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Abington Land Grant

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Location: Anne Arundel County, Marylandmap
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Location

The Abington Land Grant was in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

Abington Farm

The Abington Farm, or Abbington Farm, is a historic home and farm at Millersville, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, United States. The main house is a 2 1⁄2-story frame, side-passage, double-pile house with additions on both gable ends. The main block dates from about 1840. On the property are several outbuildings, including a frame summer kitchen; a stone and frame ice house; a frame, brick, and stone springhouse/dairy; a frame privy, chicken house, tool shed, and corncrib; a large, elaborate frame stable; and a frame tenant house.[2] The Abington Farm was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.[1] [1]

Abbington Farm Inventory No.: AA-174 Other Name(s): Abington Date Listed: 9/13/1984 Location: 1761 Severn Chapel Road , Millersville, Anne Arundel County Category: Building Period/Date of Construction: c. 1840, late 19th century [2]

Ownership History

1649 Arrival of John Gaether

Under his persuasion in 1649, John Gaether (2) and his son, John Gaither (3), moved to Anne Arundel County, Maryland with their families and helped establish the Maryland Colony. [3][3]

John Gaither (3), son of John Gater or Geather (2) I was the first to spell the Gaither name as it is spelled today. He was born at Elizabeth city, Virginia on January 26, 1642 and died at Abington plantation, Maryland on November 12, 1702. He married Ruth Morley. In 1697, John Gaither (3) was listed as a military officer.[3]

1662 Gaither Land in Maryland

In 1662, the following record was made in Maryland: Then came John Gaither and demanded the renewment of a warrant for 450 acres—renewed.[4] [4]

1663 Abington on South River

In 1663, John Gaither and Robert Proctor surveyed Abington, at the head of South River. It adjoined Freeman's Fancy, Freeman's Stone and Freeman's Landing.[4]

In 1662, the following record was made in Maryland: "Then came John Gaither and demanded the renewment of a warrant for 450 acres -- renewed." In 1663 John Gaither and Robert Proctor surveyed "Abington," at the head of South River. It adjoined "Freeman's Fancy," "Freeman's Stone" and "Freeman's Landing." These three settlers wre sons in law of Joseph Morley, whose will, of 1674, made Robert Proctor and John Gaither his executors, and legatees of his whole estate. [5]

1664 Patent

It was patented by John Gaither and Robert Proctor in 1664. [6]

There, many large tracts of land were granted to them, starting with the 364 acre plantation “Abington” on January 26, 1663. Later, John Gaither (3) built the “Three Beall Moro”, and “Bite the Biter” and “Left Out” plantations and became the largest land holder in Maryland.[3]

1674 Estate of Joseph Morley

These three settlers were sons-in-law of Joseph Morley, whose will, of 1674, made Robert Proctor and John Gaither his executors, and legatees of his whole estate.[4]

They sold Morley's Lot and Morley's Grove to Colonel William Burgess.[4]

Robert Proctor and Elizabeth, his wife, late widow of John Freeman, and daughter of Joseph Morley, sold Freeman's lands to Captain George Puddington, which were later bought by John Gaither from Captain Edward Burgess, executor of Captain Puddington.[4]

1690 William Ridgely

William Ridgely came to this province of Maryland, in 1672; Colonel Henry's will show him to be his brother. His furst survey, in 1697, was "Ridgely's Beginning," northside of South River. In 1690, he bought, of James Finley, a portion of "Abbington," at the head of South River, and made it his homestead. [7]

John Ridgely was made executor, and heired the homested, "Abington". He married Elizabeth Mayo, of South River, and bought of "Edward Gaither, of 'Edward" the whole of "Gaithers Collection."[8]

Captain John Browne, mariner of London, sold, in 1690, to James Finley, three hundred acres out of "Abington;" said land laid out for John Dearing. and during that same year Captain John Browne sold to John Gaither, lands that had been laid off for Mr. Chapman out of "Freeman's Fancy." Captain Browne also, sold to John Gaither, lands in Abington, recently held by Robert Proctor. At the time of his death in 1705, John Gaither held all of Freeman's Lands and all of Abington, except that held by William Ridgely and Elizabeth, his wife.[9]

1699 Abington to John Gaither III

27 Aug 1699 John Gaither III received 'Abington', Anne Arundel County, Maryland of 148 acres [10]

Before the death of his father he was already in possession of 148 acres of "Abington", when on August 27, 1699, he negotiated a resurvey which brought the tract up to 1,091 acres,[11]

1702 Land Acquisition

To John Gaither III: 'Abington', Anne Arundel County, Maryland [10] "Abington" by award of the court at the settlement of his father's estate . Land Relinquish Aft 1702 Anne Arundel County, Maryland [12] by deed as heir-at-law to his brother Benjamin, and to Edward Gaither, portions of his father's estate [11]

1713 John Worthington's Will

Abington mentioned in John Worthington's Will, 1713[13]

Abington Births

  • John Gaither III January 15, 1677 Abington, Anne Arundel Co., Maryland - June 20, 1739 ~ Managed by David McDougle.
  • John Gaither 1720 Abington, Anne Arundel, Maryland, USA - 1751 ~ Managed by Philip Tripp.



Sources

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abington_Farm
  2. http://mht.maryland.gov/nr/NRDetail.aspx?NRID=828&COUNTY=Anne%20Arundel&FROM=NRCountyList.aspx
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Early Gaither Family History. Sources: Encyclopedia of American Biography, volume XVIII, “The American Gaither Family Record”, by George H. Gaither, “Gaither, Gater or Gatear Family From England” by Evelyn W. Dunn. https://familysearch.org/photos/stories/3721821
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 Beard Family, American Family History.com. http://www.anamericanfamilyhistory.com/Beard%20Family/BeardRuth.html. Accessed November 25, 2015.
  5. Warfield, Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, p. 107
  6. National Register of Historical Places Application Form Inventory. http://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/stagsere/se1/se5/001000/001200/001288/pdf/msa_se5_1288.pdf
  7. Warfield, Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, p. 81
  8. Warfield, Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, p. 82
  9. Warfield, Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, p. 108
  10. 10.0 10.1 Anne Arundel Gentry, Harry Wright Newman, (Baltimore, Maryland: Maryland Pioneer Series, 1933), page 357, 21 Nov 2008, cited by "If the Legends are True".
  11. 11.0 11.1 "If the Legends are True." Palm Springs Bum. John Gaither. http://www.palmspringsbum.org/genealogy/getperson.php?&personID=I32999 Accessed November 26, 2015
  12. Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, J. D. Warfield, (Baltimore, Maryland: Kohn & Pollock, 1905, 601 pages), page 108: 3), 12 May 2007. Cited by "If the Legends are True."
  13. Warfield, Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, p. 108




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