Headrick_Chapel_Cemetery.jpg

Headrick Chapel Cemetery, Sevier County, Tennessee

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Date: 25 Jan 2019 [unknown]
Location: Sevier County, Tennesseemap
Surnames/tags: Cemeteries Headrick
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About

This free space page for Headrick Chapel Cemetery is part of WikiTree's Tennessee Cemeteries Project, and was created to document the life and times of our ancestors that are interred there. The Tennessee Cemeteries Project is a subproject of the larger U.S. Cemeteries Project.


Cemetery name: Headrick Chapel Cemetery

Address: Sevierville, Sevier County, Tennessee

GPS Coordinates: 35.7003, -83.6792


Information: Headrick Chapel is a beautiful small church and cemetery in a pastoral setting in Wears Valley in rural Sevier County. This church and cemetery is located on Wears Valley Road between Pigeon Forge, TN and Townsend, TN within a rock's throw of the Blount/Sevier county line. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

An excerpt from Wears Valley Chamber of Commerce:

"While religion and churches had an important role in people’s daily lives, they also served a role in honoring those during the somber occasions of funerals. Throughout the 19th century funerals were held near the valley’s western part at Headrick Cemetery. Instead of holding a service inside the church, people found it more convenient to convene at the cemetery location. The most prominent spot at this cemetery was a large oak tree that provided shelter for the people attending. This became difficult at times, since the weather would not always cooperate, driving a need to hold a funeral service indoors; especially in 1902, when a severe thunderstorm took down the tree, apparently, with a lightning strike. This led to the long-awaited building of a chapel, known simply as the Headrick Chapel. The chapel–like the Bethlehem Church–was shared by the faiths of Baptists and Methodists. Both would honor the deceased by ringing the church bell once for every year of life that person lived. It is a tradition that has been carried on by generations of folks and is still done today. This has led to the Headrick Chapel’s recognition of being placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001."





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