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Thomas Smith (1696 - 1750)

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Thomas Smith
Born in Wrightstown, Bucks, Pennsylvaniamap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died in Windy Bush Farm, Bucks, Pennsylvaniamap
Profile last modified 23 Jul 2019 | Created 22 Oct 2011
This page has been accessed 674 times.

Contents

Biography

Death

1750[1]

Note

Samuel Smith, the second of the eight children of Thomas and Elizabeth (Sanders) Smith, was born at Windy Bush, 1 mo. 17, 1729-30.  (March 17, 1730), and died there 2 mo. 14, 1812.  He married in 1750, at Buckingham Friends’ Meeting, Jane, the daughter of John and Ann (Lenoir) Schofield, of Solebury, who died 10 mo. 29, 1815, at the age of eighty-nine years. 

Page 634 DAVIS

Event

DAVIS: CHARLES J. SMITH, of Buckingham, one of the enterprising and progressive farmers of that vicinity, is a representative of two of the oldest families of Buckingham.  He is a son of Jonathan and Sarah (Johnson) Smith, and was born in Buckingham, on the farm on which he now resides, September 15, 1865.

 
The pioneer ancestors of the subject of this sketch were Robert and William Smith, both natives of Yorkshire, England, though not known to be of common ancestry, both of whom settled near Wrightstown, Bucks county.  William Smith was the first to arrive, coming in 1684 in a ship which landed its passengers at New Castle, now Delaware, from which point William Smith, then a young and unmarried man, engaged passage on a boat up the river, and was entertained for some time at the house of Phinehas Pemberton, a native of Yorkshire, who was at that time one of the most prominent men of the little Quaker colony on the Delaware.  On 9 mo. 20, 1690, William Smith married Mary Croasdale, daughter of Thomas and Agnes Croasdale, who had come from Settle, in Yorkshire, in 1682, in the “Welcome.” They were married at the house of John Chapman, the pioneer settler of Wrightstown, from whom William Smith made his first purchase of land, adjoining Penn’s Park.  Mary (Croasdale) Smith died in 1716, and in 1720 William Smith married a second wife, Mercy, by whom he had seven children.  He died in 1743.  Of the eight children of the first marriage, Thomas Smith was the ancestor of the subject of this sketch.  He married in 6 mo., 1727, Elizabeth Sanders,and took up his residence at “Windy Bush,” in Upper Makefield township, near the point where the four townships of Buckingham, Wrightstown, Solebury and Upper Makefield join, on a tract of land surveyed to his father in 1709 by Penn’s land commissioners.  He died in 1750. 
 
Samuel Smith, the second of the eight children of Thomas and Elizabeth (Sanders) Smith, was born at Windy Bush, 1 mo. 17, 1729-30.  (March 17, 1730), and died there 2 mo. 14,1812.  He married in 1750, at Buckingham Friends’ Meeting, Jane, the daughter of John and Ann (Lenoir) Schofield, of Solebury, who died 10 mo. 29, 1815, at the age of eighty-nine years.  Ann Smith, the third of the ten children of Samuel and Jane, was born 11 mo. 15, 1754, and died in 1854 at the age of ninety-nine years, ten months and twenty-seven days.  She married at Wrightstown Meeting, 11 mo. 19, 1774, Joseph Smith, a grandson of Robert Smith, the other pioneer of the name. 
 
Robert Smith is said to have come from England with a brother Timothy and two or three sisters, the parents dying on the passage to America.  He was a resident of Makefield in 1710, when he witnessed the marriage of his sister Ruth to Joshua Cheesman.  His brother Timothy married Rachel Milnor in 1716, and became a prominent man in the community.  Robert Smith married, 7 mo. 30, 1719, Phebe Canby, daughter of Thomas Canby, one of the most prominent men of his time, a preacher among Friends, and many years a member of colonial assembly.  Robert Smith settled on a farm in Buckingham, adjoining the Makefield farm of William Smith, and died there 6 mo. 26, 1745.  The house built by him on this tract in 1738 was the home of his descendants for six generations.  He was an overseer of Buckingham Meeting, and his wife was an approved minister among Friends.  She married in 1753, Hugh Ely, of Buckingham, and died 1 mo. 19, 1774. 
 
Timothy Smith, the second of the nine children of Robert and Phebe (Canby) Smith, was born 1 mo. 29, 1722, and died 5 mo. 14, 1798.  He married at Buckingham Meeting, 2 mo. 17, 1745, Sarah Kinsey, daughter of Edmund and Sarah Ogburn Kinsey, early settlers at the site of Buckingham meeting house, where Edmund was an approved minister.  Sarah Kinsey Smith died 5 mo. 17, 1812.
 
Joseph Smith, fourth of the seven children of Timothy and Sarah (Kinsey) Smith, was born in Buckingham, 7 mo. 7, 1753, and died at Smithtown, in Tinicum township, Bucks county, 9 mo. 28, 1826.  He was the inventor and patentee of the first plow with an iron mouldboard, and in connection with his brother Robert engaged in their manufacture in 1800.  In 1802 he removed to Smithtown and erected dwellings and shops, and carried on the manufacture of plows until his death in 1826.  It was in these shops that anthracite coal was first successfully used for fuel about 1812.  He married, as above stated, Ann Smith, daughter of Samuel and Jane (Schofield) Smith, of the other branch of the family.
 
William Smith, the third of the twelve children of Joseph and Ann Smith, was born in Buckingham, 6 mo. 3, 1779, and married, in 1804, Margaret Worthington, daughter of Mahlon and Mary (Paxson) Worthington, and granddaughter of Richard Worthington, one of the earliest settlers in lower Buckingham, where Mahlon was born 12 mo. 19, 1750. 
(Followed by a sketch of Jonathan SMITH, father of Charles J. SMITH) 

Residence

Upper Makefield Twp., Bucks, Pennsylvania, British North America
[2]

Marriage

1727[3]
1690[4][5]

DNA

Descendant of yDNA group NE52 William Smith (c1668 ENG-1743 PA) m m(1) Mary Croasdale. See SmithConnections Northeastern DNA Project.[6]

Thomas Smith was born on the 20th of December 1696 in Wrightstown, Pennsylvania He was the son of William Smith and Mary (Croasdale) Smith.

Thomas married Elizabeth Jessie Sanders before 1728 when their son Thomas was born.

Sources

  1. Source: #S73 TMPLT FIELD Name: Page Data: Text: Of the eight children of the first marriage,Thomas Smith was the ancestor of the subject of this sketch.  He married in 6 mo., 1727, Elizabeth Sanders,and took up his residence at “Windy Bush,” in Upper Makefield township, near the point where the four townships of Buckingham, Wrightstown, Solebury and Upper Makefield join, on a tract of land surveyed to his father in 1709 by Penn’s land commissioners.  He died in 1750. 
  2. Source: #S73
    Of the eight children of the first marriage,Thomas Smith was the ancestor of the subject of this sketch.  He married in 6 mo., 1727, Elizabeth Sanders,and took up his residence at “Windy Bush,” in Upper Makefield township, near the point where the four townships of Buckingham, Wrightstown, Solebury and Upper Makefield join, on a tract of land surveyed to his father in 1709 by Penn’s land commissioners.  He died in 1750. 
  3. Source: #S73
    Of the eight children of the first marriage,Thomas Smith was the ancestor of the subject of this sketch.  He married in 6 mo., 1727, Elizabeth Sanders,and took up his residence at “Windy Bush,” in Upper Makefield township, near the point where the four townships of Buckingham, Wrightstown, Solebury and Upper Makefield join, on a tract of land surveyed to his father in 1709 by Penn’s land commissioners.  He died in 1750. 
  4. Source: #S73
    The pioneer ancestors of the subject of this sketch were Robert and William Smith, both natives of Yorkshire, England, though not known to be of common ancestry, both of whom settled near Wrightstown, Bucks county.  William Smith was the first to arrive, coming in 1684 in a ship which landed its passengers at New Castle, now Delaware, from which point William Smith, then a young and unmarried man, engaged passage on a boat up the river, and was entertained for some time at the house of Phinehas Pemberton, a native of Yorkshire, who was at that time one of the most prominent men of the little Quaker colony on the Delaware.  On 9 mo. 20, 1690, William Smith married Mary Croasdale, daughter of Thomas and Agnes Croasdale, who had come from Settle, in Yorkshire, in 1682, in the “Welcome.” They were married at the house of John Chapman, the pioneer settler of Wrightstown, from whom William Smith made his first purchase of land, adjoining Penn’s Park.  Mary (Croasdale) Smith died in 1716, and in 1720 William Smith married a second wife, Mercy, by whom he had seven children.  He died in 1743.  Of the eight children of the first marriage,Thomas Smith was the ancestor of the subject of this sketch.  He married in 6 mo., 1727, Elizabeth Sanders,and took up his residence at “Windy Bush,” in Upper Makefield township, near the point where the four townships of Buckingham, Wrightstown, Solebury and Upper Makefield join, on a tract of land surveyed to his father in 1709 by Penn’s land commissioners.  He died in 1750. 
  5. Source: #S73
    On 9 mo. 20, 1690, William Smith married Mary Croasdale, daughter of Thomas and Agnes Croasdale, who had come from Settle, in Yorkshire, in 1682, in the “Welcome.” They were married at the house of John Chapman, the pioneer settler of Wrightstown, from whom William Smith made his first purchase of land, adjoining Penn’s Park. 
  6. SmithConnections Northeastern DNA Project, haplogroup Rb1 NE52 William Smith.
Note: Free online access to the book (scanned images of the book's actual pages) available at openlibrary.org
Also, a transcription of the text was published May 2007 on the Bucks County, Pa., USGenWeb pages at www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/
  • "United States Census, 1790," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHKJ-12B : accessed 12 July 2019), Thomas Smith, Bucks, Pennsylvania, United States; citing p. 221, NARA microfilm publication M637, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 8; FHL microfilm 568,148.


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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Thomas by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. Y-chromosome DNA test-takers in his direct paternal line on WikiTree: It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with Thomas:

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