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Deacon Family and the Sandemanian Church

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Contents

Introduction to the Sandemanian Church

Robert Sandeman
The Sandemanian church is a non-conformist protestant movement which began in Scotland in 1730’s and spread into England and to the USA. The church was founded by John Glas (1695-1773) (and is also known as the Glasite Church) but much of the teaching was developed and promoted by his son-in-law Robert Sandeman (1718-1771), who founded churches in England and in North America.

The churches were close knit communities, and many families were members of the church for several generations.


Deacon Family and the Sandemanian Church

History of the Deacon Family

This narrative does not include all the descendants of William.

William Deacon (abt.1729-1810) was born in Cranford, Northamptonshire and moved to Kettering where he set up a business manufacturing woollen stuffs. He married Hannah (Benford) Deacon (abt.1733-1811) in 1754 and remained in business in Kettering until the 1790’s. William and Hannah became members of the Sandemanian Church in London in 1790 and he became a deacon in 1794 until 1800. He retired to Trowbridge where he died in 1810.

Children of William Deacon (abt.1729-1810)

Elizabeth Deacon (abt.1755-1770) lived and died in Kettering, aged 15.
William Deacon (abt.1757-1815) was born in Kettering Northamptonshire and he owned a house in Kettering. He may have moved to Market Harborough by the time of his marriage in 1788. He married Ann Archer in 1788 in St Andrews, Holborn, when they were described as William Deacon, Factor of Market Harborough, Leicestershire to Miss Archer of London. They lived for two years at Market Harborough, and in 1790 moved to London, running a large carrying business. He died in November 1815, at Hampstead, Middlesex.
His eldest son William Archer Deacon (abt.1789-1867) was born in Market Harborough (according to Ancestry). He did his apprenticeship in London as a clockmaker from 1803 to 1810 , became a Freeman of the City of London in 1820 and emigrated to Australia in 1836
Samuel Charles Deacon (1790-1861) was born in London and became a member of the London Sandemanian Church in 1840, when he was 50 years old.
Thomas Deacon (1792-1858) was born in London and was a friend of Michael Faraday and other young men from the Sandemanian church in London. He joined the Sandemanian Church and married Ann (Fuller) Deacon (1801-1878) and his children married into other Sandemanian families.
Selina Deacon (abt.1797-1835) was a Sandemanian member and married David Watson Martin (1798-1884) in 1827, he came from a Sandemanian family.
Thomas Deacon (1763-abt.1832) was born in Kettering. He was living in Trowbridge when he married Ruth (Rutt) Deacon (abt.1773-1841) in 1793 The witnesses were William Grosvenor, Sandemanian member and Charles Rutt. Their daughter Hannah Deacon (abt.1795-1819) died young and was buried in Trowbridge in 1819. The burial record stated that "No minister the parents being Sandemanians" He died in London in 1832 and was buried at Bunhill Fields burial ground, used by nonconformists.
Ruth Deacon (abt.1794-abt.1851) was born in Trowbridge but was living in Lambeth by 1841.
Benford Deacon (1767-1818) was born in Kettering. He married Ruth Rose in 1801 in Trowbridge. His children were born in Trowbridge (need to check some missing details).
He moved to London and by 1813 he was Benfold Deacon of Cross Street, Islington.
Phoebe Deacon (abt.1801-abt.1878) married George Leighton (abt.1795-1833) in 1822, from a Sandemanian family.
Matilda (Deacon) Leighton (1805-1867) married John Leighton (abt.1803-1869) in 1826, brother of George, above.
Daniel Deacon (1771-1846) was born in Kettering. He began his apprenticeship with Samuel Archer (1762-1836), his brother- in-law. He became a member of the Sandemanian Church in London in 1796 and running a carrier business.
Daniel Deacon (1796-1860) married Sarah Leighton who was also from a Sandemanian family.
Esther Deacon (1827-1882) became a Sandemanian member
Esther Deacon (abt.1798-abt.1871) became a Sandemanian member in 1837 and her husband Henry Deacon (1801-1881) was also a member.
James Deacon (1803-1864)
Jane Holmes Deacon (1805-1876)
Eliza Deacon (1806-1871)
John Deacon (abt.1772-1828) was born in Kettering. In 1788 he began an apprenticeship with Samuel Smith, a joiner. John married Frances (Coleman) Deacon (abt.1775-1858) in Middlesex, England on the 24th April 1795.
He established a cabinetmaker and business in Ridinghouse Great Portland Street, and an upholstery business at No 240 Regents Street. He died in 1828 in London. He became a member of the Sandemanian church in 1797 ands his wife Francis was also a member.
Henry Deacon (1801-1881) married his cousin Esther Deacon (abt.1798-abt.1871) in 1821 and both his sons married women from Sandemanian families
Mary Deacon (1808-1883) married Thomas Prentice Rutt (1805-abt.1880) from a Sandemanian family.
Samuel Deacon (abt.1774-1841) Samuel married Lydia Rutt at Saint Bartholomew The Great, London in 1802.


Links to the Glasite/Sandemanian Church

As members of the family left Northamptonshire and settled in London and Trowbridge, it is probable that the Deacon family attended the Sandemanian church in Trowbridge. This is based on a number of clues.

It is also based on the links between the family and members of the London Sandemanian Church, which include

The Deacon family were one of the key families in the Sandemanian Church in London. The category "Deacon Family and the Sandemanian Church" has been added to this profile to help identify relevant people.

The aim is to collect the names of the family members of the Deacon family who were associated with the church. Not all will have become formal church members but are within 1-2 generations of a known member.

Deacon Trading addresses

1786 London directory [1] Deacon HH Manchester Warehouseman 14 Milk St


Kents Directory 1803 [2]

Deacon John Chair and cabinet maker, St Paul' Alley, Aldersgate Street
Deacon Jas and co Manchester factors, 4 Lad lane
Deacon Tho. Hosier and haberdasher 1 Well Street, Wellclose Sq
Deacon Mary and sons, Manchester Warehouse 13, Milk Street
Deacon & Morrell, Pen and Quill Warehouse 149 Fleet Street (Humphry Gamon Deacon)
Deacon H Stock broker Tokenhouse Yard Lothbury

Post Office directory, 1812 [3]

Deacon James and Co Cotton and Linen factors 4 Lad Lane
Deacon Mary, Sons and Ellis Manchester Warehouse 13 Milk St
Deacon and Morrell Pen and Quill Warehouse 149 Fleet St
Deacon T&B Chair maker 7 Riding House Lane Gt Portland St (this was the address for John Deacon (abt.1772-1828), not sure who T and B might be
Deacon H stock broker 29 Token house yard, Lothbury
Deacon J H Stock and Exchange Broker 9 Finch Lane
Deacon Joseph Chair maker 41 Lambeth Road
Deacon Samuel Cabinet maker 7 Air Street Piccadilly
Deacon T Haberdasher 1 Well Street Wellclose Square

Post Office directory, 1814 [4]

Deacon James and Co Cotton and Linen factors 4 Lad Lane
Deacon Mary, Sons and Ellis Manchester Warehouse 13 Milk St
Deacon and Morrell Pen and Quill Warehouse 149 Fleet St
Deacon T&B Chair maker 7 Riding House Lane Gt Portland St
Deacon Daniel Carrier Commercial Inn London Wall Daniel Deacon
Deacon H stock broker 29 Token house yard, Lothbury
Deacon J H Stock and Exchange Broker 9 Finch Lane
Deacon W Coffee mart & Sugar Warehouse, under the sanction of the committee of British Coffee planters and merchants 2 Skinner Street, Snowhill William Deacon (abt.1757-1815)

Post Office directory, 1817[5]

Deacon Daniel carrier to Nottingham, Mansfield, Sheffield Leeds, Wakefield and all parts of the North, White Horse Inn, Cripplegate Daniel Deacon
Deacon Francis Oil Merchant Grove, Guildford Street Borough

Deacon Residential addresses

1811 Holdens Directory[6]

Deacon Edward Esq, special pleader 1 Hare ct, Temple
Deacon John Esq 8 Bishopsgate Within
Deacon J H Esq James St Westminster
Deacon W P Esq 4 Tavistock Sq
Deacon Mr Banford 27 Cross St Islington Benford Deacon (1767-1818)
Deacon Mr Charles 14 Milk St Cheapside
Deacon Mr James 26 Guildford St
Deacon Mr John 55 Watling St
Deacon Miss 26 Guildford St


Links to other families

Barnard family

Edwin Deacon began an apprenticeship with Edward Barnard in 1828

Links to other pages

Histories of other Sandemanian Families

Barnard Family and the Sandemanian Church
Boosey Family and the Sandemanian Church
Chater Family and the Sandemanian Church
Leighton Family and the Sandemanian Church
Peat Family and the Sandemanian Church
Rutt Family, London Nonconformists
Vincent Family and the Sandemanian Church
Young Family and the Sandemanian Church


Other pages with details of Sandemanians

An introduction to the Sandemanian Church includes an overview but also details of the categories used for the various families.
Research into the London Sandemanian Church and the questions I am seeking to answer
The arrival of Sandemanianism in London with details of the people involved and the impact on the nonconformist community

Sandemanian Church London membership list 1762 - 1868 providing the most complete details of the London Sandemanian's with over 650 names included. Links added to Wikitree profiles as discovered.
Sandemanian Church London membership list as researched by Prof Geoffrey Cantor covering men and some of their wives from 1821-1867. Most have links to Wikitree profiles.
Sandemanian Church London membership list 1885 provides a one off snap shot of existing members in 1885. Most have links to Wikitree profiles.
London Sandemanian marriages and other links between families It was common in the Sandeman church in London for marriages to take place within the church, so this is a list of marriages and other links between church families.
Sandemanians and the bookbinding, paper and publishing trades There were 14 families in the London Sandemanian with links to the bookbinding, paper and publishing trades.
Grosvenor Family Stationers businessDetails of business addresses used by the company.
Reid and Sons Silversmiths a Sandemanian family from Newcastle, some of whom married into the London Church
London Nonconformist Glass Cutters, the Leathley, Chater and Hayward Families The families were linked by marriage and in business, with some becoming Sandemanians.
Sandemanian Church, Old Buckenham, Norfolk and links with the church in London.
The letter from the London Sandemanian Church to the Edinburgh Church in 1855, including signatories to the letter.





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