upload image

Eureka rebellion obituaries

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Date: [unknown] [unknown]
Location: Ballarat, Victoria, Australiamap
Surname/tag: Eureka
Profile manager: Anne Young private message [send private message]
This page has been accessed 952 times.

See main page Space:Eureka_Rebellion

Obituaries of Eureka veterans. In some cases the claim to being a rebel can be quite spurious, however, for the moment we take them at face value.

Contents

Deaths and casualties

Deaths

22x Miners
6x Soldiers

Injuries

many x Miners
some x Soldiers
1x Policeman[1]

List of casualties incurred by the force under the command of Captain J. W. Thomas, 40th Regiment, in the attack on the rebel, camp at Eureka, on the 3rd December, 1854

-12th Regiment.
  • Lieutenant W. H. Paull, severely wounded.
  • Private William Webb, mortally ditto, since dead.
  • Private Robert Adair, severely wounded.
  • Private John Smith, severely ditto.
  • Private Felix Boyle, severely ditto.
  • Private William Buttwill, very severely ditto.
  • Private Timothy Galvin, severely ditto.
  • Private William French, severely ditto.
-40th Regiment.
  • Private Michael Rooney, killed.
  • Captain H. C. Wise, dangerously wounded.
  • Private John Bryan, severely ditto
  • Private Henry Cottes, slightly wounded.
  • Private William Juniper, severely ditto.
  • Private Bernard O'Donnell, severely ditto,
  • Private Joseph Wall, mortally, since dead.
  • Private Patrick Sullivan, slightly wounded.

By command, (Signed) E. MACARTHUR, D.A.G.[2]

Obituaries

Edmond Ahern (1829-1914) - has profile

"WOMEN JUSTICES. South Melbourne Bench. ... Mrs. A. K. Wallace, J.P. Mrs. Wallace was sworn in by the Chief Justice on Monday, ... Mrs. Wallace is the daughter of an old Eureka veteran, the late Mr. Ahern, of Ballarat, where she was born ..." [3]

Mrs A K Wallace = Elizabeth (Ahern) Wallace (1877-1969) and her father is Edmond Ahern (1829-1914)


Richard Allan (abt.1833-1905) - has profile

"EX-CR. RICHARD ALLAN, J.P. A EUREKA STOCKADE VETERAN. One by one the old pioneers are crossing the big Divide, and the ranks of the stouthearts who dared in the days lang syne are dwindling away. General regret will be felt throughout the district at the passing away of Ex-Councillor Richard Allan, J.P., of Tennyson, who left earthly scenes on Thursday night, after a long illness, borne with fortitude, and alleviated as far as human aid could devise by the loving care of kindly hands. Ex-Councillor Allan came to the Tennyson latitudes about 1876, from Newlyn, near Creswick, and farming with success, prospered like most of those who make agriculture a study as well as a calling when started. In the early days Ex-Cr. Allan happened to be at Ballarat at the time of the Eureka riots, and took part in the stirring then involved, and the participants in which are now so few through the hand of Death, no less than three of the few remaining Eureka veterans, viz., Messrs. George Lowe, Chas. Sublet, both of Rochester, and Mr. Allan, having passed away within ...(unreadable)... for himself as a most ... guardian of the rights of those he represented in the SW Riding of the Echuca Shire. Mr Allan was also a man of no mean literary talent, being for years a contributor to the Leader and other journals. The deceased, who was a native of Scotland, has been ailing for some years from Asthma, and the end was most unexpected. He had been confined to his bed for the past five months, and lapsed into unconsciousness, dying as stated on Thursday night, of heart failure, at the ripe old age of 72 years. Messrs Jas. Allan, Tennyson and Richard Allan, Bamawm are sons and the Misses Allan (3), of Tennyson, are daughters of deceased, whose wife predeceased him about 3 years ago."[4]


Edward Alexander Archbald (1851-1918) - has profile

E. A. Archbald,' Broken Hill's Town Clerk, is an Adelaide native, where he first saw light of day in 1851. When a boy he was a spectator of Australia's "little war," the affair of the Eureka Stockade. He left Melb. in 1875 for Western N.S.W., and has remained there, "on the track," at Wilcannia, Silverton, and Broken Hill ever since. He has been employed by the Broken Hill Council since 1889.[5]

ARCHBALD.—On the 17th July, at his residence, 14 Halifax street, Edward Alexander Archbald. (late of Broken Hill), beloved husband of Louisa Maria Archbald, aged 65 years.[6]

ARCHBALD.—The FRIENDS of the late Mr. EDWARD ALEXANDER ARCHBALD (late of Broken Hill) are respectfully informed that his Funeral will leave his late residence, 14 Halifax-street, THIS DAY (Thursday), at 3.30 p.m., for the West Terrace Cemetery.[7]


James Ashburner (abt.1828-1917) - has profile

"... Mr J. Ashburner, in an interesting speech, related his experience at the Stockade fifty years ago. He remarked that he was one of those who assisted to conceal Peter Lalor behind some slabs after he had been wounded. He (Mr Ashburner) was taken prisoner by the Go-vernment troops, and was chained to Tom Hayes all night in a log hut. Many other prisoners were in the hut at the same time, and the sufferings of the men were terrible. He could only compare the log hut to the black hole of Calcutta..." [8]


William Edward Atherden (1838-1934) - has profile

"EUREKA STOCKADE VETERAN. With the death at Osborne Park (W.A.) of William Edward Atherden, 96, the last living link with the Eureka Stockade was severed. Atherden, after deserting from a ship at Geelong walked barefooted to Ballarat. There he was among the 114 miners who were taken prisoners after the fight, and was chained hand and foot to three others. Atherden, who was an orchardist at York until 14 years ago, is believed to have been the last survivor of the stockade." [9]

"EUREKA STOCKADE VETERAN. The Late Mr. W. E. Atherden. On Saturday, Mr. William Edward Atherden, who was present at the Eureka stockade, died at Osborne Park, at the residence of his daughter. Mrs. George Muir, of King Edward road. He was 96 years of age. The late Mr. Atherden was born at Dover, England, and when still a lad, went to sea on a sailing vessel. He de-serted on arrival at Geelong (Australia) and walked barefoot to Ballarat. He worked in the diggings there and was present during the disorders of Decem-ber, 1854, when the miners engaged the police in battle at the Eureka Stockade. After the police victory, 114 miners were taken prisoner and among these was young Atherden. He used to recall having been chained hand and foot to three other miners. All were discharged except 13, who were held for trial for treason, but none was convicted. Good luck came to Mr. Atherden on his return to the diggings and within a year or two he was able to return to England, where, at the age of 19 years, he married Miss Mary Martin. On returning to Australia he settled in this State, purchasing an orchard at York. For the past 14 years he had resided at Osborne Park. He is survived by one son and four daughters. The funeral will take place this morning." [10] (N.B. William must have been 16 years of age at Eureka). And ...

Daughter's marriage; ...


Capt. Peter Barker (1826-1923) - has profile

(photo attached) "On December 28 (1923) last the late Captain Peter Barker passed peacefully away at the ripe age of 98 years. 'He was born in Stirling, Scotland, in 1826. Apprenticed to the sea at the early age of 14, he made his first trip across the Atlantic to America in a full-rigged ship, thence on to the Indian and China coasts. He sailed round the world more than once, his last deep-sea trip being to Australia. He landed at Willliamstown, Mel-bourne, in 1851. Having, with the rest of the crew, contracted the gold fever, he decided to try his luck on the Ballarat goldflelds, where he arrived early in 1852 on a bullock dray. He lost no time in pegging out a claim at the Golden Point, where he remained for about 12 months, and then sold out to two Americans, who made their fortune in a fortnight by sinking 2ft deeper. Captain Barker went to Magpie Flat, where he had better success. He was in the thick of the Eureka Stockade, and was sentry when the soldiers and police made the fatal raid in the dead of night. He escaped without injury. He continued seeking for gold until 1864. He was married by the Rev. Johnson, Presbyterian minister, In 1855, to Miss E. Waugh, daughter of Robt. Waugh, a miller in Scotland. She predeceased him by 10 years. In 1864 be left Ballarat for the rush at Wedding Mountains, New South Wales, but finding it a duffer, he tried his luck on the West Coast of New Zealand, and met with better success. His next move was to Brisbane, but he was only here a few days when the Kanoona (Rockhampton district) rush broke out. He was one of the first on the field, but did not make a fortune, so he returned to Brisbane and once more took to the sea. He was appointed master of the steamer Heatherbell, and afterwards became owner of her and the tug Young Mat. About 20 years ago he retired. Living quietly in a "cottage by the sea" at Redcliffe for 10 years. The remainder of his life was spent in Brisbane. He was the oldest Oddfellow in Australia, being a member for, about 75 years. For 58 of them he was a member of the Queen of England M.U.I.O.F., Brisbane. There were four generations bearing his name, and he is survived by three sons and three daughters. The sons are William J., Robt. W., and Peter, all living in Brisbane. The daughters are Mrs. T. Leitch and Mrs. French (of Brisbane) and Mrs. A., Schneider; (of Stanthorpe). A sister, Mrs. J. Smith, of New Farm, Is now well in the eighties. Captain Barker was shipwrecked three times—once as a boy on the coast of Ireland, when he and a seaman, the sole survivors. were cast on the rocks after a swim of nearly three miles. The wide respect in which the old skipper was held was evidenced by the large and representative funeral." [11]

"Mr. "W. J. Barker, of Normanby terrace, whose father fought in the Eureka stockade, came to Brisbane from Ballarat in 1864. Mr. Barker, senr, now 97, who is still hale and hearty, has lived here 58 years. There are four other members of the family, the youngest of whom ls 61 years, all born in Brisbane." [12]


Ex-Sergeant Bass Thomas Bass (abt.1831-1912) - has profile

"A EUREKA VETERAN. HIS DEATH REPORTED: MELBOURNE, Saturday. The death, is reported of Ex-Sergeant Bass at the age of 82, who was a member of the Fortieth Regiment and was present at the Eureka riots"[13].


John James Benham (1835-1919) - has profile

"Mr. J. J. Benham, of Universal Buildings, Grenfell-street, Adelaide, is one of the veterans who was within the Eureka Stockade in 1854. On Saturday Mr. Benham sent the following telegram to the chair-man of the Eureka celebration committee, at Ballarat:-"Hearty good wishes to survivors Eureka fight, from comrade."[14]

From the Observer (Adelaide, SA), Saturday 3 May 1919, page 18

Mr. J. J. Benham.
Mr. J. J. Benham, a highly esteemed old colonist, died on April 24 at Middle Brighton, Victoria, in the eighty-third year of his age. He went to Victoria in December last, on a visit to his family. The late Mr. Benham had a remarkable career, and had he published a book of reminiscences it would have been an historic addition to the records of those indomitable pioneers who came out to Australia imbued with the grit and determination that have made Britain famous. He was of a retiring disposition, however, and disliked publicity. He was the second son of the late Mr. Charles Benham, formerly a wine and spirit merchant, Grenfell street, Adelaide. As a boy he went to sea, and was in California when the "'Forty Niners" hastened to the gold rush. He subsequently traded in the South Seas, Japan, and China. In 1837 he landed in Queensland, and a year later walked alone from that colony to South Australia, taking three months to accomplish the journey. He remained in South Australia until the Ballarat diggings made the call to the men of Australia, and then he again "padded" it to the eastern State town. While there he took part in the Eureka stockade riot, under the leadership of Peter Lalor. After another sojourn in Queensland he finally returned to Adelaide in the early seventies, and then entered into partnership with the late Mr. Wentworth Cavenagh in an estate business, which he conducted until his death. A widow and a son (Sgt. Clarence Benham, who has just returned from the front) and daughter survive. Mr. W. H. Benham, of Kapunda (the doyen of the legal profession in South Australia) is a brother.[15]

Death index for John James Benham [16]


George Bentley (abt.1831-1911) - has profile

"Eureka Veteran's End - Ballarat Tuesday; When Mr. S. J. Goldsmith P.M. on Tuesday enquired into the death of George Bentley whose charred remains were found at Glen Park on the previous day it was stated that the old man was a Eureka Stockade Veteran. Mr. Thomas Barnett one of the witnesses stated that he had in his possession the sword with which Bentley had been armed when the soldiers stormed and captured the stockade. It was also made known that Bentley had for some time been in an infirm condition and that only a week previously Mounted Constable Morey sought to persuade him to enter the hospital. Bentley however pleaded that he might be allowed to remain in his hut, which he had occupied for 52 years. He had been warned to be careful when near the fire and judging by the position in which the charred remains were found, it was presumed that Bentley had fallen into the fireplace. Mr Goldsmith complimented Mr. Alexander Shuttleworth for the attention which he had given to Bentley and other old age pensioners residing in the locality."[17].

"EUREKA VETERAN’S TRAGIC END BURNT TO DEATH. THE CORONIAL INQUIRY, The coroner (Mr Goldsmith) yesterday held an enquiry into the death of George Bentley, an old age pensioner, who was fatally burnt in his hut at Glenpark on Monday. Detective-sergeant Rogerson conducted the proceedings. Alex Shuttleworth, miner, of Glen-park, said he had known the deceased for forty years, and had been in the habit of visiting him. The deceased was an old age pensioner. He had not been in good health for some time. Witness last saw him on Sunday, sitting by the fire in his hut, when he put a log of wood on the fire at the old man's re-quest. He then left the hut and re-turned on Monday morning when he found that the place had been burned down. Witness informed the police, and accompanied Detective-sergeant Rogerson and Constable Morey to the scene of the fire. He saw the police unearth the remains of the deceased, and was satisfied that they were Geo. Bentley’s. He believed that the de-ceased had fallen into the fire, and the rubbish in the hut had been ignited by his burning clothes. The deceased was liked by the people of the locality, and witness knew of none likely to do him an injury. The deceased told witness to call every morning to see how he was getting on. The spot where the re-mains were found was where the de-ceased usually sat. Thomas Barnett, retired butcher of Bond Street, Ballarat, deposed that he had known Bentley, who was at the Eureka riots and he had in his possession, a sword used by the deceased in the riots. The old man came from Yorkshire. Witness had been in the habit of visiting him, and knew that he had been in ill-health recently. On Wed-nesday last witness saw him sitting on his stool by the fire. Witness had an order to draw deceased's next pension for him. He had no doubt that the de-ceased fell into the fire. The deceased was 80 years of age. Witness had been afraid of deceased falling into the fire and wanted to nail a piece of timber across the fireplace as a precaution, but Bentley would not let him do it. He did not suspect foul play. Constable Morey gave evidence that he went on Monday to Glenpark in com-pany with Detective-Sergeant Rogerson and the witness Shuttleworth, and ex-amined the spot where the hut had been burned down. On clearing some of the debris away they found some charred remains resting on a log in the fire place. On the 23rd inst. witness visit-ed the deceased, and asked him if he would go to the Ballarat Hospital, as he was in a very weak state, and his hands and knees were very much swollen. He said he was suffering from dropsy. On that occasion the deceased nearly fell into the fire while using the tongs, and witness cautioned him to be careful, as he would never, be able to get out of the hut if it caught fire. He promised to go to the hospital if he was not better, within a week. He told witness he had lived in the hut for 50 years. The pensioners in the locality were well looked after by Shuttleworth and a Miss Ritchie. Dr Chaplin gave evidence concerning a post-mortem examination. There was nothing by which the exact cause of death could be determined, but the de-ceased probably fell into the fire in a fit of giddiness. The coroner returned a verdict that death was due to burns accidentally re-ceived."[18]


James Millhinch Bickett (abt.1825-1917) - has profile

A EUREKA VETERAN. The death occurred last week of Mr. James Millbinch Bickett, who was probably the last of the very early pioneers at Baliarat. Deceased, who had reached the age of 92, was among the first gold diggers at Golden Point and Eureka. At the termination of the Eureka Stockade revolt Mr. Bickett was appointed by the Government a member of a tribunal known as the local court, constituted mainly for the purpose of dealing with affairs appertaining to the Baliarat goldfield. In later years Mr. Bickett, who was the oldest honorary magistrate in the State, was appointed secretary to the mining board, and legal manager of a number of well-known companies. He was one of the founders of Ballarat School of Mines, mechanics' institute, art gallery, hospital, orphanage, and benevolent asylum.[19].


Thomas Bolger

Soon there will not be a Eureka Stockader left in Australia. The veterans are dying off rapidly. Thomas Bolger and Charley Sublet, two of Peter Lalor'a men, have died recently. These were genuine, but many of the men who now claim to be Eureka veterans were very careful to be outside Lalor's Stockade on that fatal Sunday.[20]



James Burchell

A very long news article. Burchell was a former Police Detective at Ballarat & Gold Broker, implicated in the embezzlement of a sizable amount of money from the Bank of New South Wales... in the article is a reference to Burchell having 'signed an address in favour of James Bentley' and now is forced to leave Ballarat in fear.[21]


William Burns

"EUREKA STOCKADE VETERAN. Accident to an old colonist. LIVERPOOL, Monday. William Burns, who claims to be in his 60th year, was knocked down and injured by a restive horse on Saturday morning on the premises of Mr. M. Christiansen. Dr. Pirie, who found the old man was suffering from a scalp wound. Injuries to one of his arms, and shock, ordered his removal to the local hospital. Burns, who was formerly a gold-digger, was one of the few remaining who participated In the Eureka Stockade riots." [22]


Mrs Jane Campbell Jane (Ferguson) Campbell (1828-1912) - has profile

"OBITUARY. MRS. JANE CAMPBELL. We regret to announce the death of Mrs. Jane Campbell, which occurred at the residence of her son-in-law, Mr. O. Gibbs, yesterday afternoon. Mrs. Campbell, who had attained the mature age of 83, was particularly hale and hearty for one of her years until a few weeks ago, when she became so ill that she was compelled to take to her bed. Despite every attention on the part of her medical attendant and relatives, she gradually sank until, shortly after, 1 o'clock yesterday afternoon, she passed peacefully away. The late Mrs. Campbell was born, at Enriiskillen, in the county of Fermanagh, Ireland, in 1828, and migrated to Australia in 1850. There, after marrying Mr. William John Campbell, who predeceased her 17 years ago, she settled near Ballarat, where Mr. Campbell followed agricultural pursuits. She was one of the few women at the goldfields rush at the time of the Eureka stockade. In 1894 Mrs. Campbell and most of the members of her family came to Western Australia, and since then she (has resided almost continuously at Bunbury. One of her brothers, Mr. James Ferguson, is now resident at Claremont. The surviving members of her family are Messrs. F. J. Campbell (Lowden), E. J. Campbell (Greenbushes), George and Charles Campbell (Victoria), and Mrs. L. McCombe and Mrs. 0. Gibbs, of Bunbury. Those of her grandchildren living in Bunbury are Messrs E. and H. Campbell, B. and M. McCombe, and Miss Ina McCombe and Ilma and Iris Gibbs. The funeral will take place this afternoon, the cortege leaving the residence of Mr. 0. Gibbs at 4 o'clock." [23]


Carboni - has profile

"So for as this chronicler and these columns are concerned this chapter will end the disjointed story of Ballarat origins and development. ... How the famous, and in one man’s opinion, the infamous of historic note come before us as the days roll away into the back eternities. Esmond, the gold discoverer lies, as I write this, in the Ballarat Hospital, a hopeless invalid near the end of his seventh decade of years. Since he entered the Hospital, news comes of the exit, at the beginning of his seventh decade, of policeman Goodenough, Carboni Raffaello’s “Spy Goodenough.” Both Esmond and Goodenough were together at the Eureka Stockade, but in very different positions, and on opposing sides. Raffaello was there also. He lies in some Roman cemetery. Esmond is in the Hospital here, and on the last day of January, 189O, the Bairnsdale correspondent of the Age wrote: —“Hy. Goodenough, formerly sergeant of police in this district, died yesterday, aged 60 years. He entered the force 37 years ago, and took part in quelling the Ballarat riots.” The first steam engine used in Ballarat ..." [24]


Mrs L F Cavanagh Louise Frances (Stark) Cavanagh (abt.1852-1932) - has profile

The Eureka Stockade. Mrs. L. F. Cavanagh (Wynnum) writes: Sir,—In to-day's " Courier " appears a short paragraph relative to the above; also a lady resident of Sandgate is mentioned as a survivor of those stirring times. I would like to mention that I, too, am an old " Stockader," and numerous thrilling incidents are indelibly stamped on my memory. I was taken to the Ballarat fields nearly two years before the memorable riot, and we also had to seek refuge in the compound, which mostly was occupied by the women and children. My aged mother died only last year, and until then possessed a flattened bullet, which rang out one night, and whizzed between us as we stood together just at the sound of the " all lights out " gave us the usual warning;, and if not promptly obeyed a hail of bullets from Soldier's Hill would tear through and terrify the " camp." We extracted the bullet mentioned from an adjacent log and retained it as a sort of curio relic of a very sensational era, and of that frightful tragedy on the Eureka on a Sunday's dawn in 1854. I often think, sir, that if the remaining few of us old " Stockaders " I could arrange a meeting, and compare reminiscences, we could spend a very interesting hour or two.[25]

*Death Letitia Mary Cavanagh on 08/02/1934 at Brisbane, Qld. Parents; George McLean & Ellen Isabella Horrigan : 1934/C/940. DOB 1861 not confident... OR

  • Death Lillias Cavanagh on 12/10/1919 at country, Qld. Parents; John Nixon & Lillias Liddle : 1919/C/5522.

Son in 1918: "Mrs L F Cavanagh, of Wynnum, has received information from the military authorities that her eldest son, R Roxburgh Cavanagh, who embarked as provost sergeant in 1916, has been missing since July 17 th this year." [26]

Another son, Glyn R. Cavanagh, engaged 1921.[27]

Still writing letters in 1928 but none later[28]

Cavanagh.—The Funeral of the late Louise Frances Cavanagh (late of Wynnum) will leave the Funeral Parlour, 45 Adelaide Street, City, This (Wednesday) Afternoon, at 3 o'clock, for the Hemmant Cemetery.[29]

Death registration: Louise Frances Cavanagh Death date:14/06/1932 Mother's name:Emma Griffin Father/parent's name:Robert Stark Registration details:1932/B/17567[30]



Mary Ann Faulkner (1833-1913) - has profile

"Mrs. Mary Ann Carroll, who died at Gordon, Victoria, recently, at the age of 88 years, claimed a personal association with many of the stirring episodes in the roaring days of the Southern State. She arrived in Ballarat in 1851, and assisted in the nursing of the diggers wounded at the Eureka Stockade. Amongst those who received her kindly attentions was Peter Lalor. She also remembered seeing, as a child, the arrival in Melbourne of Buckley, the white man who lived so long with the aborigines that he had almost forgotten the white man's language." [31]

From the Ballarat Star, Tuesday 28 October 1913, page 8:

GORDON.

OLD RESIDENT'S DEATH.

One of the oldest residents of this and the Wallace district died here on Mon-day, in the person of Mrs Mary Ann Carroll, relict of Mr William Carroll who predeceased his lady by 29 years last August. The deceased lady, who was 8? years of age, was born in Sydney, where she spent 19 years, and subsequently came to Victoria with her parents, and she remained in various parts of the State up to her demise. She met her husband, Mr Carroll, in Lexton, and married him there, and they came to Ballarat on the first gold discovery in 1851 remaining there until after the historic Eureka riots. Mrs Carroll could give very interesting accounts of the late Hon. P. Lalor and others. Subsequently she, with her husband, moved to Wallace, where they took up land and lived there for many years. Finally they settled in Gordon, and she resided here up to the time of her death. She leaves one son, Mr Francis Dalton Carroll, of Gordon. The deceased had a wonderful memory. She used to relate, amongst other things, how she saw Buckley, the white man who was so long living with the blacks, brought into Melbourne, and how he wore boots like boxes. The funeral will take place on Wednesday at the Gordon cemetery.[32]

Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic.), Saturday 1 November 1913, page 26

Crossed the Bar. Mrs Mary Ann Carroll died at her residence at Gordon, aged 85 years. She was a colonist of 75 years, and arrived in Ballarat in 1851. She claimed to have assisted her husband in the care of dig-gers wounded at the Eureka Stockade. She also remembered seeing as a child the arrival in Melbourne of the white man Buckley, who had lived so long with the aboriginals.[33]

Death index CARROLL Mary Ann Death parents' names not given died at Gordon age 85 (born about 1828) year 1913 13472/1913[34] Possibly this marriage COMMIFORD Mary Marriage CARROLL, William 1854 3233/1854[35]

But this does not reconcile with son's birth: CARROLL Francis Dalton Birth <Unknown Family Name>, Mary Ann FAULKENER <Unknown Family Name>, William BALLARAT 1856 8189/1856[36]

CARROLL Francis Dalton Death mother Mary Ann FALKNER father CARROLL William death place GORDON age 66 1926 5576/1926

Likely birth record FAULKNER MARY reg number A552/1833 V1833552 18 father EDWARD mother PHILIDELPHIA A district CJ (CHURCH OF ENGLAND SYDNEY, ST JAMES') Cite error 3; Invalid <ref> tag; invalid names, e.g. too many


Michael Carroll (1842-1924) - has profile

Eureka Veteran Passes - The death has occurred in Ballarat, at the age of 82, of Michael Carroll, whose, name is associated with the Eureka stockade epoch. Deceased in December, 1854, then a boy of 14, was acting as assistant to his father, who was a teamster between Geelong and Ballarat. At the close of the fight at the stockade between the British soldiers and aggrieved diggers, father and son were engaged to convey the wounded insurgent chief, Peter Lalor, to Geelong. There was a Government reward to £500 for the body of Lalor, dead or alive. The stockade leader, weak from the loss of blood, was in hiding in the bottom of the waggon, covered with some tarpaulins, when deceased and his father were intercepted in the bush by mounted police, who were in search for the fugitive. They were asked to keep a lookout for Peter Lalor, and were told of the reward of £500 for any information that would lead to his capture. The teamsters, however, were silent, and the insurgent chief was kept in bis hiding place until Geelong was reached. Carroll claimed to be the first white child born in Geelong. His birth occurred on April 17, 1842, nine years before gold was discovered at Ballarat. He was probably the last of the Ballarat pioneers who could speak with authority regarding the trouble that led up to the now historic revolt at the Eureka stockade[37].


J F Coleman

(a long article abridged, to those named & their roles) "THE EUREKA STOCKADE. The following is the of a series of contributions on the events connected with the Eureka Stock-ade. It is from the pen of a gentleman who was here through the whole of the time ... The camp authorities, dreading an attack they said on Bentley’s hotel, but to provoke one asserted the discontented, sent the police to act as a guard over the building. ... Some of the camp officials who had still managed to keep some faith in their honesty in the popular breast notably Mr Commissioner Amos, who was drowned in the London, aided by Mr McIntyre, who subsequently was rewarded for having done this, by being arrested for having been an aider and abettor in the riot—tried all their persuasive powers to calm the excited and now well-nigh frantic assemblage. It was labor in vain. ... To such men was committed the congenial task of discovering the ringleaders of the riot at Bentley’s hotel. They at last picked out three scape-goats. One was McIntyre, now in comfortable circumstances in Glasgow, who had used his best endeavors to restrain the crowd at Bentley’s from overt acts. Another 1 was Fletcher, a printer, whose office was on the Main road, not far on the Eastern Market side ... Fletcher, from all that can be learned, was not off the Main Road the day of the fire ...Westerby, the third man, has been asserted to be equally innocent with Fletcher in the transaction. It mattered not, how ever, the necessity was laid on those in local authority to bring someone or other before the law courts, and these men were selected. When they had been arrested a meeting was held on Bakery Hill ... it was suggested that a committee, with power to act promptly and bail the prisoners, be appointed. For a moment the suggestion was unheeded, when J. F. Coleman, now mining registrar at Stafford shire Reef, volunteered to act, and his example being speedily followed ... Messrs Evans, who had been in business relation with Fletcher, would be bail for him; so it only remained to bail McIntyre; Before doing so, the bench, consisting of Messrs Johnston, G. O’B. Webster, and Green, of the Gold-office, made enquiries as to the solvency of the proposed sureties, one of whom was Mr Saltoun, formerly a partner of Mr Waldie’s. The other surety referred to the Police-court sergeant as to how he stood, and was pronounced satisfactory. ... then an adjournment was made to Bakery Hill to take counsel. Among the first things advised was, now that McIntyre was liberated, he should take to hiding. The adviser of this step was Kennedy, and the objector was one of the bondsmen, who happened to be present. To McIntyre’s credit be it said he refused, apart from the responsibilities of his bail, to hide for an hour. The trial and conviction of the three prisoners followed ..." [38]


J J Corran

"Stricken wiih paralysis a week ago, Mr, J. J. Corran, a Eureka Stockade veteran, died on Sunday at his residence, "Tinwald," Murrumbeena, at the age of 83. Born in the Isle of Man, Mr Corran arrived in Australia in 1852, when he was about 19 years of age, and was associated with much of the stirring early goldfields history of this state. As a member of Peter Lalor's famous contingent, Mr Corran accepted responsibility and duty, although, when shooting from behind the picket fences to repel, an attack, he was so imbued with the distaste of shedding the blood of his fellow colonials, that he always fired in the air. In his later years, until he retired about two years ago, Mr Corran was a news agent at Hawksburn, His family comprise a widow of 80, eight children living out of thirteen born, and numerous grand children. The interment took place at Springvale." [39]


Stephen Cumming

"A Veteran Figure Passes.

Who finds the track, who follows the track, Must measure him steel for steel, With the sword of flame 'gainst the road he came, And the fang'd head under his heel, Who hears the song, who answers the song, Must fight for his faith afar, Where they tramp to the goal of the outlaw soul By the light of a vagrant star. • • • A veteran figure, a grand old fighter, dropped out of the rebel ranks the other week at Ballarat—dropped quietly out, and passed into the Beyond, even while at the street corners they still discussed his last gospel of divine discontent. Vale, Stephen Cumming. With him dies one more living memory of the Eureka Stockade, for though he was only a child when the outlawed Peter Lalor, with a shattered arm and a price upon his head, and the bloodhounds on his track, stumbled into his father's tent in the dusk of that disastrous day in the fifties, he remembered it all, and often described the days that followed— the hiding and the nursing of the sick fugitive till his fever had gone and his amputated arm healed. These were some of his earliest memories. Perhaps the sights and sounds, the human injustice, and the suffering of those dark days bit deep into his young soul, or maybe it was but the fighting blood of his Covenanter forefathers that urged him, but certain it is that he fought the good fight for freedom with every breath he drew—fought it stubbornly and consistently till the very hour of his going out. Sixty-seven years of age at the time of his death, Stephen Cumming was the eldest son of Stephen Cumming the elder, one of Peter Lalor's closest friends, and a constant associate of the Rationalist, Josh Symes.

He claimed Irish descent, though Ireland was only one well-loved camping-ground in the wanderings of his ancestors. Covenanters, driven out of Scotland ior their faith, they found homes in the North of Ireland ; for many years before they followed the fortunes of mining, through Wales and into Cornwall, where, at Truro, in that county, Stephen Cumming was born, and at a very early age he was brought by his people to the Great Golden Continent in the early fifties. Of his personality, apart from his qualities as a democrat and a fighter for the New Dispensation, much of human interest might be said that is outside the scope of a short article. To make no notice of one or two phases of the man, however, would be unfair to the memory of a quite unique character. He was an enthusiastic musician, and was one of the first members of the first Leidertafel established in Ballarat, being associated therein with the late Mr. John Robson. Possessed of a peculiarly beautiful bass voice and a fine gift of organisation, he was a recognised institution in his day whenever human need or the voice of charity called. Another, and widely different, side of him was a mechanical capability amounting to genius, and his joy in it. Those who knew him best, and were privileged to drop in on him casually, draw a charming little picture of the big man at play; seated in his workroom, bis fiddle tucked under his chin, his bow rasping: the strings like mad in a very diablerie of accompaniment to the wild measure cut out by a tiny engine and full head of stampers—a perfect minature battery, his pet creation, constructed with the aid of a kerosene tin, a knitting needle, a darning needle, and—brains. Another joy of his /was his beloved books, many of them the hoarded treasure (in days of a scantier literary supply) of his father, like whom he was a student of history, philosophy, science, etc., and was, in the truest sense of the word, a man of culture as well as gifts. By calling he was a battery manager (he studied chemistry at Ballarat School of Mines) and expert mining mechanic; in fact, he did most things well, and some things he did better than most. He is gone, and his country is the poorer! MARIE E. J. PITT.[40].


Martin Cusack

MARTIN CUSACK. EUKEKA STOCKADE VETERAN'S DEATH. Martin Cusack, who was the last of the 40th Regiment that was engag-ed in 1854 in the fight with the early diggers at the Eureka Stockade, died in the Ballarat Benevolent Asylum recently. In the attack on the stockade in the early morning the 40th Regiment was assisted by two companies of the 12th Regiment, which was on service in Australia, while both bodies re-ceived the support of a number of naval men belonging to a British cruiser then lying in Hobson's Bay. Cusack, who was 85 years of age, was of opinion that the revolt was a great mistake, and was not justified. Cusack, in conversation with a re-presentative of the "Age", said:— "We of the 40th Regiment marched to Ballarat from Melbourne much against our will. The Ballarat dig-gers, we knew, were our own kith and kin, and we felt it would be a poor hour of day if we were ordered to fire at them. Many of us prayed during our march through the bush that the men of the Eureka would see that there could possibly be no hope for them in a battle with well-trained Im-perial soldiers, such as the 12th and 40th Regiments. Their brush with us was a forlorn hope, and we all wished to avoid meeting them. We quietly agreed among ourselves that if we had to shoot we would fire high in order to frighten the diggers, who, as I have said, were our own kith and kin from England, Ireland, Scotland, and America. Just as we were marching on Ballarat, however, a thing occurred that greatly exasper- ated the soldiers. We were march-ing in fours near the Red Hill, when a digger (a colored man) stepped out of his tent, and picking up a quartz boulder, he threw it at our flank, killing our little drummer boy. When the poor little fellow collapsed, and rolled over his drum, we all swore we would revenge his death by show-ing no quarter in fair battle." The veteran, who enlisted in the 40th Regiment in Ireland in 1850, had been confined to his bed in the Benevolent Asylum for seventeen years.[41].


Benjamin S. Dawson

"A EUREKA VETERAN. STAWELL, This Day. Mr Benjamin S. Dawson, a very old resident of Stawell and a colonist of 62 years standing, died at Stawell on Saturday morning. Deceased, who was 83 years of age, was a native of Gainsborough, England, and came to Victoria when 21 years old. He followed up various gold rushes, being at Bendigo, Dunolly, Ararat, Avoca, Fiery Creek and Creswick, while he was present at the Eureka Stockade riots, and assisted to treat the wounded. In 1857 he was on Commercial street rush, and shortly after went to "The Reefs," as Stawell was then known, and' ever since then had been in business as a chemist and druggist. In the earlier history of the town he was connected with most of its public institutions. He was a member of the first Stawell Borough Council, constituted in January, 1870, and in November, 1870, was elected mayor. Appointed a justice of the peace in 1874, he retained the position until his death, and was probably the oldest honorary justice in the State. He leaves a family of three sons and one daughter"[42].


Robert Dawson

"Death of Eureka Veteran- Mr Robert Dawson, 98, a colonist for 70 years, has died at the Ballarat Hospital. He was one of the few survivors of the pitched battle between the soldiers and gold-dlggers at Eureka, Ballarat. on December 6, 1854. He confessed to his sense of pride at having fought on the side of the diggers in that memorable conflict. For many years, until old age prevented his following the occupation of mining, the veteran, worked In Broken Hill mines. He was a bachelor."[43].


Patrick Duggan

"Eureka Stockade veterans are fast passing away. One, Mr. Patrick Duggan, of Temora, died last week aged 87. Besides having a hand in the now historic Ballarat riot Duggan arrived so early at Temora that he aptly described that place at 'not being there at all' when he came on the scene." [44]


Charles Dyte (abt.1817-1893) - has profile

"DEATH OF A BALLARAT PIONEER. MR. CHARLES DYTE. BALLARAT, "Wednesday. Mr. Charles Dyte, mining investor, and one of the oldest and best known pioneers and public men of Ballarat, died to-night from cancer of the liver, after a four months' illness. The deceased, who had suffered great agony during the past few weeks, passed peacefully away, perfectly conscious to the last and quite resigned. Mr, Dyte, who was 75 years of age, was a native of London. In early life he followed commercial pursuits, serving his apprenticeship in the London warehouse of Messrs. E. Moses and Co. Arriving in the colony in the ship Vernon in August, 1853, the deceased gentleman proceeded to Maryborough, where he accepted a responsible position in the then flourishing establishment of Messrs. Moses, Levy and Co. Coming to Ballarat in 1854, when the agitation in respect to the diggers' licences was reaching its serious stage, Mr. Dyte joined in the movements initiated for the redress of the grievances under which the gold seekers suffered, and it was at a meeting of diggers held near Bakery Hill that he made his first appearance as a public speaker. Shortly after the encounter at the Eureka Stockade the deceased became closely associated with movements of a politicai and municipal character, and later on he commenced business as an auctioneer in Main road, meeting with remarkable success. For a number of years Mr. Dyte was one of the representatives of Ballarat East in the Legislative Assembly, his colleagues during his sessions including Messrs J. B. Humffray and C. E. Jones. He strongly advocated payment of members, but when the measure became law he lost his seat for Ballarat East. The deceased was one of the first chairmen of the local borough council, and for a long while was a leading magistrate in the district. He was one of the founders of the Orphan Asylum, and took a prominent part in the organisation of the Ballarat Fire Brigade, of which he was captain and secretary. With both of these institutions he was connected up to the time of his death. His enterprise as a citizen also materially assisted in the formation of the Ballarat Water Trust, which has since developed into a scheme of considerable magnitude. In Masonic affairs Mr. Dyte was ever foremost, and as a worshipful master he laid the foundation stone of the Ballarat East town hall. He for some years past had been a leading spirit in the Old Colonists' Association of Ballarat, of which he was a vice-president. He was also a zealous member of the local Hebrew Congregation, filling the presidential chair for several years. He was a hearty supporter of the mining industry, in which he experienced numerous ups and downs. Had he a few years ago parted with his interests in a few local stocks he could have realised a large fortune. For a lengthy period he was a heavy shareholder in the famous Kohinoor mine, but forfeited his shares just as golden stone had been struck, and the stock became very valuable. Mr. Dyte, who was a fluent speaker and a keen debater, made his final effort to re-enter Parliament when, as Minister of Mines, Mr. John James sought re-election in Ballarat East. He was unsuccessful, however, Mr. E. Murphy, now representing Warrenheip, winning the seat from Mr. James. During his career on these goldfields, Mr. Dyte was made the recipient of numerous testimonials from various public bodies, the most valuable, perhaps, coming from the Ballarat Fire Brigade. Mr. Dyte, who during recent years followed the business of a stock and share broker, was of a kind and charitable disposition, and was held in high esteem by all classes. His familiar form will be greatly missed from the Ballarat Stock Exchange buildings, in which he was in daily attendance. Mr. Dyte leaves a widow and three in family. The station master at Essendon, Mr. David Dyte, is a son of the deceased gentleman." [45]

Charles Dyte was quoted as providing a character reference for James Bentley at the Scobie murder trials. [46]

Charles Dyte had merchandise stored in the building attached to the hotel, and claimed compensation of £416 ls for the loss in the burning of Bentley's Hotel. [47]


Esmond

"So for as this chronicler and these columns are concerned this chapter will end the disjointed story of Ballarat origins and development. ... How the famous, and in one man’s opinion, the infamous of historic note come before us as the days roll away into the back eternities. Esmond, the gold discoverer lies, as I write this, in the Ballarat Hospital, a hopeless invalid near the end of his seventh decade of years. Since he entered the Hospital, news comes of the exit, at the beginning of his seventh decade, of policeman Goodenough, Carboni Raffaello’s “Spy Goodenough.” Both Esmond and Goodenough were together at the Eureka Stockade, but in very different positions, and on opposing sides. Raffaello was there also. He lies in some Roman cemetery. Esmond is in the Hospital here, and on the last day of January, 189O, the Bairnsdale correspondent of the Age wrote: —“Hy. Goodenough, formerly sergeant of police in this district, died yesterday, aged 60 years. He entered the force 37 years ago, and took part in quelling the Ballarat riots.” The first steam engine used in Ballarat ..." [48]


George Firman

"Four Eureka veterans, Isaac Hayward, David Maine, John Kemp, and George Firman arrived at Ballarat yesterday from Gippsland. Erch gives on interest-ing account of exciting scenes at the Stockade."[49]


Mr Fletcher

(a long article abridged, to those named & their roles) "THE EUREKA STOCKADE. The following is the of a series of contributions on the events connected with the Eureka Stock-ade. It is from the pen of a gentleman who was here through the whole of the time ... The camp authorities, dreading an attack they said on Bentley’s hotel, but to provoke one asserted the discontented, sent the police to act as a guard over the building. ... Some of the camp officials who had still managed to keep some faith in their honesty in the popular breast notably Mr Commissioner Amos, who was drowned in the London, aided by Mr McIntyre, who subsequently was rewarded for having done this, by being arrested for having been an aider and abettor in the riot—tried all their persuasive powers to calm the excited and now well-nigh frantic assemblage. It was labor in vain. ... To such men was committed the congenial task of discovering the ringleaders of the riot at Bentley’s hotel. They at last picked out three scape-goats. One was McIntyre, now in comfortable circumstances in Glasgow, who had used his best endeavors to restrain the crowd at Bentley’s from overt acts. Another 1 was Fletcher, a printer, whose office was on the Main road, not far on the Eastern Market side ... Fletcher, from all that can be learned, was not off the Main Road the day of the fire ...Westerby, the third man, has been asserted to be equally innocent with Fletcher in the transaction. It mattered not, how ever, the necessity was laid on those in local authority to bring someone or other before the law courts, and these men were selected. When they had been arrested a meeting was held on Bakery Hill ... it was suggested that a committee, with power to act promptly and bail the prisoners, be appointed. For a moment the suggestion was unheeded, when J. F. Coleman, now mining registrar at Stafford shire Reef, volunteered to act, and his example being speedily followed ... Messrs Evans, who had been in business relation with Fletcher, would be bail for him; so it only remained to bail MTntyre; Before doing so, the bench, consisting of Messrs Johnston, G. O’B. Webster, and Green, of the Gold-office, made enquiries as to the solvency of the proposed sureties, one of whom was Mr Saltoun, formerly a partner of Mr Waldie’s. The other surety referred to the Police-court sergeant as to how he stood, and was pronounced satisfactory. ... then an adjournment was made to Bakery Hill to take counsel. Among the first things advised was, now that McIntyre was liberated, he should take to hiding. The adviser of this step was Kennedy, and the objector was one of the bondsmen, who happened to be present. To McIntyre’s credit be it said he refused, apart from the responsibilities of his bail, to hide for an hour. The trial and conviction of the three prisoners followed ..." [50]


George Flewin

"Mr George Flewin, whose death was announced in ‘‘The Star” yesterday, was a Eureka Stockade veteran, having fought with the “diggers” in the memorable conflict of 1854. He had reached the ripe age of 95 years. For 50 years he was a resident of Miners Rest, and came to Ballarat some months ago to end his days with his daughter, Mrs E. Packham, of Creswick road. [51]


Mr Foster - has profile

Should this profile be 'Notable'?

This source seems to refer to Mr. (now Sir Wm.) Foster Stawell & not to John Fitzgerald Leslie Foster... the profile requires further information around the activities of JFL Foster at Eureka.

"When Mr. Foster was driven from office, on account of his alleged responsibility for the Ballarat riots in December, 1854... "[52]

In one biography[53] JFL Foster is mentioned to have served on the Council of the University of Melbourne; however that council member was recorded as being 'Hon. William Foster Stawell'[54] Is this the same person? If so, why is he using different names?

"...the Eureka State Trials began in the Supreme Court, before Chief Justice William a'Beckett, with Attorney General William Foster Stawell representing the Crown"[55].

[56]


J M Fraser

Was 23 at the time. Requested a mate report him dead so no reward offered. Stated only 100 in stockade at time. Mentions mate John McLeod. Also his, Fraser's, brother in 40th regiment and fought against the rebels. Also mentioned Major Blomden.[57]


Samuel Thomas Goldsmith

"One of the oldest residents of the Wattle Flat district died on Thursday, in the person of Mr Samuel Thomas Goldsmith, after a short illness. The deceased was born in London in 1841, and at the age of ten years left with his parents for Australia in the sailing ship The Six Sisters. After a short stay at Geelong the goldfields of Ballarat attracted the attention of the deceased's father, who was at the Eureka riots. The deceased was at that time living with his mother, brothers, and sisters at Bakery Hill. After residing at Ballarat for a short period the late Mr Goldsmith left with his father, and was engaged in the sawmill business in the Wattle Flat district for many years, after which he turned his attention to farming and mining. Up till the time of his death he had re-sided in the locality for 60 years. The deceased leaves a widow, six sons, and three daughters, also a brother and sister, Mr James Goldsmith, of Brown Hill, and Mrs Thomas Barnett, of Bond street, Ballarat East. The funeral took place on Saturday, and was largely at-tended, the remains being interred in the New Cemetery. The coffin-bearers were Messrs. James Goldsmith, George Goldsmith, Samuel Goldsmith, and J. H. Goldsmith. The pall-bearers were Messrs T. Barnett, sen., W. T. Peare, J. Keith, M. Sampson, T. Walpole, A. Walpole, W. Fraser, P. Pearse, T. Barnett, jun., C. Barnett, H. Barnett, S. Goldsmith, G. Calistro, T. Calistro, and J. Gunn. ..." [58]


Henry Goodenough (1829-1890) (Trooper undercover) - has profile

"So for as this chronicler and these columns are concerned this chapter will end the disjointed story of Ballarat origins and development. ... How the famous, and in one man’s opinion, the infamous of historic note come before us as the days roll away into the back eternities. Esmond, the gold discoverer lies, as I write this, in the Ballarat Hospital, a hopeless invalid near the end of his seventh decade of years. Since he entered the Hospital, news comes of the exit, at the beginning of his seventh decade, of policeman Goodenough, Carboni Raffaello’s “Spy Goodenough.” Both Esmond and Goodenough were together at the Eureka Stockade, but in very different positions, and on opposing sides. Raffaello was there also. He lies in some Roman cemetery. Esmond is in the Hospital here, and on the last day of January, 189O, the Bairnsdale correspondent of the Age wrote: —“Hy. Goodenough, formerly sergeant of police in this district, died yesterday, aged 60 years. He entered the force 37 years ago, and took part in quelling the Ballarat riots.” The first steam engine used in Ballarat ..." [59]


J W Graham

"Mr. J. W. Graham, a Bailarat pioneer, who was the founder of several Bailarat institutions, including the Trades and Labor Council, Bailarat Old Colonists' Association and the city free library, died on Tuesday after a brief illness. Deceased, who was 80 years of age, was a member of the Ballarat Stock Exchange. He was a native of the North of Ireland, and arrived in Australia in 1851, with his father. Subsequently he proceeded to Geelong, where he secured contracts for the erection of shops and private residences. Several of the principal warehouses in Eyrie-street were erected by him. Mr. Graham was present at the revolution at the Eureka Stockade in December, 1854." [60]


Mr. Green

(a long article abridged, to those named & their roles) "THE EUREKA STOCKADE. The following is the of a series of contributions on the events connected with the Eureka Stock-ade. It is from the pen of a gentleman who was here through the whole of the time ... The camp authorities, dreading an attack they said on Bentley’s hotel, but to provoke one asserted the discontented, sent the police to act as a guard over the building. ... Some of the camp officials who had still managed to keep some faith in their honesty in the popular breast notably Mr Commissioner Amos, who was drowned in the London, aided by Mr McIntyre, who subsequently was rewarded for having done this, by being arrested for having been an aider and abettor in the riot—tried all their persuasive powers to calm the excited and now well-nigh frantic assemblage. It was labor in vain. ... To such men was committed the congenial task of discovering the ringleaders of the riot at Bentley’s hotel. They at last picked out three scape-goats. One was McIntyre, now in comfortable circumstances in Glasgow, who had used his best endeavors to restrain the crowd at Bentley’s from overt acts. Another 1 was Fletcher, a printer, whose office was on the Main road, not far on the Eastern Market side ... Fletcher, from all that can be learned, was not off the Main Road the day of the fire ...Westerby, the third man, has been asserted to be equally innocent with Fletcher in the transaction. It mattered not, how ever, the necessity was laid on those in local authority to bring someone or other before the law courts, and these men were selected. When they had been arrested a meeting was held on Bakery Hill ... it was suggested that a committee, with power to act promptly and bail the prisoners, be appointed. For a moment the suggestion was unheeded, when J. F. Coleman, now mining registrar at Stafford shire Reef, volunteered to act, and his example being speedily followed ... Messrs Evans, who had been in business relation with Fletcher, would be bail for him; so it only remained to bail McIntyre; Before doing so, the bench, consisting of Messrs Johnston, G. O’B. Webster, and Green, of the Gold-office, made enquiries as to the solvency of the proposed sureties, one of whom was Mr Saltoun, formerly a partner of Mr Waldie’s. The other surety referred to the Police-court sergeant as to how he stood, and was pronounced satisfactory. ... then an adjournment was made to Bakery Hill to take counsel. Among the first things advised was, now that McIntyre was liberated, he should take to hiding. The adviser of this step was Kennedy, and the objector was one of the bondsmen, who happened to be present. To McIntyre’s credit be it said he refused, apart from the responsibilities of his bail, to hide for an hour. The trial and conviction of the three prisoners followed ..." [61]


Michael Grey

"Grey.—There passed away at his residence at Maddingley, near Bacchus Marsh, on the 26th ult., Michael Grey, at pioneer colonist of the State, who could boast of 70 years residence and whose age at the time of his demise was 94 years. The late Mr Grey arrived in Geelong in 1854, the year of the Eureka riot. He spent his early days in the rough life of the young colony, his principal em-ployment being the carrying of sheep from New Zealand to Victoria, for several old time squatters. He then took up an allotment of land in Werribee, where the post office now stands. From there he moved to the Brisbane ranges near Bacchus Marsh, but later, sold his holding to Mr Molesworth Greene, the well-known squatter, of the early days, which is now occupied by Mr W. P. Greene. His health break-ing down Mr Grey came to, Ballarat, and purchased the hotel property known as “Mac’s.’’ in Victoria street. After conducting this for some years, Mr Grey took over the old (now delicensed) Carbine Hotel, at the corner of Sturt and Windermere streets, which he ran for a number of years, and then took the old Ploughman’s Arms Hotel near Waterholes, Sebastopol. After some experience here, Mr Grey retired info private life, and went to live with his son-in-law and daughter Mr and Mrs E. P. Doherty at Maddingley. His wife pre-deceased him 17 years ago, and other members of the family are Mrs Walter Lyons, wife of Mr W. Lyons, retired railway servant, of Kensington, brother of the late Mr James Lyons, also Mrs C. Thiessen, of Ballarat, and Miss Kate Grey, owner and licensee of one of the principal hotels in Laun-ceston. The funeral took place to the Ballarat Old Cemetery ... " [62]


Walter Russell Hall

"The late Mr. Walter Russell Hall who, as has already been announced, after a full life of hard work and strenuous endeavor, died at his residence, 'Wildfell,' Potts Point, at the age of 81 years, arrived inSydney in 1852, and became associated with the great coaching firm of Cobb and Co. He took up his residence in Victoria, and was quickly attracted by the gold rush to the diggings at Ballarat. He was one of the very few survivors of the Eureka Stockade Riot in 1854. He forsook the mining field for the less elusive business of coaching, and was for many years associated with Mr. James Rutherford (who predeceased him by a few weeks) in the business of Cobb and Co. Later Mr. Hall became connected with the Mount Morgan mine. He was a member of the original company, and speculated successfully in the shares when they were thrown on the market He retired from the firm of Cobb and Co. in 1887. ..." [63]


Hambrook

"THE EUREKA STOCKADE. (4 Dec. 1855). Yesterday was the second anniversary of the fatal encounter between the troops and the holders of the Stockade, and the memorable and melancholy event was commemorated by a pro-cession and the delivery of addresses. Two o'clock was the time appointed for the rendezvous on the site of the stockade, and by three there were assembled about 200 persons, amongst whom we noticed Messrs Seekamp, Hambrook, Nicholls, O'Meara, Hayes, M'Gill, Lessman, Lynch, and others. At three o'clock, Mr Lynch mounted a stump on the ground, close to the Stockade, and read the following address to the multitude ..." [64]


Simon Hanley (has profile)

"EUREKA VETERAN. NEVER HARMED ANYBODY. REBEL AT FOURTEEN - MELBOURNE, Saturday. When 14 years old Simon Hanley fought at Eureka Stockade. Now he is spending the eve of his life at Diggora 'near Rochester. He was one of the stout-hearted pioneers who followed the lure of gold in the early 'fifties' at Ballarat. He is the mildest and most genial of men, but, his eyes flash when he refers to the days when, as a lad of about fourteen years of age, he went forth armed with a pike and a revolver. He was one of three brothers who were in the firing line. The oldest of the three —Michael — received two bullet, wounds during the fight, one of which was indirectly the cause of his death, about fifteen years later, while handling a restive horse. The other brother, Jeremiah, like Simon, escaped unharmed, and the most treasured memory of the latter in regard to this historical escapade centres in the fact that he harmed nobody. Born on a farm at Mount Katharine, in County Tipperary, Ireland, in 1849, Hanley sailed for Australia from Birkenhead in the ship Mangerton, in 1852, the vessel was blown' ashore on the coast of Scotland during an adventurous voyage that took six months to complete. Eventually however Geelong was reached. Ballarat was the rendezvous decided on by the ship's passengers, and gold was the adventurer's lodestone. The Hanley brothers did well on the diggings, but Simon soon followed farming pursuits at Windermere, and afterwards at Bungaree - a decade being spent in each place. About 1873 the Diggora lands were thrown open for selection, and he settled there"[65].

"... Few people would suspect that Mr. Simon Hanley, of Diggora, is a Eureka Stockade veteran. In fact the Hanley family played an important part in this eventful page of Victorian history, as two other brothers Michael and Jeremiah took up a prominent position in the fray, in which Michael received two bullet wounds—one just missing his heart— in the volley fired by the soldiers on the eventful dawn. Simon was only a lad of fifteen at the time yet, was lined with the pikemen on tbe hill, with a six chambered revolver in his belt. When the rioters dispersed the lad made his way to a friend's house, whpre he was reproved for not throwing away his pike. The veteran, who is the last of the Eureka survivors in tbe district, has abundant proof of his presence in the affray of Sunday morn, December 3, 1854. Mr. John Hanley, of Rochester Park, brother of the veteran, was too young to engage in public matters at the time. Mr. Hanley is hale and hearty." [66]


Michael Hanrahan

"Michael Hanrahan (1828-1912) was born at Scalpnagown, Crusheen Parish, Co. Clare, Ireland. His parents were Thomas Hanrahan and Bridget Heath. Little is known of how he survived the famine or how or where he spent the three or four years after the famine. Michael Hanrahan was a passenger on the “Miles Barton” ship that sailed from Liverpool on 27 April 1853 bound for Melbourne. He and his sister, Margaret and brother-in-law, Dan Powell arrived in Melbourne in July 1853. Michael arrived in Ballarat on 1 January 1854. His brother Thomas arrived a few years later. ​CAPTAIN OF THE PIKE DIVISION There is no record of Michael Hanrahan having been involved in an armed struggle against the landlords and ruling class in Ireland, however within ten months of his arrival in Ballarat he was chosen as the captain of the pike division at Eureka on 1 December 1854. It is not recorded if he was chosen because of previous resistance fighter involvement or because of his leadership qualities. Michael Hanrahan must have had some success as a miner during 1854 because he sent home five hundred pounds to his family in Ireland." [67] More bio details are contained in this source.


Isaac Hayward

"Four Eureka veterans, Isaac Hayward, David Maine, John Kemp, and George Firman arrived at Ballarat yesterday from Gippsland. Erch gives on interest-ing account of exciting scenes at the Stockade."[68]


George Hartley

"...Death of Mr George Hartley... A Eureka Stockade Veteran, Mr George Hartley one of the oldest pioneers of the State, died at his late residence, Egerton, on Saturday after a short illness. The old gentleman was hale and hearty before he look to his bed a few months ago. The deceased, who had reached the ripe old age of 86 years, was born at Pennsylvania, U.S.A. on Feb. 16, 1829 and came to Victoria in 1853, when he resided at Ballarat. About a year afterwards he was married, and was one of the participants of the memorable Eureka Stockade, which occurred on Sunday morning, December 3d, 1854. On the 50th anniversary of the riot Mr Hartley received the title of the "Stockade Poet," and since then he has contributed many interesting articles to the "Gordon Advertiser," of which journal he had been a subscriber for years till his health failed him. In 1868 he came to Egerton, where he resided up to the time of his death. His wife predeceased him twelve years ago, and he leaves a grown-up family of two sons and two daughters to mourn their loss, viz.—Mrs A. Walker (Egerton), Mrs W. Corfield (Ballarat), Mr Wm. Hartley (Melbourne) and Mr Fk. Hartley (Egerton). The funeral, which took place in the Egerton Cemetery on Sunday was a large and representative one, the remains being encased in a handsome black and gold coffin, which was borne by Messrs A. and J. Walker, F. R., and W. Corfield (grandsons) and W. Smith (grand-son-in-law ) The pall-bearers were Messrs W. Lewis, W. Setter, A. M'Kenzie, J. Mackin, G. Davidson, A. Davidson. D. Devlin and J Knowles. Rev. E. Hoffman read the service at the grave, and Hugh Evans and son were the undertakers," [69]


William Hartley

"EUREKA STOCKADE VETERAN. INELIGIBLE FOR A PENSION. One of the survivors of the Eureka Stockade riots, William Hartley, ap-plied to Mr. H. M. Murphy, P.M., at Ballarat on Tuesday for an old-age pension. Mr. Hartley said he was an American by birth and had been in communication with the United States Consul, but was informed that the United States Government made no provisions for her subjects abroad. Hartley also stated that he was not a naturalised British subject, and did not become naturalised, as he wished to remain loyal to the Stars and Stripes. Mr. Murphy said he was sorry he could not assist the veteran, who is now 80 years of age. Hartley must be three years a naturalised subject be-fore he can receive a pension."[70].


James Heffernan

"EUREKA STOCKADE VETERAN. Mr. James Heffernan, licensee of the Kyneton Commercial hotel, died sud-denly on Wednesday, aged 81 years. He came to Victoria in 1850, and took part in all the early gold rus-hes. With 80 other tributers, he worked the Ballarat Band of Hope Tribute, each of them clearing £500. He was in Heathcote in July, 1853, when the Mclvor gold escort was held up and robbed, and was in Bendigo when the miners burnt their rights. In December, 1854, deceased took part in the historic Eureka stockade"[71].


James Hodges

"EUREKA STOCKADE VETERAN REVIVES FLAG INCIDENT - BULLET-SCARRED SOLDIER WILL HELP WOUNDED MEN "Silver stars on heavenly blue" — the forerunner of Australia's flag — the dig-ger's emblem of freedom was hoisted at the Eureka Stockade in 1854 by Mr James Hodges, now of Fergie street, Fitzroy. Today, 85 years and carrying the marks of bullet wounds in head and leg, Mr Hodges is arranging to help the wounded soldiers by a tableau in con-nection with the artists' pageant to-morrow afternoon. In a letter to Mr Arthur Russell, in connection with the pageant, Mr Hodges wrote:— "You will understand that as I reach my 85th milestone on life's wallaby on August 31, I am not quite as active as at the time, 1854, we made the stand for liberty and self-government, as against the remnant of bad old convict misrule, and thanks to a couple of bullets I carry through life two wounds, one in the head and the other in the leg. "If I say that your committee as artists would be the best judge of the form of tab-leau I can but suggest the Flag in the act of hoisting, surrounded by a few diggers, and perhaps Eureka and Gallipoli somewhere in prominence. "When in the act of planting our Flag, I wrote and gave utterance to a few words. Here are two extracts — one for Eureka and one for Gallipoli: — "Boys, up with the Flag. Its silver stars on Heavenly blue. Staunch to our Flag, to ourselves are true." "If peace or war, strife or disorder, The Emblem of Eternity, within its border, The Southern Cross." Stars on a blue ground, said Mr Hodges, was the design of the original Australian flag, and he added: "At this time, after 60 years, it occurs to me that I ought to be among the prophets." [72]


Robert Holberry

"The death is reported of yet another Eureka Stockade veteran in the person of Mr Robert Holbery of Tunstall, who pass-ed away yesterday morning. He was a colonist of 62 years. For 32 years he was a coachdriver for Cobb and Company, and travelled in the Echuca, Beachworth, and Wangaratta district. He also spent seve- ral years in Adelaide as an employee of the same firm. He drove a number of sol- diers to the Eureka Stockade. It was his boast that he never met with an accident until 18 months ago, when a Ringwood train collided with the back wheel of his buggy at the Tunstall crossing. He was severely injured, and did not recover en- tirely from the effects." [73]


Henry Thomas Holyoake

"Holyoake.— On the 23rd January, at his late residence, 303 Nicholson street, Carlton, Henry Thomas, the dearly beloved husband of Jane Burns, and fourth son of the late George Holyoake, of Birmingham, England, aged 50 years. One of the agitators for the ' miners' rights during the Eureka riots, and connected with the Victorian press for the last twenty-seven years. ..." [74]


John Basson Humffray

(Played a large part in Eureka. Secretary Reform League. Colonial Government. Many sources) Mentioned as 'having been returned to Government with Lalor' after the Eureka Rebellion and changes to elector laws. [75]

"DEATH OF MR. J. B. HUMFFRAY. From Our Correspondent. BALLARAT, 'Wednesday. Mr. J. B. Humffray (whose name is closely associated with the history of the colony and of old gold digging days) died this morning shortly before 3 o'clock. Mr. John Basson Humffray, in the early days of our Parliamentary history made a considerable figure, though the retired life he has led for many years past has almost caused his name to be forgotten. Mr. Humffray died after a lingering illness, consequent upon rheumatic gout and dropsy. The deceased gentleman was born in Montgomeryshire, Wales, in 1826, and was therefore in his 65th year. His father was a master weaver, and was enabled to give each member of his family a liberal education, John Basson Humffray was intended for the law, but on the news of the gold discoveries reaching England he abandoned his legal studies, and with many others left for the Eldorado of the South. He arrived in Melbourne in 1853, and subsequently proceeded to Maryborough; where he worked as a digger for some time. Early in 1854 he went to Ballarat, and worked with several parties in the neighbor hood of the Black Hill. At this time the licence question was agitating the minds of all on the goldfields, and Mr. Humffray, being a cultured man and a good speaker, took a prominent part in the meetings that were held in the then canvas township of Ballarat. Peter Lalor, Kennedy, Black, Verne, Raffales(sic.) and other diggers of the time, feeling bitterly the persecution of the authorities in respect to the diggers' licences, advocated a determined course of action in the resistance of the oppressive rule, but Humffray, being a "moral suasion man," urged the diggers to seek redress of their wrongs in a "constitutional" manner, and in a way that would not necessitate bloodshed. But his arguments were ineffective on the excited assemblages, as the majority of the gold seekers were determined to put an end to the unsatisfactory state of affairs that existed by recourse to arms. In order to assist in averting such a crisis, if possible, Humffray started a newspaper called the 'Leader', which was written in the interests of moral suasion, but its efforts proved futile, and tho journal became defunct on the issue of the seventh number. On the Thursday preceding the Eureka revolt, Mr. Humffray, knowing that armed resistance was contemplated by the diggers, again urged all on the goldfields to lay down their weapons and to contend for their rights by peaceful arbitrament. On this day, however, Peter Lalor was engaged in mobilising and drilling his forces. Taking up a position on a stump he prayed that God would bless the diggers in their effort to "squelch" tyrannical rule in Ballarat, and he then swore in his men under the Southern Cross, which flag is now in the Museum of the Melbourne Public Library. At the same time, but in another part of the field, Humffray standing on a box addressing a large meeting. At him were pointed the revolvers of several diggers who cried, "You have led us so far why not lead us now?" Humffray replied "Put down the revolvers, mates; the Government are more afraid of you with a newspaper in your hand than a revolver." The riots on the Eureka, took place on the following Sunday, 3rd December, 1854, with the result known. When the British soldiers and diggers met in conflict in the early morning Humffray was calmly sleeping in his tent on the flat where the Eastern-road is now situated. He was aroused from his slumbers by the roll of the musketry of the British troops, and on his proceeding to the Eureka he found a number of his warmest acquaintances lying dead or wounded on the ground in and around the stockade. To-day there are very few old diggers to be met with who say that the Eureka insurrection was not justified. Mr. Humffray's opinion to the contrary, many old pioneers, who were hunted from post to pillar in the early days of the goldfields, are agreed that the riots initiated the reform, and that had the diggers not taken the determined stand they did the persecution would have gone on until something more startling than a skirmish would have occurred. It should be added that Mr. Humffray worked hard before and aftor the riots in the interests of the diggers ; he accompanied numerous deputations to Melbourne to urge an alteration in the goldfields laws; he was the principal speaker among his party in laying the grievances of the ...(unclear) divers Uyyit men ...the memorable 3rd December he prepared a memorial to the Government, praying for forbearance on the part of the authorities, and promising to assist in the maintenance of law and order. On the presentation of this document, Mr. Humffray was placed under arrest, but he was set at liberty after incarceration for a few hours. His advocacy of moral suasion led to his being accused of "trimming" in the interests of the Government, but those who knew him well absolved him from all stigma in this respect. Mr. Humffray and Mr Lalor were the first Parliamentary representatives of Ballarat. Their election to the old Legislative Council (which assembled in St. Patrick's Hall) took place on Camp Hill, near the site of the Ballarat Savings Bank. The poll was taken by a show of hands. Nine members had to be elected in the colony. Sir Charles Hotham, the then Governor, having the right to appoint a nominee. This nominee was Dr. Owens, well known as an agitator in the Sandhurst district. Mr. Humffray acted as a Parliamentary representative of Ballarat and district for a number of years. In 1861 he was appointed the First Minister of Mines, but in 1864 he was defeated by Mr. C. E. Jones, mainly owing to his vote in connection with the squatters leases. In 1869 he was again returned to Parliament, regaining his seat from Mr. Jones. His colleague was Mr. Charles Dyte. Humffray suffered his second Parliamentary defeat in 1871, and in retiring he expressed his intention of not again seeking honors as far as the Legislature was concerned. The deceased gentleman, who was of a kind and genial disposition, took, however, as a private citizen, considerable interest in public affairs. When the question of the Eureka riots cropped up in public discussion he was a frequent contributor to the press, and the giving of Information relative to the early diggings afforded him considerable pleasure. Several of his brothers are in the Indian civil service, and he has also relatives residing in Melbourne and in New Zealand. He leaves a widow and one son. Mr. Humffray was never in affluent circumstances. He speculated extensively, and like many others he was unsuccessful. Of late years he received a helping hand from the citizens of Ballarat, who remembered that he had done much in the interests of the district in the days when Parliamentary representation meant unceasing worry and the loss of time and money. The death of Mr. Humffray calls to mind how few there are left in Parliament of those who were returned upon the inauguration of the new constitution in 1855. When he last (in 1874) endeavored to gain a seat in Parliament for the representation of Ballarat East, the candidates and polling were as follow Townsend McDermott, 1047; John James, 742; E. Steinfeld, 586; J. B. Humffray, 238; Charles Dyte, 174. The two first named were elected." [76]

"A PAGE IN HISTORY - OUR HUMFFRAY It was mentioned in our issue yesterday that Mr James Basson Humffray had died. He was born in Newtown, Montgomeryshire, Wales, in 1830, was articled in the old country to a solicitor, and arrived in this colony towards the end of 1853, and went to Ballarat early in 1854. His father was a manufacturer in the flannel trade. The subject, of our sketch at first worked in the Gravel Pits, Ballarat, and was not successful in that vocation. For some time he prosecuted his studies with the intention to procure admission as a barrister, but he never passed the necessary examination. Subsequently he opened a book selling and stationer's shop in Main-road, Bal-larat, but he relinquished that business, and during the later years of his life he was dependent on charity. Mr Humffray's career as a public man began at Ballarat during those troublesome time which culminated in December, 1854, in the Eureka affair, he having been one of the popular leaders who sought to obtain redress of the diggers' grievances, He, however, was always a man of peace — an advocate of moral as distinguished from physical force. He was secretary of the re-form league formed by the diggers to carry their views into effect, and in fact his name frequently appears in the chronicles of the events preceding the storming of the Eureka stockade by the authorities. Counselling legal agitation only to the last, he left the stockade on the night before the battle, which took place on December 2nd(sic.), 1854. Immediately after that event he re-ap peared on the scene, still consistently trying to promote peace. On December 6th a meeting was held at which resolutions in favour of the exercise of forbearance and humanity were passed. Martial law had then been proclaimed, and there was some vagueness about the resolutions which might be construed as conveying a gentle remonstrance to the authorities on the one hand, or to the rebellious subject of the Queen on the other. At any rate, they did not satisfy the authorities, and when Mr Humffray, who had taken an active part in the meeting, went with others to present the resolutions to the representative of the Governor at Ballarat, he was arrested. He was, however, liberated almost immediately. At periods of great excitement, when passions are burning, persons of moderate views are always liable to be denounced as trimmers. That epithet was applied to Mr Humffray in the days we are now dealing with by some of the extremists on his own side. He was Indeed accused of having been a traitor to the diggers' cause. But in calmer times it was generally acknowledged that he had done good and faithful service to the side with which he had identified himself; and it became known that so far from having been traitorous he had given secret assistance to some of the unhappy men who had been wounded in the affray, and had scorned to secure the blood money which was placed on their heads. That his course of action throughout the crisis commended itself to the approval of the community in which he lived is evident from the circumstances now to be related. Under the Constitution Act 1855 two Houses of Parliament were created in Vic-toria, and, pending the Royal assent to that measure, five representatives from the gold-fields were added to the old Legislative Council. Mr P. Lalor and the subject of this sketch were chosen to represent Ballarat. At the election of the first Parliament under the new constitution in October, 1856, Mr Humffray was returned to the Assembly for North Grant, which electorate included, Ballarat East. He was one of the first of our legislators, if not the first, to try to pass a Mining on Private Property Bill, he having moved in that matter as far back as March, 1857. In later years he made other unsuccessful efforts to secure that object. Ballarat East having been made an electoral district, he was returned by it in August, 1859. When Mr Heales took office in November, 1890, he chose Mr Humffray as one of his colleagues, making him the first Minister of Mines of the colony, a mining department not having existed, here be-fore that date. That Administration retired in November, 1861, and Mr Humffray was defeated at the next general election in 1864. He was, however, again returned for the same electorate, and for the last time at the general election of February, 1868. His subsequent efforts to obtain a seat were not successful. As a legislator Mr Humffray never attained a prominent or influential position. He seldom addressed the House, and when he did it was rarely indeed on the more important questions which agitated the community during his parliamentary career. In the political struggles of 1868 he voted as a rule with the Constitutional party, and was one of the minority which, in the Parliament which began in that year, opposed the M'Culloch Go-vernment. Unlike several other members of that minority, however, he was always in favour of payment of members. In our Parliamentary annals Mr Humffray's name last appears, in con-nection with a grant of about £300, which was voted to him in 1872 as payment of his claim (held to be good equitably but not legally) to a pension on account of his having, held, office as Minister of the Crown. In July, 1858, he opened the first gasworks erected in Ballarat." [77]

"The funeral of the late Mr. J. B. Humffray took place to-day, but was poorly attended. The City Hall flag was flying half mast high to-day, but no municipal representatives wero pre-sent In the procession. Mr. M'Pherson, M.L.C., and Mr. Murphy, M.L. A., werE present. Mr. Humffray's dying request was that hE should be buried in the Old cemetery near the grave which contains the remains of the diggers who fell under the fire of the British soldiers at the Eureka stockade. The wish has been complied with." [78]


Jeremiah Hughes (has profile)

Jeremiah Hughes, 83 years of age, an old Eureka. Stockader, died at Cuthero station, from exhaustion consonquent on the heat, on Sunday. Hughes, who was a very old district resident, and for many years an employee of Cuthero station, had for some time been in receipt of an old age pension. He was buried in the local cemetery on Sunday, the Rev. Father Maginnis of-ficiating at the grave.[79]


Happy Jack

The one known as HAPPY JACK while a big blackfellow, whose name and fate are alike a mystery, has been described as one of the pluckiest fighters in the Stockade. [80]


Geo. Johnson

"In a little bark cabin at Avoca Geo. Johnson, 80, a Eureka Stockade veteran, has passed away. A colonist of 70 years, Johnson amassed considerable wealth as a tributor in mines at Ballarat, Maryborough and Avoca. For many years he was a leading coursing enthusiast. In characteristic digger style, he spent his money freely, and died a poor man." <ref>Obituary Geo. Johnson. The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), Tue 9 Mar 1920, p.2. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/73190428?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran</ref>

"AVOCA. OBITUARY. A very old identify of the Avoca Lead in the person of Mr George Johnson, has died after a brief illness. The deceased, who was 79 years of age, lived alone in a little hut on the old deserted diggings which had been the scene of his labor in the balmy days. Mr Johnson was familiarly known as “Ballarat George" and he was a Eureka Stockade Veteran. His death removes one of the old type of miner and his friends will miss the interesting reminiscences which he was always pleased to relate. Only a few diggers are now left on the Lead here." [81]


John Jones

"Eureka Veterans- It is not generally known that two veterans who were present at the Eureka Stockade fight are still living in Sebastopol. These are Messrs Thomas and John Jones, who reside in Cheshunt street, Sebastopol and whose ages are over 90 and 80 years respectively After the Eureka fight the veterans, felled a number of trees, cut out the required slabs and made the coffins for 17(sic.) soldiers killed in the historic Event. Both the Messrs Jones' are hale and hearty despite their advanced age." [82]


Thomas Jones

"Eureka Veterans- It is not generally known that two veterans who were present at the Eureka Stockade fight are still living in Sebastopol. These are Messrs Thomas and John Jones, who reside in Cheshunt street, Sebastopol and whose ages are over 90 and 80 years respectively After the Eureka fight the veterans, felled a number of trees, cut out the required slabs and made the coffins for 17(sic.) soldiers killed in the historic Event. Both the Messrs Jones' are hale and hearty despite their advanced age." [83]


John Keenan - has profile

DEATH OF A EUREKA STOCKADER. . MARYBOROUGH, Tuesday. Mr. John Keenan, a resident of Ma jorca for 33 years, died yesterday. He arrived in Victorli at the age of 17, in 1852, and lived for some time at Geelong. The gold-fields attracting him he visited Ballarat, and took an active part in the Eureka stockade riot, dur ing which he was shot in the right leg, and after being disabled was con cealed in a manger until a dray was procured, at a cost of £14, to convey him to the Geelong Hospital. Whilst being conveyed there lie was stopped lay a company of armed police, who accepted his explanation that his in juries were due to a fall down a shaft.


John Kemp (1826-1907) - has profile

"Four Eureka veterans, Isaac Hayward, David Maine, John Kemp, and George Firman arrived at Ballarat yesterday from Gippsland. Each gives on interesting account of exciting scenes at the Stockade."[84]


Alexander Henry King

"...Alexander Henry King, brother of Mr John Charles King (late business manager of the Argus), was a direct lineal descendant of the first Lord Baron of Ockham. He was born at Moydalgan House, County Down, Ireland, on the 14th October, 1827. He left Ireland about May, 1810, with his father, mother, two brothers, and three sisters. The father died at the Cape of Good Hope, and one of the sisters died shortly after anding in Melbourne. The family arrived in Aus-tralia on the 1st January, 1841, after a pas- sage of over six months’ duration. The eldest brother, John Charles King, was appointed Government auctioneer, a post which he held until the Melbourne Town Council was formed. ..."[85]


Mrs Thomas Kirby

"EUREKA VETERAN. Among the many Eureka veterans now alive, may be mentioned Mrs. Kirby, relict of the late Mr Thomas Kirby, who resides at Dunnstown. Mrs Kirby is over 90 years of age. Her part in the memorable battle with tho soldiery of the day, was the sheltering of Peter Lalor, when hard pressed by his pursuers. He ran Into the cottage, and avoided capture by taking refuge under the old lady's Bed. The soldiers were put off his trail, but one of them fired a bullet which pierced the canvas walls. Mrs Kirby, despite her advanced age, enjoys fairly good health, but it is only with difficulty that she can move about." [86]


Charles Knox

EUREKA VETERAN PASSES IN NATAL. BALLARAT, Tuesday. "News has been received from Harding, Natal, of the death of Charles Knox, a participant In the incidents which culminated in the Eureka Stock-ade. Mr Knox arrived In Australia In 1851 from Samoa, where he had been wrecked on the barque Favorite In 1849. He had mining experience in Bathurst before coming to Ballarat, and became one of the first prospectors in the rich "Bakery Hill" Ballarat East, alluvial run, and was working only twenty-five yards distant from the spot where the famous Welcome nugget was found. He found a nugget worth nearly £400. In later years Mr Knox opened stores in Natal and Transvaal, each of which was named Ballarat, and for some time managed the famous Simmer and Jack mine"[87].


Peter Lalor (has profile)

"DEATH OF A VETERAN. THE LATE MR. PETER LALOR. BY "THE VAGABOND." Thirty-seven years ago a young Irishman landed in Melbourne. The cry of "Gold!" brought hither all sorts and conditions of men, but few who have been more notable than Peter Lalor, scion of a notable family. The old mansion house of Tennikill in Queen's County was the home of a race, the chiefs of which maintained at home the traditions of their family and Irish hospitality, whilst the younger branches went forth into the world to fight their way therein with nothing but their courage and their talents to aid them. Charles Lever has given us the type of many such a family as that of the Lalors of Tennikill. They were, of course, sportsmen. Mr. Patrick Lalor, father of our Peter Lalor, was a Master of Hounds, as well as being the first representative of Queen's County, after Catholic Emancipation, in the House of Commons. "Tom Lalor, of Creagh," is well known as the Master of the Ossory Hounds. The cadets of the family developed a military strain. One of the cousins of Mr. Peter Lalor became a Field Marshal and Grandee of Spain. Three of his brothers fought in the American war, one being killed in the cause of the South, and another whilst fighting for the Stars and Stripes. Another cousin was the celebrated Frank Power, the war correspondent of the Times, who died with Gordon at Khartoum. The present head of the house and owner of Tenni-kill is Mr. Patrick Lalor, and his brother, Mr.Richard Lalor, like his father, is member for Queen's County. A younger brother is Dr. Joseph Lalor, a physician who has held the highest appointments in Ireland, including that of head of the Lunacy department. The mantle of medicine has likewise descended upon Mr. Peter Lalor's only son, Dr. Joseph Lalor, a young physician worthily esteemed by all who know him, in whose house the old hero of the Eureka Stockade and many a Parliamentary battle in the cause of the freedom of the people, and as is generally admitted the best Speaker who ever filled the chair in Victoria, peacefully ended his days. A week back when I visited Church-street, Richmond, Mr. Peter Lalor lay sick unto death. He had been long suffering from an incurable disease. He had received the last rites of his church, and was calmly awaiting his end. I consider it one of the greatest compliments paid to me as a journalist in Australia when I was told that the ex-Speaker would be glad to see me, although he or his medical attendants, Doctors Williams and Robertson, forbade any other visitors. Sitting in an arm chair at the study window looking out from the height of Richmond Hill over pleasant South Yarra and Toorak, Mr. Peter Lalor, courtly and gracious in his greeting, did not look like one of those who are morituri. Yet science had given the fiat; it was only a question of a few days, it might be of a few hours. After we shook hands Mr. Lalor's first thought was hospitality, and his attendant, an ex valet of Sir Henry Loch's, was ordered to ring the bell for refreshments before we com-menced our afternoon's conversation, in which, if I did not obtain the complete "story of his life from year to year," I was enlightened on many points of which the history of the day has been silent. Of the Eureka Stockade affair my previous authority had been Withers' admirable History of Ballarat, given to me during my stay in that city six years ago by Mr. James Oddie, who also told me much of interest in regard to the early days of the gold diggings, with which Mr. Peter Lalor's name will be ever connected. This interview, which I first sought, was by the wish not only of the ex-Speaker but of his devoted son, Dr. Joseph Lalor. Father —— had done his duty and the church had said "post hominem vermis; post vermem foetor et horror sic in non hominem vertitur omnis homo." I, as a journalist, surely may be allowed to testify that "the good may not be interred with his bones." Mr. Peter Lalor was 62 years of age, having been born in 1827. He was a student at Trinity College, Dublin, and a civil engineer when he emigrated to Melbourne to try his luck on the gold diggings. His first essay was on the Ovens goldfield, but in February, 1853, he migrated to Ballarat. Here Mr. Peter Lalor and his "mates" took up some valuable claims, from which they hoped to be soon able to realise sufficient to permit them to return with a com-petence to their native homes. Mr. Duncan Gillies was also working in an adjoin-ing claim. But the oppression of the central authorities, and the petty insolence and tyranny and corruption of the camp officials exasperated the miners until they were driven into open revolt, and the flag of the Southern Cross was raised, Peter Lalor being appointed commander in chief of the insurgent diggers. The verdict of posterity is that the malcontents were justified in their endeavors to ob- tain redress for their grievances, if not in the manner by which they sought it. I remember when one of her Majesty's pro-consuls from a neighboring colony was shown the site of the Eureka Stockade he paralysed some of the attendant officials by saying, "That was altogether the most in-famous piece of business ever done in the name of the Queen." Peter Lalor and his followers suffered, but their blood was not shed in vain. Redress tor their grievances quickly followed the abortive attempt at insurrection. As the old hero said: "'Tis better as it is now. We not only got all we fought for, but a little more. It is sweet and pleasant to die for one's country or in defence of one's liberty, but it is sweeter to live and see the principles for which you have risked your life triumphant. I can look back calmly on those days. Mr. Peter Lalor had been fortified by the last rites of the Catholic Church, of which he was.a member. But, as he told me, during his career in this colony he was never identified, like other prominent politicians, as a supporter of the policy of that church, and he will be remembered here-after as a thorough democrat and protectionist, and advocate of the rights of the people. English contemporaneous history gives little record of the rising at Ballarat. Mr. Justin M'Carthy does not even mention it. Yet its consequences might have been fatal to the con-tinuance of Imperial rule in this country. It seemed a tornado in a teapot at first when a Scotch miner was murdered in a quarrel at an ill famed public house kept by one Bentley, and his mates burned down the place in revenge. This was on the 17th of October, 1854, and this was the first breath of the approaching storm, which fanned the smouldering discontent of the miners into open rebellion. A deputation of diggers waited on Sir Charles Hotham, the Governor, and "demanded" the release of the men imprisoned for burning the hotel. His Excellency would not accept any communi-cation in which the word "demand" was used. It was in vain that the deputation informed him that they were under a strict agreement to substitute no other word, and that if they returned without the prisoners a riot would ensue. Sir Charles Hotham determined to "act firmly," and the Executive gathered all the forces, military and police, which were at its disposal, at Ballarat. At a meeting at Eureka of armed diggers, on the 30th November, resolutions were passed declaring that they would no longer pay the exorbitant and unjust licence fee. The diggers burnt their licences and prepared to resist by force the oppression of the Govern-ment. Meanwhile bodies of military and police continued to arrive at the camp of Ballarat. The diggers had before this been much incensed by the soldiers marching about the diggings, and even firing upon the people without the reading of the Riot Act. They now deter-mined to organise themselves to resist the approach of more soldiers. It was then that Mr. Peter Lalor was chosen by the diggers as their "commander-in-chief." A strong and powerful man of firm will, he was a born leader of the people. A large number of the insurgents were drilled and equipped; those who could not be provided with better arms were bid fix iron spikes on poles. The Government spies soon informed the authorities of these preparations, and on the 1st December it was reported at Ballarat that the diggers had occu-pied an entrenched camp at Eureka. Captain Thomas, the officer in command of the Govern-ment forces, determined to attack the miners at once. This step was not expected, and the in-surgents were taken by surprise. The alarm was not sounded inside the stockade until the soldiers were within 150 yards, and although a tolerably heavy fire was kept up by them from this distance the diggers stood bravely to their posts. The whole of the forces under the command of Captain Thomas were then brought up. They must have considerably outnumbered the occupants of the stockade, although it is not possible to ascertain the exact number on either side. The engagement lasted barely 25 minutes, for the ammunition of the insurgents ran out, and the stockade was carried at the point of the bayonet. The miners fought well and manfully, especially the leaders. Mr. Peter Lalor was severely wounded in the arm, and was at first supposed to be killed. In the very agonies of death he was con-cealed beneath a heap of slabs, from under which the blood streamed down the hill. When the soldiers had retreated with their prisoners he managed to escape, though faint and very weak through loss of blood. He was hidden for three days in a hut on the ranges, after which he was secretly conveyed to the house of a worthy Catholic priest, Father Smyth, where his arm was amputated by Dr. Doyle. A reward of £200 was offered for his apprehension, but his friends remained true and he was not taken. When the news of the attempted insurrection reached Melbourne, "society" was agitated, and, in response to a requisition, the Mayor called a meeting at the Mechanics' Institute, at which resolutions were attempted to be passed upholding the action of the Go-vernment and its officials in their treat-ment of the diggers. But these resolutions were received with so much dissatisfaction that the Mayor was obliged to vacate the chair, and a number of resolutions were passed alto-gether opposed to the action of the Executive, and calling upon the Government to immedi-ately settle the differences with the miners. Mr. Frencham, one of the discovers of gold in Victoria, spoke strongly in favor of the diggers, and bid the people "go forth with their brother diggers to conquer or to die." The re-solutions in favor of the miners were received and carried with the greatest enthusiasm. The Government again endeavored on the following day to secure the declared support of the public, and with this end a meeting was held on a large piece of ground near St. Paul's Church, at the corner of Flinders-lane. The chair was occupied by Mr. Henry Langlands and nearly 7000 people were present. But in this case also the resolu-tions passed condemned the policy of the Government, and showed sympathy with the miners. Finding they were not supported by the people, the Executive revoked the martial law which had been proclaimed at Ballarat, and abandoned several coercive measures which they had proposed to introduce. Petitions were adopted both in Melbourne and Ballarat, set-ting forth that "the recent unhappy outbreak at Ballarat was induced by no feeling of dis-affection to the person of her Majesty, and by no traitorous designs against the institutions of the monarchy, but purely by a sense of political wrong, a loss of confidence in the local adminis-tration of law, and an irritation engendered by the injudicious and offensive enforcement of an obnoxious and invidious tax which, though legal, has since been condemned by the gold-fields commission." Thousands of people signed this petition, and at last the Chief Secretary, Mr. Foster, gave way and resigned office. The diggers tried for high treason were released by a verdict of "not guilty" of their countrymen. The repeal of obnoxious mea-sures followed, and, according to the historian, responsible government commenced in reality after the insurrection at the Eureka Stockade. The diggers were granted political privileges, previously denied them, co-equal with the other classes of the community. Not only were they benefited, but the whole colony likewise. The insurrection brought about social and political progress, and the Government was made to recognise more fully the power and rights of the people. During the time that Mr. Peter Lalor remained in seclusion he told me he had many narrow escapes, being hidden by his friends at first in one place and then another until the storm had blown over, and the authorities appeared to have given up any attempt at pro-secution. Nine months afterwards, after the constitution was proclaimed in 1855, Mr. Peter Lalor was elected as a member for Ballarat. His address was brief and plain, as became a man whose career up to to then had been one of action and not of words. Almost his whole political creed was summed up in the following:— "I am in favor of such a system of law reform as will enable the poor man to obtain equal justice with the rich one, which at present I believe to be impossible." Mr. Lalor was returned without opposition and soon after appointed inspector of railways, which post he held until the passing of the Officials in Parliament Act prevented him from doing so. In 1856, under the new consti-tution, he was elected for South Grant. In 1871 he was unsuccessful in contesting his old seat, but in 1875 was again returned for South Grant, which seat he retained until the last ses-sion of Parliament. He held the position of Chairman of Committees for many years in the Assembly, and filled the office with remarkable ability. In August, 1875, he was appointed Minister of Customs in Sir (then Mr.) Graham Berry's Ministry, and in 1877 Postmaster-General under the same chief. On the retire-ment of Sir C. Gavan Daffy in 1880, Mr. Peter Lalor was elected Speaker of the Legislative Assembly, which office he held till October 1887, when his health gave way and he found himself unable to bear the strain of his duties in connection therewith. A sum of £4000 was voted to him by Parliament as a retiring allowance. He had previously re-fused a knighthood. Mr. Peter Lalor was known in connection with what is commonly called Black Wednes- day. Here his impartiality in striking at the root as well as the branch of officialdom, was displayed. On one of the heads of a depart-ment bringing him a list of 19 officials who could be dispensed with the Minister said, "Yes, this list is very complete with one excep-tion," and then he wrote the name of the head of the department at the top. As Commis-sioner of Customs Mr. Lalor will be long re-membered, but it was as Speaker that he made his great repute. Mr. Lalor was noted for his impartiality. It could never be alleged against him that he in any way fa-vored those of his own race or religion. He ruled the House through three Parliaments as it has never yet, and perhaps never again will be ruled. "The first duty of a Speaker," said Mr, Lalor, "is to be a tyrant. Remove him if you like, but whilst he is in the chair obey him. The Speaker is the embodiment of the corporate honor of the House. He is above party. He is the greatest representative of the people. In England he is called 'the First Commoner.' In the Australian colonies I hold that he is the first official in the land. One thing I would never allow when Speaker and that was any 'scenes,' any bickerings between two members. If any noisy member wanted to come into collision with another I interfered. He had it out with the Speaker, and I do not think got the best of it." And there was a twinkle in Mr. Lalor's eye as he no doubt recalled to mind some instances where he had put down unruly mem-bers. The same magnificent presence and voice, the physical qualification which made him sway the people when at the Eureka Stockade he administered the oath to 500 diggers, "We swear by the Southern Cross to stand truly by each other, and fight to defend our rights and liberties," gave Mr. Lalor, as Speaker, a wonderful command over the House. His knowledge of the law of Parliament was phenomenal, and added to this he possessed the readiest wit. He was ever prompt with a cultivated humorous retort, which turned the tables upon many recalcitrant members in a manner which left no soreness at the rebuff. During his last year in the chair Mr. Lalor suffered severely from his present disease, and it is certain that his application to his duties shortened his life. After relinquishing the office of Speaker Mr. Peter Lalor took a voyage to San Francisco for the benefit of his health, but since his return he gradually declined, and his medical advisers for some time imagined that the end was close at hand. Mr. Peter Lalor was married in 1854 to Miss Alicia Dunn, of Geelong, "the best of wives," he said, who died within the last two years. They had only one son and one daughter. The latter married to Mr. Lempriere, jun., died a few years back. In chronicling the demise of one of the truest men I have been privileged to meet and know during a long career in many lands, it seems to me that he well fulfilled the words of Shaks- peare, To thine ownself be true, And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou can'st not then be false to any man. After life's fitful fever may he sleep well! " [88]


"THE LATE PETER LALOR. A conspicuous figure in Victorian history has just departed this life. Mr Peter Lalor, the Eureka stockade veteran, is now no more, and thousands in this and the neighboring colonies will learn with regret the news of his end. An admirable sketch of his life from the pen of "The Vagabond" appeared in Monday's Age, aud we abridge the following particulars :— ..." [89]


Patrick Leahy

"A VETERAN FiGHTER. Of all the Eureka Stockade veterans, Patrick Leahy, who recently handed in his gun to the undertaker at Fremantle (W.A.), was probably the most picturesque. He came from County Kerry in the early 50 s, and at Ballarat met Peter Lalor, The two became close friends. Although in the forefront of the battle with the red coats, Leahy escaped all damage. Later, he went to N.S.W., and was at Lambing Flat in 1861. He helped to promote the roll-up of 3000 diggers, by reason of which the great -aggregate Chinaman left with his hog-tail streaming in the wind. In 1875, just after the landing of 8000 Chows at Cook town, he was again in the front of a well-earned disturbance. In fact, he was one of the leaders of the anti-alien movement, as long as he was able to sit up and take reasonable nourishment. In the "80's" of last century he had become an old man, and from that time outward he pottered about the West-ralian diggings. He lived to be 98. Before coming to Australia he had served a military apprenticeship, first in the local faction quarrels of Kerry, and later in the Kaffir scrum of '34. — "Bulletin." [90]

"Eureka Stockade Veteran. The death last week of Patrick Leahy, telegraphs our Fremantle correspondent, has removed another of the few remaining survivors of the Eureka Stockade fight. Leahy was born in County Kerry, Ireland, in 1819, and was, therefore, 93 years of age. He fought in the Kaffir war of 1834. and was one of the miners in the Eureka Stockade, in 1854. In 1861 he was prominent in the forcible expulsion of Chinese from Lambing Flat, N.S.W., and in 1875 was associated with the anti-Chinese movement In Queensland. In 1888 he worked on the Kimberley goldfields, and was at Coolgardie in 1893. In his declining years he lived at Fremantle on a pension." [91]


John Leeich - has profile

EUREKA STOCKADER'S DEATH. MELBOURNE, Tuesday. — John Leich, aged 93, and one of the oldest residents of Geelong, died to-day. De ceased took an active part in the de fence of the Eureka Stockade in 1854.[92]


Lessman

"THE EUREKA STOCKADE. (4 Dec. 1855). Yesterday was the second anniversary of the fatal encounter between the troops and the holders of the Stockade, and the memorable and melancholy event was commemorated by a pro-cession and the delivery of addresses. Two o'clock was the time appointed for the rendezvous on the site of the stockade, and by three there were assembled about 200 persons, amongst whom we noticed Messrs Seekamp, Hambrook, Nicholls, O'Meara, Hayes, M'Gill, Lessman, Lynch, and others. At three o'clock, Mr Lynch mounted a stump on the ground, close to the Stockade, and read the following address to the multitude ..." [93]


Thomas Lillis - has profile

A EUREKA STOCKADER The death occurred at Boulder yes- terday of Mr. Thomas Lillis, aged 77 The deceased was one of the Eureka Stockaders and he came to the West from Ballarat 14 years ago. His death took place after an illness ex- tending over a couple of weeks. De- ceased leaves a widow and grown up family, one son, Martin, beinl licen- isee of the Commercial Hotel, Boulder.[94]


Henry Lorenzo de Longville

"Henry Lorenzo de Longville, 87 years of age, who was one of the men who fought with Peter Lalor at the Eureka Stockade, died at Clare-mont, West Australia, last week. On the morning of the attack, December 3, 1854, he was on sentry duty and gave the alarm to Lalor's men when he discovered the military advancing in the darkness of the early morning. He took part in the jubilee celebra-cions of the Stockade, which were held in Perth in 1904. In 1876 he received a decoration from the French Presi- dent for gallantry in saving the en-tire crew of a French ship wrecked at Port MacDonnell, South Australia. He was born at Fort Arkansas, U.S.A., and came to this country with one of the first groups of Cali-fornian miners who travelled to Bal-larat"[95].


William Lynas

Death of a Eureka Stockader — The death is reported of Mr. William Lynas, J.P.. a much respected resident of Wooroonooke, (Vic) at the age of 75 years. Deceased, a Charlton correspondent states, was a na- tive of Tyrone, Ireland, and prior to com- ing to Victoria in 1854 he served for three years in the Royal Irish Constabulary, being stationed at Limerick and Belfast. He was present at the Eureka Stockade riots in Ballarat. Shortly after he joined the Victorian police force and remained in it for 25 years, being stationed at Ballarat, Lintons, Benalla and Mansfield, being in charge of the two latter stations during the operations of Power, the bushranger, and the Kelly gang in those districts. He had some stirring experiences whist scour- ing the country in search of the gang. He attained to the rank of sergeant, and was last stationed at Dunolly. On resigning from the force he selected land in the Charlton district, where he had since re- sided with his wife and family.

Notes on Current Events. (1905, April 28). The Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1871 - 1938), p. 23. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article100659657


John Lynch - has profile

EUREKA VETERAN DEAD - Mr. John Lynch mining surveyor for the Smythesdale district, died on March 21. The deceased, who had been in failing health for the last four or five years became unconscious on Monday the last and remained so until hs death on Wednesday. He was born in County Clare. Ireland, and left for the Victorian goldfields in the early fifties. He followed mining pursuits and was ultimately elected by the diggers as surveyor for Warren's Lead, the appointment being afterwards confirmed by the government. He was also one of those who took an active part in the historic Eureka riot, being one of Peter Lalor's lieutenants. Years ago he was prominent in all local movements, and was elected a councillor of the borough of Smythesdale in 1861. A few years afterwards he was one of those who formed the borough of Browns and Scarsdale. Mr. Lynch was married in Ballarat in 1857, his wife having pre-deceased him by a few years. The surviving family consists of Captain J. Lynch, Mr. Maurice Lynch, M.B., Mr. Peter Lynch, L.R.C.S. Mr. Arthur Lynch, M.A., ex-member for Galway in the British House of Commons, and best known as "Colonel" Lynch during the South African war; Mr. Thomas Lynch a surveyor in West Australia; and one daughter, Miss B. Lynch..."[96].

"A Eureka Veteran. — Mr. John Lynch, who led the pikemen in the affray at the Eureka Stockdale, in 1854, under Peter Lalor, died the other day at the age of 80. Subsequent to the State trial arising out of the Stockdale trouble, Mr. Lynch, who is a surveyor by profession, settled at Smythesdale. He is the father of Colonel Arthur Lynch, who towards the close of the South African war came into' notoriety in England through his pro-Boer record."[97]

"One of the Eureka stockade veterans in the person of Mr. John Lynch died at Smythesdale (Victoria) last week. Mr. Lynch, who was 80 years. of age, was born in County Clare, Ireland, and left for the Victorian goldfields in the early fifties. He followed mining pursuits, and was ultimately elected by the diggers as surveyor for Warren's Lead. He was also one of those who took an active part in the historic riot, being one of Peter Lalor's lieutenants. Years ago he was prominent in all local movements. The deceased was the father of Mr. Arthur Lynch, M.A., ex-member for Galway in the British House of Commons, and best known as " Colonel" Lynch during the South African war."[98]

"THE EUREKA STOCKADE. (4 Dec. 1855). Yesterday was the second anniversary of the fatal encounter between the troops and the holders of the Stockade, and the memorable and melancholy event was commemorated by a pro-cession and the delivery of addresses. Two o'clock was the time appointed for the rendezvous on the site of the stockade, and by three there were assembled about 200 persons, amongst whom we noticed Messrs Seekamp, Hambrook, Nicholls, O'Meara, Hayes, M'Gill, Lessman, Lynch, and others. At three o'clock, Mr Lynch mounted a stump on the ground, close to the Stockade, and read the following address to the multitude ..." [99]

"Days of Eureka Stockade - SOLDIER, POET, REBEL. Many affectionate and proud references to his Australian birth and experiences are to be found In the auto-biograhy of Colonel Arthur Lynch the "Man of Gal-Way," deep thinker, brilliant writer, politician, poet, and democrat. It Is a graphic story, an outstanding book of romantic life and achievement. Colonel Lynch was born at Smythesdale, near Ballarat, where his father, who was later "tried" for for his part In the Eureka Stockade, was a mining and land surveyor and civil engineer of high standing. Young Lynch spent a good deal of his childhood with his grandfather, Peter MacGregor, of Ballarat, who belonged to the clan of Rob Roy; thus he gained a broad Scottish accent; he also got a spartan training, which In later years stood him in good stead on many occasions. Smythesdale was only a. small centre, yet it became famous for Its runners. Lynch attributes the fact to the arrival there of Frank Hewitt, a Limerick man, who had beaten J. G. Harris, and so won the Australian championship. All the boys in Smythesdale became hero-worshippers, and It was not surprising that many of them afterwards distinguished themselves on the track. At 15 Lynch was sent to the Melbourne University, where his brother Peter was already studying medicine. "There," he puts It on record, "the Differential Calculus entranced me . . ." It did not, however take up all his time, for he recounts many amusing anecdotes,' and has much to say about his numerous old school friends. After came Paris — Berlin — London — and Pretoria. Kruger made him a colonel, and his Irish brigade Is not llkely to be forgotten; yet one cannot help liking and admiring this wild Irishman, for his wlldness and waywardness were merely a part of his peculiarly restless and versatile genius. ("My Life Story," by Colonel Arthur Lynch. London. John Long; also from Dymock's.)" [100]


Cottnam Walter MacLean (1834-1928) - has profile

"Eureka Veteran. MACKAY RESIDENT BECOMES REMINISCENT. A glowing account of the Eureka stockade and the events leading up to the outbreak by the diggers was given to a 'Mercury' representative by Mr. C. W. Maclean Jubilee-street, who has resided In Mackay and district tor a number of years. Although 95 years ot age, Mr. Maclean is still hale and hearty, and possesses a memory that would be very creditable to a man many years his junior. Although he finds it difficult to walk any great distance, he is still able to potter round the house and yard. Born in Coll, Scotland, Mr. Maclean is a descendent of the Macleans of Duart, and possesses a history of the clan. His great grandfather was resident governor of the tower of London, and his grandfather was killed in the Island of Dominico, in suppressing the rebellion of the blacks there. His father, who was an only son, served in the 68th Light Infantry in Canada for eight years, and was forced to resign on account of failing sight. He left a family of ten, all of whom with the exception of Mr. Maclean, are thought to be dead, although one brother in New Zealand may still be alive. Mr. Maclean landed at Liardet (Sandridge) Beach, Melbourne, in 1852, having sailed from the Old Country in the Isabella, which was under the command of the late Captain Peat. Twenty-four hours after landing, he and his brother were on the road to Ballarat in search of gold; which already had been discovered there in large quantities. On arrival at Eureka he picked up a nice piece of gold and thought his luck was in. Although he and his brother Francis were trying their luck at goldmining they knew as much about mining and pick-and-shovel work as the newest born child; their hands soon blistered and their backs ached. Instead of working the pipe clay at the bottom, they fooled about with black sand in which they thought the gold, was to be obtained. Their cash soon cut out and his brother took to work in a shop and Mr. Maclean kept on panning the dirt for what he could find. This contiuued for a couple of years, and then the diggers objected to paying the miners' license of 30/- a month. Meetings were called, headed by Peter Lawlor at Bakery Hill; a blue flag with white stars was hoisted, and dozens of speeches were made. Finally the diggers agreed to burn their licenses, and this was done. At the end of November, 1854, a man named Scouvey(sic.), a Scot, called at the Eureka Hotel to get a drink, and the owner hit him over the head with a spade and killed him. The diggers, to get their revenge, burnt his house. Several diggers were arrested and accused of burning the house. This incensed the diggers, and they decided to build what was known, and is still known as the Eureka stockade. The material utilised consisted of slabs that were used in sinking the shafts. By some means, unknown to those concerned, the Government was made aware of what was taking place, and two companies of troops were sent up to quell the disorder. These were the 12th and 40th Infantry under the command of Captains Thomas and Wise respectively. On the Sunday morning, December 4, the soldiers arrived and drew up in formation in front of the stockade. He was not sure whether a Magistrate was present or not to read the Riot Act, but two volleys were fired into the stock-ade by the troops, and 13 men were killed, their names afterwards being placed on a memorial tablet. Captain Wise was severely shot, on the leg and preferred to die rather than have it 'amputated. Later 120 of the dig-gers were captured and taken to Melbourne, and a petition was sent throughout Victoria, asking that they be given their liberty. Bentley, the owner of the Eureka Hotel, was tried on a charge of murder and acquitted. The diggers objected to this acquittal, and Bentley was tried again and found guilty, a term of two years imprisonment being imposed on him. Peter Lawlor was shot in the wrist during the raid on the stockade, and his hand had to be amputated. He was hidden away by his followers, and although a big reward was offered for his arrest, he was never taken. In consequence of the rising, the Government imposed a duty of 2/- an ounce on all gold exported, and the license fee was fixed at-£l a year instead of 30/- a month, as had been the case previously. The diggers therefore got some benefit as a result of their outbreak. However, as Mr. Maclean said, the revenue had to be obtained from some source, and a tax was imposed on storekeepers amounting to approximately £4 a year. One scene, said Mr. Maclean would always last in his memory. It was that of a double gum tree which stood at the bottom of Bakery Hill, and which, he was given to understand was still there. He and his brother pegged out a piece of ground, 48ft. square, in which they had shares. They worked the mine until they struck water, and his brother then sent over a cask of beer to the shaft, and they all got drunk; the result being that they lost their claim, which was jumped by a party of Italians. The latter party had exceptionally good stone there, and took out an enormous quantity of gold. Every time he passed that gum-tree afterwards he became very angry with his brother when he thought of his stupidity in sending beer to the shaft. After that he started tha Avoca goldmine, and met with a little success, although his success was only, in a meagre degree. This was in the early 60's, and after toiling so long and being unlucky as a goldminer, he followed the example of many other unfortunate diggers and gave up the chase of the elusive metal. Leaving there, he went to Melbourne, and, with his wife, boarded the Stag, which took him to Mauritius. The journey, however, did not pass without some experience befalling him. On one occasion he was flung over the jib-boom during a storm, and on another he was knocked off the mainsail by the foot-rope. The first officer on the boat was hopelessly drunk at one port, and Mr. Maclean, having a slight knowledge of Hindustani, took the cargo aboard, and for this he was made a present of £2/2/- by the skipper — a large amount in those days. In Mauritius he followed the occupation of a sugar-grower and gained considerable experience. Fever- was taking its toll towards the end of that time; on one occasion he saw 300 boys down with the malady, and quinine was worth £30 an ounce, being unprocurable - at that price. Eventually he contracted the disease, and he and his wife again heard the call to return to Australia and answered it, arriving in Melbourne. He did not stay there very long and came to Queensland, where he selected land and went in for sugar-growing in the Southern districts. Then, as he put it in the course of his remarks, he was fired out, frosted out, and flooded out, so he got out and made for Mackay, arriving here in '72 by the sailing boat Louisa Maria, which was in command of the late Captain M'Ewen. The conditions of employment on the plantations did not appeal to him, as he was asked to do five men's work for the "handsome" remuneration of £1 a week. Returning to Southern Queensland, Mr. Maclean selected land at Cabool-ture, and again grew sugar, but his fate was something similar to what it had been on previous occasions, and he was forced to give it up. While at that centre he made the acquaintance of the late Mr. Jas. Croker and his father, whom he later met on his return to Mackay. On this occasion he would not work here, as the wages offered were too small, and he retired from hard work. In 1882 word was received of the finding of gold at Mt. Britten, near Nebo, and the thirst for gold again becoming pronounced, Mr. Maclean eventually went there to again try his luck. He joined Messrs. Ricketts and Mills in the working of a quartz reef known as the Edith Mary. They got a little gold there, which was crushed at Harold Finch Hatton's mill, and returned 15dwt. to the ton. This was not enough, and Mr. Maclean gave it up. On one occasion while there he had a rather discouraging experience, the gold being so near and yet so far . A photographer named Smith had been working at the head of a gully and left, leaving a man named Davy in charge. The latter asked Mr. Maclean to come up and give him a hand, and he sank a pothole about 2ft. square. Water began to flow into it, and he put his hand down to feel the bottom of the hole, but could not recognise anything. Later Davy picked a nugget weighing 72oz. out of that hole, and it bore the marks of his shovel. It was subsequently sold to a butcher at Clermont. Mr. Maclean still possesses the mining rights held by him when on that field, and they bear the dates of 1881, 1882, and 1883 they are in a splendid state of preservation, and are quite different from the miners' rights issued to-day, being printed on parchment, whereas those of the present time are on ordinary printing paper. On leaving Mt. Britten, Mr. Maclean took up land at Eton, where he commenced to grow cane, at the same time taking a position in the mill. He had splendid land there, and cut as much as 30 tons to the acre, for which he received 10/- a ton irrespective of the c.c.s; contents of the cane. Such a thing, as payment on analysis, said Mr. Maclean, was not thought of in those days. He spoke of the wonderful progress made in Mackay. It was a very good place to live in, and after 40 years living in the bush, he was astounded on his return to find such magnificent buildings, and he expressed the wish that the town would still prosper. In the course of his chat with our representative, Mr. Maclean said he could recall many sad -events on the mining fields, such as the various accidents that had occurred in the mines and the methods used of bringing the injured to the surface, but he did not care to do so. He speaks several languages, and gave an excellent display of his ability to write Greek, whilst he also produced a bundle of French magazines which he reads and translates without the slightest difficulty."[101].


David Maine

"Four Eureka veterans, Isaac Hayward, David Maine, John Kemp, and George Firman arrived at Ballarat yesterday from Gippsland. Erch gives on interest-ing account of exciting scenes at the Stockade."[102]


Mrs Suzannah Mansfield

"ANOTHER Eureka Stockade veteran ('Sydney Mail,' 5/9/'34) is Mrs. Susannah Mansfield, of Darwin (N.T.), who at ninety-one years of age has the distinction of being the oldest woman resident in Northern Australia. Popularly known all over the north as 'Gran,' Mrs. Mansfield was born in Tasmania, and as a girl she arrived with her parents at Ballarat (Vic.) during the height of the Eureka riots. She can tell many interesting tales of those early days. She has been living in Darwin for the last thirty years" [103]


Issa Mattson Isaac Mattson (abt.1823-1917) has profile

"... An interesting personality coming to Ballarat for home coming after an absence of forty years, is Mr Issa Mattson, now residing in Melbourne. Mr Mattson, who is 94 years of age is in wonderful health, and was, prior to coming to BalIarat, one of the pioneers of the Sacramento, California, goldfields. He fought in the Eureka Stockade, and will be present in the reserved portion, specially set apart for Eureka veterans to witness the pageant on Easter Tuesday. ..." [104]

"Eureka Veteran Dies. Mr Isaac Mattson, whose death occurred on Tuesday in his 94th year, took an active part in the Eureka Stockade incident at Ballarat In 1852(sic.), being an intimate friend of Peter Lalor and of Esmond, the gold discoverer, one of Lalor's foragers for ammunition. Ho was one of the pioneers of mining in California. He took an active part in securing the Presidency of the United States for Zachary Taylor in 1848. and left California for Ballarat in 1851. The remains were interred privately in the Coburg Cemetery. He has left four daughters, 17 grandchildren and nine great grand children." [105]


McKee

"... Another man who fought in the Eureka Stockade has just died—M'Kee, of Ballarat. The thought obtrudes: Is the Eureka veteran going to loiter as long here as the Waterloo veteran has done in England? ..."[106]


Donald M'Dougal

EUREKA VETERAN PASSES. - Referring to the death of Mr Donald M'Dougall, which was dealt with in a recent issue, a correspondent writes:- One of the earliest settlers passed away on Tuesday night inl the person of Mr Donald M'Dougall, of Craigielea. The deceased gentleman, who was born at Inverness, Scotland, close to the his-toric Culloden Field, was a passenger on the Union Jack, which arrived at Geelong, 62 years ago. Following the gold centres for a time, Mr M'Dougall was present at Eureka in the stirring time when the miners struck their notable blow for freedom. Fortune, however, failed to attend his mining efforts, and he opened a store at Beau-fort, where his mother, who had accom-panied him from Scotland, was the first white woman to be buried. Subsequent-ly Mr M'Dougall engaged in farming pursuits at Learmonth, but at one of the first land boards held at Ararat, he was successful in securing an allot-ment on the Hopkins Rliver, about a mile from the township. Later on Mr M'Dougall moved to Craigielea, a few miles distant, where he resided till his death at the ripe old age of 81. During his long and strenuous career the deceased took an active and intelli-gent interest in all matters of public concern, and politically held very de-cided views in the Democratic Protec-tionist direction. He was also a noted stock breeder and prize taker on the district show ground"[107].

"ANOTHER EUREKA VETERAN. A very old resident of the Ararat district and an early pioneer of the State passed away on Tuesday night last in the person of Mr. Donald McDougall, of Cragielea, Maroona. The deceased gentleman, who had reached the extreme age of 80 years, was born in Inverness, Scotland, close to the site of the battle of Colloden. He came to Victoria in 1852, landing at Geelong, and proceeding to Ballarat he was present at the Eureka riots. Abandoning mining, after some years Jof varying fortune, he opened a store at Fiery Creek (Beaufort), his mother being the first white woman buried there. Subsequently he engaged in farming pursuits at Lake Learmonth, and on the opening up of the land for selection he came to Ararat and selected land at Kiora, but soon settled at Cragielea, where he resided until his death. He leaves a surviving sister, Mrs. McArthur, three sons and a daughter, Miss Martha Chisholm McDougall. One of his sons, Mr. J. K. McDougall, for some years representing the Wannon electorate in the Federal Parliament, and Messrs. Dougald and Donald McDougall are well known district residents." [108]


Jimmy McGill

"Jimmy McGill, of Eureka Stockade fame died in Melbourne on the 14th of last month. There was only one mourner at the burial, viz., Mr Marsh, bricklayer, late of Ballarat. It is said that at the period of the Eureka riots the sum of £lOOO was offered for the ’head" of poor old McGill."[109]

"THE EUREKA STOCKADE. (4 Dec. 1855). Yesterday was the second anniversary of the fatal encounter between the troops and the holders of the Stockade, and the memorable and melancholy event was commemorated by a pro-cession and the delivery of addresses. Two o'clock was the time appointed for the rendezvous on the site of the stockade, and by three there were assembled about 200 persons, amongst whom we noticed Messrs Seekamp, Hambrook, Nicholls, O'Meara, Hayes, M'Gill, Lessman, Lynch, and others. At three o'clock, Mr Lynch mounted a stump on the ground, close to the Stockade, and read the following address to the multitude ..." [110]


George McGrath

Poor quality OCR George McGrath died age 95[111]

"Mr. George M'Grath, a Eureka Stockade veteran, died, on the 4th instant, at his residence, Scott parade, Ballarat, at the age of 95. He was a native of County Carlow, Ireland, and arrived in Victoria in 1852. He was one of the principal shareholders in the famous Buniyong Alluvial Mining Company, from which for a long while he received dividends of £100 per week. Deceased in later years carried on farming operations at Wallace."[112]


Tobias McGrath

"OBITUARY The funeral of the late Mr Tobias M'Grath, an old and much respected pioneer and one of the very few remaining Eureka veterans, took place yesterday, and was well attended by many old friends and acquaintances. The remains were removed from his late residence, Cambrian Hill, and were inferred in the New Cemetery, The coffin bearers were Messrs Michael and James M'Grath(nephews of deceased), J. W. Cooney and J. Chatham (grandsons), and the pallbearers were Messrs M. J. Harrington, J. C. Chatham M.L.A. and J. P. Coonoy (sons-in-law), F. Blood, ' M. Nolan, M. Lynch, J. Ives, R. Crough, Wm. Davey, P. Chatham, P. McCarthy, P. Marstersen, M. Lynch and Const. D. Sullivan. The service at the grave was conducted by the Rev. Fr. Duffy and the funeral arrangements were in charge of Messrs Steve Wellington and Son." [113]


Mr McIntyre

(a long article abridged, to those named & their roles) "THE EUREKA STOCKADE. The following is the of a series of contributions on the events connected with the Eureka Stock-ade. It is from the pen of a gentleman who was here through the whole of the time ... The camp authorities, dreading an attack they said on Bentley’s hotel, but to provoke one asserted the discontented, sent the police to act as a guard over the building. ... Some of the camp officials who had still managed to keep some faith in their honesty in the popular breast notably Mr Commissioner Amos, who was drowned in the London, aided by Mr McIntyre, who subsequently was rewarded for having done this, by being arrested for having been an aider and abettor in the riot—tried all their persuasive powers to calm the excited and now well-nigh frantic assemblage. It was labor in vain. ... To such men was committed the congenial task of discovering the ringleaders of the riot at Bentley’s hotel. They at last picked out three scape-goats. One was McIntyre, now in comfortable circumstances in Glasgow, who had used his best endeavors to restrain the crowd at Bentley’s from overt acts. Another 1 was Fletcher, a printer, whose office was on the Main road, not far on the Eastern Market side ... Fletcher, from all that can be learned, was not off the Main Road the day of the fire ...Westerby, the third man, has been asserted to be equally innocent with Fletcher in the transaction. It mattered not, how ever, the necessity was laid on those in local authority to bring someone or other before the law courts, and these men were selected. When they had been arrested a meeting was held on Bakery Hill ... it was suggested that a committee, with power to act promptly and bail the prisoners, be appointed. For a moment the suggestion was unheeded, when J. F. Coleman, now mining registrar at Stafford shire Reef, volunteered to act, and his example being speedily followed ... Messrs Evans, who had been in business relation with Fletcher, would be bail for him; so it only remained to bail MTntyre; Before doing so, the bench, consisting of Messrs Johnston, G. O’B. Webster, and Green, of the Gold-office, made enquiries as to the solvency of the proposed sureties, one of whom was Mr Saltoun, formerly a partner of Mr Waldie’s. The other surety referred to the Police-court sergeant as to how he stood, and was pronounced satisfactory. ... then an adjournment was made to Bakery Hill to take counsel. Among the first things advised was, now that McIntyre was liberated, he should take to hiding. The adviser of this step was Kennedy, and the objector was one of the bondsmen, who happened to be present. To McIntyre’s credit be it said he refused, apart from the responsibilities of his bail, to hide for an hour. The trial and conviction of the three prisoners followed ..." [114]


Kenneth McKenzie

" "Home, sweet home," Is the note struck in the pictures illustrating the "Return, to Ballarat" at Easter. ... and portraits of the "Forward Ballarat" Home-coming Committee are given. An historic feature Is the portrait of Mr Kenneth McKenzie, a Eureka veteran, who re-turned after an absence of 50 years. ..." [115][116]


Alfred M'Lachlan

"One by one Eureka Stockade veterans drop off. The last to go was Mr. Alfred M'Lachlan, who was a leading figure in the early gold rushes to the Ballarat, Bendigo and M'lvor goldfields. He was a principal in most of the protests entered by the fiery diggers of those days against the Government method of collecting fees, and despite the difficulties and temptations which beset those early diggers he managed to amass a competency "and live in contented retirement in Fortitude Valley, near Brisbane." [117]


Matthew McMullen

"OBITUARY. The funeral of the late Mr. Mathew McMullen, late of the Victorian Railways, took place Thursday to the Bendigo Ceme-tery, leaving his late residence, 64 Neale street, at 3 p.m. It was largely attended. The deceased gentleman arrived in Victoria in 1849 with his parents, at the age of seven years. He was on the Ballarat dig-gings as a lad at the time of the Eureka Stockads riot. He followed a sea-faring life until he joined the railways in 1870, and retired in 1903. As a lad he had a very vivid memory of Black Thursday, and often told of some of the hardships. De-ceased is a native of Belfast, Ireland, and was twice married. A widow and one son by the first marriage survive. The coffin bearers were Messrs W. H. Taylor, E. J. Hogan, J. Taylor and L. Mullany. The Rev. Father Doyle read the burial service. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs Fizelle and Mulqueen." [118]


Archibald McNair

"One of the most interesting of the Eureka pioneers is Mr Archibald M'Nair, a sturdy old veteran, who arrived yesterday from his home in Brunswick to take part in the celebration of the anniversary of the Stockade fight. Mr M'Nair arrived here in 1853, having previously been on Campbell’s- Creek, Tarrangower, and Maryborough, diggings. He found the digger hunting equally as bad on those diggings as in Ballarat, and tells some interesting tales of the dodges resorted to by the diggers to escape from their natural enemies. He arrived on the Eureka, a few days before the riot, and remembers seeing the burning of Bentley’s Hotel. ' Appropos of the murder of Scobie, Mr M'Nair states that he knew Scobie in Dunblane, Scotland, from which part of the world he hails. Mr M'Nair does not profess to have fought in the Stockade. He arrived on the scene just after the military had left it, and states that contrary to the statement of some others of the veterans, he found no difficulty in entering the Stockade, which he did with seven others, Prior to the fight, however, he, on hearing the fighting, rushed up the hill towards the Stockade, but was met by a trooper, who, presenting a revolver at him, ordered him back, and, adds the veteran, “I went back without arguing the point.” Mr M'Nair, on entering the Stockade, encountered the dead bodies of several of the defenders, and the sight of these quite satisfied him, for he abandoned any further search. He looks on the fight as having been both a good and a bad thing, for it acted in both ways on the events of the day." [119]


William Melville

Yet another Eureka Stockader.—An old and respected resident of the Tower Hill district, in the person of Mr Wil liam Melville, died at Crossley, on Fri day, at the age of 82 years. The late Mr Melville came from County Lim erick, Ireland, and in 1842 he landed at Adelaide, afterwards coming to Tower Hill, in the early days, and lived 10 yeas at Parnlon, and then returned to the Tower Hili district, where he lived nearly all the time until his death. He was present at the Balla rat Stockade trouble. Deceased leaves a widow, four sons and five daughters.[120]


W H Michael

"Mr W. H. Michael, one of the Eureka Stockade veterans, has died at Bea-consfield, Tasmania."[121]


R.B. Micher

DEATH OF A EUREKA STOCKADER. BALLARAT, Sunday. Mr. R. B. Micher, electoral registrar, of Ballarat East, died yesterday, aged 68: He was an old digger, and was present at the encounter between the diggers and the mill- tary at the Eureka stockade in 1854. A large number of old pioneers attended his funeral to-day, and the various Wesleyan Sunday schools and other bodies were well repre sented in the cortege.

DEATH OF A EUREKA STOCKADER. (1899, October 9). The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article188661591


Montague Miller - has profile

"Eureka Veteran Dead - A message was received at the Trades Hall yesterday that Mr Montague Miller, believed to be one of the last survivors of the Eureka Stockade fight, had died, at the age of 90 years in West Australia. Mr Miller had been identified with Labor organisations for 50 yenrs. He landed in Melbourne In the "forties," and was wounded at Eureka."[122].

"Eureka Stockade Veteran. One ot the most picturesque char-acters in Australia has just arrived in Brisbane on his first visit to Queens-land. This is Mr. Monty Miller, who was born in Tasmania on Julv , 1832, and took part with the rebel diggers in the battle of Eureka Stockade, at Ballarat in December, 1854. He was wounded there in several parts of his body. Mr. Miller is one of the oldest Australians living, and probably the only survivor of Eureka Stockade now in Australia. His first-hand knowledge of Australian history is wonderful, and, as he is a man of much culture, his descriptions of life in the early days are very fascinating. One of the surprising things about Mr. Miller is his mental alertness and his retention of the old rebellious spi-rit of the Ballarat diggers. To-day he is an exponent of industrial unionism, and his visit to Brisbane has been ar-ranged by the Queensland Socialist League and other organisations with similar aims."[123].

Monty Miller Passes. A EUREKA STOCKADE VETERAN.' A link between tho old industrialism and the new, unto the last a stalwart, a never-say-die, unrelenting and unchanged, grim and tenacious, Australia's 'Grand'-Old-Man' from a Socialistic and industrial point of view, Montague Miller, aged 89,years, passed away, at Perth, on the 17th instant. More interesting than anything else connected with Miller's stormy career is the fact that he was the last of the survivors of the Eureka Stockade and it is worthy of recall that in the columns of this journal, the Old Man a few years back wrote reminiscently, graphically and Intelligently of Australla's flrst and only 'revolution.' It was during the war that 'Monty' then an old man, fell foul of the War Precautions Act, and for his unrestrained and irreconcilable outbursts in the interests of the 1.W/W., he was sent to prison, ultimately being released on account of his age and impaired health. Almost up to within a few months of his death his virility was remarkable, and as showing the stuff he was made of at 87 years of age he undertook a lecturing tour, and up to within two months of his demise he preached in Melbourne the doctrines of humanity and freedom. What perhaps, is one of his last letters, is that written on September 23 last, to his sister, Mrs. W. Woodhill, of Maroubra Bay and in the course of which he set forth that 'this may be the last time you will hear from me.' His mind, however, outlived the infirmities of the body. His were rest-less days and sleepless nights 'grim warders of the House of Pain' and he declared himself as being in a state of advanced constitutional decay.' I am at the beginning of the end - and that is nothing to fret about, as death is but an end, just as birth is a beginning to the unsolvable riddle we call life. I am at peace with myself and all the world, and can wait the termination of existence with tho calm tranquil phil-osophy that comes from, being a good and sound Atheist. It has been THE GLORIES OF ATHEISM that have fortified me to meet and conquer all the troubles of life, which have thickened with the rolling tide of ageing years, the last of which has been made strenuous by the legacy of 'Law and Order' so that my once fine constitution is broken beyond all hope of recovery. But I have the consoling joy that my life has been lived well. I hope I am right in thinking so — it has not been for self-desire, but for the good of the human race, especially the poor and oppressed. 'For modes of faith let graceless zealots fight; He can't be wrong whose life is in the right.' ? Incidentally, he mentioned having a work ready for publication in Melbourne and go on : - At the present time i am engaged on the M.S. of 'Law and Order': - "Autobiography of'an Alleged Criminal.' It Is the outline of my life since I first came under the bondage of law as an indentured apprentice till the moment I lay down my pen. It will Include, Eureka Stockade experiences and my middle life prosecutions for the right of free thought, free speech and also the right of public meeting, and a free press. Evidently 'Monty' -died as he lived fearless and a rebel. Australians should think kindly of this deceased veteran"[124].


Monty Miller Dead, Eureka Stockade Veteran. Monty Miller, of Eureka Stockade fame, aged 89, died on Wednesday, November 17, in Perth. For about eight weeks be had been suffering from a form of paralysis of the stomach, but his in-tellect was clear and bright throughout. His residence became a magnet, and drew all militants in the metropolitan area to express their sympathy with him. The history of his life has been pre-pared by an amanuensis. He arranged all the details of his funeral, insisting on a red coffin on a lorry, and would not have a hearse or mourning, and he pre-pared his own obituary notice, in which he declared that he died after a long and painful illness, borne with atheistic fortitude derived from the glory of materialistic philosophy. At the deceased's request, Labor member Thomas Walker delivered an oration at the graveside; and read verses handed to him by the deceased prior to his death. Walker said it was easy enough to go through life with compromise and cour-tesy, but it took a hero to face life acknowledging the truth. He appealed to all to emulate the deceased's example in giving his life for his fellow men. On the coffin, as it was lowered, was a wreath of gum leaves from a tree transplanted from Eureka Stockade. The late Monty Miller, during his long life of 90 years, consistently advo-cated the more advanced tenets of the Labor Movement. With singleness of purpose, sincerity and enthusiasm for the cause, "Monty" was an outstanding and inspiring figure in the Australian Labor Movement. Despite the many rebuffs and disappointments he en- countered in his lifelong crusade against the evil forces of society, de-spite his great age, "Monty" up to the last retained all the ardor, impetuosity, and enthusiasm of youth. His great work, his shining example of self-abnegation, and his fidelity to principle will be long remembered, and should serve to inspire the younger generation to fol-low in his footsteps, and carry on the humanitarian work to which this grand old Labor battler devoted his life. He visited Brisbane in the beginning of 1919, and gave a series of lectures at the Trades Hall and other centres. He was a prominent participant in the famous red flag procession in Brisbane on that Sunday in March, 1919, and proudly carried a red flag, though he was not arrested. "Monty" was in 1918 arrested and convicted under the notorious Unlawful Associations Act, and was sentenced to six months imprisonment, but this brutal act of vindictiveness on the part of the Hughes Government raised such a storm of protest throughout Australia, that "Monty" was re-leased before his sentence expired"[125].


William Mitchell

FOUGHT AT EUREKA STOCKADE. LONGREACH (Q.). Thursday. The funeral of the late Mr Wm Mitchell took place to day. Mr Mitchell landed in Victoria in 1852 and was among, the first in the rush to Bendigo and Ballarat. He took part In the fighting at the Eureka Stockade. He worked his way up from Victoria through New South Wales to Queensland and was at St George in 1863. Leaving there when Gym pie broke out he worked on practically every mining field in Queensland. He went to New Caledonia in 1875 returning to New South Wales in 1877 and Oueenslnnd In 1879 and lived In this State ever since. He was over 75 years of age.[126]


A EUREKA STOCKADER LONGREACH, Thursday. -- The funeral of the late William Michell took place to-day. It appears that Mitchell landed in Victoria in 1858 and was among the first in the rush to Bendigo and Ballarat. He took part in the fighting at Eureka Stockade. He worked his way up from Victoria through New South Wales to Queensland in 1879, and had lived in this State ever since.[127]


James Moran

"DEATH OF A EUREKA VETERAN. MELBOURNE, Thursday.—A survi-vor of the Eureka stockade named James Moran died at Windsor to-day, aged 74"[128].

DEATH OF A EUREKA STOCKADER. The men who took part in the stirring incidents connected with the diggers' re- volt at Ballarat, when the Eureka stock- ade was captured, are passing away. An- other of them has gone, in the person of Mr. James Moran, who died at Windsor at the age of 74. He was a mate of the late Peter Lalor, and was with that gentleman half an hour before he received the shot which deprived him of his arm. The deceased was an old colonist, having arrived before the gold discoveries.

DEATH OF A EUREKA STOCKADER. (1904, February 19). Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1859 - 1929), p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article148892317


Charles Mullaly

"EUREKA STOCKADE VETERAN REACHES 101 YEARS OF AGE - FOUGHT ALONGSIDE LALOR. Redeeming a promise made by him some months ago, Mr Lawson the Premier, has made arrangements for Mr Charles Mullaly, a centenarian of the Coleraine district, to be ad-mitted to the Melbourne Benevolent Asylum, Cheltenham, and today the sturdy old pioneer, who is 101 years of age, took up residence in his new home. Mr Mullaly fought beside Peter Lalor, at the Eureka stockade, and set a match to a heap of miners' li-cences. When a reward of £1000 was placed upon his leader's head Mr Mullaly aided in his escape. His father arrived in Sydney from Ireland in 1814, and Mr Mullaly was born there in 1819 and christened at St. Mary's Church. In the fifties he was a race-horse owner and jockey. Photo in article. Coleraine Centenarian" [129]


Charles Nicholas

"Mr. Charles Nicholas, of "Tretnen-heere," Diggora, who has resided in this district for tbe last thirty-two harvests, was at Ballarat during the Eureka Stockade riots. Mr. Nicholas, though pestered one day by a trooper who made him produce his miner's licence half a dozen times in a couple of hours, was amongst the peaceable of the mining population, and did not arise till after the affray was finished. Then he visited the scene of carnage, of which he can speak feelingly. Mr. Nicholas ?avers? that the description of the riots and all the incidents connected therewith have been most fairly depicted in the account of the Eureka Stockade, penned by the late Richard Allan, Esq. J.P., of Bamavm, who was also a Stockade veteran. Mr. Nicholas, whose memory is prodigious, is still in active service, though he will be 85 years of age next August."[130]


M. F Neylon

"Death of Mr. Neylon. The death of Mr. M. F. Neylon, which occurred at Highview, Jolimont, at the age of 83?(88?), on Friday last, removed a very old and successful colonist and a well-known and respected resident of the Western district. A native of County Clare, Ireland, he arrived in Geelong in 1850, at the age of 18 and was in business for many years. He was one of the first on the Ballarat goldfields, and witnessed the Eureka riots, and took an active part in endeavoring to arrange a peaceful settlement. In 1862 he took up land at Beeac, now known as the St and in 1874 he purchased the Commercial Hotel in Camperdown, which he conducted until 1900, when he sold out and returned to Stonyhurst, where he remained until two years ago, when owing to failing health he removed to Melbourne. He was for some time one of the Weering representatives on the Colac Shire Council. He was one of the original shareholders in the Geelong to Melbourne railway, was amongst the first to support export of frozen meat and later the manufacture of butter on co-operative principle. He was fond of sport in all its forms, particularly horseracing, and bred and raced horses as far back as the fifties ...

Having acquired wealth he did not overlook his responsibility and was a generous supporter of charitable institutions. He was a life member of the Camperdown Mechanics' Institute, in consideration of financial aid given. He was also a trustee of the Camperdown showground and materially assisted in inducing the society to take up its present excellent site. He was always an ardent supporter of the Camperdown Turf Club and in the distant past, when that institution was not in such a flourishing condition as now, the deceased gentleman was always ready to dip his hand in his pocket to clear off its debt. His keen interest in the Colac Hospital was many times manifested and he made a handsome donation for the purpose of purchasing an X-ray apparatus. He leaves a widow, three daughters and five sons to mourn their loss. The surviving members of the family are Messrs. John Neylon (Malvern), P. T. Neylon, of Black Rock (Camper-down, F. Neylon (Stonyhurst), C. H. Neylon (Shire Engineer, Footscray) and Dr. L. L. Neylon (at present in a military hospital in England, and who has recently been made a Captain in the Royal Army Medical Corps). The daughters are Mrs. A. C. Mickle (Camperdown), Mrs. W. J. Toohey (Sandringbam) and Miss Neylon ("Highview," Jolimont). Two of the grandsons (Lieut. C. A. Mickle and Bombardier Neylon) are on active service, the latter being in France at present. The body was ... laid to rest in the R.C. portion of the Camperdown cemetery, ... The funeral was a very large one ... As a mark of respect to the late Mr. Neylon, the Hampden Shire Council on Monday adjourned its meeting for a time." [131]


H R Nicholls

"A EUREKA STOCKADE VETERAN. ... The death of Mr. H R. Nicholls, editor of the Hobart Mercury for 19 years, removes from the Australian journalistic world a familiar figure, and one who had led a strenuous life devoted to the best interests of the masses. Originally editor of the Ballarat Star, he rendered great service to the mining community, most notable amongst his achievements being the authorship of the limited liability company system, and of the legislation holding mining companies responsible for mining accidents. The democratic bent in his ideas and in his journal might have been expected of a man who took part in the Eureka Stockade fight, and who drew up the petition for the amnesty at the finish. Recognition came to him when he was elected as a member of the first Local Court. Leaving Ballarat he joined the Argus and Australasian as leader writer and essayist, and although time was mellowing his fiery democracy he still did yeoman work when Parliamentary abuses needed castigation, and when the public weal demanded the advocacy of broad measures. In his Hobart career he will be best remembered as the hero of the famous contempt of court case arising out of comments made upon Mr. Justice Higgina as President of tbe Federal Arbitration Court. In that case Mr. Nicholls was vindicated and he won thecase which was brought against him by the Attorney-General, Mr. Hughes." [132]

"THE EUREKA STOCKADE. (4 Dec. 1855). Yesterday was the second anniversary of the fatal encounter between the troops and the holders of the Stockade, and the memorable and melancholy event was commemorated by a pro-cession and the delivery of addresses. Two o'clock was the time appointed for the rendezvous on the site of the stockade, and by three there were assembled about 200 persons, amongst whom we noticed Messrs Seekamp, Hambrook, Nicholls, O'Meara, Hayes, M'Gill, Lessman, Lynch, and others. At three o'clock, Mr Lynch mounted a stump on the ground, close to the Stockade, and read the following address to the multitude ..." [133]


Charles Nicholson

"DEATH OF Eureka VETERAN - The "Otago Witness" Dunedin, N.Z., records the death recently, at the great age of 91 of a fine old Highlander, Charles Nicholson (known as Sgiathanach(sic.)), who in his time proved himself a representative British Colonist, and whose life was full of moving incidents; of dangers and difficulties passed and overcome. He was born in Skye in 1828. On his mother's side he was closely connected with the family of Flora Mac-Donald going to Edinburgh University in his teens as a medical student, he unfortunately, took a leading part in a town and gown riot, in which, the doors of the town hall were smashed and burnt, The ringleaders fled from the town, and Nicholson passed on to Guy's Hospital, whence, after further wild pranks, he drifted to Ceylon. The discovery of gold in Australia was a trumpet call to all roving spirits like Nicholson, and he made his way to Victtoria, where he followed many of the most notable rashes in the fifties of last century- When the Ballarat diggers rose in rebellion,"Nicholson," the stormy pet-rel, -was once more in the forefront, and he was in the Eureka Stockade when rushed and captured by the soldiers. As editor of the "Diggers' Newspaper" at Ballarat, he was prosecuted by the authorities, but the charge failed. Nich-olson then joined the mounted police of Victoria, a magnificent body of men, and was in charge of some very large es-corts bearing gold from the diggings to Melbourne. In this capacity he had some thrilling experiences with bush rangers in one instance his escort was attacked by a well-Known outlaw, nicknamed "The Jewboy", and the leader and Nicholson exchanged shots at short range. "Jewboy"' was driven off but Nicholson carried the robber's bullet in his leg to the grave. Later by special appointment, he was in charge of a squad of blacktrackers searching for bushrangers and they succeeded in capturing the notorious "Jewboy". About this time he was sent as second in charge of an expedition to look for trace of the ill-fated Dr. Leichhardt. and travelled through the Northern Territoryto the Gulf of Carpentaria, where the Nicholson River still tells of its early history. Only six or seven men of this expedition ever returned. Nicholson used to tell an interesting story of how the whole force was saved by means of the bagpipes. The party had encaamped on desert land adjacent to dense jungle lying to the north. They were surprised by a large body of natives, upwards of 200 in number. One of the party, McIn-tosh, called out, "The Pipes, Charlie! The pipes while we retreat." Nicholson had the pipes out in a twinkling, and on the first skirl the natives stood amazed, speil-bound. He held them there, playing for his life and the lives of the party, until glancing over his shoulder, he saw his mates were close to the jungle. Then he himself turned and followed his friends. On reaching them he looked back and saw the natives still standing spell-bound, and they eventually disappeared. Once more attracted by the lure of new discoveries of gold. Nicholson set off for Otago in 1861"[134].


James Nolan

"Mr. James Nolan, of Warrenheip, one of the Eureka Stockade veterans, died on Tuesday,' aged 87." [135]

"Another of the Eureka Stockade men, Mr. James Nolan, died at his residence, Warren-heip, on Saturday last, after a couple of days illness, at the age of 87 years. He was not long on the Ballarat goldfieids before the Eureka riots took place, and joined in the outbreak. He was about 54 years in Victoria, and was a native of County Kilkenny, Ire-land." [136]


Jas Oddie

"DYNAMITE OUTRAGE. ATTEMPT TO WRECK LALOR STATUE. EXPLOSION MYSTERY SOLVED. The mystery attending the loud explosion which occurred shortly before 2 o'clock on the morning of Friday, 7th April, and which so greatly alarmed many of the residents of Ballarat. was, to a certain extent, solved when it was discovered yesterday that the Peter Lalor Statue, which stands in the Sturt street gardens, between St. Patricks Cathedral and St. Andrew's Kirk had been damaged, apparently by an explosion of dynamite. The discovery was ade by some boys on Sunday afternoon, and the police were informed yesterday. The right foot of the statue has been shattered, while the block of bronze on which the figure stands has been shifted slightly out of alignment, and the granite block supporting that has been moved out of its true position on the pedestal, while the corners of two of the tablets bearing inscriptions have been torn away from the granite pedestal to which they were affixed. On the bronze slab to which the figure was affixed,a large dint appears, and the legs are bespattered with mud. All these facts point to an explosion of dynamite. The theory is that a couple of sticks of dynamite or gelignite were placed ; under the right foot of the statue, and packed in with clay to make the concussion greater, hence the mud-bespattered legs. The remains of the clay tamping are plainly noticeable near the foot. Fortunately, dynamite explodes in a downward direction, and it was this and only this, that saved the statue from being completely wrecked. Had an explosive with an upward tendency been used, the result would have been much more disastrous. A great sensation was caused in the City when the news of the outrage leaked out, and the statue was yesterday visited by hundreds or citizens, who gave vent freely to their indignation at this dastardly attempt to wreck a work of art inwhich for a quarter of a century the people of this centre have taken such pride. There have been two loud early morning explosions in the City during the past week or two, but it seems beyond all shadow of doubt that the explosion on the' 7th inst. was the one which was aimed at the destruction of the statue. This took place shortly before 2- a.m. At the time, two members of 'The Star' staff, were on their way homeward. They stopped to converse for a few moments with Senior-Constable Wright and Constable O'Neil near the corner of Armstrong and Sturt streets, when they noticed a peculiar red light. As they turned to say good-night to the police, a deafening, explosion took place, the concussion causing them to stagger, while it shook the Post Office building and rattled the windows of the City watchhouse. The Two pressmen ex-pressed their firm conviction that the explosion came from about opposite St. Andrew's, and with the police they went up to that corner to investigate. Here they were joined by Constable Calwell. who was standing near Harry Davies and Co.'s at the time of the occurrence and said he thought he saw a blue light just as the explosion took place. ' A close search of the ground in the neighborhood was made but without results, and the base of the Lalor statue was then included in the examination, but no one thought of looking higher up for a solution of the mystery. It seems strange that with so many persons passing up and down Sturt street daily the damage to the statue was not noticed before, and once attention is drawn to it, the marks of an outrage are very plain; but it must be remembered that the feet of the statue are some distance above the ground, higher than the most observant person looks as he walks along the gardens, which, because of their beauty, generally attract all the attention of passers-by. There is no accounting for the motive of the miscreant responsible for the outrage, which can only be put down as the act of a lunatic. Whoever he is, he is a person with easy access to explosives and with some knowledge of the manner of handling them. This may be deduced from the clay tamping used. The charge was probably exploded by a long fuse, and the perpetrator was well out of the way when the police began their search of the locality after the explosion Fortunately the damage done is not beyond remedy, and the work of repairing the statue should not prove very expensive. The statue, which is of bronze, mounted on a magnificent granite pedestal, cost £1000 to cast and erect, the whole of the expense being defrayed by the late Mr Jas. Oddie, who being a Eureka veteran himself, was an ardent admirer of the ' diggers' leader. It was erected by T. Nelson MacLean of London, and was erected in 1892 and handed over by Mr Oddie as a gift to the citizens of Ballarat. The City Council has decided to offer a reward of £50 for evidence leading to the conviction of the perpetrator of the dastardly act" [137]


E O'Mahony Edmund O'Mahoney (abt.1832-1910) - has profile

That fine old Irishman, Mr. E. O'Mahony, of O'Mahony's Creek, Gippsland — variously at either side of the world a Young Irelander and a Eureka Stockader, but for many, years past a most useful Australian citizen— is at present paying one of his rare visits to Sydney. [138]


Mr. J O'Brien

"THE EUREKA STOCKADE. GATHERING AT KALGOORLIE. The jubilee of the Eureka Stockade, where the diggers of Ballarat- made a stand for liberty on the now historic Sunday, December 4, 1854, was celebrated on Sunday in the several States of the Commonwealth in divers manners. ... Kalgoorlie could boast of the presence of three men who had either in their youth or early manhood been associated closely with the events of '54. They are Messrs. A. J. MacPherson, O'Brien and Knuckey. ... The chairman called upon the three veterans to speak. Each man was received with cheers. 'Mr. J. O'Brien, a sturdily-built man from Kanowna, made a decided hit with the crowd. He gave his recollection of the mass meeting at Bakery Hill. Apparently the advocates of peaceful measures for obtaining the redress of wrongs had not had his sympathy, for he joined with the party he believed in the now historical words of one of the speakers on Bakery Hill---"Moral persuasion is all a humbug, there's nothing convinces like a lick in the lug." He gave a good description of the arms of the diggers. He showed how companies were formed which elected their own officers, including sergeants. There was the riflle company, the musket company, the pistol company, and the pike company. The true heroes of the stockade in his opinion were the men who were armed with pikes only - the men who stood patiently awaiting the advance of the soldiers who kept pouring in musketry fire upon those diggers who were not in a position to fire back. Mr. O'Brien paid a tribute of praise to Captain Wise; who climbed the stockade and shouted to his men, only to fall "among the pistols." Mr O'Brien believed Captain Wise was too gallant a soldier to fall in such "a squabble". The speaker got rounds of applause from the spectators on account of his displays with his walking-stick of the use of "the pike and improvised bayonets of the diggers. In other words Mr. O'Brien gave a realistic illustration of Goldsmith's old soldier "who shouldered his crutch and fought his battles o'er again." He related that he himself was possessed of a rifle and revolver at the time the diggers made their stand. He likened Peter Lalor to a man who was every inch a man. Mr. J. Knucky, who claimed to be a participant in the stirring scenes of '54, was carried away by a rush of reminiscences of the period, and spoilt an otherwise capital narrative by a risky story of the doings of an ignorant mayor who had been created a justice of the peace. Mr. A. J. Macpherson, whose narrative of his recollections of the troublous times of '54 has already been published in these columns, contented himself with a brief remark or two. He was given a splendid reception by the crowd. ... Three cheers were given for the three Eureka veterans. Mr. O'Brien poked vigorously with his stick at his nearest neighbors in deprecation of the compliment. A round, of cheers was also given for Peter Lalor. ...."[139]


Patrick O'Meara

"GENEBAL NEWS EUREKA, VETERAN. The death occurred recently of Mr. Patrick O'Meara, one of the pioneers of the Charlton district, at the age of 87 years. He was a fine type of colonist, a native of Limerick, Ireland, and came to Victoria 62 years ago. He followed mining pursuits at Bendigo, Ballarat and Maryborough, and took part in the Eureka Stockade fight." [140]

"THE EUREKA STOCKADE. (4 Dec. 1855). Yesterday was the second anniversary of the fatal encounter between the troops and the holders of the Stockade, and the memorable and melancholy event was commemorated by a pro-cession and the delivery of addresses. Two o'clock was the time appointed for the rendezvous on the site of the stockade, and by three there were assembled about 200 persons, amongst whom we noticed Messrs Seekamp, Hambrook, Nicholls, O'Meara, Hayes, M'Gill, Lessman, Lynch, and others. At three o'clock, Mr Lynch mounted a stump on the ground, close to the Stockade, and read the following address to the multitude ..." [141]


Ninian Paton

In His 93rd Year - A survivor of the Stockade fight is Mr. Ninian Paton, of Bennett- street, Neutral Bay, who is in his 93rd year. "I came from Glasgow to Melbourne in 1852," he said. "At the age of 12 I was working at Ballarat, and retain vivid memories of the famous Eureka Stockade. I had a position near the blacksmith, who owing to the shortage of weapons, was turning the proverbial 'plough shares Into swords." "A man beside me had the top of is head lifted off in the encounter with the troopers." Miner and Seaman Ninian Paton liked the adventurous life of those days. He wandered the goldfields of Australia and New Zealand, and spent two years at sea. In 1885 he came to Sydney and built his first shop on the site where Lowe's now are, opposite the Queen Victoria Markets. Some years later it was burnt to the ground, the bank crash followed and Ninian Paton, at the age of 50, and with a family of 10, had to start business all over again. At the age of 88 he underwent a major operation, and now, as he said yesterday, "I never felt better!"[142]


John Paterson

"CHAMPIONS OF OTHER DAYS. ... In this my concluding series of reviews of former amateur athletic champions associated at some time or other with Ballarat, pride of place may be given to W. J. Paterson as the winner of ... is a son of a former resident of this city, and a grandson of a Eureka veteran, both father and grandfather having been John Patersons ... " <ref>Newspaper Article John Paterson. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Sat 23 Jul 1921, p.12. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/211969919?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran</ref>


Samuel Perry

OBITUARY - EUREKA VETERAN PASSES. Very great regret was expressed when it was announced that one of the sturdy band of early pioneers of the State had passed away, this being Mr Samuel Perry, of Rocky Lead. The deceased was born in Bristol, England, in the year 1834, and was thus 83 years of age. He reached this country from' the Home-land in the year 1852, at once proceeding to the Ballarat goldfield, where he took a very active interest in public matters of the day, and was one of those who participated in the fight at the Eureka Stockade. He was afterwards arrested for his connection with the rebellion, but was liberated. He had most interesting experiences during that time, and was able to give a very vivid chronicle of that, memorable event. So far as has been ascertained, Mr Perry was the only one who actually fought on 3rd December, 1851(sic.), who was present at the Ballarat home-coming last Easter, when a representation of the Eureka riot was given. His mining operations being of a successful nature, Mr Perry paid a visit to his native land in the year 1855, but returned to Victoria in the following year. At one time he was a property owner in Ballarat. For 54 years he resided at Rocky Lead, and through being a man of sterling qualities he endeared himself to all his acquaintances, being most highly respected. A widow, four daughters and five sons are left to mourn their loss, and for them widespread sympathy is felt in their sad bereavement. One of the sons, Albert, enlisted in New Zealand, and is on war service abroad. The district will miss such an old identity—a colonist of 65 years, standing."[143]


John L. Potter

"THE LAST ALIVE. Eureka Stockade Veteran It was recently stated that the last survivor of the Eureka Stockade battle had died in Brisbane. This is not correct. In Timaru (N.Z.) is living a white-haired old gentleman, John L. Potter by name, who claims to be the last survivor. Though nearly 100 years old, he has never worn glasses, has not lost a tooth, has never had a day's illness, is still a busy builder and contractor, and never feels tired. He neither drinks nor smokes. His memory is still first rate, and he has a clear recollection of all the events, that led up to the battle, in which he took part. The revolt against official tyranny at Ballarat in 1854, as Mr Potter claims, did much to break down the military and official spirit that threatened the foundations of the democracy in this land. When gold was first discovered the Crown only allowed men to dig for it under the most strlngent rules and regulations. Every man had to pay 7/6 a week for his "Miner's Right" and then only had a claim eight feet square. "As the diggers had no voice in the government of the country, the inevitable happened," relates Mr Potter. "One hundred thousand men gathered from all parts of the world were not going to be bludgeoned into tame submission by a few tyrannical officials. A leader was found in Peter Lalor, and under him the diggers were drilled and instructed in modes of attack and defence. But the authorities were alert, and before the miners could benefit much by training the crisis was precipitated. For the purpose of self-defence they hurriedly gathered logs, slabs, upturned carts, and anything they could lay hands on, and built a barricade on the Eureka lead. Here they burned the licences, and every man took a solemn oath never to buy another. All sorts of weapons had been commandeered, for which queer old receipts had been given. "The engagement began by sniplng in the dark, and bush fights. The first victim was a little drummer boy — an unfortunate incident, which aroused the spirit of revenge in the troops. "Information obtained by spies reached the troops that on the coming Saturday evening, December 2, 1854, most of the men would be at home In the!r tents, leaving about 200 in the stockade. Before daylight on December 3, the attack was made, the military and police marching on the entrenched camp. In an hour it was all over, and at 4.30 a.m. Australia had had her first baptism of blood. Commander-in-Chief Peter Lalor leaped on to a stump to direct and cheer his men, and Immediately received a shot in the arm. He fell and his comrades covered him with slabs. The soldiers searched for him high and low, but he wab safely hidden. The reward of £200 for his arrest could not tempt one of those loyal-hearted fellows. Lalor lived to enter the Victorian Parliament, and became Speaker. His status and memory are two of the most cherished possessions of Ballarat. "Captain Wise, five soldiers, and 30 diggers were killed, a great number were wounded, and 125 diggers were taken prisoners. Three months later thirteen of the diggers were put on their trial for treason in Melbourne, but though 180 jurymen were empanelled, not one could be found to convict the men. The rewards of £200 for Lalor and £500 for Verne, another leader, were withdrawn. Though the diggers were defeated in battle, their cause was won. The gold licence was modified. Parliamentary representation was granted, and Ballarat entered upon a new era of progress."[144].

"OLD MINER. EUREKA STOCKADE VETERAN. WELLINGTON (N.S.W.), July 25. Claiming to be the oldest gold miner in the British Empire, John Lishman Potter will celebrate his 95th birthday to-morrow. Potter now resides at Tinaru u (N.Z.). He arrived in Australia from England as a young man, and fought at the Eureka stockade." [145]

(Potter is claimed to be a 'Geordie') [146]


Simon Pritzler

n.b. Most of this recount does not compare with other source documents available; which brings into question some of the other claims. i.e. Simon Pritzler was with the 12th Reg but was not posted to Eureka, nor Lambing Flats. His first actions was in the 3rd Moari War. http://freepages.rootsweb.com/~twelthregiment/military/12th_Regiment_All_Soldiers_Details.pdf

"EUREKA VETERAN DEAD - SYDNEY. Saturday. Mr Simon Pritzler, a very old resident of Goulburn, and a retired police officer and former army man, died on Wednesday at the age of 84. He was a native of Ireland, joined tho 12th British Regiment of foot, and came to Sydney In the forties. He took part in tho Eureka Stockade battle, and also served with credit In the New Zealand war. When in the military servlce In Sydney, he was selected as one of the bodyguard of Sir John Young, then Governor of the colony, and travelled with him to Windera- deen near Collector, the party arriving there the day after the murder of Constable Nelson and Ben Hall, Gilbert, and Dunn, on January 26, 1865. The outlaws had made public their Intention of "getting" the Governor. Private Pritzler was on guard and during the night he fired at a bush-ranger's "telegraph," scaring the gang away. Sir John was not other- wise molested. Mr. Pritzler then left the military service and joined the police force under Captain Zouch. He was 33 years in the service"[147].


John Reed

BENDIGO. - DEATH OF EUREKA VETERAN - Mr John Reed, who was one of the men who drove the first soldiers to Ballarat, and who fought in the Eureka Stockade, died no Friday at the age of 96 years"[148].


Mrs Elizabeth Mary Richards

"Mrs. Elizabeth Mary Richards, 82, who died recently at Brighton, had been 63 years in Victoria, for 20 years of which she had lived in Brighton. She was the widow of Mr. Elijah Richards, a well-known Ballarat mining manager, who cameto Victoria in 1841. He took part in the Eureka Stockade riots. Mr. Richards was killed in the Britannia mine, Ballarat East, about twenty years ago. A family of four daughters is left." [149]


John Richardson

"Appeal for Eureka Stockade Veteran.— The Ballarat 'Courier' writes : An appeal on behalf of a Eureka veteran has been sent to Mayor Dunn by Mr. Phil. Leahy of Yarrawonga, who states that John Richardson, one of the Eureka men, a resident of that town, is anxious to end his days in Ballarat. Mayor Dunn was asked if he can procure a cheap little dwelling here for the old man, and if he can residents of Yarrawonga will raise his fare to Ballarat. The Mayor will see what he can do."[150]


Eugene Ashly Smith

"OUR LABOR PIONEERS. ... A shining example of this was to be found in a Eureka Stockade veteran, in the person of Eugene Ashly Smith, who crossed the great divide at the age of 101 years at Mount Isa recently." [151]


George Smith

George Smith, a Eureka stockader, has died in West Australia at the age of 68.

Needles. (1901, June 15). Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), p. 28. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87804290


Archibald William Stout

"EUREKA STOCKADE VETERAN DIES AT 106. GRAFTON, Wednesday. The death occurred at Maclean today of Archibald William Stout, who was reported to be 106 years of age. He was a bachelor, and lived for many years on the Clarence River. Born on the Island of Skye, Scotland, he came to Australia with his parents in the late 1830's. He was a miner in the early days and was present at the Eureka Stockade." [152]


Charles Sublet

"Soon there will not be a Eureka Stockader left in Australia. The veterans are dying off rapidly. Thomas Bolger and Charley Sublet, two of Peter Lalor's men, have died recently. These were genuine, but many of the men who now claim to be Eureka veterans were very careful to be outside Lalor's Stockade on that fatal Sunday." [153]

"Mr. Chas. Sublet, a Eureka Stockader vete-ran, had an unpleasant experience on Satur-day afternoon. While standing at the head of a horse attached to a buggy, the animal was startled by a passing motor and dashed Mr Sublet violently against the kerb. Assist- ance was at once rendered , and it was ascer-tained that no injury was sustained, with the exception of severe shock, which is in itself serious enough to a person of the advanced age of the sufferer."[154]


John William Sweetnam

"Mr John William Sweetnam died in the Melbourne Benevolent Asylum, aged 83 years. Mr Sweetnam arrived in Victoria in 1842, and lived near Ballarat. He was a friend of the Eureka Stockade rioters in the early fifties, and when, after the fall of the stockade, the police were on the track of Peter Lalor, the diggers' leader, Sweet-nam, hid Lalor in his dwelling one night, and got him safely away." [155]


E Syme

(Former editor of the Argus now editor of The Age (Melbourne) "... he had done a little for them in another way ; when the news of the massacre reached Melbourne he was one of half a dozen who turned the tide in favor of the dig-gers. He wrote out the three resolutions which upset the Government meeting and gave the triumph to the popular cause. He wrote all the resolutions submitted to the popular meetings during that exciting period. The Government had learned a lesson from those events. ..." [156]


===J Russell Thomson=== (5x other names mentioned) "DEATH OF AN OLD RESIDENT OF BALLARAT May 26. Mr J. Russell Thomson died at his residence, Ballarat West, to night, of liver com-plaint. He was 64 years old. Mr Thomson was always greatly liked and esteemed here, his courteous bearing and his integrity commanding for him the respect of all who knew him. He will be remembered by old residents as a membet of the firm of 'Thomson, Walsh and Moore, sharebrokers. He was in Ballarat before the Eureka Affair, and was in the police court when Bentley was charged with the murder of the digger James Scobie, and acquitted by the magistrate, Mr. Dewes. On that occasion Mr Thomson narrowly escaped committal for daring to urge that Bentley's was a case which should be sent to a jury ; but his ex-pression of opinion was popular. At an indignation meeting close to where Scobie was killed, Mr.Thomson, with Messrs T.D. Wanliss, P. Lalor, J.W. Gray, W. Corkhill, A. McP. Grant, and Archd. Carmichael were appointed to collect money to defray the cost of a further prosecution of Bentley. In the early days here Mr Thomson amassed a fortune, and has of late lived retired. He still supported mining, but latterly with little suceess. He has, no relatives in the colony." [157]


Henry C Thorburn

"A very old resident of Victoria died in Sydney on Thursday morning in the person of Mr. Henry . C. Thorburn who landed in this State in the year 1852. Before coming to Australia, Mr Thorburn was a Queen's chorister boy and as such was present at the christening of the late King Edward, and on many occasions had, the honor of singing before Queen Victoria. On his arrival here Mr. Thorburn was attracted to the Castlemaine goldfields, and well remembered the time when the miners used to light their pipes with banknotes and fire nuggets in place of shot from the barrels of their guns. He was in Ballarat at the time of the Eureka Stockade, and for many years carried on business in Castlemaine." [158]


William Tucker

"EUREKA VETERAN - COWRA. Tuesday. The death is reported of William Tucker 91 for forty years a resident of Woodstock, who took part In the historic fight at the Eureka Stockade"[159].


Patrick Tully

"Path of a Pioneer. DEAD at Ray Station, near Charle-ville (Q.), at 92 years, Patrick Tully, Eureka Stockade veteran and pioneer squatter. Born In County Gal-way, Ireland, he arrived in Victoria in 1853, and made his way to Ballarat. He was in the Eureka Stockade on De-cember 3, 1854, when Captain Thomas made his memorable attack. Mr. Tully subsequently migrated to Goulburn, where he married Miss Durack, a mem-ber of another Australian pioneering family. From Goulburn he went to Western Queensland, and took up Ray Station, where he resided for 47 years." [160]


Frederick Vern

Criminal Sessions. Rioting. Frederick Vern, more popularly known as " Colonel Vern, who distinguished himself on the occasion of the Eureka Stockade affair, was charged with rioting on the 7th of April last, at the Black Lead, Hard Hills. Mr, Walsh defended the prisoner. Henry Reed deposed : I am a miner, and work at the Black Lead. On the 7th of April a meeting at which Vern was present, was held in that locality, for the purpose of protesting against claim jumping, which was then very prevalent. It was resolved that claims belonging to one party, and jumped by another, should be filled up. I heard Vern say, " If any man stops us from doing so, by my God I'll make a dead cock of him." While he was saying this he pulled out a revolver. After the meeting about a hundred men came to my shaft, and began to shovel earth into it. Vern was amongst them, with a pistol in his hand. While the work of filling up the shaft was going on Vern caught hold of my pick and took it from me, while another man did the same by my shovel. I swear that the pistol now produced is the same which Vern used on that occasion. William Jeffries deposed : I was present at the meeting mentioned by the last witness. I heard Vern say that he would lead the way, and with a body of miners go and fill up certain shafts. He also stated that anybody who dared to oppose him was a dead man. While the last witness's shaft was being filled up, I wrenched the pistol now produced from Vern's hand. I do not deny that several claims were unjustly jumped about this time. Mr. Walsh having addressed the jury in favor of the prisoner Vers, proceeded to call Robert Beattie, who deposed that he also was present at the meeting aforesaid, and that no disturbance took place, worth mentioning. The meet ing was convened to publish the enactment of Mr. Baker's regulations, and to put a stop to the practice of claim jumping. He heard Vern say that if, while filling up some shafts, he was opposed by any body using unlawful weapons, he would " drop that party." Witness presumed that Vern meant, by dropping a party, shooting him. By the Crown prosecutor ; I was not acquainted with Vern until I saw him at Ballaarat. I was not in the Eureka Stockade affair. I heard Vern say he would not touch any man that only used a pick, meaning-, if he did not use an unlawful weapon. By his Honor: When the meeting broke up the men proceeded to fill up the shafts. After two more witnesses had been called, who proved that Vern's conduct was characterised by nothing worse than a little harmless "bounce,' the jury found him guilty and his Honor sentenced him to three months' imprisonment.[161]


Geo. Thomas Wallace

"Geo. Thomas Wallace, a Eureka Stockade veteran, died in the Albury hospital on Saturday, aged 75." [162]


Eureka Ward

" "Home, sweet home," Is the note struck in the pictures illustrating the "Return, to Ballarat" at Easter. ... and portraits of the "Forward Ballarat" Home-coming Committee are given. An historic feature Is the portrait of Mr Kenneth McKenzie, a Eureka veteran, who re-turned after an absence of 50 years. ... and Mrs A. Eureka Ward, who was born at the Eureka diggings." [163][164]


Harry Watson

"EUREKA VETERAN. Mr Harry Watson, an old resident of Warwick, Queensland, died at the residence of his daughter, Mrs Harry Bristow, of Toowoomba, recently. Deceased, who was 85 years of age, a native of Brighton (England). He came to Australia 72 years ago, and engaged in mining pursuits. He was in Ballarat at the time of the Eureka Stockade incident, and was one of the participants in that historical fight, of the miners for freedom. He subsequently worked his way as a gold miner up through New South Wales to as far as Peak Downs (Queensland). Later he took to sheep shearing, being engaged principally on the Glenelg and the surrounding stations, he resided for many years in Warwick. His wife predeceased -him about 10 years ago. For the past 12 months he resided with his daughter, where he died. Mr W. Watson, of Broken Hill, a well known unionist and a member of the Democratic Club, is a son of deceased." [165]


J A Watts - has profile

WARRACKNABEAL. A EUREKA STOCKADER. Mr J. A. Watts, herbalist, of this town, who was connected with the Eureka Stockade affair, has received a letter re- questing his attendance at Ballarat on the 3rd prox., when the 50th anniversary of the incident will be celebrated.[166]


Mr Westerby

(a long article abridged, to those named & their roles) "THE EUREKA STOCKADE. The following is the of a series of contributions on the events connected with the Eureka Stock-ade. It is from the pen of a gentleman who was here through the whole of the time ... The camp authorities, dreading an attack they said on Bentley’s hotel, but to provoke one asserted the discontented, sent the police to act as a guard over the building. ... Some of the camp officials who had still managed to keep some faith in their honesty in the popular breast notably Mr Commissioner Amos, who was drowned in the London, aided by Mr McIntyre, who subsequently was rewarded for having done this, by being arrested for having been an aider and abettor in the riot—tried all their persuasive powers to calm the excited and now well-nigh frantic assemblage. It was labor in vain. ... To such men was committed the congenial task of discovering the ringleaders of the riot at Bentley’s hotel. They at last picked out three scape-goats. One was McIntyre, now in comfortable circumstances in Glasgow, who had used his best endeavors to restrain the crowd at Bentley’s from overt acts. Another 1 was Fletcher, a printer, whose office was on the Main road, not far on the Eastern Market side ... Fletcher, from all that can be learned, was not off the Main Road the day of the fire ...Westerby, the third man, has been asserted to be equally innocent with Fletcher in the transaction. It mattered not, how ever, the necessity was laid on those in local authority to bring someone or other before the law courts, and these men were selected. When they had been arrested a meeting was held on Bakery Hill ... it was suggested that a committee, with power to act promptly and bail the prisoners, be appointed. For a moment the suggestion was unheeded, when J. F. Coleman, now mining registrar at Stafford shire Reef, volunteered to act, and his example being speedily followed ... Messrs Evans, who had been in business relation with Fletcher, would be bail for him; so it only remained to bail MTntyre; Before doing so, the bench, consisting of Messrs Johnston, G. O’B. Webster, and Green, of the Gold-office, made enquiries as to the solvency of the proposed sureties, one of whom was Mr Saltoun, formerly a partner of Mr Waldie’s. The other surety referred to the Police-court sergeant as to how he stood, and was pronounced satisfactory. ... then an adjournment was made to Bakery Hill to take counsel. Among the first things advised was, now that McIntyre was liberated, he should take to hiding. The adviser of this step was Kennedy, and the objector was one of the bondsmen, who happened to be present. To McIntyre’s credit be it said he refused, apart from the responsibilities of his bail, to hide for an hour. The trial and conviction of the three prisoners followed ..." [167]


John Whelan

A Eureka Stockader.—The death is an- nounced of Mr. John Whelan, Warrenheip. Deceased, who was between 70 and 80 years of age, was one of the original shareholders in the famous Band of Hope Company, Bal- larat, in the wake of which followed the Band and Albion, and latterly the Band and Loch. He was, on the whole, very successful in his mining investments, and prosperity also at- tended his agricultural pursuits in Bungaree. He took part in the diggers’ encounter with the troops at the Eureka Stockade in 1854.[168]


James Wiburd

"EUREKA VETERAN. - Mr James Wiburd, a resident of Bathurst for 50 years, and who was one of the few survivors of the Eureka Stockade, died on Monday at the age of 87 years. Mr Wiburd arrived in Australia at the age of 19 years, and settled in Victoria. He took part in the early gold rushes in this State, and was one of those who participated in the riots at Ballarat in December, 1854, which culminated in the attack on the Stockade. He received slight wounds in the melee. Up to the time of his death he had in his possession an old Winchester rifle which he used on the historic occasion. He has left a large grown-up family, including Geo Wiburd at one time champion cyclist of Australia, and Carvossa Wiburd, who for many years has been in charge at Jenolan Caves"[169].


Theophilus Williams (1825-1904) - has profile

"...Point is also given to this conflict of evidence by a statement made to me by Mr Theophilus Williams, J.P., late mayor of Ballarat East. He tells me that his tent was hard by the Stockade, and be saw the fight, and is prepared to “affirm on affidavit that he saw two red-uniformed soldiers haul down the flag.” He also remembers that the flag had on it a cross “something like” that on the flag in the Art Gallery. ..."[170]


John William Wilson

"John William Wilson, the Eureka veteran whose boast it was that he owned the land on which, years before he was chained to a log during the Eureka troubles, pro- vided handsomely for Ballarat char-ities. In his will he left real estate worth £2850 and personal property valued at £18,405." [171]


Mrs Elizabeth Wilson

"Wilson.-One of the oldest and most respected pioneers of the Ballarat district in Mrs Elizabeth Wilson passed away at the residence of her son, Mr Richard Wilson, Essex Hotel, on Monday last, and the large and representative gathering at her funerel, which took place on Wednesday, bore eloquent testimony to the esteem in which she was held by all. The late Mrs Wilson. was born at Falkirk, in 1828, and arrived at Wiliamstown, Victoria with her husband in 1852, having completed many months sailing in the sailing ship Wanotta under Captain Lee. On arrivmg in Victoria Mrs Wilson and her late husband, Mr Richard Thompson Wilson, came on to Ballarat "and made their home at Canadian, and were living there at the time of the Eureka Riot. On the death of her husband in 1900 Mrs Wilson went to live with her son at the Essex Hotel, and had resided there until the time of her death. She leaves a surviving family of three to mourn their loss—Mr Richard Wilson, Mrs Peter Sharp, and Mrs C. Schroeder— also 26 grandchildren, 49 great grandchildren, and one great great grandchild. The funeral...left her late residence for the New Cemetery ... the casket ... was borne by four of her grandsons;—'Messrs A. V. Sharp, John Wilson, Harry Chalmers, and Abe Richards. The following representative gentlemen were also present:—...." [172]


Bulletin?

A Bulletin correspondent tells of a Eureka stockader finding six dead China men in a drive in Ballarat in '55. Yarn probably not true. But if it is it is only another proof of the often-repeated assertion that the Chinese knew it long ago. Same as the bicycle, the mutoscope, and the phonograph. The Chinaman had all these things centuries ago, used them, set them aside, and forgot them. It may yet be attempted to be demonstrated that Australia was originally part of the Chinese mainland. And if John and the Jap combine and make head it may again be Pagan territory — a yello .v Australia.

SUNBEAMS. (1904, March 13). The Sun (Kalgoorlie, WA : 1898 - 1929), p. 4. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article211584915


Eureka Anniversary 1904

long article - OCR needs correcting

[173] Men mentioned:

  • James Oddie
  • Commissioner Doveton
  • Commissioner Armstrong
  • Mr George Hartley, of Mount Egerton, was the poet of the stockade
  • Mr M. Carroll, the son of the man who took Peter Lalor down to Geelong, described how Lalor was taken to Father Smyth’s presbytery, where his arm was amputated.
  • Peter Lalor
  • Father Smyth
  • Mr John Manning, another stockader
  • Mr A. T. Arthur (mother and sister living on Eureka too)
  • Timothy Hayes
  • Mr Marks
  • Mr W. Bourke, of Buniyong
  • Martin Diamond (name not John as on statue)
  • "Gentleman" Hynes
  • The Canadian Ross
  • A man named O’Neill, from Creswick, was shot near a tent - body burnt
  • A.W. Arnold of Avoca reminiscences mentioned
    • Mrs Hommer's Theatre on Red Hill
    • Frank Carey's restaurant
    • a black cook
    • Harry Jackson
    • Walter Howson
    • Jim M'Gill's revolver corps
    • Captain Wise
    • Scott, a Canadian, killed
    • Bentley's Hotel burning
    • married at Bakery Hill by Rev John Potter

[174] Names Mentioned:

  • James Oddie
  • Peter Lalor
  • Mr Shields, of Princetown, who drove 130 miles in his buggy to be here
  • Mr Watts, of Warracknabeal, who claimed the honor of being the oldest colonist there — having landed in South Australia 68 years ago — and was the leader of the band of Creswick diggers, who started 2000 strong to march into Ballarat to help the Ballarat men, but arrived with only 400 men
  • Larry Higgins
  • Mr. Green, a stockader from Maryborough

[175] Names mentioned

  • Mr. Henry James, aged 78, of Geelong, an old Stockader
  • Mr. John Madden, of the Geelong railway, is also in Ballarat at present,

being granted a free pass by the Government. His father, Wm. Madden, arrived iu Victoria in the ship Mangertun in 1852, and was living with his family at the Black Hills, near Ballarat; for about two years previous to the riot. He and his two mates. Patsy Gettings and John Hines (both of whom were, afterwards killed by his side during the fight) had two rich claims on the Eureka Lead.

    • William Madden
    • John Madden son of William
    • James Madden son of William
    • Patsy Gettings killed
    • John Hines killed
    • blacksmith, who made the pikes lying dead
    • a Portuguese, who used to sell sherbet, etc., lying dead
    • Luke Sheehan, was wounded, and was afterwards sentenced to be shot
  • Mr. Gullan threw stone

[176] "EUREKA STOCKADE. The fiftieth anniversary of the Eureka Stockade, when the minors of Ballarat resisted by force the harsh regulations, was celebrated on Mon-day on many Australian goldfields including those of Western Australia. At Perth Montague Miller, a Eureka Stockade veteran, took part, and at Kalgoorlie three old men (Messrs. O'Brien, Knucky, and Macpherson), who either participated in the riot or who were in the Ballarat district at the time, gave their impressions of the stirring events of 1854. Re- solutions were carried expressing grateful re-membrance for those diggers who sacrificed their Iives in the cause of freodom, also that the Govemment be asked to have an authentic account of the Eureka Stockade placed in the school books of the State."

[177] Names mentioned; -Mr. J S O'Brien, who took part -in the rising -Messrs. A. J. McPherson and J. Knuckey, who were in Ballarat at the time of the rising, but not actual participants.

[178] Names mentioned; -Mr. J. Ashburner, from Armadale, who concealed Peter Lalor behind some slabs after he was wounded -Mr. J. W. Watts who led the Creswick contingent into Ballarat when Lalor was gathering his adherents within the stockade.

[179] Men mentioned:

  • James Oddie
  • E. Rankin (Beeac),
  • A, Sturrick (Melbourne),
  • J. Ashburner (Armadale),
  • N. Batty (Havelock),
  • A. Third (Bairnsdale),
  • J. O'Brien (Bald Hills),
  • C. Tropmf (Maryborough),
  • John Haig (Berringa),
  • E. Jones (Newport),
  • J. Murphy (Ganman, N.S.W.),
  • H. James (Geelong),
  • W. Dumbrill (Albury),
  • C. Knight (Lal Lal),
  • J. Earles (Ballarat),
  • W. Fisher (Creswick),
  • Beattie (Melbourne),
  • A. Osborne (Melbourne),
  • Jas. Long (Warrnambool),
  • J. Kays (Melbourne),
  • J. Watts (Warracknabeal),
  • J. Wyburd (Bathurst),
  • G. Shields (Camperdown),
  • J. Stewart (Kyneton),
  • M. O'Mahony (Gippsland),
  • J. Evans (Melbourne),
  • T. Manhallack (Brunswick),
  • G. G. Firman (Morwell),
  • J. Richardson (Wahgunyah),
  • D. Maine (Morwell),
  • J. Madden (Geelong),
  • J. Kemp (Morwell),
  • L. Holmes (Gippsland.)

"EUREKA STOCKADE. JUBILEE CELEBRATION. (Very long article with lots of details... summarised)

  • H. de Longville (took an active part in the reform movement, on sentry duty in the Stockade and on the approach of the troops gave the first alarm to Peter Lalor)
  • Lieutenant Kossack (a captain in the Hungarian Army, led the left flank of the police against the stockaders, and was one of the few officials in sympathy with the miners)
  • Chris. Christesen (a member of the Ballarat Reform League, present from the firing of the first shot until the fall of the Stockade, succeeded in evading the troops)
  • W. G. Holmes (in the Stockade during the fight, and saw his brother fall dead in front of him)
  • William Atherden (in the Stockade, and was taken prisoner)
  • Duncan Clark (a member of Ross's corps. out scouting, but returned in time to assist to carry Ross, who was wounded to Irwin's Star Hotel)
  • Montagu Miller (as a boy reach-ed the Stockade after the soldiers had retired, and assisted the wounded and to bury the dead)
  • Arthur Curnick (work-ed as a boy in the blacksmith's shop in which the stockaders' pikes were forged, father and brother in the Stockade
  • James Madden (as a lad was present on the fateful morning with his father, who

was on duty)

  • John Williams (a member of the Reform League, present at the monster meeting, when the licences were burned)
  • W. R. Taylor (a prominent Chartist in the ranks of the Bendigo Re-form League)
  • John Hall (as a lad was present at the site on the morning of the affray)
  • John Greenwell (when a boy was; present at the meeting which preceded the tragic conclusion of the reform move-ment)
  • Matthew McCormick (pre-sent at the Stockade at the close of the fight)

[180]

Sources

  1. Past patterns & Future directions; Victoria Police and the problem of corruption and serious misconduct (the office of police integrity) Feb 2007 https://www.ibac.vic.gov.au/docs/default-source/reports/opi-report/past-patterns-future-directions---feb-2007.pdf?sfvrsn=dc586175_8
  2. Sydney Morning Herald, 19 December 1854, page 5 http://www.eurekapedia.org/Felix_Boyle
  3. Newspaper Article Mr. Ahern. Record (Emerald Hill, Vic. : 1881 - 1954), Sat 24 Dec 1927, p.8. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/164457229?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  4. Obituary Richard Allan. The Elmore Standard (Vic. : 1882 - 1911), Sat 2 Dec 1905, page 2. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/253493228?searchTerm=richard%20allan%20eureka%20veteran
  5. Critic (Adelaide, SA : 1897-1924), Wed 25 May 1904, page 7. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/211403728
  6. Family Notices (1918, July 18). Daily Herald (Adelaide, SA : 1910 - 1924), p. 4. Retrieved June 29, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106517119
  7. Family Notices (1918, July 18). Daily Herald (Adelaide, SA : 1910 - 1924), p. 2. Retrieved June 29, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106516933
  8. EUREKA STOCKADE (at 50 years anniversary) Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 10 Dec 1904, p. 16. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/222540452?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  9. Obituary William Edward Atherden. The Independent (Deniliquin, NSW : 1901 - 1946), Fri 1 Jun 1934, p.8. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/102675941?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  10. Obituary William Edward Atherden. The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), Mon 14 May 1934, p.12. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/32991959?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  11. Obituary Capt. Peter Barker. Daily Standard (Brisbane, Qld. : 1912 - 1936), Sat 2 Feb 1924, p.10. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/178976056?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  12. Obituary - William J Barker. The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Thu 1 Mar 1923, p.2. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/180465167?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  13. The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950), Mon 30 Dec 1912, Page 1. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/79937836
  14. Newpaper article - J J Benham The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Mon 5 Dec 1904, page 4. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/5032288?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  15. Obituaries. (1919, May 3). Observer (Adelaide, SA : 1905 - 1931), p. 18. Retrieved September 23, 2022, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article164130779
  16. Death Index (Victoria Registry of Births Deaths & Marriages : accessed 23 Sep 2022). Index entry for Jno Jas BENHAM, Year: 1919; Parents: Benham Chas and Mary Ann HOARE; Spouse: -; Death Place: Brighton; Birth Place:  ; Age: 83; Reg. Number: 5025/1919
  17. The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wed 1 Nov 1911, Page 5. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/11628762
  18. Obituary George Bentley The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Wed 1 Nov 1911, p.4. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/217980124?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  19. Port Pirie Recorder and North Western Mail (SA : 1898 - 1918), Tue 11 Sep 1917, Page 2. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/95307970
  20. Victoria. (1905, April 28). The Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1871 - 1938), p. 30. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article100659567
  21. The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954, Tue 31 Oct 1854, page 3. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/12960661?searchTerm=hance%20scobie
  22. Obituary William Burns. The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), Mon 13 Nov 1911, p.2. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/221521868?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  23. Obituary - Mrs Jane Campbell. Bunbury Herald (WA : 1892 - 1919), Sat 12 Oct 1912, p.5. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/87152821?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  24. Newspaper Article - Esmond, Carboni, Goodenough. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Sat 8 Feb 1890, p.1. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/209579393?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  25. The Eureka Stockade. (1913, March 29). The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), p. 4. Retrieved May 31, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article19873940
  26. PERSONAL NOTES. (1918, August 23). The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), p. 8. Retrieved September 21, 2022, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article20248779
  27. Family Notices (1921, January 1). The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), p. 4. Retrieved September 21, 2022, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article20468363
  28. SERMON APPRECIATED (1928, September 26). The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), p. 11 (5 O'CLOCK CITY EDITION). Retrieved September 21, 2022, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article182781440
  29. Family Notices (1932, June 15). The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), p. 10. Retrieved September 21, 2022, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article21975835
  30. Death Registration Index, The State of Queensland, Department of Justice and Attorney-General, Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages; index entry for Louise Frances Cavanagh, Death date: 14 Jun 1932, Father: Robert Stark, Mother: Emma Griffin, Registration Number: 1932/B/17567; Link to Record : accessed 21 Sep 2022
  31. Obituary - Mary ann Carroll The Australian Worker (Sydney, NSW : 1913 - 1950), Thu 6 Nov 1913, p.5. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/145768601?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  32. GORDON. (1913, October 28). The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), p. 8. Retrieved September 20, 2022, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article215801472
  33. Crossed the Bar. (1913, November 1). Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), p. 26. Retrieved September 20, 2022, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222259106
  34. Death Index (Victoria Registry of Births Deaths & Marriages : accessed 20 Sep 2022). Index entry for Mary Ann CARROLL, Year: 1913; Parents: Unknown and Unknown UNKNOWN; Spouse: -; Death Place: Gordon; Birth Place:  ; Age: 85; Reg. Number: 13472/1913; Reg. Number: 13472/1913
  35. Marriage Index (Victoria Registry of Births Deaths & Marriages : accessed 20 Sep 2022). Index entry for COMMIFORD, Mary and CARROLL, William; Year: 1854, Reg. number: 3233/1854
  36. Birth Index (Victoria Registry of Births Deaths & Marriages : accessed 20 Sep 2022). Index entry for Francis Dalton CARROLL, Year: 1856; Parents: William and Mary Ann FAULKENER; Place: BALLARAT Reg. Number: 8189/1856
  37. Worker (Brisbane, Qld. : 1890 - 1955), Thu 17 Jul 1924, Page 6. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/71061715
  38. Newspaper article Mr J F Coleman. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Thu 17 Feb 1870, p.2. Retrieved June 29, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/219306215?searchTerm=eureka%20stockader
  39. Obituary J J Corran. Malvern Courier and Caulfield Mirror (Vic. : 1914 - 1917), Fri 1 Dec 1916, p.1. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/130659484?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  40. The Socialist (Melbourne, Vic. : 1906 - 1923), Fri 5 Dec 1913, Page 2. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/240678001
  41. The Forbes Advocate (NSW : 1911 - 1954), Fri 1 Nov 1912, Page 11. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/113856071
  42. The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Mon 28 Sep 1914, Page 3. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/241774312
  43. The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Mon 17 Jan 1921, Page 1. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242253868
  44. Death Notice Patrick Duggan The Riverine Grazier (Hay, NSW : 1873 - 1954), Fri 24 Aug 1917, page 4. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/140395920?searchTerm=Retrieved June 28, 2021, from eureka%20veteran
  45. Obituary Charles Dyte. The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Thu 28 Dec 1893, p.5. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/197189625?searchTerm=humffray
  46. Newspaper Article. Scobie murder trials. Bell's Life in Sydney and Sporting Reviewer (NSW : 1845 - 1860), Sat 2 Dec 1854, p.1. Retrieved 21 july 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/59759511?searchTerm=james%20scobie
  47. Ballarat Star, 09 June 1858
  48. Newspaper Article - Esmond, Carboni, Goodenough. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Sat 8 Feb 1890, p.1. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/209579393?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  49. Newspaper article Isaac Hayward The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 - 1918), Sat 3 Dec 1904, page 5. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/226688971?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  50. Newspaper article Mr Fletcher. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Thu 17 Feb 1870, p.2. Retrieved June 29, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/219306215?searchTerm=eureka%20stockader
  51. Obituary George Flewin. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Tue 7 Oct 1919, p.1. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/212670989?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  52. Page 16. http://classic.austlii.edu.au/au/journals/AUColLawMon/1883/2.pdf
  53. https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/foster-john-leslie-fitzgerald-vesey-3559
  54. https://archives.unimelb.edu.au/resources/keys-to-the-past/keys/key-2
  55. https://www.eurekaschildren.org.au/documents/Liberty_Oct_2018_(Issue%2066).pdf
  56. https://georgehiginbothamandeureka.net/principal-protagonists/
  57. AN OLD STOCKADER'S LETTER. (1907, December 20). The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950), p. 3 (THIRD EDITION). Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77319656
  58. Obituary Samuel Thomas Goldsmith (son of Eureka Stockader) The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Mon 21 Feb 1916, p.3. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/241387477?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  59. Newspaper Article - Esmond, Carboni, Goodenough. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Sat 8 Feb 1890, p.1. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/209579393?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  60. Obituary J W Graham. The Border Morning Mail and Riverina Times (Albury, NSW : 1903 - 1920), Thu 21 Jul 1910, p.4. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/111382136?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  61. Newspaper article Mr J F Coleman. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Thu 17 Feb 1870, p.2. Retrieved June 29, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/219306215?searchTerm=eureka%20stockader
  62. Obituary - Michael Grey The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Fri 1 Aug 1924, p.6. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/213533996?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  63. Obituary Walter Russell Hall. Daily Advertiser (Wagga Wagga, NSW : 1911 - 1954), Mon 23 Oct 1911, p.3. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/142485845?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  64. Newspaper Article - Eureka 1st Anniversary - Seekamp, Hambrook, Nicholls, O;Meara, Hayes, McGill, Lessman, Lynch The Star (Ballarat, Vic. : 1855 - 1864), Thu 4 Dec 1856, p.3. Reteived 29 June 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/66040013?searchTerm=eureka%20stockade
  65. The Bathurst Times (NSW : 1909 - 1925), Mon 30 Mar 1914, Page 4. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/111497538
  66. Newspaper Article John Hanley. The Elmore Standard (Vic. : 1882 - 1911), Sat 3 Feb 1906, p.4. Retrieved 8 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/262590518?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  67. Eureka Australia website - Michael Hanrahan. Retrieved 12 July 20221, from https://www.eurekaaustralia.org.au/maurice-hanrahan.html
  68. Newspaper article Isaac Hayward The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 - 1918), Sat 3 Dec 1904, page 5. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/226688971?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  69. Obituary George Hartley Gordon, Egerton and Ballan Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Fri 19 Mar 1915, p.4. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/129417786?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  70. Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954), Sat 15 May 1909, Page 7. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/45071216
  71. Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918), Fri 30 Apr 1909, Page 4. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/225038311
  72. Newspaper article - James Hodges. The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Thu 29 Jul 1915, p.1. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242347309?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  73. Obituary Robert Holberry. The Ballarat Courier (Vic. : 1869 - 1884; 1914 - 1918, Wed 15 Jul 1914. p.9. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/73310527?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  74. Obituary Henry Thomas Holyoake. The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Tue 25 Jan 1881, p.1. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/204049233?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  75. Newspaper Article Humffray. The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Wed 28 Nov 1855, p.6. Retrieved June 29, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/154866977?searchTerm=eureka%20stockader
  76. Obituary John Basson Humffray. The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Thu 19 Mar 1891, p.5. Retreived 29 June 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/201460628?searchTerm=humffray
  77. Obituary John Basson Humffray. Mount Alexander Mail (Vic. : 1854 - 1917), Fri 20 Mar 1891, p.2. Retreived 29 June 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/199630858?searchTerm=humffray
  78. Funeral report J B Humffray. The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Fri 20 Mar 1891, p.6. Retreived 29 June 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/201452331?searchTerm=humffray
  79. PEOPLE. (1906, January 13). Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article44489376
  80. The Argus, 3 June 1899
  81. Obituary George Johnson. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Tue 2 Mar 1920, p.6. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/212058473?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  82. Newspaper Article John & Thomas Jones. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Fri 13 Apr 1917, p.4. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/154800258?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  83. Newspaper Article John & Thomas Jones. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Fri 13 Apr 1917, p.4. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/154800258?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  84. Newspaper article Isaac Hayward The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 - 1918), Sat 3 Dec 1904, page 5. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/226688971?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  85. Alexander Henry King mentioned in a much larger article (details of immigration might match with trooper John King of Eureka) The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Wed 30 Dec 1885, page 3. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/206305604?searchTerm=eureka%20John%20King
  86. Newspaper article Mrs. Thomas Kirby. The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Mon 9 Apr 1917, p.2. Retrieved June 26, 2021, fromhttps://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/241705074?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  87. The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Tue 11 Oct 1910, Page 5. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/241986784
  88. Obituary The death of a Veteran - Peter Lalor. The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Mon 11 Feb 1889, page 5. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/196997065?searchTerm=vagabond
  89. Obituary The late Peter Lalor - The Lilydale Express (Vic. : 1886 - 1897 ; 1914 - 1920), Wed 13 Feb 1889, page 3. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/252162590/28057594
  90. Obituary Patrick Leahy. Lithgow Mercury (NSW : 1898 - 1954), Wed 14 Aug 1912, p.1. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/218733034?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  91. Obituary Patrick Leahy. The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Tue 30 Jul 1912, p.8. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/241633797?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  92. EUREKA STOCKADER'S DEATH. (1908, April 1). The North Western Advocate and the Emu Bay Times (Tas. : 1899 - 1919), p. 3. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64839798
  93. Newspaper Article - Eureka 1st Anniversary - Seekamp, Hambrook, Nicholls, O;Meara, Hayes, McGill, Lessman, Lynch The Star (Ballarat, Vic. : 1855 - 1864), Thu 4 Dec 1856, p.3. Reteived 29 June 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/66040013?searchTerm=eureka%20stockade
  94. A EUREKA STOCKADER (1910, June 19). The Sun (Kalgoorlie, WA : 1898 - 1929), p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article211132446
  95. The Horsham Times (Vic. : 1882 - 1954), Fri 23 Jan 1920, Page 5. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/73189060
  96. The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Sat 31 Mar 1906, Page 28. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/139181832
  97. Obituary John Lynch Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative (NSW : 1890 - 1954), Thu 5 Apr 1906, page 23. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/157627071?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  98. Death Notice John Lynch. Western Star and Roma Advertiser (Toowoomba, Qld. : 1875 - 1948), Wed 28 Mar 1906, p.2. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/97411221?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  99. Newspaper Article - Eureka 1st Anniversary - Seekamp, Hambrook, Nicholls, O;Meara, Hayes, McGill, Lessman, Lynch The Star (Ballarat, Vic. : 1855 - 1864), Thu 4 Dec 1856, p.3. Reteived 29 June 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/66040013?searchTerm=eureka%20stockade
  100. Newspaper Article Days of Eureka Stockade - SOLDIER, POET, REBEL. The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), Sun 8 Feb 1925, p.16. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/222935788?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  101. Daily Mercury (Mackay, Qld. : 1906 - 1954), Fri 8 Jul 1927, Page 7. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/173771261
  102. Newspaper article Isaac Hayward The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 - 1918), Sat 3 Dec 1904, page 5. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/226688971?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  103. Newspaper Article Mrs Suzannah Mansfield. Sydney Mail (NSW : 1912 - 1938), Wed 19 Sep 1934, p.7. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/166108105/17072794
  104. Newspaper article - Issa Mattson. The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Fri 23 Mar 1917, p.2. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/241703636?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  105. Obituary Isaac Mattson. The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Fri 28 Sep 1917, p.4. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242471926?searchTerm=mattson%20eureka%20veteran
  106. Death notice McKee. Melbourne Punch (Vic. : 1855 - 1900), Thu 6 May 1897, page 6. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/174625768?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  107. The Ararat Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Tue 13 Oct 1914, Page 3. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/74238567
  108. Obituary Donald McDougall. The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Thu 8 Oct 1914, p.4. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/241775137?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  109. NEWS AND NOTES - The Ballarat Star newspaper (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Sat 12 Jan 1884, page 2. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/201621260
  110. Newspaper Article - Eureka 1st Anniversary - Seekamp, Hambrook, Nicholls, O;Meara, Hayes, McGill, Lessman, Lynch The Star (Ballarat, Vic. : 1855 - 1864), Thu 4 Dec 1856, p.3. Reteived 29 June 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/66040013?searchTerm=eureka%20stockade
  111. PERSONAL. (1909, August 24). Zeehan and Dundas Herald (Tas. : 1890 - 1922), p. 4. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article85606654
  112. Obituary George McGrath Queensland Times (Ipswich, Qld. : 1909 - 1954), Mon 9 Aug 1909, page 5. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/112059917?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  113. Obituary Tobias McGrath. The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Thu 6 Apr 1916, p.3. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/241391612?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  114. Newspaper article Mr McIntyre. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Thu 17 Feb 1870, p.2. Retrieved June 29, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/219306215?searchTerm=eureka%20stockader
  115. Newspaper article Kenneth McKenzie. The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Thu 12 Apr 1917, p.9. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242690178?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  116. Newspaper article Kenneth McKenzie. Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 14 Apr 1917, p.9. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/121152024?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  117. Obituary Alfred M'Lachlan. Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 - 1918; 1925), Thu 18 Apr 1912, p.6. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/175616517?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  118. Obituary Michael McMullen Bendigonian (Bendigo, Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Thu 5 Jul 1917, p.22. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/90856827?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  119. Newspaper Article - The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Sat 3 Dec 1904, p.8. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/208878539?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  120. PERSONAL ITEMS (1906, July 16). The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), p. 2. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article210679722
  121. Death Notice W H Michael Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 4 May 1907, page 19. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/221255888?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  122. The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Fri 19 Nov 1920, Page 1. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242248317
  123. Cairns Post (Qld. : 1909 - 1954), Tue 21 Jan 1919, Page 4. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/40386443
  124. Truth (Brisbane, Qld. : 1900 - 1954), Sun 28 Nov 1920, Page 9. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/204031927
  125. Worker (Brisbane, Qld. : 1890 - 1955, Thu 25 Nov 1920, Page 11. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/71048210
  126. AN OLD PIONEER. (1913, January 10). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 10. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15389440
  127. Telegrams. A EUREKA STOCKADER. (1913, January 11). Cairns Post (Qld. : 1909 - 1954), p. 8. Retrieved May 31, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39923499
  128. Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Fri 19 Feb 1904, Page 3. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/153920924
  129. News article - Charles Mullaly. The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Tue 18 Nov 1919, p.8. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242641898?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  130. newspaper recollection Charles Nicholas The Elmore Standard (Vic. : 1882 - 1911), Sat 3 Feb 1906, page 4. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/262590518?searchTerm=richard%20allan%20eureka%20veteran
  131. Obituary - M F Neylon. Cobden Times and Heytesbury Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Wed 5 Apr 1916, p.2. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/135692637?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  132. Obituary H R Nicholls. The Murchison Times and Day Dawn Gazette (Cue, WA : 1894 - 1925), Tue 20 Aug 1912, p.4. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/233494468?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  133. Newspaper Article - Eureka 1st Anniversary - Seekamp, Hambrook, Nicholls, O;Meara, Hayes, McGill, Lessman, Lynch The Star (Ballarat, Vic. : 1855 - 1864), Thu 4 Dec 1856, p.3. Reteived 29 June 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/66040013?searchTerm=eureka%20stockade
  134. Daily Herald (Adelaide, SA : 1910 - 1924), Sat 31 Dec 1921, Page 5. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/106641700
  135. Death Notice James Nolan. Camperdown Chronicle (Vic. : 1877 - 1954), Thu 7 Sep 1905, p.4. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/30352905?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  136. Obituary James Nolan. Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Wed 6 Sep 1905, p.6. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/89589539?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  137. Newspaper article Jas Oddie. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Tue 18 Apr 1916, p.1. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/154539131?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  138. PERSONAL (1904, June 25). Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 19. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article111299217
  139. The Eureka Stockade - Kalgoorlie Western Argus (WA : 1896 - 1916), Tue 6 Dec 1904, p.30. Retrieved June 26, 2021. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/32744166?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  140. Obituary Patrick O'Meara The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Thu 28 Oct 1915, p.4. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/241689937?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  141. Newspaper Article - Eureka 1st Anniversary - Seekamp, Hambrook, Nicholls, O;Meara, Hayes, McGill, Lessman, Lynch The Star (Ballarat, Vic. : 1855 - 1864), Thu 4 Dec 1856, p.3. Reteived 29 June 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/66040013?searchTerm=eureka%20stockade
  142. Ninian Paton - Biography - The Sun newspaper (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), Thu 17 Jan 1935, page 21. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/230276619
  143. Creswick Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Fri 28 Dec 1917, Page 2. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/132688431
  144. The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Sat 9 Feb 1924 , Page 6. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/243757081
  145. Newspaper Article John Lishman Potter. Queensland Times (Ipswich, Qld. : 1909 - 1954), Fri 26 Jul 1929, p.5. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/118484314?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  146. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/107601678?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  147. The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Sat 18 Nov 1922, Page 11. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/243786423
  148. The Ballarat Courier (Vic. : 1869 - 1884; 1914 - 1918), Sat 12 Oct 1918, Page 11. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/73540937
  149. Obituary Mrs Elizabeth Mary Richards. The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 - 1950), Mon 19 Apr 1920, p.3. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/79580451?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  150. Newspaper article John Richardson. Benalla Standard (Vic. : 1901 - 1931), Fri 9 Jan 1914, p.2. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/155590393?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  151. Newspaper Article Eugene Ashly Smith. Worker (Brisbane, Qld. : 1890 - 1955), Wed 9 Nov 1932, p.2. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/71032678?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  152. Obituary Archibald William Stout. Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954), Thu 4 Jul 1940, p.6. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/139378547?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  153. Newspaper article - Victoria. . The Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1871 - 1938), (1905, April 28), p. 30. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article100659567
  154. Newspaper article - Chas Sublet The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 - 1918), Tue 17 Jan 1905, page 3. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/227776828?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  155. Obituary John William Sweetnam. Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 27 Jun 1914, p.26. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/121132225?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  156. Newspaper Article E Syme. The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Wed 28 Nov 1855, p.6. Retrieved June 29, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/154866977?searchTerm=eureka%20stockader
  157. Obituary - J Wallace Thomson. The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Sat 29 May 1886, p.1. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/9122547?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell#
  158. Obituary Henry C Thorburn. Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954), Tue 6 Aug 1912, p.2. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/45223245?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  159. Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), Wed 5 Jul 1922, Page 7. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/118848453
  160. Obituary Patrick Tully. Smith's Weekly (Sydney, NSW : 1919 - 1950), Sat 9 Sep 1922, p.23. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/234282057?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  161. Frederick Vern - Rioting. Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918) View title info, Mon 30 Jun 1856, page 3. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/88051045
  162. Obituary Geo. Thomas Wallace. The Riverine Grazier (Hay, NSW : 1873 - 1954), Fri 6 Feb 1914, p.4. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/140271156?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  163. Newspaper article Eureka Ward. The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 - 1954), Thu 12 Apr 1917, p.9. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/242690178?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  164. Newspaper article Eureka Ward. Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 14 Apr 1917, p.9. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/121152024?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  165. Obituary Harry Watson. The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Thu 20 May 1915, p.2. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/241673536?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  166. WARRACKNABEAL. (1904, November 23). The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), p. 6. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article208877639
  167. Newspaper article Mr Westerby. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Thu 17 Feb 1870, p.2. Retrieved June 29, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/219306215?searchTerm=eureka%20stockader
  168. THE SAMOAN COMPLICATIONS (1899, April 15). The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 - 1918), p. 2. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180895111
  169. The Evening Echo (Ballarat, Vic. : 1914 - 1918), Wed 20 Mar 1918, Page 1. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/241733780
  170. Mention of Theophilus Williams at Eureka Stockade. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Fri 1 May 1896, page 1. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/207485111?searchTerm=eureka%20John%20King
  171. Obituary John William Wilson Northern Standard (Darwin, NT : 1921 - 1955), Tue 3 May 1927, p.4. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/48033126?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  172. Obituary Mrs Elizabeth Wilson. The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Fri 23 Mar 1923, p.2. Retrieved 7 July 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/213547509?searchTerm=eureka%20James%20Campbell
  173. THE EUREKA ANNIVERSARY (1904, December 2). The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), p. 5. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article208878484
  174. PIONEERS’ SMOKE NIGHT. (1904, December 6). The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article208878722
  175. THE EUREKA STOCKADE. (1904, December 7). Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1859 - 1929), p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article148216741
  176. Eureka Stockade Anniversary The Clarence River Advocate (NSW : 1898 - 1949), Fri 9 Dec 1904, page 5. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/121396104?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  177. ANA. - Kalgoorlie Western Argus (WA : 1896 - 1916), Tue 1 Nov 1904, p. 10. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/32743064?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  178. About people - The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 - 1918), Tue 6 Dec 1904, p. 3. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/226684788?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  179. EUREKA STOCKADE Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 10 Dec 1904, p. 16. Retrieved June 26, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/222540452?searchTerm=eureka%20veteran
  180. Newspaper Article JUBILEE CELEBRATION. The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), Mon 5 Dec 1904, p.3. Retrieved June 28, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/25368530?searchTerm=atherden




Collaboration
  • Login to edit this profile and add images.
  • Private Messages: Send a private message to the Profile Manager. (Best when privacy is an issue.)
  • Public Comments: Login to post. (Best for messages specifically directed to those editing this profile. Limit 20 per day.)


Comments: 1

Leave a message for others who see this profile.
There are no comments yet.

Categories: Eureka Stockade