Arms_of_Smythe_of_Wiltshire_and_Kent.png

Arms of Smythe of Wiltshire and Kent

Privacy Level: Public (Green)
Date: [unknown] [unknown]
Location: [unknown]
Surnames/tags: Smythe Heraldry Judde
Profile manager: Steve Hunt private message [send private message]
This page has been accessed 416 times.

Contents

Introduction

This is a study of the arms of the family of Thomas (Customer) Smythe Esq and his wife Alice (Judde) Smythe, daughter of Sir Andrew Judde and Mary Murfyn.

Arms of Smyth of Corsham, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire Visitation of 1623 recorded that a Mathew Smyth of Corsham had presented a coat in an old Seale said to be 210 years old. The Arms were described as:[1][2]

Azure, an escutcheon argent within an orle of six lions rampant or.

The arms are depicted in "Heraldry in Wiltshire".[3]

The arms are also recorded on a monument to Robert Smith of Blackland, Wiltshire, who died in 1691.[4]

While Thomas (Customer) Smythe was of this Corsham family, he was granted his own arms as described below.

Arms of Thomas (Customer) Smythe Esq

Thomas (Customer) Smythe received a grant of arms in 1559[5], described as:

“per pale or and azure, a chevron argent between three lions passant guardant counterchanged”

His arms have also been recorded as:[6]

"Per pale or and azure on a fess engrailed argent between three lions passant guardant counterchanged three fleurs-de-lys gules.
Crest, on a wreath argent and azure: A panther's (?) head erased argent semy of roundels sable tusked or gorged with a collar sable studded and chained or"

The same arms are also noted in the Smyth pedigree in the Visitation of London, 1568[7], although the entry referred to a manuscript which had the note ... "the fesse should be a playn cheveron Silver".

Arms of Smythe 1568

The arms above and to the left are those of Customer Smythe and to the right those of Smythe impaled with Judde, as of the Visitation of London 1568.[8]

Customer Smythe received a further grant of arms from Clarencieux Cooke in 1588. The Grant was described as:[2][9]

"Azure, a chevron engrailed between three lions passant guardant Or.
Crest – an ounce’s head erased Argent, Pelletee, and gorged with a collar sable, edged Or, charged with three Pellets, and chained Or."
Arms of Thomas Smythe 1588

A Grant of 1588 to a Thomas Smith of London is recorded in "Grantees of Arms[10] but the details are absent.

The arms shown by Crisp[11] for Smythe's son in law Thomas Fanshawe Esq are Fanshawe impaling Smythe. The chevron for Smythe is marked 'or' [i.e. gold].

The monument to Thomas Smythe Esq and his wife Alice at St Mary Ashford, Kent, includes the arms of Smythe impaled with the following: Judde, Chiche, Chichele, Apulderfield, Averenches, Criol, Crevequer, and Murfyn.

The arms of Wiliam Cordell a college visitor and Thomas Smythe are displayed on the inside of the front quad at St John's college Oxford.

Alice Judde, Wife of Customer Smythe

A stamp used by Alice (Judde) Smythe on the outer cover of three books:[12]

Arms of Alice (Judde) Smythe

Crest:

1. A leopard's head erased pellety collared chained and ringed (Smythe).
2 A boar's head couped at the neck holding in its mouth a sprig of oak (Judde).

Quarterings:

left hand side - Per pale a chevron engrailed between three lions passant gardant (Smythe).
right hand side, quartered:
A fess raguly between three boars heads couped (Judde) x 2.
Three lions rampant within a bordure (Chiche).
On a chevron a mullet a crescent for difference (Murfyn/Mirfine).

Smythe Monument, Ashford, Kent

Arms are displayed on the monument to Thomas Smythe Esq and his wife Alice at St Mary Ashford, Kent. The eight coats on the right hand side all relate to the ancestry of Alice Judde. The ancestral connections are:

The Scott Manuscript

The quarterings as per the monument to Thomas Smythe Esq and his wife Alice at St Mary Ashford, Kent, are depicted in an illuminated pedigree commissioned (early 17th century) by Sir John Scott (left half for Sir John Scott and right half for Katherine (Smythe) Scott, a daughter of Thomas (Customer) Smythe and Alice Judde).[13]

Arms of Sir John Scott and Katherine (Smythe) Scott

The quarterings for Smythe (right half) are Smythe, Judde, Chiche, Chicheley, Apulderferld, Averinge [Averenches], Kyriell [Crioll], Crevequer, and Morfen [Murfyn/Mirfine].

The Smythe coat is shown on the monument to Katherine (Smythe) Scott at Nettlestead, Kent.

Monument to Lady Katherine (Smythe) Scott

Sir Thomas Smythe, 1st Viscount Strangford

The Arms of the Viscounts of Strangford (descendants of Thomas Smythe and Alice Judde) were recorded in Burke[14] as:

Azure, a chevron engrailed between three lions passant, Or.
Crest – an ounce’s head erased ar. Collared and chained as.
Supporters – Dexter, a lion or. Guttee de larmes: sinister, a leopard ar. Collared and chained sa.
Motto - Virtus incendit vires [virtue kindles one’s strength]

The following image represents a stamp used by Thomas Smythe, 1st Viscount Strangford, grandson of Thomas (Customer) Smythe and Alice Judde:[15]

Stamp of the Viscount Strangford

Lambard[16] depicted the arms of Sir Thomas Smythe, 1st Viscount Strangford, based on the 12 coats described in the Visitation of Kent.[17] The coats were: Smythe, Judde, Chiche, Criol, Crevequer, Averenches (although this coat differs from the Averenches coat in the Scott Manuscript), Chichele, Apuldrefield x 2, Murfyn, Donne (said to have been brought in by Murfyn), and Fineux (his maternal line).

Interestingly, an engraving by Simon de Passe of 1616 which was published in John Woodall's The Surgions Mate[18][19] shows the arms for Sir Thomas Smythe, son of Thomas (Customer) Smythe and Alice Judde. The quarterings are Smythe, Judde, Chiche, Criol, Crevequer, Averenches (2nd type), Chichele, Apulderfield and Murfyn/Mirfine. Wadmore[20] stated that the arms on his monument at Sutton at Hone, Kent, are Smythe, Judde, Chiche, Criol, Averenches, Crevecour, Chichele, and Stafford [the last is presumably an error and is Murfyn, and Apulderfield has been omitted].

See also a stamp of Percy Clinton Sydney Smythe, 6th Viscount Strangford.[21]

Various arms including Smythe, Judde etc are depicted within a stained glass window from 1834 at St Mary Ashford, Kent, commissioned by the 6th Viscount Strangford.

Visitation of London 1633-1635

The following was depicted in the Smyth pedigree in the Visitation of London:[22]

Arms of Smyth in the Visitation of London

The quarterings are:

Smythe; Judde; Chiche
Chichele; Apulderfield; Criall [Crioll]
Crevecure [Crevequer]; Averenches; Murfyn

Quarterings

Judde

Arms of Judde:[17][23][24]

Gules a fess engrailed between three boars heads couped argent

Sir Andrew Judde was granted arms on 03 Mar 1551/1552[25] and they are displayed on his monument in St Helen Bishopsgate, City of London:

A fess raguly between three boars heads couped (Judde); and
Three lions rampant within a bordure (Chiche).

Similar arms can be found for the Judd School of Tonbridge.[26]

What appears to be the arms of Judde and Chiche are depicted on 'The Judde Memorial' at Dulwich Picture Gallery.[27] The subjects of the picture from 1560 may be William Judde and his wife perhaps Joan or Ann Williams alias Cromwell.

"Prince Arthur's Book" (late 15th century)[28][29] included the arms of Judde as follows:

Gules, on a fess engrailed or, between three boars' heads couped argent, a mullet sable

These arms presumably reflected a third son, but which third son is unknown.

Chiche

Arms of Chiche of Kent:

Azure three lioncels rampant within a bordure argent[17]
Three lions rampant within a bordure[12]
Three lions rampant within a bordure engrailed[30]
“The origin of this name [Chich] has often puzzled me. As Birsty is a crasis of Birchensty and Chumley of Cholmondeley, so I think Chiche to be a contraction of Chicheley. For (Harl. MS. 1094) the pedigree of Chicheley contains a match of Wm. C., Alderman of London, temp. Henry VI., with Cath., dau. of Wm. Chiche of Chicheley, gent., and Isabel his niece marries Alan, son of Valentine Chiche of the Dungeon. We meet with Ernaldus de Chicb, temp. Henry II. (Philipot). Perhaps the last of the name in Kent was Catharine Chiche, widow, of Canterbury, whose will, dated 1525, is met with at Somerset House in Porch 6. The arms, 3 lions rampant, are on the tomb of Thomas Elys, Mayor of Sandwich, temp. Ric. II. Genealogists say Alice his dau. and coh. was wife of Sir Tho. Chiche. 1311, Roger Elys was manucaptor of Tho. Chiche, M.P. for Canterbury (Parl. Writs). Azure, 3 lions rampant argent within a bordure of the same, are quartered by the three families of Norton, Finch, and Tattesham in respect of matches with the three coh. of John Elys of Otham, who died 1467, and who must have married an heiress of Chiche (Notices of the Ellises, ii., 293)."[30]

Chichele

Arms of Chichele:[17][31][32]

Or, a chevron between three cinquefoils gules
Arms of Chichele

Apulderfield

Arms of Apulderfield:[17], "evidently derived from the coat of Crevequer"[33][34]

Sable, a cross voided or
Arms of Apulderfield

The second Apulderfied coat in the Visitation of Kent[17], although described as uncertain by Steinman:[33]

Ermine, a fesse vaire (Or and gules)

See also similar coats.[35]

"Appulderfield, called by contraction, Apperfield, whose original arms, Ermine, a fess vaire, or, and gules, as well as their augmentation, granted by king Richard I. to Henry de Apulderfield, Sable, a cross, or, voided of the field, are in several places on the roof of Canterbury cloisters, and in the windows of several churches in that city."[36]

[Apulderfield or Apuldrefield or Apperfield]

Averenches

Looking at the the Scott manuscript[17] it would to appear to be something like:

Argent, a cross gules with a bordure sable

Visitation of Kent:[17]

Or, five chevronels gules

[Averenches or Albrincis or Avereng]

Criol

From the Glover Roll (1245-1250) for a Bertram de Crioll:[30][35]

D'or a deux cheverons et ung quartier de goules

From the Charles Roll (temp. Henry III and Edward I) for a Bertram d'Criel:[30]

Or, 2 chevrons and a canton gules.

From the Parliamentary Roll (probably temp. Edward I) for a Sir Nicholas de Kyriel:[30]

Or 2 chevrons and a quarter gules

Visitation of Kent:[17]

Or, two chevronels and a canton gules
Bertram de Croyl

[Criol or Crioll or Kyriell]

Crevequer

From the Glover Roll (1245-1250) for a Hamon de Crevequer[30][35]

D'or ung faulx crois de gules

From the Parliamentary Roll (probably temp. Edward I) for a Sir Robert le Creuker:[30]

Gules cross or.

The Dering Roll (1270-1280)[37] and the Visitation of Kent:[17] and the St George's Roll (c1285).[38]

Or, a cross voided gules
Arms of de Crevequer

[Crevequer or Creuker]

Murfyn

The arms of 'Merfyn' were recorded as:

Or a chevron and in dexter chief a crescent sable

It was stated that Thomas Mirfine bore this coat with a mullet argent on the chevron for difference (i.e. he was a third son).[16][17][39]

Arms of Thomas Murfyn

A quartering for Murfyn including the crescent and mullet is shown in the stamp of his granddaughter Alice (Judde) Smythe[12] and a stamp of his great great grandson Sir Thomas Smythe, 1st Viscount Strangford.

A similar quartering was present in the Scott manuscript for his great granddaughter Katherine (Smythe) Scott though it did not show the crescent.[13]

Uncertainties

The question arises: what were the links between the family of Judde and the families of Crevequer, Criol and Averenches? Perhaps the link was Judde via Chiche to Criol, Crevequer and Averenches.

Bertram de Criol and Eleanor de Crevequer

A Manuscript of pedigrees at the Centre for Kentish Studies[40] includes a Criol pedigree with an Agnes de Criol as a daughter of Bertram de Criol and 'Agnes', daughter of Hamo de Crevequer. Agnes de Criol is supposed to have married a Thomas Chiche.

At first glance this appears to provide the answer to 'what were the links between the family of Judde and the families of Crevequer, Criol, Averenches'? A Bertram de Criol did marry an Eleanor de Crevequer, daughter of Hamo de Crevequer. Bertram and Eleanor had three known children; John, Bertram and Joan. John died first without issue and then his brother Bertram died also without issue. However, an Agnes de Criol was not recorded as a co-heir in the Inquisition Post Mortem of her supposed brother Bertram de Criol (son of Bertram and Eleanor) in 1306. His heir was his sister Joan de Criol who married Richard de Rokesley.

Other than the Criol pedigree in the Centre for Kentish Studies, no other evidence has been identified, as yet, for the existence of an Agnes de Criol who may have married a Chiche.

Was this Criol pedigree the basis on which the Smythes of the late sixteenth century formulated their arms to include Criol, Crevequer and Averenches?

Other Possible ancestral links

  • According to Dunlop[41], Emma de Crevequer was a daughter of an Elias de Crevequer and an Emma de Criol. There may have been a connection with Bertram de Criol.

Sources

  1. Visitation of Wiltshire 1623. Edited by George W Marshall, 1882, p 33 Internet Archive.
  2. 2.0 2.1 The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, for the Year 1830. Volume 100, 13 Dec 1830, pp 487-488 HathiTrust.
  3. Buckeridge, David (2000) Heraldry in Wiltshire. Eight Volumes in One. Published Devizes, Wiltshire.
  4. Sir Thomas Phillipps. Monumental Inscriptions of Wiltshire 1822. Wiltshire Record Society Volume 53. Edited by Peter Sherlock. 2000, p 225.
  5. Grantees of Arms named in Docquets and Patents to the end of the Seventeenth Century. Rylands W H (Ed). 1915. The Publications of the Harleian Society. Vol LXVI., p 235 Internet Archive.
  6. Gwynn-Jones, P. Tudor Enigmas. The Coat of Arms. Third Series Vol. I, Part 2, no. 2010, Autumn 2005, p 90 pdf.
  7. Visitation of London, 1568: With Additional Pedigrees, 1569-90, the Arms of the City Companies, and a London Subsidy Roll, 1589. Publications of the Harleian Society. Vols 109-110. London H S and Rawlins S W. 1963. Smyth Pedigree pp 17-18.
  8. Visitation of the City and Suburbs of London, 1568. By Robert Cooke, Clarenceux King of Arms. Queens College MS 72. University of Oxford, p17 Internet Archive.
  9. Grazebrook, H S. The Heraldry of Smith. 1870, pp 36-40 pdf.
  10. Grantees of Arms named in Docquets and Patents to the end of the Seventeenth Century. Rylands W H (Ed). 1915. The Publications of the Harleian Society. Vol LXVI.
  11. Visitation of England and Wales. Crisp F A (Ed). Notes. Vol 6, 1906, pp 148-152 Internet Archive.
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 Stamp of Alice (Judde) Smythe. British Armorial Bindings armorial.
  13. 13.0 13.1 Heraldry - Scott Family of Kent. Bonhams 26 Jun 2007 Bonhams.
  14. Burke J esq and Burke J B esq. Encyclopedia of Heraldry, or General Armory of England, Scotland, and Ireland. Third Edition with a Supplement. 1851, see entry for Smythe HathiTrust.
  15. Stamp of Sir Thomas Smythe, Viscount Strangford. British Armorial Bindings armorial.
  16. 16.0 16.1 Lambard, F. Andrew Judde. Archaeologia Cantiana. Vol 43, 1931, pp 99-101 pdf.
  17. 17.00 17.01 17.02 17.03 17.04 17.05 17.06 17.07 17.08 17.09 17.10 The Visitation of Kent. Taken in the Years 1619-1621. The Publications of the Harleian Society Vol XLII. Edited by Robert Hovenden, 1898. Smith Pedigree pp 113-114 Internet Archive.
  18. Sir Thomas Smythe. ODNB, 2004.
  19. Woodall, J. The Surgion's Mate. 1617 Internet Achive.
  20. Wadmore, J F. Sir Thomas Smythe Knt (A.D. 1558-1625). Archaeologia Cantiana Vol 20, 1893, pp 82-103 KAS.
  21. Stamp of Percy Clinton Sydney Smythe, 6th Viscount Strangford. British Armorial Bindings armorial.
  22. Visitation of London 1633, 1634 and 1635. Vol. II. Publications of the Harleian Society. Edited by Joseph Jackson Howard. 1883, p 245 Smyth Pedigree HathiTrust.
  23. Stephenson, M and Griifin, R. A Roll of Arms belonging to the Society of Antiquaries, temp. Henry VIII, c.1540. Archaeologia, or, Miscellaneous tracts relating to antiquity. Society of Antiquaries of London. Vol. LXIX, 1920, [or Second Series Vol. XIX), p 92 and illustration 307 Internet Archive.
  24. Wadmore, J F. Some Account of the History and Antiquities of the Worshipful Company of Skinners, London. Transactions of the London and Middlesex Archaeological Society. Vol 5, 1881, p 139 LAMAS.
  25. Grantees of Arms named in Docquets and Patents to the end of the Seventeenth Century. Rylands W H (Ed). 1915. The Publications of the Harleian Society. Vol LXVI. p 141.
  26. The Judd School wikipedia.
  27. 'The Judde Memorial'. Dulwich Picture Gallery image.
  28. Arthur Charles Fox-Davies. The Art of Heraldry. 1904, p 428 Internet Archive.
  29. Arms from "Prince Arthur's Book". Illustration for The Art of Heraldry by Arthur Charles Fox-Davies image.
  30. 30.0 30.1 30.2 30.3 30.4 30.5 30.6 William Smith Ellis. Early Kentish Armory. Archaeologia Cantiana Vol 15, 1883, pp 1-30 pdf.
  31. The Visitations of Cambridgeshire, 1575 and 1619. The Publications of the Harleian Society. Vol XLI, 1897, Chichley Pedigree p 33 Internet Archive.
  32. Transactions of the Monumental Brass Society. Vol. III, 1899, pp 13-14 Internet Archive.
  33. 33.0 33.1 G Steinman Steinman. Some account of the manor of Apulderfield, in the parish of Cudham, Kent. The Topographer and Genealogist, Vol. 3, 1858, pp 1-21 and 178-222 (see p 182-185, 193, 199-200) google books or FMG.
  34. Arms of Apulderfield armory.
  35. 35.0 35.1 35.2 Greenstreet, J and Russell, C. The "Dering" Roll of Arms (continued). The Reliquary, Quarterly Archaeological Journal and Review. Vol. XVI, 1875-76, pp 237-40 Internet Archive.
  36. Edward Hasted, 'Parishes: Challock', in The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 7 (Canterbury, 1798), pp. 332-340 BHO.
  37. The Dering Roll Roll.
  38. Ancient Rolls of Arms. Charles' Roll of the Reigns of Henry III. and Edward I. Armytage G J (Ed.). 1869. Coat 262 Google Books.
  39. Stephenson, M and Griifin, R. A Roll of Arms belonging to the Society of Antiquaries, temp. Henry VIII, c.1540. Archaeologia, or, Miscellaneous tracts relating to antiquity. Society of Antiquaries of London. Vol. LXIX, 1920, [or Second Series Vol. XIX), p 96 Internet Archive and illustration 365 illustration.
  40. A pedigree of Criol. Taken from a Manuscript of Pedigrees in the Centre for Kentish Studies, Maidstone U350/Z34 Link.
  41. Dunlop, J R. Pedigrees of the Families of Averenches and Crevequer of County Kent. Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica. Fifth Series, Vol. VI, 1926-1928, pp 214-222.




Collaboration


Comments

Leave a message for others who see this profile.
There are no comments yet.
Login to post a comment.