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Burdick Family Record in America

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Date: [unknown] [unknown]
Location: Rhode Islandmap
Surname/tag: Burdick
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This page was created to take the extensive data in the profile of Robert Burdick (1630 - 1692) to enable the data in the profile to paraphrased and improve the readability of the profile and the information

The first BURDICK of record in America was ROBERT BURDICK, who was living at Newport, R.I. in 1655. He came from England to Newport in 1651 [2] He was married, Nov. 2, 1655, to Ruth Hubbard,[3] the first white child born at Agawam (now Springfield), Mass, Jan 11, 1640. Her father, Samuel Hubbard, came from England to Salem, Mass., in 1633. [4]

Robert BERDICK and Tobia Sanders were admitted as Freemen of Newport, May 22, 1655. Robert BIRDICT (1656), Tobia Sanders, and Joseph Clarke were all living at Newport in 1655. Robert BURDICK was admitted a Freeman of the Colony of Rhode Island, May 20, 1657. [5]

In the westward expansion of the early New England Colonies three of them laid claim to a tract of land called the Pequot country. In October 1658, Massachusetts declared a small settlement which had been made there, to be a plantation with the name of Southertown (now Stonington), and annexed it to Suffolk County, Mass. Special commissioners and a constable were appointed to administer it (Mass. Recs., IV, 353.) The Rhode Island Assembly, the next month, retaliated by warning all settlers in the disputed area that if they put their lands under another colonial government their holdings would be confiscated [6]

"Meantime, the Narragansett settlements (of Rhode Island) bought from the Indians, under the name of the Westerly Purchase, land a part of which lay in Southertown, and began to settle it." [7] Among the settlers were Robert Burdick, Tobias Saunders, and Joseph Clarke, farmers of Newport, and they soon found themselves in the thick of the fight between Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

William Chesbrough testified before the General Court of Massachusetts, Sept. 30, 1661, that about the middle of September, 1661, he was "occasioned to goe abroad upon his affaires, and understanding that divers persons, about thirty-six inhabitants of Road Island, were come into the bounds of Southertowne, to lay claime unto the lands... and to divide and lay out lotts in the same," whereupon he demanded "the reason of their intrusion onto other men's rights; telling them those lands were within the bounds of Southertowne and appropriated to several persons." The reply came from the leader, Benedict Arnold. He "said, in way of answer many things impertinently, the sum whereof was, that they owned themselves to be the men that claimed the lands, and said they would keepe possession, and that they would not try their title any where but in Rhode Island, or in England; and Arnold said that if any should attach him at Boston, he would like in prison seven years before he would try the titles there."

The General Court then issued a Warrant, as follows:

"WARRANT. To the Constable of Southertowne:

"Whereas, We are informed of sundry rud fellows, that contrary to the peace of our soveraigne Lord the King, etc., of this Collony, have, in a riotous manner entered upon, and taken possession of the lands of sundry of our inhabitants in the bounds of your towne. These are to require you, in his Majesties name to apprehend all such persons, and safely convey them before some of the magistrates of this jurisdiction, to give an account of such their proceedings; and hereof you are to make a true returne under your hand, and not faile. Dated 25, 8 month, 1661.

"Signed by Jo. Endicott, Gov'r. "Ri. Bellingham, Dep. Gov'r. "Daniel Gookin."

This Warrant was endorsed by the Constable:

"According to the trust committed to me, I have arrested three men, viz: Tobias Saunders, Robert Burdett, and Joseph Clarke, which last upon extraordinary occasion was, by the Commissioners and constable, set at libety. Dated 1st November, f1661.

"William Palmer,Constable."

It developed later, that at the time of their arrest the Rhode Island men "did lye in wait to intercept and seize the Constable and Deputy, with such as came with them to prison as they returned, which they had donne, but they being gone to dinner missed them."

On Nov. 14, 1661, they were brought to trial before Governor Endicott and his associates at Boston.

"Tobias Saunders and Robert Burdett being brought prisoners by virtue of a warrant from the Governor and magistrates for a forcible entry and intrusion into the bounds of Southertown, in the Pequot country, upon severall men's properties granted to them by the General Court of this jurisdiction, who upon being examined by what authority or order there were there, Tobias Saunders answered, that the Court of Road Island gave liberty for certayne of their inhabitants to purchase lands of the Indians, and that these lands were purchased by them... Being asked whether they had understood that warning was given... to depart out of those lands, and out of the bounds of said towne, Tobias answered, that they looked upon the lands to be their right, and therefore they abode upon them, and confessed he was upon it when the constable apprehended them.

"Robert Burdet being examined, acknowledged that he was upon the same land, and built a small house there, upon the lott layed out to him; and that he went upon this designe, upon the same grounds as are declared by Tobias Saunders.

"Tobias Saunders and Robert Burdett being told that they must give security to the value of one hundred pounds apeece, to answer what shall be objected against them at the next General Court, otherwise to bee committed to prison, they refused to find security and were committed."

"WARRANT FOR COMMITMENT

"The Keeper of the prison of Boston. YOu are hereby required to take into your custody the bodyes of Tobias Saunders and Robert Burdett of Rhode Island and them safely to keepe, untill they find sufficient security, to the value of one hundred pounds apiece, to answer at the next Generall Court, to be holden at Boston in May next, for forcible entry and deteyning of possession of lands belonging to the Colony of Massachusetts within the bounds of Southertowne in the Pequot country, to the endangering of men's lives contrary to the peace of our Sovereign Lord, the King.

"John Endicott, Gov'r. "Rich'd Bellingham. "Daniel Gookin."

In a letter from the General Court of Massachusetts to Rhode Island is told the result of the trial in May.

"Dated Boston 10 3rd month, 1662.

"You may hereby take notice, that two of your people namely Tobias Saunders and Robert Burditt, being long since taken on the place, and secured by us to answer their trespasse, we have now called them before the Court and find nothing from them to justify their proceedings. This Court has therefore fined them 40 pounds for your offence... and they stand committed to prison till your fine be satisfied..."

They were committed to the Boston jail and kept there for two years. Each colony sought to arrest citizens of the other. The two were at last released on being exchanged for two Massachusetts officials taken in retaliation by the Rhode Island authorities.

"From this sturdy, conscience-minded ancestor, Robert, sprang all the Burdicks who claim an early Rhode Island ancestry." (RI Records, Vol. I, pp. 455, 456, 462.)

Robert Burdick was in a list of free inhabitants of Westerly in May, 1669. On May 17, 1671, he and others took the oath of allegiance to the king and to the Colony of Rhode Island. Among those who subscribed that day are many of the ancestors of later families of Burdicks: John Crandall, Tobiah Saunders, Joseph Clark, Robert Burdick, John Maxson, Jeffery Champlin, Sr., John Lewis, George Lanphear, Nicholas Cotterill, Jur., etc. - "all of which persons did promise to stand to their engagements to his Majestie, and this Colony." (Rhode Island Records, Vol. II, P. 388.)

On the outbreak of King Philip's Indian War, Westerly was on the exposed frontier. He and his family, in July, 1675, went to Newport, but subsequently returned to Westerly.

For the years 1680, 1683, 1685 he was a deputy to the General Court of Rhode Island from Westerly. On May 17, 1691, he and his wife Ruth sold one hundred acres of land for ten pounds. Mar 8, 1692, he made an agreement with his son-in-law, Joseph Crandall, by which the latter was to take care of this father-in-law and find him suitable meat, drink, washing, lodging and apparel, etc., for life, in consideration of which Joseph Crandall was to have the dwelling house and land adjoining forever, and until Robert Burdick's death, to have also use of oxen, cart, two cows, and eight swine, and then to be returned to be disposed of by will, except the cart and wheels.

1692, Oct. 25. He having died without perfecting his will, an agreement was made by his sons and sons-in-law. What their father had disposed of by legacy to chidlren was to stand, and what remained, to be divided into nine parts. To son-in-law John Phillips, one part. The other eight parts to go to daughters Naomi Rogers and Tacy Maxson, only his wearing apparel to be divided between his sons, Thomas, Benjamin and Samuel. The lands of deceased that are undivided, to go to sons Samuel, Robert, and Hubbard Burdick. To son Thomas, two oxen and a hog. To daughter deborah Crandal, bed, warming pan, etc. To daughter Ruth Philips, iron pot, a swine, etc. To son Benjamin, heifer, swine, and iron pot. To son Samuel, a heifer and swine. To son Robert, a cow. To son Hubbard, a cow. To daughter Naomi Rogers, a swine, etc. To daughter Tacy Maxson, a swine. Inventory, 2 oxen, 2 cows, 2 heifers, 6 swine, mare, wearing apparel, warming pot, pewter, etc.

He was a seceder from the Baptist Church, joining the Seventh Day Baptists; and "many descendants held membership in the ancient and interesting old Sabbatarian Church."

His death occurred on 1692, Oct. 25; and his wife died the year before.

They were progenitors of "the old Rhode Island Burdick family, which has been identified with the history of the Colony and the Commonwealth respectively, for 250 and more years." "A glance over the records of the Colony and State shows that persons of the Burdick name have from the start to the present been intrusted with public offices of trust and honor in their communities and towns, and that name has been continually worthily borne." (Rhode Island Records, Vol. III, pp. 2069-2070.) -- Copied from "Collections of the Rhode Island HIstorical Society," Vol. III, p. 117.

The following letter was written from Westerly, August 4, 1666, by Mrs. Ruth Burdick to her father, Samuel Hubbard, at Newport:

"Most loving and dear father and mother, my duty with my husband and children presented unto you with all my dear friends. My longing desire is to hear from you, how your hearts are borne up above these troubles which are come upon us and are coming as we fear; for we have ther umors of war, and that almost every day. Even now we have heard from your Island by some Indians, who declared unto us that the French have done some mischief up the coast, and we have heard that 1200 Frenchment have joined with the Mohawks to clear the land both of English and of Indians. But I trust in the Lord, if such a thing be intended, that he will not suffer such a thing to be. My desire and prayer to God is, that he will be pleased to fulfil his promise to us, that is, that as in the world we shall have troubles, so in him we shall have peace. The Lord of comfort, comfort your body and our hearts, and give us peace in believing and joy in the Holy Ghost. Oh that the Lord would be pleased to fill out hearts with his good spirit, that we may be carried above all these things! and that we may remember his saying, 'When ye see these things come to pass, lift up your heads, knowing that your redemptiion draws nigh.' Then if these things be the certain sign of our Lord's return, let us mind his command, that is, pray always that ye may be counted worthy to escape all these things, and to stand before the son of man. Let us have boldness toc ome unto him in the new and living way which he has prepared for us. Through grace I find the Lord doth bear up the spirits of his in this place, in some comfortable measure to be looking above these things, the Lord increase more and more unto the day of his appearing, which I hope is at hand. Dear father and mother, the Lord hath been pleased to give us here many sweet and comfortable days of refreshing, which is great cause of thankfulness, and my desire is that we may highly prize it, and you with us give the Lord praise for his benefit. I pray remember my love to all my dear friends with you in fellowship. Sister Saunders desires to be remembered to you all, so doth sister Clarke. Your daughter, to my power. Ruth Burdick."

Robert Burdick married November 2, 1655, at Newport, R.I., to Ruth Hubbard, then 15 years old. She was the first white child born in Springfield, Mass. Her father, Samuel Hubbard, was one of the founders, at Newport, December 23, 1671, of the Seventh Day Baptist Church......[8]

Baptism Baptism 16 NOV 1652 Newport, Newport Co., Rhode Island. Baptized into the Seventh Day Baptist Church, Newport, RI (Newport 1st Baptist Church 1644 - Newport RI; MF 1993.6; Microfilm Room; Seventh Day Baptist Historical Society, Janesville, WI)[9] Robert Burdick was baptised as a member of the First Baptist Church of Newport on 11/16/1652 and represented the church in its struggle against the persecution of dissenters from the established church in Massachusetts. He and Tobias Saunders were arrested in 162 and sentenced to two years in Boston jail but were eventually released in a prisoner exchange. He was among the earliest settlers of the western section of Rhode Island. He was listed as a member of the Newport Seventh Day Baptist Church in its 1692 record.

He died Oct. 26, 1692.[10]

Robert, b?; m. 1655, Nov. 2, Ruth Hubbard (b. Jan. 11, 1640; d. aft 1691, daughter of Samuel & Tacy (Cooper) Hubbard) ; d. 1692.

1652 - baptized by Joseph Torrey.

1656 - freeman.

1661, Nov. 1, Westerly - He and Tobias Saunders, were arrested by Walter Palmer, constable, and soon after brought before Governor John Endicott, charged with forcible entry and intrusion into the bounds of Southertown, in the Pequot country. He acknowledged he was upon the same land and built a small house there. They were committed to prison, both refusing to find security for appearance at General Court.

1662, May 22. In a letter from Rhode Island to Massachusetts, mention is made of the imprisonment by the latter state of Robert Burdick and Tobial Saunders, for not producing their deeds of Narragansett lands.

1669, May 18. His name was in a list of inhabitants of Westerly.

1671, May 17. He took oath of allegiance.

1675, Jul. He and his family came to Newport on account of the Indian war, returning to Westerly subsequently.

1679, Sept. 17. He took oath of allegiance.

1680-83-85. Deputy.

1683, Sep. 25. Samuel Hubbard, having returned to Newport, from a journey to Rye, &c., detgailed some events of the trip. He says: "at Westerly, the first day after the Sabbath, brother Burdick buried a son," and among others there, were grandson John Phillips, and Ruth his wife, and Benjamin Burdick; "a very great burial, above twenty horses."

1691, May 17. He and wife Ruth, sold John Macoone 100 acres, for L10.

1692, Mar. 8. He made an agreement with his son-in-law Joseph Crandall, by which latter was to take care of his father-in-law and find him with suitable meat, drink, washing, lodging and apparel, &c., for life, in consideration of which Joseph Crandall was to have the dwelling house and land adjoining, forever, and until Robert Burdick's death, to have also use the oxen, cart, two cows and eight swine, and then to be returned to be disposed of by will, except the cart and wheels.

1692, Oct. 25. He having died without perfecting his will, an agreement was made by his sons and sons-in-law. What their father had disposed of by legacy to children was to stand, and what remained, to be divided into nine parts. To son-in-law John Phillips, one part. The other eight parts to go to daughters Naomi Rogers and Tacy Maxson, only his wearing apparel to be divided between his sons, Thomas, Benjamin and Samuel. The lands of deceased that are undivided, to go to sons Samuel, Robert and Hubbard Burdick. To son Thomas, two oxen and a hog. To daughter Deborah Crandall, bed, warming pan, &c. To son Benjamin, heifer, swine and an iron pot. To son Samuel, a heifer and a swine. To son Robert, a cow. To son Hubbard, a cow. To daughter Naomi Rogers, a swine, &c. To taughter Tacy Maxson, a swine.

Inventory, 2 oxen, 2 cows, 2 heifers, 6 swine, mare, wearing apparel, warming pan, pewter, &c.[11]

Names of those who may have been his relatives appear very early in Colonial records. A William Burditt, aged 25, came to Virginia in the "Susan" in 1615. George Burditt or Burdett came from Yarmouth, Norfolk, England, where he was popular election had preached two years, and resided for a time in Salem, Mass. William Burdick was master of the ship "Hopewell" which brought many colonists to this country in 1635. (Cutter, New Eng. Families, Vol. I, p. 460.) A Robert Burditt, who may have been related to Robert above, was born in England in 1633, came to New England when a young man, and settled in Malden, Mass. There he married, November, 1653, Hannah Winter. The names of his children are smiliar to those of the Rhode Island family, being, Hannah, Mary, Joseph, Thomas, Ruth. He died June 16, 1667. His descendants retained the spelling Burditt. (Cutter, New Eng. Jamilies, p. 978.)

When Connecticut was granted a new charter, the disputed area of Southertowne (Stonington) was given to her, and Massachusetts retired from the race. Later a compromise was arrived at in England between Connecticut and Rhode Island, whereby the latter was awarded the area of Westerly, where Robert Burdick had built his house, and where he settled on being released by Massachusetts.

Research Notes More on the 1 Nov 1661 arrest my Constable Palmer at The Essex Antiquarian (32:23, 2012).[12]

Sources ↑ Find A Grave: Memorial #54918967 ↑ (Abridged Compendium of Amer. Genealogies, 907, 518, 970.) ↑ New England Marriages to 1700. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB1568/rd/21174/246/426879187 Torrey cites: Austin's Dict. 31, 58, 106; Crandall 16; Hubbard 55; Rogers (,3) 146; Miner Anc. 118; Utah Gen. Mag. 19:62; Reg. 14:24; Burdick (1905) 5; Burdick (1937) 5 ↑ (Cutter, New Eng. Families, p. 978.) ↑ (Rhode Island Records, 1636-1663, Vol. 1, pp. 302, 303, 356.) ↑ (RI Col. Rec., I, 401). ↑ (Osgood, American Colonies in the 17th Century, pp. 367-369.) ↑ Source: #S620 Page: pp.1-5 ↑ Source: #S654 Page: p. 73-74 ↑ Source: #S654 Page: p. 87 ↑ Source: #S102 Page: p. 31 ↑ he Essex Genealogist. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2018.) https://www.americanancestors.org/DB396/i/54118/23/1424508790 Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island comprising three generations of settlers who came before 1690 : with many families carried to the fourth generation Author: Austin, John Osborne Publication: J. Munsell's Sons, Albany, NY, 1887 "Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island" Author: Johnson, Nellie Publication: Syracuse Typesetting Co, Syracuse, N.Y. 1937, pp 2-6 Newport Seventh Day Baptist Trilogy Author: Sanford, Ilou M. & Don A. Publication: Heritage Books, Inc., Bowie, MD, 1998 Call Number: BX6395.N49S3G 1998 [edit]



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Robert Burdick was my sixth great grandfather. I would like to learn when the name change from Burdett to Burdick was made. It appears it occured by Thomas Burdett 1535-1591 spouse Bridget Curzon and his son Samuel Burdick -1664 spouse Francis St. Lawrence are the first relatives I found using the Burdick name. [email address removed]
posted by Bert Burdick Jr.