Richard Rush

Richard D. Rush (1780 - 1859)

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Hon. Richard D. Rush
Born in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United Statesmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married about in Annapolis, Anne Arundel, Maryland, USAmap [uncertain]
Descendants descendants
Died in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United Statesmap
Profile last modified | Created 4 Oct 2010 | Last significant change: 22 Dec 2018
00:25: Natalie (Durbin) Trott edited the Biography for Richard D. Rush (1780-1859). [Thank Natalie for this]
This page has been accessed 1,103 times.

Categories: United States Attorneys General | US Secretaries of the Treasury.

Contents

Biography

Richard Rush, second son and third child of Dr. Benjamin and Mrs. Julia Rush, was born in Philadelphia on the twenty-ninth day of August, A.D. 1780, and was married on the twenty-ninth day of August, A.D. 1809, by the Rev. Judd to Catherine E. Murray, daughter of Dr. James and Mrs. Sarah E. Murray then of Piney Grove, but formerly of Annapolis, Maryland. He died at his house in South Eighth Street below Locust Street, Philadelphia, on the thirtieth day of July, A.D. 1859, and was buried in his family vault in North Laurel Cemetery in the City of Philadelphia.

He had been made Attorney General of the United States by President James Madison, and afterward appointed acting Secretary of State. In A.D. 1817, he was sent as Minister Plenipotentiary to the Court of St. James, where he remained nearly eight years, when he was recalled by President John Quincy Adams to fill the office of Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, subsequently he went again to England to collect and receive the Smithsonian Legacy, and after some interval was appointed Minister to France. After his return to this country he spent the latter years of his life either at Sydenham, his country seat, formerly in the county (but now Fifteenth Street and Columbia Avenue in the City of Philadelphia) of Philadelphia, or at his house in South Eighth Street below Locust Street.

A memorial containng travels through life or sundry incidents in . . .

Benjamin Rush, Louis Alexander Biddle, Henry J. . . .


Richard Rush Gets the Gold

Posted on April 24, 2010 by june lloyd

The Smithsonian Institution’s Museum of American History has reopened after being closed for extensive renovations. A sizable number of York County residents annually visit the Smithsonian’s complex of outstanding museums, most of which are conveniently located less than two hours from York in our nation’s capitol. The Smithsonian Institution was established with funds left by English scientist James Smithson. A former resident of York, Richard Rush, was instrumental in obtaining that legacy.

Richard Rush, the son of Declaration of Independence signer Benjamin Rush, was born in Philadelphia in 1780. A brilliant student, he graduated from Princeton at age 17 and was admitted to the Philadelphia Bar to begin practicing law at 20. He successively became Attorney General of Pennsylvania in 1811, United States Attorney General in 1814, and then Minister to Great Britain in 1817. Rush seems to have been the perfect appointee for the latter job, which came at a time shortly after the end of the War of 1812 when American and British relations were still touchy. His diplomacy and charm bore fruit in peaceful agreements concerning disarmament on the Great Lakes and setting a permanent border line between a sizable portion of the United States and Canada. During this time, he also helped devise the Monroe Doctrine against foreign intrusion in the Western Hemisphere. After returning from Great Britain, Rush served as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury and ran, unsuccessfully, for Vice President on a ticket with John Quincy Adams in 1828.

The Rushes found they needed to economize when Richard left government service in 1829. Consequently their Philadelphia house was sold and their Washington residence rented out. Richard and Catherine and at least five of their ten children moved to York. This was a good location, as Jacob Emmitt, the landlord of their spacious residence just north of St. Mary’s Church on South George Street, later advertised in the York Gazette, presenting “daily communication with the cities of Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, and Harrisburg.” Catherine Murray Rush was a Baltimore native, so that may have been a factor in choosing York. They also had York friends, including lawyer and politician Charles A. Barnitz, with whom son Benjamin Rush read law during this period. Richard Rush became a Trustee of the York County Academy, a position he held for many years, even after he left York. While living here, Rush became one of the leaders of the national Anti-Masonic movement. He believed that politicians especially should not be members of secret societies; all aspects of their lives should be honest and open.

Shortly after leaving York several years later, Rush was sent by President Andrew Jackson to England to pursue the Smithson bequest. Smithson had died in 1829 and had written in his will that if his nephew, his only heir, died childless, the estate was to go to the “United States of America, to found[ed] at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men.” The nephew died, without children, in 1835, but the nephew’s mother challenged the will in the notoriously cumbersome British Chancery Court. In a remarkably short two years, Rush was awarded the estate on behalf of the U.S. He sold Smithson’s properties, converting the proceeds to 104,960 gold sovereign coins. According to the Smithsonian website, Rush set sail on the aptly named Mediator on July 17, 1838. He arrived in the U.S. six weeks later with Smithson’s mineral collection and library as well as the 11 boxes of gold coins. The sovereigns were turned over to the U.S. Treasury and melted down to yield $508,318.46 worth of gold, a sizable nest egg with which to found one of our country’s premier educational institutions.

In the 1840s, Rush added to his extremely impressive resume by being named Minister to France at age 67. Still, after holding several Cabinet posts and serving as ambassador to two European world powers, he has been said to have viewed his part in obtaining the Smithson legacy his most important public service. York Countians can be proud, that for a while, this well-liked, distinguished personage was one of our own.

Sources

  • Maryland, Compiled Marriages, 1655-1850, Ancestry.com Operations Inc. (2004), Maryland Compiled Marriages
  • Colonial Families of the United States of America: in Which is Given the History, Genealogy and Armorial Bearings of Colonial Families Who Settled in the American Colonies From the Time of the Settlement of Jamestown, 13th May, 1607, to the Battle of Lexington, 19th April, 1775. 7 volumes. 1912. Reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1966, 1995. Page 547, Murray Family
  • Colonial Families of the USA, 1607-1775, Colonial Families of the United States of America: in Which is Given the History, Genealogy and Armorial Bearings of Colonial Families Who Settled in the American Colonies From the Time of the Settlement of Jamestown, 13th May, 1607, to the Battle of Lexington, 19th April, 1775. 7 volumes. 1912. Reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1966, 1995. Page 364, Maynadier Family
  • Colonial Families of the United States of America: in Which is Given the History, Genealogy and Armorial Bearings of Colonial Families Who Settled in the American Colonies From the Time of the Settlement of Jamestown, 13th May, 1607, to the Battle of Lexington, 19th April, 1775. 7 volumes. 1912. Reprinted, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1966, 1995., Page 408, Rush Family
  • Find A Grave: Memorial #22740


Family Data Collection - Individual Records about Richard Rush. Pennsylvania and New Jersey, Church and Town Records, 1708-1985 about Hon Richard Rush. American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) about Richard Rush

Repository

Edmund West, comp.. Family Data Collection - Individual Records [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000.

Original data: Historic Pennsylvania Church and Town Records. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

Original data: Godfrey Memorial Library. American Genealogical-Biographical Index. Middletown, CT, USA: Godfrey Memorial Library.


Acknowledgments

This person was created through the import of Jenkins Family File w:sources 9.ged on 04 October 2010. The following data was included in the gedcom:

Note

Note: @N505@
@N505@ NOTE
Minister to France and England and Secretary to the Treasury.
Source: #S437
@S437@ SOUR
Type: Newspaper
Title: Death of Dr. Rush of Philadephia
Periodical: New York Times
Place: Philadelphia
Date: May 30, 1869
Page: 3
Source Locality: internet via ProQuest Historical Newspapers

DATV Oct. 25, 2006



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Richard is 21 degrees from Robin Helstrom, 20 degrees from Katy Jurado and 13 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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