upload image

Bernardina de Salas y Trujillo's Adopted Daughters

Privacy Level: Open (White)

Location: Nuevo México, Nueva Españamap
Profile manager: Marcie Ruiz private message [send private message]
This page has been accessed 358 times.

The facts are:

  • Diego de Trujillo took 3 little girls from the Zuñi Pueblo and gave them to his daughter Bernardina de Salas y Trujillo to raise as her own. The three girls had Spanish fathers and he wanted them raised as "true Christians for their being part Spanish."[1]
  • One was María Josefa de Hinojos, who was described as "a coyote of Zuñi and (half) sister of an indian named Ventura."[2]
  • The other two girls were sisters.

The question is which two girls are the two adopted sisters? Fray Chávez seems rather confused. In his book Chávez: A Distinctive American Clan of New Mexico, he first mentions the three girls and says in addition to Josefa de Hinojos, the other two girls were María and Juana de Salazar.[1] However, later in the book he says that the two sisters were María de Salazar and Isabel de Salazar, who was married to Juan Lucero de Godoy.[3] Juana, mentioned earlier, was married to Diego Luján so they are definitely two different women. There is another Juana in the family, Juana Hurtado, who is described as a natural daughter of Andrés Hurtado. She was married at least twice, none of the men being Diego Luján, so she is also a different woman.[4]

In Aqui Se Comienza, the two girls are named Juana de Salazar and María de Salazar, with an interesting twist.[5] Fray Chávez mentioned that the two girls could have been the daughters of Bartolome de Salazar, which would explain the surnames they used.[1] However, Brenda Aragón de Chávez wrote that Bernardina's husband Andrés Hurtado may have been their father. He was born in Zacatecas where there was an Hurtado Salazar couple who were possibly his parents.[6] Perhaps the women took the surname of a paternal grandmother.[5] Since some of Bernardina's biological daughters also used the Salazar surname, this seems to be a more reasonable possibility.

Finally, in the prenuptial investigation for Isabel's marriage to Juan Lucero de Godoy, it names her parents as Andrés Hurtado and Bernardina de Sala y Trujillo and states that she was related to Juan "in the 3rd degree affinity," meaning she was related to one of his first two wives.[3] If she was adopted, the impediment would have listed her biological parents names. This points to Isabel not being one of the adopted Indian girls.

To summarize, the two half-Indian girls were Juana de Salazar and María de Salazar, who may or may not have been the daughters of Bartolome de Salazar or Andrés Hurtado.

Sources:

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Chavez, Angelico. Chávez: A Distinctive American Clan of New Mexico (Santa Fe, N.M: Sunstone Press, 2009), p. 68.
  2. Chávez, Angélico. New Mexico Roots Ltd: a demographic perspective from genealogical, historical and geographic data found in the diligencias matrimoniales or pre-nuptial investigations (1678-1869) of the Archives of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe. PDF image copy, UNM Digital Repository, http://digitalrepository.unm.edu/cswr_reference/5 : 1983, Vol. 2, p. 316; José Vicente Duran y Chavez and María Concepcion Aragon.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Chávez, Angélico. New Mexico Roots Ltd: a demographic perspective from genealogical, historical and geographic data found in the diligencias matrimoniales or pre-nuptial investigations (1678-1869) of the Archives of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe. PDF image copy, UNM Digital Repository, http://digitalrepository.unm.edu/cswr_reference/5 : 1983, volume 5, p. 964; 1688, El Paso del Norte, Juan Lucero de Godoy (63) and Isabel de Salazar.
  4. Chávez, Fray Angélico. Origins of New Mexico Families: A Genealogy of the Spanish Colonial Period. (Santa Fe: Museum of New Mexico Press, revised 1992), pp. 80 and 299.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Valencia, y V. G. M., Aquí Se Comienza: A Genealogical History of the Founding Families of La Villa De San Felipe De Albuquerque. (Albuquerque, New Mexico: New Mexico Genealogical Society, 2007), p. 57.
  6. José Antonio Esquibel, Beyond Origins of New Mexico Families, revised Jan 2019, (https://sites.google.com/site/beyondoriginsofnmfamilies/ : accessed 22 Aug 2019), Hurtado.




Collaboration
  • Login to edit this profile and add images.
  • Private Messages: Send a private message to the Profile Manager. (Best when privacy is an issue.)
  • Public Comments: Login to post. (Best for messages specifically directed to those editing this profile. Limit 20 per day.)


Comments

Leave a message for others who see this profile.
There are no comments yet.
Login to post a comment.

Categories: Family Mysteries