upload image

Fitz Randolph Brickwalls

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Date: [unknown] [unknown]
Location: Globalmap
Surnames/tags: Fitz Randolph FitzRandolph Fitz-Randolph
This page has been accessed 216 times.

Contents

Fitz Randolph One Name Study

This is a research page of the Fitz Randolph One Name Study. Click this link to return to Study's Fitz Randolph Traditions home page.

Members helping to develop this page

Members who have contributed

Fitz Randolph Brickwalls

This page of the Fitz Randolph One Name Study highlights brickwalls that Fitz Randolph descendants have encountered in confirming their link back to Edward Fitz Randolph. By sharing information and working together, we may be able to find clues or devise strategies to break through those walls. There may also be cases of links that have been identified that we are not fully convinced about, and this would be an opportunity to review them carefully together. Please help identify any brickwalls that you have come across and post them here -- and feel free to make suggestions how we might organize this page to be more useful and effective in helping to tackle them! And this is not a new idea: Trisha FitzRandolph initiated an exchange exactly on this topic that is now posted at the Spokt.com Fitz Randolph Hub over 15 years ago.

Some possible examples to confirm:

Buncombe County Randolphs

DNA has helped to confirm that descendants of Samuel Randolph of Buncombe County are in fact Fitz Randolphs, which in turn led to identifying the Samuel Randolph in question as Samuel Fitz Randolph, born in 1741 in New Jersey. Subsequent efforts have helped to strengthen the case for the link, but still relies on a certain amount of circumstantial evidence. See his profile (link) for more background and a number of outstanding issues. Does this merit more attention, and if so, what strategy could we take?

Elizabeth Randolph Tipton

Elizabeth, or 'Betsey', does not have parents yet identified. Based on her location, she looks suspiciously to be related to the Samuel Fitz Randolph branch. Researcher Allen Jensen is the manager of Elizabeth's wikitree profile and descends from Elizabeth. He has a few DNA matches that suggest a connection to that Fitz Randolph branch. To break down this brickwall, both the DNA and conventional genealogical evidence needs to be identified and firmed up.

Randall family connections

Another discovery with DNA has been the relationship of the descendants of Joseph S Randel born in 1803 in South Carolina to the Fitz Randolphs. As laid out from his wikitree profile, Joseph has been traced back to his grandfather Joseph Randel, suggested to be the son of Samuel Fitz Randolph Jr born 1694 and his wife Johanna Kinsey. As evident in Joseph Randel's profile, this specific link is still speculative and certainly merits additional investigation of both the paper trail and the dna evidence, i.e. whether dna can help strengthen the link to the Samuel Fitz Randolph Jr branch of the family.

Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1759-1847), Bath, Ohio

Researcher Randolph Stilson has been working on establishing the connection for his line back to Edward the Pilgrim. Here he explains the approach he has used with more details of the information he used to get to his conclusion, in a document posted on this page. Please comment and offer any advice or relevant information!

From Randolph Stilson, the owner of this brickwall:

One of the problems with any surname study is the multiple use of given names within a family group over many generations. A way of dealing with the confusion this causes, especially for the neophyte researcher is to create a chart or database that lists the known ancestors with the common given names with their dates (if known) and whatever parentage information is available. The object here is not necessarily to provide positive proof of lineage connection but to prove probability - this may mean providing a negative proof - that the cousins of the same given name are not direct descendants of the ancestor the researcher is attempting to prove a link to. I have attempted to do just this with the set of Jonathan Fitz Randolph cousins who started appearing in the third generation after the arrival of Edward and Elizabeth (Blossom) Fitz Randolph in the British New England colonies, the generation that would be their grandchildren.

The idea is to look at the available data (such as genealogical publications, census information, local histories, etc.) and eliminate those individuals who are clearly not the link ancestor in order to reduce the field of individuals that could be the link ancestor. By continuously winnowing out those who don't fit the time or place requirements that fall within the specifications of the known ancestor (birth for example), the field of possible links to the most probable ancestor can be determined.

For example: Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1702-1766) is known to have died intestate as a citizen of Woodbridge, Middlesex County, New Jersey - his son-in-law Benijah Daniels being his principal creditor was assigned as estate administrator. Benijah's spouse was Susannah Fitz Randolph (1727-?). Since she is known to have been the child of Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1702-1766) and Margaret Manning (1701-?) we can dismiss the Susannah Fitz Randolph that was the daughter of Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1692-1783) and Mary Bonham (1691-?) as being irrelevant to the search for any missing link involving Susannah Fitz Randolph (1727-?).

Case in point: Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1732-?), Susannah's youngest brother and youngest child of Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1702-1766) and Margaret Manning. He has a second cousin Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1722-1799), son of Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1692-1783) and Mary Bonham (1701-?) and a second cousin once removed Jonathan (b. 1755) son of Malachi Fitz Randolph the older brother of Jonathan (1722-1799). We are attempting to determine a connection between any of these Jonathans and Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1759-1847) of Bath, Summit County, Ohio.

First we eliminate consideration of all the female Fitz Randolphs of the three generations which include Edward and Elizabeth (Blossom) Fitz Randolph's daughters since their children's surnames in most cases are no longer Fitz Randolph. We examine each of the children of the immigrant ancestors to see who bore children named Jonathan and note (if provided) their birth dates and places. Next we check resources to determine if there is primary documentation that can eliminate branches of the family for not containing Jonathans as children. This should leave a set of individual parents who did have a child named Jonathan.

With this set established we then note birth dates and places, marriage dates and places - to see if any of the Jonathans in the set are old enough or have married in time and in the place given for the birth of the child so that any that don't meet these criteria can be eliminated as potential parents.

Now it is true that the male parent may not actually have been a Jonathan - and in the case cited above there is a possibility that the eldest brother of Jonathan (1732-?) , James (1725-?) may have been the father of the Jonathan (1759-1847) we are seeking to link to Edward Fitz Randolph as a ggg grandson. There are also individual Fitz Randolph children in each generation who disappear and could potentially be the actual link between the known ancestor and the immigrant ancestor. This is perhaps where the use of genetics comes into play. But generally, by following a similar research strategy as described should make a chink in the brick wall which may lead to the wall's collapse. The strategy will at least help identify where the DNA tests should look first to find the link.

Additional notes and updates:

Other proposals ???





Collaboration
  • Login to edit this profile and add images.
  • Private Messages: Send a private message to the Profile Manager. (Best when privacy is an issue.)
  • Public Comments: Login to post. (Best for messages specifically directed to those editing this profile. Limit 20 per day.)
Comments: 1

Leave a message for others who see this profile.
There are no comments yet.
Login to post a comment.
One of the problems with any surname study is the multiple use of given names within a family group over many generations. A way of dealing with the confusion this causes, especially for the neophyte researcher is to create a chart or database that lists the known ancestors with the common given names with their dates (if known) and whatever parentage information is available. The object here is not necessarily to provide positive proof of lineage connection but to prove probability - this may mean providing a negative proof - that the cousins of the same given name are not direct descendants of the ancestor the researcher is attempting to prove a link to.

I have attempted to do just this with the set of Jonathan Fitz Randolph cousins who started appearing in the third generation after the arrival of Edward and Elizabeth (Blossom) Fitz Randolph in the British New England colonies, the generation that would be their grandchildren.

The idea is to look at the available data (such as genealogical publications, census information, local histories, etc.) and eliminate those individuals who are clearly not the link ancestor in order to reduce the field of individuals that could be the link ancestor. By continuously winnowing out those who don't fit the time or place requirements that fall within the specifications of the known ancestor (birth for example), the field of possible links to the most probable ancestor can be determined.

For example: Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1702-1766) is known to have died intestate as a citizen of Woodbridge, Middlesex County, New Jersey - his son-in-law Benijah Daniels being his principal creditor was assigned as estate administrator. Benijah's spouse was Susannah Fitz Randolph (1727-?). Since she is known to have been the child of Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1702-1766) and Margaret Manning (1701-?) we can dismiss the Susannah Fitz Randolph that was the daughter of Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1692-1783) and Mary Bonham (1691-?) as being irrelevant to the search for any missing link involving Susannah Fitz Randolph (1727-?).

Case in point: Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1732-?), Susannah's youngest brother and youngest child of Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1702-1766) and Margaret Manning. He has a second cousin Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1722-1799), son of Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1692-1783) and Mary Bonham (1701-?) and a second cousin once removed Jonathan (b. 1755) son of Malachi Fitz Randolph the older brother of Jonathan (1722-1799). We are attempting to determine a connection between any of these Jonathans and Jonathan Fitz Randolph (1759-1847) of Bath, Summit County, Ohio.

First we eliminate consideration of all the female Fitz Randolphs of the three generations which include Edward and Elizabeth (Blossom) Fitz Randolph's daughters since their children's surnames in most cases are no longer Fitz Randolph. We examine each of the children of the immigrant ancestors to see who bore children named Jonathan and note (if provided) their birth dates and places. Next we check resources to determine if there is primary documentation that can eliminate branches of the family for not containing Jonathans as children. This should leave a set of individual parents who did have a child named Jonathan.

With this set established we then note birth dates and places, marriage dates and places - to see if any of the Jonathans in the set are old enough or have married in time and in the place given for the birth of the child so that any that don't meet these criteria can be eliminated as potential parents.

Now it is true that the male parent may not actually have been a Jonathan - and in the case cited above there is a possibility that the eldest brother of Jonathan (1732-?) , James (1725-?) may have been the father of the Jonathan (1759-1847) we are seeking to link to Edward Fitz Randolph as a ggg grandson. There are also individual Fitz Randolph children in each generation who disappear and could potentially be the actual link between the known ancestor and the immigrant ancestor. This is perhaps where the use of genetics comes into play. But generally, by following a similar research strategy as described should make a chink in the brick wall which may lead to the wall's collapse. The strategy will at least help identify where the DNA tests should look first to find the link.

posted by Randolph Stilson