

Name

Joris Jansen Rapalje; baptized Georges Rapareillet
First Name: Joris (Dutch version of French/Walloon Georges), George
Patronymic: Jansen, Janszen, Janse, Janssen (adopted in America)
Surnames: Rapareilliet, Rapelje, Rapalie, Rapalye, deRapalje, Rapelle, de Rapalie, and de Rappalje[18]

Christening

28 Apr 1604 at the Roman Catholic Church of St. Nicholas, Valenciennes: 1604, 28 Avril, Georges Rapareillet, illegitimus fils de Jean Rapareillet, susceptor (godfather) Noe Vasseur susceptrix (godmother) Jehenne de latre[19][20]
Place : [21] Valenciennes, Hainaut[22][23][24][25], Walslant, Spanish Netherlands (now called Valenciennes, Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France)[26]

Marriage

  1. Amsterdam archive: inschrijvingsdatum: 13-01-1624 name groom/ naam bruidegom: Raparlie, Joris name bride/ naam bruid: Triko, Catharina

[27]

Marriage: to Catalyntje (also Catalyntie) Trico (Tricault in French)[28] on January 21, 1624,[29] Walloon Church of Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, Netherlands. He was 19; she was 18.
from the Walloon Index: 13 January 1624, Amsterdam: "Joris Raparlie born in Valenchiene (Valenciennes in French) (age) 19 (years), boratwercker (living at) Waelport (section of Amsterdam) and Catharina Triko"[30]
Quote: '[...] four days before their ship left Amsterdam on January 25, 1624. "Espousé le 21 de Janvier", the clerk of the Walloon Church of Amsterdam recorded, without wasting too much time getting the names right, "Joris Raporbie de Valencenne, et Caterine triko." Being illiterate, both made their marks on the page. He was nineteen, she was eigtheen; neither had parents sign the registry, which suggests that both were either alone in the world or alone in that part of the world, which amounted to the same thing. Like many they had nothing to lose. [...] in an border dispute needed evidence of 'Christian' occupation [...] representatives of William Penn found an old woman to testify who was known to be one of the first European settlers. Catalina Trico, now in her eigthies, was a widow but she and Joris had had a long and fruitful marriage. The records of New Netherland show them among the first buyers of land in the wilderness of southern Manhattan, building two houses on Pearl street steps away from the fort [...].[31]

Emigration

They sailed from Amsterdam on January 25, 1624 aboard De Eendracht (The Unity) to New Netherland.[32][33][34][35][36]

Children

Joris and Catalyntje had the following children:[37][38]
  1. Sarah, born June 9, 1625; died 1685: m(1) Hans Hansen Bergen and m(2) Teunis (Tunis) Gysbert Bogaert (Bogart)
  2. Marritie (Maria, Marretje), March 11, 1627; died 1685: m. Nov. 18, 1640, Michael Paulus or Paulisen Vandervoort, from Vancermonde or Vlaenderen in the Netherlands, the ancestor of the Vandenvoort family in this country, who resided for some years in New Amsterdam, where, Sept. 15, 1646, he obtained a patent for a lot
  3. Jannetie (Jannetje), August 18, 1629: m. Dec. 21, 1642, Rem Jansen Vanderbek (Vanderbeek), from Severen, in Westphalia, by one account Coevorden, in Overyssel, by another, the ancestor of the Remsen family in this country
  4. Judith, born July 5, 1635; died 1726: m. Pieter Pietersen Van Nest, the ancestor of most of the Van Nest family of this country
  5. Jan (Jan Joriszen), born August 28, 1637; died 1663: m. April 26, 1660, Maria Frederickse (Lubertson), of the Hague, died in 1662, without surviving issue
  6. Jacob, born May 28, 1639, shot dead by the Indians while standing in his door (shot and killed by Indians while on the front steps of the Tap House on Pearl Street, Paerel Straet on a 1660 map)[39]
  7. Catalyntie (Catalyntje, Catalina), born March 28, 1641[40][41]: m. 1664, Jeremias Jansen Westerhout, who came over on the ship Rose-tree
  8. Jeronemus (Jeronimus), born June 27, 1643[42]; died 1690: m. Anna Denyse (Denise), daughter of Teunis Nyssen or Denyse
  9. Annette (Annetje), born February 8, 1646: m(1) May 14, 1663, Marten Reyyese, as written by himself, or Ryerse (Ryerson), of Amsterdam, the ancestor of the Ryerson family in this country; m(2) Jan. 30, 1692, Joost Fransz (Franz), widower of Gertruy Aukes, who emigrated in 1654
  10. Elizabet (Elisabeth), born March 28, 1648[43]; died 1712: m. Dirck Cornelisse Hooglandt (Hoogelandt) and had a son Ariaen Dirckse, bapt. Sept. 22, 1670
  11. Daniel, born Dec. 29, 1650; died 1725: m. June 13, 1674, Sarah Klock, of Fort Orange

Occupation

  1. boratwercker - a weaver of wool cloth[44][45][46]
  2. farmer :After a few years of farming, Joris and Catalynsie opened a small tavern or "tap house" on the north side of what is now Pearl Street, abutting on the Fort, where they managed the tap-house and grew vegetables and served their guests.
  3. tap-house (tavern) owner in New Amsterdam, on Bridge Street[47][48]
  4. 'Patentee at the Waelboght, June 16, 1637', Patent GG20.[49][50][51]
  5. 'Patentee, Nieuw Amsterdam, March 18, 1647, lot in Manhattan.' [52][53][54]
  6. member of the Council of Twelve Men, 1641[55][56][57]
  7. magistrate of Breuckelen (now spelled Brooklyn) in 1655, 1656, 1657, 1660, and 1662[58]

Religion

Protestant. On December 25, 1662, he became a member of the Protestant Reformed Dutch Church of Brooklyn.

Death

He died 21 February 1662,[59] Breuckelen (Brooklyn), New Netherland (King's County, New York)[60]

Sources

  1. original statement had April 26 and was followed by a restatement of the baptism, with the April 28 date, so maybe April 26 was his birth date
  2. Note N152 from Lance Foster
  3. He was one of "six children of Jean Rapareillet and his unnamed wife" (he has also been shown as the youngest son of the nine children of Jean and wife Elizabeth Baudoin; another source surmised that the first two children were by another wife or were children of a different Jean; combined with discounting Joris as illegitimate leaves six children for Jean and his wife).
  4. Source: Amsterdam archief 13-01-1624 - Raparlie, Joris - Triko, Catharina - DTB 428, p.328 - Huwelijksintekeningen van de KERK. - OTR00022000169 Marriage 13 January 1624 Amsterdam (scan, left page first entry]
  5. "Netherlands, Noord-Holland Province, Church Records, 1523-1948," images, FamilySearch : Marriage 13 January , 1624 Amsterdam: accessed 29 January 2016 , Nederlands Hervormde > Amsterdam > Huwelijksaangiften, Trouwen 1623-1625 > image 172 of 596; Nederlands Rijksarchiefdienst, Den Haag (Netherlands National Archives, The Hague)
  6. this contradicts the Walloon Index notation of a January 13 date, although the quoted French is persuasive. A review of the original documents is probably needed.
  7. 'Island at the Center of the World, by Russell Shorto (Doubleday 2004)
  8. Arien Jorsie, according to the Bergen family history
  9. O’Callaghan, E.B., Documents relating to the State of New-York, Vol 3. Weed, Parsons & Co., Albany, 1849. pgs 50 - 51. https://archive.org/stream/documentaryhisto03ocal#page/48/mode/2up
  10. The Bergen family history, published in 1876
  11. Manhattan in 1628, Michaëlius, Jonas (New York : Dodd, Mead, 1904), p 176, explains the name meant inner water, not Bay of Walloons.
  12. "located where the present United States Marine Hospital in Brooklyn stands and also included the land between Nostrand and Grand avenues" - Island at the Center of the World, by Russell Shorto (Doubleday 2004)
  13. "hiring out some cattle" was the phrasing provided in this profile, attributed to Island at the Center of the World, by Russell Shorto (Doubleday 2004)
  14. this needs verification; another source said he purchased the Manhattan property from the Indians
  15. date was March 18th, 1647 according to the information attributed to Shorto's Island at the Center of the World
  16. New Amsterdam, 1660
  17. believe the source is Island at the Center of the World, by Russell Shorto (Doubleday 2004); another version in the profile apparently paraphased, saying "in 1679, she was living alone, growing flowers and vegetables and had 145 descendants, soon to be 150, alive at that time."
  18. Wikipedia uses Rapelje; the street in Albany is named Rapalye (pictured in the Wikipedia article)
  19. The "illegitimus" is surmised to be because the Catholic priest did not consider a Protestant marriage legitimate
  20. Jehenne de Latre was Jean's sister
  21. Either birthplace or christening place - both places were attached to a 28 April 1604 birth date
  22. Hyperlink entered by Philip van der Walt, April 12, 2014.
  23. Valenciennes, Archives Nord, St. Nicholas Parish Index (1567-1699), image 199. Valenciennes
  24. Valenciennes, Archives Nord, VALENCIENNES (SAINT NICOLAS) / B [1598-1660], 5 Mi 055 R 013 , image 41/741. http://www.archivesdepartementales.lenord.fr/?id=recherche_etat_civil
  25. New Netherlands Connection, Vol 1, Pg 90 (the article is about Catalina Trico, the information about George Rapareilliet as mentioned above is found in the footnotes on pg 90)
  26. Since 1668 Valenciennes has been in the Department du Nord of France. Previously it had been in Haincut, a province in the part of Spanish Netherlands; one source had Rochelle, France
  27. bronverwijzing: DTB 428, p.328 opmerkingen: Huwelijksintekeningen van de KERK. Archief van de Burgerlijke Stand: doop-, trouw- en begraafboeken van Amsterdam (retroacta van de Burgerlijke Stand) Ondertrouwregister: NL-SAA-26387005 Marriage January 13, 1624 Amsterdam archive
  28. b 1605 in Pry (Pris or Prische), now Dept. Nord, France
  29. According to the book, Island at the Center of the World, by Russell Shorto (Doubleday 2004), their marriage was only four days before their ship sailed to America.
  30. information is a transcription of a transcription posted in WikiTree. See Sources for a description of the Walloon Index. Additional information given following "Catharina Triko": "(here spelled Friko, but in the original Dutch it is Trico)(living at) Nes (in Amsterdam) born at Pris in Waesland (French speaking area) (age) 18, accompanied by Marry Flamengh, her sister." Annotation accompanying the reference: "The original entry says that Catherine Trico was born at Paris, but this is deleted and "Pris" is recorded." Information in parentheses was not added by me, but I don't know when it was added (on the index card itself or after it was posted to WikiTree or sometime in between).
  31. Source: The Island at the Centre of the World. The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony that Shaped America. Russell Shorto, Random House, New York, 2004, ISBN 978-0-385-50349-5 (p. 41). Entered by Philip van der Walt, April 12, 2014.
  32. page 63 : Stokes, I. N. Phelps. The iconography of Manhattan Island, 1498-1909. — New York : Robert H. Dodd, 1915-1928.
  33. from Catalyntie's profile: Catalyntie's own testimony before Gov. Thomas Dongan in her old age recites the story of the Unity taking them on to Fort Orangie
  34. Record for Sarah Joris Rapalje
  35. Olive Tree passenger list
  36. another source says Joris came in 1663, then returned to marry Catalina, came alone on the Unity in 1664 with Catalina following in the second ship. This seems unlikely in the extreme, but is presented so it can be refuted: "In the Bergen family history, published in 1876, it is asserted that they both came to the "Mannatans" on the Unity, commanded by Arien Jorsie, and were part of 18 families which remained on-board to go to Fort Orangie (Now Albany), where they lived until 1626. New research, since the publication of the Bergen Book, has Catalyntie arriving on the Niew Nederlandt in 1624, which brought a number of Huguenot refugees from La Rochelle."
  37. list of children taken from The Bergen Family, by Teunis G. Bergen, Albany, N.Y., 1876, as cited in Generation 8, #138, The Ancestors of Maria Vanderveer, which gave source as "per an original family record, preserved in the library of the New York Historical Society" - death dates from another source; names in parentheses from other sources
  38. ’’Family Register’’ located in: New Netherland Connections, Vol 8, #4, pg 85-90
  39. another reference says the Tap House was on Bridge Street; a Dutch Grants mention Joris Rapalje's lot on Pearle Street
  40. another source had March 21
  41. New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol 5, Pg 30. ‘‘Records of the Reformed Dutch Church’’. accessed through NEHGS.
  42. New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol 5, Pg 33. ‘‘Records of the Reformed Dutch Church’’. accessed through NEHGS.
  43. New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol 5, pg 91.‘‘Records of the Reformed Dutch Church’’. accessed through NEHGS.
  44. boratwerker, also written boratworker and boat wecker
  45. weaver of a certain kind of cloth which in French is called bure defined in a French dictionary as a "loosely woven brown colored material of wool," "borat" is defined in a Dutch dictionary as a weaver of wool cloth (summary of a researcher's analysis of other researchers' work, including Dr. George E. McCracken, Editor of the American Genealogist and Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists). Click the Changes tab for the original presentation (profile after August 14 but before August 21, 2013).
  46. cut one reference that he was a "sailor" as an extrapolation from "boat wecker"
  47. "The records of New Netherland show them among the first buyers of land in the wilderness of southern Manhattan, building two houses on Pearl Street steps away from the fort" - excerpt from The Island at the Center of the World
  48. Grants on Pearl Street lists Joris Rapelje as an "early occupant" (1643-47); Valentine, D. T. History of the City of New York (New York : G.P. Putnam, 1853.), p 34
  49. O'Callaghan, E. B. 1797-1880. History of New Netherland Or, New York Under the Dutch. New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1848., Vol 2, pg 581. https://archive.org/stream/historyofnewneth02ocal#page/580/mode/2up
  50. NY State Secretary’s Office, O’Callaghan, E.B., Calendar of Historical Manuscripts in te Office of the Secretary of State, Albany, N.Y, Part 1, Dutch Manuscripts. Pg 364. Pub 1865. http://archive.org/stream/calendarofhistor00newy#page/364/mode/2up
  51. Ghering, Charles T., New York Historical Manuscripts, Dutch. Volumes GG, HH, II, Land Papers, pg 7, 9, 19, 26, 52, 54, 57. Accessed through New Netherlands Institute website: http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/files/1314/0284/1244/Volumes_GG_HH__II_-_Land_Papers.pdf
  52. O'Callaghan, E. B. 1797-1880. History of New Netherland Or, New York Under the Dutch. New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1848., Vol 2, pg 585. https://archive.org/stream/historyofnewneth02ocal#page/584/mode/2up
  53. NY State Secretary’s Office, O’Callaghan, E.B., Calendar of Historical Manuscripts in the Office of the Secretary of State, Albany, N.Y, Part 1, Dutch Manuscripts. Pg 372. Pub 1865. http://archive.org/stream/calendarofhistor00newy#page/372/mode/2up
  54. Ghering, Charles T., New York Historical Manuscripts, Dutch. Volumes GG, HH, II, Land Papers, pg 7, 9, 19, 26, 52, 54, 57. Accessed through New Netherlands Institute website: http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/files/1314/0284/1244/Volumes_GG_HH__II_-_Land_Papers.pdf
  55. Wikipedia article
  56. O'Callaghan, E. B. 1797-1880. The Register of New Netherland, 1626 to 1674. Albany, N.Y.: J. Munsell, 1865. , pg 52. https://archive.org/stream/registerofnewnet00ocalrich#page/52/mode/2up
  57. Documents Relative to the Colonial History of New York, Vol 1, pg 415. https://archive.org/stream/documentsrelativ01alba#page/414/mode/2up
  58. O'Callaghan, E. B. 1797-1880. The Register of New Netherland, 1626 to 1674. Albany, N.Y.: J. Munsell, 1865. , pg 73-74. https://archive.org/stream/registerofnewnet00ocalrich#page/72/mode/2up
  59. one source had 1662/63, which was probably an overcorrection of a transcriber; another source said he died in February 1662 at age 57
  60. one of the merged profiles had "See the Descendants of Jean Rapareillet. Also see The Ancestors of Maria Vanderveer." (Listed under Sources)
  • Quoted here: "For documentation of Joris (Georges) Rapalje's origin and marriage see George E. McCracken, “Joris Janzsen Rapalje of Valenciennes and Catelyntje Jeronimus Trico of Pry,” The American Genealogist 48(1972):118-20; George O. Zabriskie's article in de Halve Maen, cited above; and Hugh T. Law, How to Trace Your Ancestors to Europe (1987), pp. 83-87. As both McCracken and Zabriskie acknowledge, it was Law who actually discovered the key marriage and baptismal records, in 1964. All of these authors emphasize that earlier accounts of the Rapalje ancestry are unreliable."
  • The Bergen Family - or the descendants of Hans Hansen Bergen..., by Teunis G. Bergen, pub. by Joel Munsell, Albany, 1876.
  • Genealogies of New Jersey Families - From the Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey, Vol. 1, p. 62-71.
  • Walloon Index. Description from Hugh T. Law's article, "Chapter 7, Ancestors Traced to France: Joris Jansen De Rapelje and Catharine Trico," How To Trace Your Ancestors to Europe, 1987. : French-speaking refugees founded churches in the Netherlands and held services in French. In the last century, specialists made index cards of the baptism, marriage and burial records of these churches. They also combed their Dutch records and some French and German ones and made similar cards from entries pertaining to refugees and their descendants. They then alphabetized these cards, and the "Walloon Index" was born.
  • Index: Stokes, I. N. Phelps. The iconography of Manhattan Island, 1498-1909. — New York : Robert H. Dodd, 1915-1928. 6 v (see Manhattan Island, Earliest Settlements on: in center column)
  • page 63: Stokes, vol. 4 (first of several pages concerning sailing date for Rapaljes - 1623 or 1624)[61]
  • page xiii: Stokes, vol. 4 (for discussion of Gregorian/Julian calendar change as it effects Amsterdam/New Amsterdam at settlement and later)
  • The Problem with Dates, by Sue Roe (Gregorian/Julian calendar change for England/English colonies, and discussion of how Quakers recorded dates)
  • footnote, page 56: Lamb, Martha J. History of the City of New York (New York : A.S. Barnes and Co., c1896.)
  • A Cossart Family History, 1939

Leads

Footnotes

  1. original statement had April 26 and was followed by a restatement of the baptism, with the April 28 date, so maybe April 26 was his birth date
  2. Note N152 from Lance Foster
  3. He was one of "six children of Jean Rapareillet and his unnamed wife" (he has also been shown as the youngest son of the nine children of Jean and wife Elizabeth Baudoin; another source surmised that the first two children were by another wife or were children of a different Jean; combined with discounting Joris as illegitimate leaves six children for Jean and his wife).
  4. Source: Amsterdam archief 13-01-1624 - Raparlie, Joris - Triko, Catharina - DTB 428, p.328 - Huwelijksintekeningen van de KERK. - OTR00022000169 Marriage 13 January 1624 Amsterdam (scan, left page first entry]
  5. "Netherlands, Noord-Holland Province, Church Records, 1523-1948," images, FamilySearch : Marriage 13 January , 1624 Amsterdam: accessed 29 January 2016 , Nederlands Hervormde > Amsterdam > Huwelijksaangiften, Trouwen 1623-1625 > image 172 of 596; Nederlands Rijksarchiefdienst, Den Haag (Netherlands National Archives, The Hague)
  6. this contradicts the Walloon Index notation of a January 13 date, although the quoted French is persuasive. A review of the original documents is probably needed.
  7. 'Island at the Center of the World, by Russell Shorto (Doubleday 2004)
  8. Arien Jorsie, according to the Bergen family history
  9. O’Callaghan, E.B., Documents relating to the State of New-York, Vol 3. Weed, Parsons & Co., Albany, 1849. pgs 50 - 51. https://archive.org/stream/documentaryhisto03ocal#page/48/mode/2up
  10. The Bergen family history, published in 1876
  11. Manhattan in 1628, Michaëlius, Jonas (New York : Dodd, Mead, 1904), p 176, explains the name meant inner water, not Bay of Walloons.
  12. "located where the present United States Marine Hospital in Brooklyn stands and also included the land between Nostrand and Grand avenues" - Island at the Center of the World, by Russell Shorto (Doubleday 2004)
  13. "hiring out some cattle" was the phrasing provided in this profile, attributed to Island at the Center of the World, by Russell Shorto (Doubleday 2004)
  14. this needs verification; another source said he purchased the Manhattan property from the Indians
  15. date was March 18th, 1647 according to the information attributed to Shorto's Island at the Center of the World
  16. New Amsterdam, 1660
  17. believe the source is Island at the Center of the World, by Russell Shorto (Doubleday 2004); another version in the profile apparently paraphased, saying "in 1679, she was living alone, growing flowers and vegetables and had 145 descendants, soon to be 150, alive at that time."
  18. Wikipedia uses Rapelje; the street in Albany is named Rapalye (pictured in the Wikipedia article)
  19. The "illegitimus" is surmised to be because the Catholic priest did not consider a Protestant marriage legitimate
  20. Jehenne de Latre was Jean's sister
  21. Either birthplace or christening place - both places were attached to a 28 April 1604 birth date
  22. Hyperlink entered by Philip van der Walt, April 12, 2014.
  23. Valenciennes, Archives Nord, St. Nicholas Parish Index (1567-1699), image 199. Valenciennes
  24. Valenciennes, Archives Nord, VALENCIENNES (SAINT NICOLAS) / B [1598-1660], 5 Mi 055 R 013 , image 41/741. http://www.archivesdepartementales.lenord.fr/?id=recherche_etat_civil
  25. New Netherlands Connection, Vol 1, Pg 90 (the article is about Catalina Trico, the information about George Rapareilliet as mentioned above is found in the footnotes on pg 90)
  26. Since 1668 Valenciennes has been in the Department du Nord of France. Previously it had been in Haincut, a province in the part of Spanish Netherlands; one source had Rochelle, France
  27. bronverwijzing: DTB 428, p.328 opmerkingen: Huwelijksintekeningen van de KERK. Archief van de Burgerlijke Stand: doop-, trouw- en begraafboeken van Amsterdam (retroacta van de Burgerlijke Stand) Ondertrouwregister: NL-SAA-26387005 Marriage January 13, 1624 Amsterdam archive
  28. b 1605 in Pry (Pris or Prische), now Dept. Nord, France
  29. According to the book, Island at the Center of the World, by Russell Shorto (Doubleday 2004), their marriage was only four days before their ship sailed to America.
  30. information is a transcription of a transcription posted in WikiTree. See Sources for a description of the Walloon Index. Additional information given following "Catharina Triko": "(here spelled Friko, but in the original Dutch it is Trico)(living at) Nes (in Amsterdam) born at Pris in Waesland (French speaking area) (age) 18, accompanied by Marry Flamengh, her sister." Annotation accompanying the reference: "The original entry says that Catherine Trico was born at Paris, but this is deleted and "Pris" is recorded." Information in parentheses was not added by me, but I don't know when it was added (on the index card itself or after it was posted to WikiTree or sometime in between).
  31. Source: The Island at the Centre of the World. The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony that Shaped America. Russell Shorto, Random House, New York, 2004, ISBN 978-0-385-50349-5 (p. 41). Entered by Philip van der Walt, April 12, 2014.
  32. page 63 : Stokes, I. N. Phelps. The iconography of Manhattan Island, 1498-1909. — New York : Robert H. Dodd, 1915-1928.
  33. from Catalyntie's profile: Catalyntie's own testimony before Gov. Thomas Dongan in her old age recites the story of the Unity taking them on to Fort Orangie
  34. Record for Sarah Joris Rapalje
  35. Olive Tree passenger list
  36. another source says Joris came in 1663, then returned to marry Catalina, came alone on the Unity in 1664 with Catalina following in the second ship. This seems unlikely in the extreme, but is presented so it can be refuted: "In the Bergen family history, published in 1876, it is asserted that they both came to the "Mannatans" on the Unity, commanded by Arien Jorsie, and were part of 18 families which remained on-board to go to Fort Orangie (Now Albany), where they lived until 1626. New research, since the publication of the Bergen Book, has Catalyntie arriving on the Niew Nederlandt in 1624, which brought a number of Huguenot refugees from La Rochelle."
  37. list of children taken from The Bergen Family, by Teunis G. Bergen, Albany, N.Y., 1876, as cited in Generation 8, #138, The Ancestors of Maria Vanderveer, which gave source as "per an original family record, preserved in the library of the New York Historical Society" - death dates from another source; names in parentheses from other sources
  38. ’’Family Register’’ located in: New Netherland Connections, Vol 8, #4, pg 85-90
  39. another reference says the Tap House was on Bridge Street; a Dutch Grants mention Joris Rapalje's lot on Pearle Street
  40. another source had March 21
  41. New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol 5, Pg 30. ‘‘Records of the Reformed Dutch Church’’. accessed through NEHGS.
  42. New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol 5, Pg 33. ‘‘Records of the Reformed Dutch Church’’. accessed through NEHGS.
  43. New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol 5, pg 91.‘‘Records of the Reformed Dutch Church’’. accessed through NEHGS.
  44. boratwerker, also written boratworker and boat wecker
  45. weaver of a certain kind of cloth which in French is called bure defined in a French dictionary as a "loosely woven brown colored material of wool," "borat" is defined in a Dutch dictionary as a weaver of wool cloth (summary of a researcher's analysis of other researchers' work, including Dr. George E. McCracken, Editor of the American Genealogist and Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists). Click the Changes tab for the original presentation (profile after August 14 but before August 21, 2013).
  46. cut one reference that he was a "sailor" as an extrapolation from "boat wecker"
  47. "The records of New Netherland show them among the first buyers of land in the wilderness of southern Manhattan, building two houses on Pearl Street steps away from the fort" - excerpt from The Island at the Center of the World
  48. Grants on Pearl Street lists Joris Rapelje as an "early occupant" (1643-47); Valentine, D. T. History of the City of New York (New York : G.P. Putnam, 1853.), p 34
  49. O'Callaghan, E. B. 1797-1880. History of New Netherland Or, New York Under the Dutch. New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1848., Vol 2, pg 581. https://archive.org/stream/historyofnewneth02ocal#page/580/mode/2up
  50. NY State Secretary’s Office, O’Callaghan, E.B., Calendar of Historical Manuscripts in te Office of the Secretary of State, Albany, N.Y, Part 1, Dutch Manuscripts. Pg 364. Pub 1865. http://archive.org/stream/calendarofhistor00newy#page/364/mode/2up
  51. Ghering, Charles T., New York Historical Manuscripts, Dutch. Volumes GG, HH, II, Land Papers, pg 7, 9, 19, 26, 52, 54, 57. Accessed through New Netherlands Institute website: http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/files/1314/0284/1244/Volumes_GG_HH__II_-_Land_Papers.pdf
  52. O'Callaghan, E. B. 1797-1880. History of New Netherland Or, New York Under the Dutch. New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1848., Vol 2, pg 585. https://archive.org/stream/historyofnewneth02ocal#page/584/mode/2up
  53. NY State Secretary’s Office, O’Callaghan, E.B., Calendar of Historical Manuscripts in the Office of the Secretary of State, Albany, N.Y, Part 1, Dutch Manuscripts. Pg 372. Pub 1865. http://archive.org/stream/calendarofhistor00newy#page/372/mode/2up
  54. Ghering, Charles T., New York Historical Manuscripts, Dutch. Volumes GG, HH, II, Land Papers, pg 7, 9, 19, 26, 52, 54, 57. Accessed through New Netherlands Institute website: http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/files/1314/0284/1244/Volumes_GG_HH__II_-_Land_Papers.pdf
  55. Wikipedia article
  56. O'Callaghan, E. B. 1797-1880. The Register of New Netherland, 1626 to 1674. Albany, N.Y.: J. Munsell, 1865. , pg 52. https://archive.org/stream/registerofnewnet00ocalrich#page/52/mode/2up
  57. Documents Relative to the Colonial History of New York, Vol 1, pg 415. https://archive.org/stream/documentsrelativ01alba#page/414/mode/2up
  58. O'Callaghan, E. B. 1797-1880. The Register of New Netherland, 1626 to 1674. Albany, N.Y.: J. Munsell, 1865. , pg 73-74. https://archive.org/stream/registerofnewnet00ocalrich#page/72/mode/2up
  59. one source had 1662/63, which was probably an overcorrection of a transcriber; another source said he died in February 1662 at age 57
  60. one of the merged profiles had "See the Descendants of Jean Rapareillet. Also see The Ancestors of Maria Vanderveer." (Listed under Sources)
  61. note that date has to be 1624 if record of marriage in Amsterdam in January 1624 is correct; not having seen the original entry...

Acknowledgments

  • Click the Changes tab to see the details of contributions and edits. Following are some of the many contributors. Thanks to all!
  • Amy Hubley-Morris created a profile for Joris Rapalie on November 29, 2012, which had that Joris was born about 1687.
  • The WikiTree profile for George de Rapelje (De Rapelje-3) was created by Ginny Sharp through the import of Sharp Family_2013-07-26.ged on Jul 27, 2013. It included the information that he "came from Rochelle, France on ship New Netherlands."
  • Joris was born in 1604. Joris de Rapalje ... He passed away in 1662. as remembered by Betty Malone, Saturday, October 18, 2014.

Research notes

Needs paraphrasing

The following sections are excessively long and nearly all of it is copyrighted.

See also :

Dutch Colonization, "Mahigans," & Mohawks
At first the company sprinkled its few settlers over a wide area. In the Dutch understanding, laying claim to a patch of territory required inhabiting it (for the English, as would later become an issue, all that was required was having an official representative set foot on a patch of soil not previously claimed by Christians).
Catalina and Joris were in the party initially shipped 150 miles upriver from Manhattan to the falls, where a fort-trading post (Fort Orange, later under the English, Albany) was to be constructed. They sailed through the mud-colored tidal chop, by majestic palisades of rock along the western shore, then passing on both shores the undulating humps of the highlands, to the place the traders reported was the key junction of Indian traffic. Here the east-flowing Mohawk River, after traveling all the way from the Great Lakes region, careened over seventy-foot falls before emptying in the North (Hudson) River. Here the newcomers disembarked and stood defenseless before the towering pines. For shelter initially they dug square pits in the ground, lined them with wood, and covered them with bark roofs(a minister who arrived a few years later, when proper houses were being built, sneered at the "hovels and holes" in which the first arrivals "huddled rather than dwelt").
The natives of the country appeared soon after the settlers stumbled ashore, exchanged presents, and made other gestures of friendship with the ship's captain. It was disorienting for the newcomeres, but the sun had the warmth of spring in it, and the crumbly black earth seemed to cry out to be impregnated with seed. The Rapaljes and the other coupes stayed two years at the location, in autmn harvesting grain "as high as a man," the next spring whispering prayers of thanks when three company ships arrived whose names--The Cow, The Sheep, The Horse--betrayed their cargo. During the whole time the Indians "were all quiet as lambs," as Catalina remembered in old age, coming regularly and trading freely with the settler.
Events soon derailed the initial settlement strategy in the Dutch province. Joris Rapalje, his wife Catalina, and the other settlers at Fort Orange saw their hard work come to a sudden, grisley end in the spring of 1626. Their settlement on the riverbank was on former hunting grounds of the Mahicans, who had welcomed them. To the north and west stretched the territory of the Mohawks. Three miles from the fort, the commander of the fort, three of his men and a party of 24 Mahicans were inundated by a storm of arrows suffering fatal hits. The Mohawks made a show of their victory, and nicely capped the terror they had caused by roasting and eating one expecially unfortunate Dutchman named Tymen Bouwensz. In one swift, bold assault, a band of ambushing Mohawks put an end to the Dutch Mohigan alliance and, by the way, altered the history of the world.
THEIR LEGACY
Over the course of the brief life of New Netherland and into the history of New York the Rapalje children and their offspring would spread across the region. In the 1770s, John Rapalje would serve as a member of the New York State Assembly (he rejected revolution and became a Loyalist). Their descendants have been estimated at upwards of one million, and in the Hudson Valley town of Fishkill, NY, a lane called Rapalje Road is a quiet suburban testament to the endurance of a long-ago slapdash wedding of two young nobodies on the Amsterdam waterfront, which, as much as any political event, marked the beginning of the immigrant, stake-your-claim civilization not only of Manhattan but of America.
A Sreet Rapelye
New York City and United States history can be gleaned from the most mundane, unexceptional places. There's a tiny street on the Cobble Hill-Red Hook border that exists in two sections, having been ravaged by the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway and submerged under the Brooklyn Battery toll plaza, that remembers the family that produced the very first European child born in the colony that would become New York state.
Rapelye Street runs from Henry to Hicks and from Hicks again (with an interruption by the BQE) west to Hamilton.
19-year old Joris Jansen de Rapelje and his wife, 18-year-old Catalyntje Trico, arrived in North America in 1624 from the Netherlands, on a ship called the Eendracht (Unity), accompanied by several other families, Huguenots who intended to escape the provincialism and religious intolerance then in control in Holland. After arriving in the harbor in what would, over the next few decades, be transformed into New Netherland, the Unity sailed up the Hudson River 130 miles to Fort Orange. The Rapelje's daughter Sarah was born there, and she is regarded as the first child born in what's now the state of New York.
By 1626, a year after Sarah's birth, Dutch authorities relocated the families at Ft. Orange to Ft. Amsterdam at the southern end of Manhattan Island. There, roads were being laid out, farms established, houses, a church and a large storage facility built. The Rapeljes built a house near the East River, and were there during the murderous Kieft War (1643-45), which began when the Dutch governor, Willem Kieft, attacked nearby ?Delaware-speaking Indian villages. Thousands of Indians were killed, as well as a number of Dutch settlers. One was Sarah's baby brother, Jacob, who was born in 1639 and was killed, probably in 1643.
In the mid-1630s, about a decade before the start of the Kieft War, the Rapeljes exchanged trade goods with the Canarsie Indians for 335 acres on Long Island, at a place called Wallabout Bay, which was near the present-day site of the Brooklyn ?Navy Yard. A 19th-Century account says their house was "the first house on Long Island, and inhabited by Joris Jansen de Rapelje ... [the father of] Sarah, the first white child of European parentage born in the State."
The Rapeljes were now Long Island farmers; they would stay Long Island farmers until the early 20th Century. New York Newsday
Few chapters of Rapelje family history are more compelling than the one written by Peter Rapelje, the grandfather of the current Peter [of Glen Cove] , who was born in 1873 on the family farm in New Lots, 10 miles from Joris' first land purchase on Long Island. This family had not wandered far from where they began, a testament to their attachment to a place that had sustained them for so long.
This Peter broke from the generations of farmers and earned an engineering degree from Brooklyn Polytechnical Institute. He worked on the first subway tunnel that connected Manhattan to Brooklyn -- the very tunnel that brought the shift in population that would later erase his farm from the map. His photographs of that tunnel fill one of the Rapelje family's albums...
Peter Rapelje the engineer and amateur photographer traveled all over taking pictures -- thousands of pictures.
"The story is that he walked all over to take the pictures," said Eleanor Rapelje. "Peter was very upset about what was happening. My Peter's aunt said her father believed they were tearing down history. Taking these photographs was his way of preserving it." [sounds familiar eh? --your webmaster]
In 1941 and 1948, grandfather Peter also wrote two long accounts of his childhood, remembering how rooms were laid out in the family's farmhouse -- "Grandma always kept her flowers in the northwest corner of the northwest room" -- and recalling the sights and smells of his childhood. "In the evenings my grandfather used to sit in the sitting room on the left side of the fireboard with his chair tipped back against the mantel. The rest of the family would gather round the center table on which stood the kerosene lamp for reading." New York Newsday
Joris Jansen Rapalje info
Arms of Joris Jansen Rapalje.
ARMS- Azure, three bars or.
CREST- Issuing from a ducal coronet or, on a high hat of dignity azure, three bars of the first. The hat surmounted with six ostrich feathers or and azure.
Motto- Willing obedience and serenity of mind.
(Crozier: "General Armory.")
"Joris Janssen Rapalje came to New Netherlands in 1623 ("American Families of Historic Lineage" says about 1632 [a typo?]) on the ship "Unity," which was the first vessel to bring agricultural colonists to the Hudson Valley. For three years, from 1623 to 1626, he resided at Fort Orange, now Albany, but at the end of that time he removed to New Amsterdam, which was becoming a center for persecuted Huguenots and Walloons. He located on what is now Pearl Street and was residing there when his deed to the property was confirmed March 13, 1647. He had already purchased from the Indians, on June 16, 1637, a farm containing one hundred and sixty morgens or three hundred and thirty-five acres. The Indians called it Rennagaconck, while the Dutch called it Wale bocht. It was located where the present United States Marine Hospital in Brooklyn stands and also included the land between Nostrand and Grand avenues. He may have resided there for a time and been obliged to return to the city on account of Indian troubles. In 1641 Joris Rapalje was elected member of a board of twelve men to consult with Governor Kieft on account of the dangerous situation the confronting the Colony on account of unrest among the Indians. This was the beginning of representative government in the Dutch portions of America, and the board availed itself of the opportunity to strengthen such institutions by an attempt to limit the arbitrary power of the Governor, for which they wished to substitute a more democratic system. According to their plan four of their number should become members of the Permanent Council. The representative body was, however, abolished the following year. June 22, 1654, Joris Rapalje sold his property on Pearl Street to Hendrick Hendrickson and removed to his farm at Wale bocht, where he lived the rest of his life. In 1655, 1656, 1657, 1660, and 1662 he was a magistrate in Brooklyn. He apparently died about the time of the close of the Dutch administration, as his name disappears from the records of the time.


still to be dealt with
"Joris Janssen Rapalje came to New Netherlands in 1623 ("American Families of Historic Lineage" says about 1632 [a typo?]) on the ship "Unity," which was the first vessel to bring agricultural colonists to the Hudson Valley. For three years, from 1623 to 1626, he resided at Fort Orange, now Albany, but at the end of that time he removed to New Amsterdam, which was becoming a center for persecuted Huguenots and Walloons. He located on what is now Pearl Street and was residing there when his deed to the property was confirmed March 13, 1647. He had already purchased from the Indians, on June 16, 1637, a farm containing one hundred and sixty morgens or three hundred and thirty-five acres. The Indians called it Rennagaconck, while the Dutch called it Wale bocht. It was located where the present United States Marine Hospital in Brooklyn stands and also included the land between Nostrand and Grand avenues. He may have resided there for a time and been obliged to return to the city on account of Indian troubles. In 1641 Joris Rapalje was elected member of a board of twelve men to consult with Governor Kieft on account of the dangerous situation the confronting the Colony on account of unrest among the Indians. This was the beginning of representative government in the Dutch portions of America, and the board availed itself of the opportunity to strengthen such institutions by an attempt to limit the arbitrary power of the Governor, for which they wished to substitute a more democratic system. According to their plan four of their number should become members of the Permanent Council. The representative body was, however, abolished the following year. June 22, 1654, Joris Rapalje sold his property on Pearl Street to Hendrick Hendrickson and removed to his farm at Wale bocht, where he lived the rest of his life. In 1655, 1656, 1657, 1660, and 1662 he was a magistrate in Brooklyn. He apparently died about the time of the close of the Dutch administration, as his name disappears from the records of the time.
Joris Janssen Rapalje married Catalyntje Trico, who was born in 1605 {in Paris} and died September 11, 1689. She was a daughter of Joris Trico, of Paris, France, and his wife Michele Sauvagie. After the death of her husband, Catalyntje continued to reside at Wale bocht. She was seventy-four years of age at the time Jasper Dankers and Peter Sluyter, the Labodists, visited her there and described her in their journals as follows:
M. de la Grange came with wife to invite me to accompany them in their boat to the Wale bocht, a place situated on Long Island almost an hour's distance below the city, directly opposite Correlaerr hoeck from whence, I had several times observed the place which appeared to me quite pleasant-- she is worldly minded, living with her whole heart, as well as body, among her progeny which now number 145 and will soon reach 150. Nevertheless, she lived alone by herself a little apart from the others, having her little garden and other conveniences with which she helped herself.
Children:
(left this list in situ as it seems to have a lot more information, which should probably be moved to each child's profile)
  • Sara, born at Fort Orange, June 9, 1625, the first white child to be born in New Netherlands, died about 1685; married (first) Hanse Hansen Bergen; (second) Teunis Cysberts Bogart.
  • Marritje, born March 11 {16}, 1627. {married Michael Paulus Vandervoort}
  • Jannetje, born August 16, 1629; married, December 21, 1642, Remmet Janzen Van Jeversen.
  • Judith, born July 15 {5}, 1635; married Peter Pietersen Van Nest.
  • Jan, born August 28, 1637, died January 25, 1663; married April 16 or 26, 1660, Maria Fredericks of the Hague; was a deacon of the Dutch Reformed Church of Brooklyn.
  • Jacob, born May 28, 1639, killed by the Indians.
  • Catalyntje, born March 28, 1641; married August 16, 1664, Jeremias Jansen Van Westerhaut.
  • Jeremias, born June 27, 1643; married Anna, daughter of Teunis Nyssen or Denyse; occupied the ancestral home at the Wallabout; schepen of Brooklyn in 1673 and 1674; justice of the peace in 1689 and 1690.
  • Annitie, born February 8, 1646, married (first), May 14, 1663, Martin Ryerse, from Amsterdam; (second), January 30, 1692 Fransz Joort. {Joost France}
  • Elizabeth, born March 26, 1648; married Dierck Cornelisen Hooglandt.
  • Daniel, born December 29, 1650, baptized at the Dutch Reformed Church, January 1, 1651, died in Brooklyn, December 26, 1725; married (first) Sarah Clock; (second) Tryntie Alberts.
His Birth
1604 , France and New Amsterdam
"Roman Catholic Church of St. Nicholas, Valenciennes: 1604, 28 Avril. Georges Rapareillet, illegitimus fils de Jean Rapareillet, susceptor (godfather) Noe Vasseur susceptrix (godmother) Jehenne de latre."
Huguenot
1500 , France
"Briefly, the Rapalye's were Protestants in a land (France) that was hostile to Protestants. In the religious wars of the 16th century, they became victims of Papal animosity. They were scattered and spread throughout Europe and became prominent in Switzerland and Belgium. George came to Fort Orange (Albany) with his bride in 1623."
His Death
1663 , Brooklyn, New Amsterdam
George reportedly died at a church election of officers meeting, possibly of a heart attack, on 21 February 1663.
Joris Jansen Rapalje
138 Joris Janszen RAPELJE. Born on 28 Apr 1604 in Rochelle, France. (Another source says he was born on 24 Aug 1572).14 Christened on 28 Apr 1604 in Valenciennes, Nord, France. Joris Janszen died in Brooklyn, Kings Co., New York on 21 Feb 1662; he was 57. Occupation: sailor, boratworker (weaver).8 Alias/AKA: Joris Jansen Rapalie,5 George Or Joris Jansen RAPAREILLIET / RAPALJE, Joris Janse / Jansen / Janssen RAPALJE / DE RAPPALJE.

The following excerpt from The Bergen Family, by Teunis G. Bergen, Albany, N.Y., 1876, beginning on page 24:[62][63]

Joris (George) Jansen Rapalie, the father of Sarah, and the common ancestor of the Rapalies of this country, . . . appears to have resided for three years, until in 1626, in Albany, then removed to New Amsterdam, where he remained for more than 22 years (occupying and owning a house and lot on the north side of the present Pearl street, and butting against the south side of the fort, for which he received a patent on the 18th of March, 1647), and until after the birth of his youngest child in 1650.(1)
During at least a portion of this time he kept a tavern or tap-house, as then styled, his name appearing as late as March 16, 1648, on the records in the book of the burgomasters court(2) of said city, among the inn keepers and tapsters, inhabitants who promised to observe the proclamation of Gov. Stuyvesant of March 10th, 1648, in relation to the regulation of such houses. He probably removed to his Long Island farm as early as 1655, which he probably partially cultivated previously, for April 13th of that year he was appointed one of the magistrates of Brooklyn, in the place of Pieter Cornellisse.(3) Rapalie figured frequently in numerous suits on the records of the burgomaster's and schepen's court of New Amsterdam, up to 1656, on the 28th of April, of which year a return was made in a suit of Cornelia Schellinger1 against "Joresy Rapalje," of Rapalje's having departed beyond the jurisdiction of the court, and the same return was made on the 25th of the following November, in a suit of Jacob Schellinger(4) against "Catalyn Joresy," Rapalje's wife.
On the 16th of June, 1637, Rapalie bought a tract of land of the Indians, "Kakapeyno, and Pewichaas," called "Rinnegakonck," situate "on Long Island, south of the Island of the Manhattans, extending from a certain Kil till into the woods south and eastward to a certain Kripplebush (swamp), to a place where the water runs over the stones." On the 17th of June, 1643,(5) his Indian purchase was patented to him by the governor, and is described as "a piece of land called Rinnegakonck, formerly purchased by him of the Indians, as will appear by reference to the transport, lying on Long Island, in the bend of Mereckkawick(6) (now Brooklyn), east of the land of Jan Monfoort,(7) extending along the said land in a southerly direction, towards and into the woods 242" rods, by the kill and marsh easterly up 390 rods, at the "sweet marsh 202 rods on a southerly direction into the woods, and behind into the woods 384 rods in a westerly direction, and certain outpoints next to the marsh, amounting in all to the contents of 167 morgens and 406 rods" (about 335 acres).
On this land, which is situated in the city of Brooklyn, in the vicinity of and including the United States Hospital, and on the easterly side of the Waaleboght, Rapalie finally looated, and died soon after the close of the Dutch administration, having had eleven children.(8)
In August, 1641, Rapalie was one of the twelve men representing Manhattan, Breukelen and Pavonia, elected to suggest means to punish the Indians for a murder they had committed. In 1655, '56, '57, and 1660, he was one of the magistrates of Brooklyn.
---
(1) See Riker's Newtown, p. 267. He sold his house and lot June 22d, 1654, to Hendrick Henderson, drummer, for 800 gl.
(2) The records here referred to are proclamations, etc., issued prior to the establishment of the courts, and entered in the beginning of this book, containing said court records.
(3) Pieter Cornellisse, a house carpenter, in New Amsterdam as early as 1640, was appointed one of the magistrates of Brooklyn, April 9, 1654. In 1646, he obtained a patent for over 27 morgens in Brooklyn adjoining lands of Cornelius Dircksen, fetryman.
(4) Cornelia Schellenger was a daughter of Cornelis Melyn; the early patentee and settler of Staten Island, she marrying (1st), April 30, 1647, Jacob Loper, and (2d), April 7, 1643, Jacobus Schellenger.
(5) See Book G. G., pp. 20 and 64, land papers, office sec. state, Albany.
(6) The bend of Mereckkawick is the same as the Waaleboght cove, and Mereckkawick is the Indian name of Brooklyn.
(7) The patent of Jan Monfoort for 28 morgens, was dated May 29, 1641, and a second patent for the same premises, Dec. 1, 1643; in which they are described as "betwixt the land of Jorse Rapalje on the east side, and the land of Pieter Monfoort on the west side," April 23, 1701, Peter Monfoort and Maria his wife, John Monfoort and Ida his wife, William Cowenhoven and Jonica his wife, and Claes Wyckoff and Sarah his wife, for Ï150, as heirs at law, conveyed Jan Monfoort's patent to Garret Cowenhoven, as per a deed in hand of H. C. Murphy, In Jan Monfoort left no issue, the parties conveying being the children of his brother, Pieter Monfoort.
(8)His children, as per an original family record, preserved in the library of the New York Historical Society, were Sarah, born June 9, 1625, m. successively to Hans Hansen Bergen and Teunis Gysbert Bogaert: Marritie, born March 11, 1627, m. Nov. 18, 1640, Michael Paulus or Paulisen Vandervoort, from Vancermonde or Vlaenderen in the Netherlands, the ancestor of the Vandenvoort family in this country, who resided for some years in New Amsterdam, where, Sept. 15, 1646, he obtained a patent for a lot: Jannetie, born August 18, 1629, m. Dec. 21, 1642, Rem Jansen Vanderbek, from Severen, in Westphalia, by one account Coevorden, in Overyssel, by another, the ancestor of the Remsen family in this country: Judith, born July 5, 1635, m. Pleter Pietersen Van Nest, the anoestor of most of the Van Nest family of this country: Jan, born August 28, 1637, m. April 26, 1660, Maria Fredericks, of the Hague, died in 1662, without surviving issue: Jacob, born May 28, 1639, shot dead by the Indians while standing in his door: Catalyntie, born March 28, 1641, m. 1664, Jeremias Jansen Westerhout, who came over on the ship Rose-tree: Jeronemus, born June 27, 1643, m. Anna Denyse, daughter of Teunis Nyssen or Denyse: Annette, born Feb. 8, 1646, m. (1st), May 14, 1663, Marten Reyyese, as written by himself, or Ryerse, of Amsterdam, the ancestor of the Ryerson family in this country; m. (2d), Jan. 30, 1692, Joost Fransz, widower of Gertruy Aukes, who emigrated in 1654: Elizabet, born March 28, 1648, m. Dirck Cornelisse Hooglandt, and had a son Ariaen Dirckse, bapt. Sept. 22, 1670: and Daniel, born Dec. 29, 1650, m. June 13, 1674, Sarah Klock, of Fort Orange.

<not sure where the following was from>

http://www.stipak.com/vanderveer/maria/bios/5.HTM
Catelyna Trico Rapalje
1600's , Long Island NY
http://longislandgenealogy.com/HistoricLI.pdf
Pages 25-26
Historic Long Island
.............................The following year Joris Jansen de Rapalje, a Huguenot who married Catelyna Trico of Paris, and had resided at Fort Orange and at New Amsterdam, bought a farm on the Waal-boght, which name, later corrupted into Wallabout, had been given to the present site of the Navy Yard. Rapalje died in 1665, but his widow livedon at the Waal-boght- the mother of Brooklyn- and there in 1679 the Labadists missionaries, Dankers and Sluyter, found her with her eleven children and their descendants, who then numbered one hundred and forty five. They describe her as devoted with her whole soul to her progeny. "Nevertheless she lived a lone, a little apart which she took are of herself." When, in 1688, Governor Dongan wished to establish the fact that the first settlement on the Delaware were made by the Dutch he made use of the evidence of the widow Rapalje, who described her arrival in 1623, told how, "Four women came along with her in the same ship, in which the Governor Arian Jarissen came also over, which four women were married at sea." and afterwards with their husbands were sent to the Delaware. A few years later she made a second affidavit at her house "in ye Wale," wherein, recalling the Indiana war of 1643, she pleasantly alluded to her previous life with the red men, for three years at Fort Orange, "All of which time ye Indians were all as quiet as lambs and came and traded with all ye freedom imaginable.".........
Valenciennes France
Before 1500 <snipped 693 through 14th century>
1500-1793
In 1524, Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, arrived at Valenciennes, and - even when Henry II of France allied with him against the Protestants in 1552 - Valenciennes became (c.1560) an early center of Calvinism and in 1562 was location of the first act of resistance against persecution of Protestants in the Spanish Netherlands. On the "Journée des Mals Brûlés" (Bad Burnings Day) in 1562, a mob freed some Protestants condemned to die at the stake. After the "révolte des gueux" in 1566, Philip II of Spain's forces massed at the porte d'Anzin (in a fortress known as "La Redoute") were besieged by Valenciennes in 1576. In 1580, Alexander Farnese, Duke of Parma took Valenciennes and Protestantism was eradicated there, but despite these conflicts Valenciennes remained under Spanish protection. With its manufacturers of wool and fine linens, the city was able to become economically independent.
In 1591, the Jesuits built a school and then the foundations of a church of Sainte-Croix. In 1611, the facade of the town hall was completely rebuilt in magnificent Renaissance style. In the seventeenth century the Scheldt was channelled between Cambrai and Valenciennes, benefitting Valenciennes' wool, fabric and fine arts. To use up flax yarn, women began to make the famous Valenciennes lace.
<The French army laid siege to the city in 1656...snipped>
Bergen Family
From The Bergen Family by Teunis G. Bergen, Albany, N.Y., 1876, beginning on page 24:20
[Page 24]
Joris (George) Jansen Rapalie, the father of Sarah, and the common ancestor of the Rapalies of this country, is said by some writers to be a proscribed Huguenot, from Rochelle in France, an emigrant in 1623 in the ship Unity with Catalyntie Trico, whom he probably married before the voyage (although the ceremony may have been performed after his arrival, having no date of the same), appears to have resided for three years, until in 1626, in Albany, then removed to New Amsterdam, where he remained for more than 22 years (occupying and owning a house and lot on the north side of the present Pearl street, and butting against the south side of the fort, for which he received a patent on the 18th of March, 1647), and until after the birth of his youngest child in 1650.1 During at least a portion of this time he kept a tavern or tap-house, as then styled, his name appearing as late as March 16, 1648, on the records in the book of the burgomasters court2 of said city, among the inn keepers and tapsters, inhabitants who promised to observe the proclamation of Gov. Stuyvesant of March 10th, 1648, in relation to the regulation of such houses. He probably removed to his Long Island farm as early as 1655, which he probably partially cultivated previously, for April 13th of that year he was appointed one of the magistrates of Brooklyn, in the place of Pieter Cornellisse.3 Rapalie figured frequently in numerous suits
________________
[Footnotes on Page 24]:
1See Riker's Newtown, p. 267. He sold his house and lot June 22d, 1654, to Hendrick Henderson, drummer, for 800 gl.
2The records here referred to are proclamations, etc., issued prior to the establishment of the courts, and entered in the beginning of this book, containing said court records.
3Pieter Cornellisse, a house carpenter, in New Amsterdam as early as 1640, was appointed one of the magistrates of Brooklyn, April 9, 1654. In 1646, he obtained a patent for over 27 morgens in Brooklyn adjoining lands of Cornelius Dircksen, fetryman.
[Page 25]:
on the records of the burgomaster's and schepen's court of New Amsterdam, up to 1656, on the 28th of April, of which year a return was made in a suit of Cornelia Schellinger1 against "Joresy Rapalje," of Rapalje's having departed beyond the jurisdiction of the court, and the same return was made on the 25th of the following November, in a suit of Jacob Schellinger against "Catalyn Joresy," Rapalje's wife.
On the 16th of June, 1637, Rapalie bought a tract of land of the Indians, "Kakapeyno, and Pewichaas," called "Rinnegakonck," situate "on Long Island, south of the Island of the Manhattans, extending from a certain Kil till into the woods south and eastward to a certain Kripplebush (swamp), to a place where the water runs over the stones." On the 17th of June, 1643,2 his Indian purchase was patented to him by the governor, and is described as "a piece of land called Rinnegakonck, formerly purchased by him of the Indians, as will appear by reference to the transport, lying on Long Island, in the bend of Mereckkawick3 (now Brooklyn), east of the land of Jan Monfoort,4 extending along the said land in a southerly direction, towards and into the woods 242"
________________
[Footnotes on page 25]:
http://www.stipak.com/vanderveer/maria/bios/5.HTM
Joris Jansen Rapalje
138 Joris Janszen RAPELJE. Born on 28 Apr 1604 in Rochelle, France. (Another source says he was born on 24 Aug 1572).14 Christened on 28 Apr 1604 in Valenciennes, Nord, France. Joris Janszen died in Brooklyn, Kings Co., New York on 21 Feb 1662; he was 57. Occupation: sailor, boratworker (weaver).8 Alias/AKA: Joris Jansen Rapalie,5 George Or Joris Jansen RAPAREILLIET / RAPALJE, Joris Janse / Jansen / Janssen RAPALJE / DE RAPPALJE.
From The Bergen Family by Teunis G. Bergen, Albany, N.Y., 1876, beginning on page 24:20
[Page 24]
Joris (George) Jansen Rapalie, the father of Sarah, and the common ancestor of the Rapalies of this country, is said by some writers to be a proscribed Huguenot, from Rochelle in France, an emigrant in 1623 in the ship Unity with Catalyntie Trico, whom he probably married before the voyage (although the ceremony may have been performed after his arrival, having no date of the same), appears to have resided for three years, until in 1626, in Albany, then removed to New Amsterdam, where he remained for more than 22 years (occupying and owning a house and lot on the north side of the present Pearl street, and butting against the south side of the fort, for which he received a patent on the 18th of March, 1647), and until after the birth of his youngest child in 1650.1 During at least a portion of this time he kept a tavern or tap-house, as then styled, his name appearing as late as March 16, 1648, on the records in the book of the burgomasters court2 of said city, among the inn keepers and tapsters, inhabitants who promised to observe the proclamation of Gov. Stuyvesant of March 10th, 1648, in relation to the regulation of such houses. He probably removed to his Long Island farm as early as 1655, which he probably partially cultivated previously, for April 13th of that year he was appointed one of the magistrates of Brooklyn, in the place of Pieter Cornellisse.3 Rapalie figured frequently in numerous suits
________________
[Footnotes on Page 24]:
1See Riker's Newtown, p. 267. He sold his house and lot June 22d, 1654, to Hendrick Henderson, drummer, for 800 gl.
2The records here referred to are proclamations, etc., issued prior to the establishment of the courts, and entered in the beginning of this book, containing said court records.
3Pieter Cornellisse, a house carpenter, in New Amsterdam as early as 1640, was appointed one of the magistrates of Brooklyn, April 9, 1654. In 1646, he obtained a patent for over 27 morgens in Brooklyn adjoining lands of Cornelius Dircksen, fetryman.
________________
[Page 25]:
on the records of the burgomaster's and schepen's court of New Amsterdam, up to 1656, on the 28th of April, of which year a return was made in a suit of Cornelia Schellinger1 against "Joresy Rapalje," of Rapalje's having departed beyond the jurisdiction of the court, and the same return was made on the 25th of the following November, in a suit of Jacob Schellinger against "Catalyn Joresy," Rapalje's wife.
On the 16th of June, 1637, Rapalie bought a tract of land of the Indians, "Kakapeyno, and Pewichaas," called "Rinnegakonck," situate "on Long Island, south of the Island of the Manhattans, extending from a certain Kil till into the woods south and eastward to a certain Kripplebush (swamp), to a place where the water runs over the stones." On the 17th of June, 1643,2 his Indian purchase was patented to him by the governor, and is described as "a piece of land called Rinnegakonck, formerly purchased by him of the Indians, as will appear by reference to the transport, lying on Long Island, in the bend of Mereckkawick3 (now Brooklyn), east of the land of Jan Monfoort,4 extending along the said land in a southerly direction, towards and into the woods 242"
________________
[Footnotes on page 25]:
http://www.stipak.com/vanderveer/maria/bios/5.HTM
An Immigrant Story
1624-1689 , Ft Orange and New Amsterdam
This is taken from a book by Russell Shorto, The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony that Shaped America, @2004, Doubleday, Chapter 3.
The Journey
Three months it took to follow Hudson, four if the winds failed. From Amsterdam the ships made their way across the wide inland sea called IJ, with its treacherous shoals, to the windswept island of Texel, and then set off into the white hoar of the North Sea. They gave the Portuguese coast a wide berth and skirted the Canary Islands off North Africa, their captains with skill and luck avoiding predatory privateers and priates (or not: some ships were taken by both). Then, riding the trades, they beat a long, forbidden arc southwest across the blue-gray wilderness of the Atlantic, swinging upward again north of the Bahamas and along the coast of the new land, the new world, keeping a sharp eye for the hooked penisula that Hudson notes, and so into the enveloping embrace of the great harbor.
As the sea-battered ships finally entered the harbor, the passengers gazed out onto a wholly new landscape, stranger and more complex than the flat land they had left. Sailing silently into the inner harbor, approaching the sourthern tip of Manhattan Island, the ships glided into a reedy, marshy expanse of tidal wetland (the Mohawk name for Manhattan--Ganono--translates as "reeds" or "place of reeds", a complicated crowwover region of freshwater and marine speicies, where bay, swamp forest, and serpentine barrens bred skying, cawing shore birds--plovers, sandpipers, dowitchers, yellowlegs--as well as think populations of hemebody mallards, and also drew migrating flocks of oldsquaws, mergansers, and wigeons that blackened the gray November sky....Rising up above the island's reedy shoreline were forested hills: the best guess on the origin of the Indian name that would stick is the Delaware Mannahata, "hilly island," though some have suggested that simply "the island" or "the small island" is a more accurate translation.
Some background
...The truce negoitiated between Spain and the Dutch Republic during the year of Hudson's voyage (1609) was to last for twelve years. It ended promptly in 1621, and immediately the spear-rattling began among Dutch right-wingers....The renewal of war with Spain fit in with a scheme for Dutch frigates of a privately owned company to carry out raids on Spanish ships in Caribbean and South American waters. This privateering was an accepted wartime activity.
Merchants and politicians were suddenly interested. Wealthy businessmen organized themselves into five regional chambers, each of which contributed startup funds. The Steas Genera, the governing body of the country, added a modest amount, and by October 1623 the West India Company was flush as any new company in history, with more than seven million guilders in its coffers....
Of course settlers were required, and raising them proved to be one of the hardest aspects of the whole complex business of creating an Atlantic empire. Times were good in the homeland; the future looked even better. And Amsterday was probably the best place in the world to be poor...
But, as always the country was loaded with refugees, and, by promising land in exchange for six years of service, the company managed to round up a handful of hale young Walloons--French-speaking exiles from what is today Belgium--made sure, like Noah, that they had a female for every male, and hustled them into Amsterdam council chamber, where they swore an oath of allegiance to the company and the government.
The councillor who administered the oath, Claes Perszen, was a renowned physician and surgeon, so renowed that while we know him from Rembrandt's viscerally famous painting The Anatomy Lesson Dr Tulp ("tulp" or "tulip," being a nickname, from the flower painted above his front door), at the time it was the doctor who, in agreeing to the portait, helped make the artist famous....
There was lots of raw youth: four couples were actually married at sea, the shilp's captain, Cornelis May (for whom, incidentially, Cape May, NJ, is named), doing the honors. Another pair, Catalina Trico and Joris Rapalje--were smarter.
Their story
Maybe they knew what conditions would be like on baord, and didn't relish the idea of consummating a marriage there. They agreed to take part in the wildly hazardous enterprise on the condition that the company first marry them in a hastier-than-normal ceremony, which took place four days before their ship left Amsterdam on January 25, 1624. "Espouse'le 21 Janvier," the clerk of the Walloon Church of Amsterday recorded, without wasting too muchy time getting the names right, "Joris Raporbie de Valencenne, et Caterine triko." Being illiterate, both made their marks on the page. He was nineteen, she was eighteen: neither had parents sign the registry, which suggests that both were either alone in the world or alone in that part of the world, which amounted to the same thing. Like many who were to follow, they had nothing to lose.
Considering the stupendous dangers awaiting them, first at sea and then on arrival, it wasn't a union a betting man would likely lay money on. And yet, sixty years later, when the English colonies of Pennsylvania and Maryland were embroiled in a border dispute and needed evidence of "Christian" occupation of certain lands along the eastern seaboard, the representatives of William Penn found an old woman to testify who was known to have been among the first European settlers. Catalin Trico, now in her eighties, was a widow, but she and Joris had had a long and fruitful marriage. The records of New Netherland show them among the first buyers of land in the wilderness of sourthern Manhattan, buidling two house on Pearl Street steps away from the fort, obtaining a milk cow, borrowing money from the provincial government, moving their homestead to a large tract of farmland across the river in the new village of Breuckelen, and giving birth to and baptizing eleven children. Their first, Sarah was considered the first Euopean born in what would become New York (In 1656, at the age of thirty, she proclaimed herself "first born christian daugher of New Netherland")....


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Images: 2
Birth Record for George Rapareilliet
Birth Record for George Rapareilliet

de Rapalje, Joris marriage record, Int. Marriage 13 January, 1624 Joris Raparlie and Catharina Triko
de Rapalje, Joris marriage record, Int. Marriage 13 January, 1624 Joris Raparlie and Catharina Triko

Collaboration

On 11 Jul 2017 at 14:54 GMT Robert Harrison wrote:

I came across another interesting relationship. It APPEARS to me that a person is related to herself as her AUNT... Anyway, I am referring to Marigritie Van Neste (Van_Neste-12 and Van_Neste-13). Are these in fact the same person, or not. They show up with two different sets of parents. However, birthdates, etc do not seem to jive.... I added a little spreadsheet to the profiles to try to get some help in understanding who's who. My interest is that #12 is the ancestor (mother) of a bunch of my wife's relatives... Any thoughts/help would be appreciated.

Regards, Robert

On 5 Jul 2017 at 01:44 GMT Liz (Noland) Shifflett wrote:

Astrid - it's gone forever, except as a redirect. Any link that went to Rapalie-16 gets redirected by the URL to its new profile, so Rapalie-16 will never be an active profile again. But it was not the normal spelling ("i" instead of "j"). If it had been "Rapalje-16" then WikiTree would not have allowed it to be merged away into another profile with the same spelling but a higher number. If the profile with the higher number is PPP the merge cannot be completed, because WikiTree won't let either profile be merged away (the PPP one or the one with the lower number).

Cheers, Liz

On 4 Jul 2017 at 23:42 GMT Astrid (Schellenberger) Spaargaren wrote:

Roger B.!


Got the PPP part. As I think I got it before...... No Gedcoms or others can change things right away (freely). Protecting so things can be discussed before any change........... and not changed right away,

Just unhappy the profile number Rapalje-16 is gone? Is it gone? If I make an new Raplje will I or anyone else ever be able to make a Rapalje-16? Or is it gone forever...............

Part of the Unknown Project -recycling profiles-. Merging -looking at it that way- seems wrong. Better re-use them for children or parents not yet added. Like at the Coymans.............. I forgot the option to re-use as I got nervous I made duplicates.......

Hmm maybe there is a G2G threat about profiles with a lower number merged away......... They will never return?

Just curious.

Thank you B.

Night for now.

A.

On 4 Jul 2017 at 22:14 GMT Bea (Timmerman) Wijma wrote:

Hi Astrid,

PPP locks the LNAB (field) and the parents, so it is to prevent parents are removed or changed and of course to prevent a LNAB or the correct LNAB with the lowest number gets merged away.

If like in this case, there are duplicates with different LNAB, and if people feel or think, the other duplicate profile perhaps has a more correct LNAB, we all (if it isn't merged away already of course) can decide to remove the PPP from this one and to PPP the duplicate.

So if someone would have thought hey Rapalie-16 in fact is a better or more correct LNAB for Joris, they could have put the merge on hold by setting them as unmerged match with an explanation why they think or feel these profiles are not ready for a merge. And that's when we could have decided to perhaps deprotect this one and protect the other and after that propose and merge them.

So PPP is just protecting the LNAB and the parents, and the project profiles are added so we all can share, keep track of and manage and work on them together using the Project google groups.  ;)

On 4 Jul 2017 at 21:57 GMT Astrid (Schellenberger) Spaargaren wrote:

Thank you Dodie and Bea.

So the PPP-ed (I know the PPP is for stopping anyone to change the profile) page always above the profile that represents the same person, even if that profile has a lower WikiTree- ID number. And of course not as Dodie says, with the wrong LNAB.

Unless the other profile is more accurate. But before being able to merge the PPP has to be removed.... Did I understand that right?

Still.......... It is easy to change a wrong LNAB. Or to re-use the "wrong" profile for someone with the same LNAB. I don t want to be of any trouble. Just trying to understand.

Thank you again.

A.

On 4 Jul 2017 at 17:45 GMT Bea (Timmerman) Wijma wrote:

It is because there were numerous duplicates imported or created in the past for this family, so this always has been the PPP profile where all duplicates were and still are merged into, so if profiles have PPP all duplicates are merged (only possible way) into that PPP't one.

If the LNAB of the other profile had a better LNAB we before the merge should have removed the PPP and PPP the other profile.

But they are already merged now, so .. ;)

On 4 Jul 2017 at 17:30 GMT D (Hoskins) H wrote:

It's actually because of the LNAB that it would be merged into Rapalje-19 instead of Rapalie-16. I guess there was a spelling error and that is why the reverse merge.

On 4 Jul 2017 at 15:53 GMT Astrid (Schellenberger) Spaargaren wrote:

I thought it is WikiTree policy to merge always into the lowest ID? Why into the higher ID? Because of the extensive biography?

Thank you.

Astrid

On 4 Jul 2017 at 12:38 GMT Robert Harrison wrote:

Rapalie-16 and Rapalje-19 appear to represent the same person because: I created Rapalie-16 based on a source (A Cossart Family History,1939) contained in my Free Profile Watchlist. Afterwards, I found that Rapalje-19 is the same person. I verified that looking at one of the daughters (Judith), who lines up. Please eliminate Rapalie-16 by merging him into Rapalje-19.

I understand that I just cannot simply delete Rapalie-16. Thanks, Bob Harrison

On 31 Mar 2017 at 03:38 GMT Beryl Meehan wrote:

Refer to Historic families of America - The Almy Family of Portsmouth 1630 and Joris de Rapalje of Fort Orange Albany New York, 1623. Published by Charles, Kingsbury, Miller of Chicago, IL, 1897

indexed. Total 136 pages. Some sources included. Two separate families in one publication. http://archive.org/stream/historicfamilies00mill/historicfamilies00mill_djvu.txt

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Joris is 13 degrees from Claude Monet, 17 degrees from Gigi Tanksley and 15 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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