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George Cleeve Information

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The following apparent extraction from Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine. (Little, G.T. Burrage, H.S., Stubbs, A.R. New York: Lewis Historical Pub; 1909) was removed from the profile of George Cleeve (abt.1586-1667)


CLEAVES Cleve, Cleeves and Clive, variously spelled, is derived from local names. Parishes of this name are found in the counties of Gloucester, Somerset and Worcester. The Cleve coat-of-arms is : A wolf's head erased per pale dancette art sable. The family bearing this armorial has its seat in Walford, county Salop. Another ancient armorial of the family is: Argent an escarbuncle sable. The following is used by the family at Huxley, Chester, who descend from the Clives of Syche : Argent on a fesse between three wolves' heads erased sable as many mullets or. Crest : A griffin passant with wings endorsed ducally gorged or. The London family has the same device. A coat-of-arms in general use, perhaps the original of the above : Argent on a fesse between three foxes heads erased sable, as many mullets or. Crest : A fox's head erased sable. (I) George Cleeves, the first of the name in this country, was born in England about 1576, and came from Plymouth in Devonshire in 1630 and settled first at Spurwink, or Scarborough, Maine. After two years he moved farther eastward and is said to have been the first settler at Falmouth, now the city of Portland, drawn thither, it is said, by the magnificent harbor. He served on the grand jury in 1640. He united with Richard Tucker, of Saco, both in trade and land speculation, "thereby promoting great discord among patentees." Cleeves and Tucker took a lease of fifteen hundred acres of land, including Hog Island in Casco Bay, from Sir Ferdinando Gorges, the patentee of Maine, January 27, 1636. They conveyed Hog Island by lease to Alexander Rigby, May 23, 1643. George Cleeves granted to Edward Rigby a thousand acres near Casco Bay. Cleeves sold a lot at Saco, both in trade and land speculation, "thereby promoting great discord among patentees." Cleeves and Tucker took a lease of fifteen hundred acres of land, including Hog Island in Casco Bay, from Sir Ferdinando Gorges, the patentee of Maine, January 27, 1636. They conveyed Hog Island by lease to Alexander Rigby, May 23, 1643. George Cleeves granted to Edward Rigby a thousand acres near Casco Bay. Cleeves sold a lot at Black Point, September 30, 1648, to Henry Watts; one hundred acres to Nicholas Bart- lett, on Falmouth Neck, adjoining land of Cleeves and his son-in-law, Michael Britton: to Michael Mitton a tract fronting Casco river from Mitton's dwelling house to land of Richard Tucker, Falmouth Neck, on Back Cove, May 1, 1658; to Nathaniel Mitton fifty acres on Back Cove, May 20, 1658; to John Bush four hundred acres at Cape Porpoise, May 14, 1661 ; to Hope Allen four hundred acres at Falmouth ; to Michael Britton a tract at Casco Bay, February 24, 1650; to Thomas Kimball, Hog Island, in Casco Bay, May 15, 1658; grants to various neighbors to establish bounds April 12, 1664. Cleeves was admitted a freeman in 1658; was deputy to the general court in 1663. He died in 1667, probably very old, as his wife Joan, who died in 1663, was eighty- seven. (See histories of Willis and Folsom, Winthrop i., p. 237, ii., p. 256; Sullivan, 312- 16.) Cleeves had a daughter Elizabeth, who cruel death of any of the innocent victims of the Rev. Cotton Mather and his fellow persecutors during the witchcraft delusion.





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