upload image

Jane Andrews / Mackworth and her Husbands

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Date: [unknown] [unknown]
Location: Falmouth, Massachusetts Bay Colonymap
Surname/tag: Andrews / Mackworth
Profile manager: Bertram Sluys private message [send private message]
This page has been accessed 82 times.

Jane (Unknown) Mackworth (abt.1605-aft.1676)

Samuel Andrews (abt.1598-bef.1638)

Arthur Mackworth (abt.1598-abt.1658)

Contents

Jane & Samuel Andrews from London

We don't know Jane's maiden name. We know she would have married Samuell Androwes / Andrews around 1624 in the London area, possibly in the St James Garlickhithe church since that's where 4 of 5 of their oldest children were baptized. We found no record of their marriage. It's likely Jane was originally from the London area.

Samuel's last name normally appears as Androwes in records before he immigrated. That's the way it was normally spelled in St James Garlickhithe church in London. However, it appears in his son Samuel's record as Andrewes, and also in his daughter Rebecca's baptism record (she was baptized in a different church). These spellings were used interchangeably for the same name.

Some documents list Samuel as a draper, others as a dyer. Records tell us he came from London. The family lived in Shepherd's Alley in London in the parish of St Andrews Garlickhithe. Samuel was examined on April 14, 1635 at London for passage to New England.

Samuel Andrews' family history in the new world is difficult to trace because early records from the Saco and Falmouth areas are meagre. Samuel Andrews was a citizen of London who arrived in the new world on April 14 1635 on the ship the Increase with his wife Jane and children Jane, 3, and Elizabeth, 2, and a servant named Elen Longe, aged 20. His son James is missing from this record - the best explanation is that it was accidentally forgotten. It's not uncommon for mistakes to appear in lists like this. Samuel settled first in Biddeford and was taxed there in 1636. He then built a house in Saco and lived there.[1]

Samuel and his family were members of the Church of England, as were most people in Maine. They brought their certificates of conformity with them to the new world. Occasionally worship services were held at his wife Jane's house.[2]

Samuell and Jane brought with them from London four books in one: a Geneva Bible, a Book of Common Prayer, a concordance and some paraphrases of the Psalms, printed around 1599. It now sits in the Houghton Library. Their first four children are listed in it: James (born Feb 2 1625), Rebecka (April 6 1628), Jane (Feb 26 1629), and Elizabeth (May 4 1632). This document confirms their older children.[3]

Samuel Andrews died before August 1, 1638 at which time there is a deed in which Jane is called "widow." This means he lived in the new world only about 3 years before he died.

Richard Vines deeded and rented land to the widow Jane Andrews. August 1 1639 is the first known deed for 100 acres west of the Saco River. By this time she had married for a 2nd time.[4]The others seem to be confirmations of the same deed, such as on June 22 1654. On April 22 1657, Jane Andrews widow of Samuell Andrews wrote an indenture with Richard Vines. Both were from Sacoe. Vines rented Jane and her heirs the 100 acres on the Sacoe River next to the 4 acres Samuell had built a house on and fenced in, and also the marsh land with it where they could cut hay for the cows and fish and fowl. Rent was 12 pence on every feast of St. Michael the Archangel.[5]


Samuel Andrews' Family

We are very fortunate to know where Samuel Andrews came from - it's something we don't know for many other people coming to America from England in the mid 1600's. However, his parents have remained very elusive. There are several family trees for Samuel Andrews that have questionable people listed on them. One names his mother Elizabeth Grantham and his grandfather John Andrewes. It seems Elizabeth was from Derbyshire - this is highly unlikely. Another lists Benjamin Andrews as Samuel's father. The only Benjamin shown in London was married about 80 years too late.

The only Samuel Androwes I could find in England who was born about the right time was baptized on Dec 29 1694 in North Luffenham, Rutland, some distance from London. He has no parents listed. Anna was born the same year; several Williams died between 10 and 20 years later. One gets the feeling this family was well settled here and wouldn't have come from and returned to London. There was also a Samuell Androwes baptized by George Androwes on Nov 4 1617 in Dartmouth, Devon - this is much too late to be our Samuell, and most other first names here don't match our Samuel's family. There were also Andrews families in Yorkshire, Suffolk, Sussex and other areas not quite in London, but none makes sense to be our Samuel's family.

So we return to search the London records for Samuel. Several churches in London were destroyed in the Great Fire in 1666, and all their records with them. So many records are missing. It seems Samuel attended St. James Garlickhithe, which was destroyed but had baptism records that survived. St. James refers to St. James the great, and it was a pilgrim church on a route going all the way into Spain. There was a hythe, or landing place for ships, nearby where French merchants sold garlic, thus the rest of the name. His marriage record to Jane appears nowhere; there is no baptism record for a Samuel Andrews in London at the right time. So either these records were destroyed or several record keepers were very lax in their duties.

A few Samuel Andrews' appear in records that at first look possible to be our Samuel. Samuell Androwes was baptized by his father John on Nov 30 1567 in St. Giles without Cripplegate, London. But this is about 30 years too early. Samuel Androwes married Joane Payne on Jan 21 1605 in St Mary Magdalene Old Fish Street with St Gregory by St Paul, London[6] Marrying a Joane, it looks so close! But it's about 20 years too early. So is Samuel Androwes who married Agnes Pennistone on Aug 3 1602 in St. Botolph Aldgate, London. Neither one of these has children listed in London. Of course, it's always possible our Samuel's marriage to Jane was his 3rd marriage, and these really do represent our Samuel. But one would expect to find a mention of their age gap if this was true. Besides, age 48 seems rather old to start a spate of having 6 children over 10 years.

There were a few Samuel Andrews / Andrewes / Androwes baptizing children in London in the early 1600's. There was a Samuel Andrewes who baptized Margaret in 1610 and Samuel in 1616 in St. Dunstan in the East, London. Many others were baptizing children in the late 1600's and early 1700's. But the one with the correct children's names at the correct times baptized 4 of them in St James Garlickhithe.

Besides our Samuel's and Jane's children, the following were born in St. James Garlickhithe:

  • 1537, Oct 28: Margerye Androwes
  • 1537, Nov 14: John Androwes
  • 1551, Jan 14: Xpopher Androwe
  • 1562, Dec 20: Andrewe Androwes, father Andrew
  • 1580, Feb 8: Frauncis Androwes, father Willyam
  • 1582, Nov 4: Avics Androwes, father Willm
  • 1642, Sept: John, father William Androwes, mother Ann

Obviously there was an Androwes family here for at least a hundred years before Samuel and Jane baptized their children here. It's very likely they're family members. However, very few connections are given here. Thus we still have no confirmed relationships to our Samuel.

Xpofer is an unusual name; it is actually the name Christopher. There was an Xpofer Andrewes who died in Shaftesbury, Dorset in 1594. Others appear in Yorkshire, Rutland and counties surrounding London in the mid to late 1600's. I don't see any connection with them to our Samuel. Only one other Xpopher Andrews appears in London: baptizing his son Edward in 1611 in St. Giles Without Cripplegate - too late to be ours.


Jane and Arthur Macworth

Jane married 2 Arthur Mackworth (Macworth) around 1637. Arthur is considered to be the first settler in the Casco Bay area. Arthur Macworth was one of at least 9 households settled in the Falmouth area by 1640.

It's believed Arthur Mackworth came with Richard Vines to Saco in 1630. It is said that Arthur Macworth founded Casco / Casco Bay at the mouth of the Presumpscot River. He seems to have been the first settler living there, arriving there somewhere around 1632 and settled at the mouth of the Presumpscot River where he received a grant and built a house on what became known as Mackey's Point and Macky's Island some years before 1635. An Indian village named Menikoe was near his house.[7]

It's likely Macworth was married by the time he settled in Casco Bay, but we don't know the name of his first wife or children. He married 2 Jane, widow of Samuel Andrews, in 1637. They had at least 4 children. Arthur and John don't seem to have had any children since they aren't mentioned in Jane's will. Sarah married Abraham Adams and Rebecca married Nathaniel Wharfe. "the wife of Francis Neale" is also mentioned in Mackworth's will; this is Jane the daughter of Samuel and Jane.[8]

Mackworth was a very respectable man. He was the person appointed by Sir Ferdinando Gorges to deliver the possession of Casco Neck to Cleeves and Tucker in 1637. And he also acted as a magistrate for many years.

A deed from Richard Vines to Arthur Macworth on March 30 1635 says he grants the land on the east side of the river in Casco Bay which he already had been using for several years, on the point of land called Menickoe but now to be called Newton - 500 acres plus one small island. Instead of Newton, they came to be called Macworth's or Mackey's point and island.[9]

In 1636 George Cleeves went to England and got from Sir Ferdinando Gorges, who owned most of what is now Maine, for himself and others. These deeds leased the land to them for two thousand years for a total of one hundred pounds a year. Hogg Island was leased to Arthur Macworth.[10]

In 1637 Arthur Macworth was one of the witnesses of a deed given by Richard Vines of Saco to John Winter.[11]

There seems to have been a lot of political intrigue in Casco Bay in the 1630's and 1640's. Arthur Macworth was often put in charge of figuring things out and administering justice.

In 1637 Arthur Macworth and Arthur Brown were to make John Cousins "give full satisfaction to an Indian for a wrong done him."[12]

In September 1640 4 men testified that the river running by Mr. Arthur Macworthe's property was called the Casco River for up to seventeen years. However, Mr. George Cleeve called it the Pesumsca or Presumpscot River in his deeds since that is what the native Americans called it.[13]

John Winter and George Cleeves seemed to have an ongoing feud from the moment they arrived in the new world, vying for land and houses. In 1632 the courts sided with Winter in giving him fishing rights and ships. Most of his business was in beaver pelts, fish, pipe staves and oil. Winter then went after the land Cleeves owned in 1640; Cleeves won that case. Winter also had the only store house for trading pelts for liquor, powder, etc., and Winters got the good deal out of it.In 1640 there was a disagreement in which John Winters refused to pay Mackworth 8 shillings for beaver pelts, only 6 shillings.[14] Macworth ended up being one of the 4 arbitrators in a case on June 28 1641 in which Winters accused Cleeves of slandering him.[15]On june 26 1641 Arthur Macworth, plaintiff, declared that George Cleeves, defendant, had slandered John Winter "to the vtter dishonour and disgrace of the plaintiffe, and to the vtter subuertion and Ruine of him, his wife and children, for ever." He recommended that Cleeves be fined 1000 pounds."[16]

On April 28 1643 Arthur Macworth was one of three men appointed to look into accusations George Cleeves made against Richard Vines. It's believed Cleeves was trying to gain more power by destroying Vines' character. It seems while Cleeves was in England he made a petition in which he included Macworth and other planters without their permission or knowledge of it. They disclaimed it in court that October. Gov. Winthrop wouldn't accept the commission, and Macworth and Bode refused to act on it. Macworth ended up supporting Vines in the coming events. In 1647 Vines became deputy governor of the area.[17]

By 1653 Massachusetts had claimed most of what is now Maine. Several people stood against this, including Arthur Macworth and his friends Robert Jordan and Henry Jocelyn. They were firmly Church of England (Episcopalian); Massachusetts was decidedly Puritan. But it eventually became part of Massachusetts, and they were required to attend Puritan services. Robert Jordan was an Episcopalian priest; and he was reprimanded for baptizing Nathaniel Wallis' children in Mrs. Macworth's house in 1660.[18]

Mackworth died in 1657, leaving his wife's wisdom to decide how to dispose of his whole estate equally between their children and her children by Samuel. Her decisions were not contested.[19]


Jane Alone

Jane is the only woman listed as head of a household in the Falmouth area in the 1650's and 1660's. She did not marry again after her 2nd husband died. It must have taken a lot of strength to head a household in such a frontier area, and Jane seemed to have that strength. In 1658 a list of the inhabitants of Falmouth was made. Once again in 1675, a list was made - she was one of 40 heads of households.[20]This would indicate she was the only woman who was the head of a household, and she would have been living either by herself or with someone working the farm (a daughter and her husband or some hired hands).[21]

Jane Macworth appears on some petitions and documents - the only women listed on long lists of men of the area. In 1658 she appears on a list of men petitioning about Robert Jordan's saw mill activities.[22]The land Mr. Jordan was going to build saw mills on was just above Mrs. Macworth's property, adjoining the falls of Casco River. In 1668 Jane Mackworth widow appears on a list protesting about some men whose conduct had been terrible and so shouldn't have the right to vote: George Cleeves, who who broke his oath and is accused of forgery, Mr. Phipen who beat others and slandered the governor, and John Philips who lived with a woman he wasn't married to. The signers include Jane, her son James Andrews and her sons-in-law Francis Neale, Nathaniel Wharfe and George Felt.[23]

On March 28 1658 Jane gave to her daughter who married Frances Neal of Casco 100 acres by Frances' house and some marshland from her father. This would have been Jane by her first husband Samuell.[24]

On March 28 1658 Jane gave to her daughter Rebecca and her husband Nathaniel Wharff a tract of land from Rebecca's father.[25]

Some of Samuell's land in Winter Harbor, Saco was deeded to Joseph Bolles by Peter Hill on Oct 12 1659. Some of Jane's land was deeded to William Phillips by Roger Hill on Oct 8 1667.[26]No explanation is given as to why this land is deeded to William Phillips, just that he has the same terms Jane had. Jane may have decided to sell this land after Arthur died. After all, each property had its own house and farmland and why would she need two houses?

In 1666 Jane gave to her daughter Sarah and her husband Abraham Adams MacWorth Island, at 56 acres.[27]

When King Philip's War broke out, Jane joined her son James in moving to Boston. Several people lived in semi-protection on James' island, but we don't know if Jane and her son were among them. Some of her daughters were. They would definitely have been in Boston by October 1676 since Jane died in Boston before October 24 1676.[28]

Sources

  1. "The Andrews Family of Marblehead and Salem" (July 1950), Moriarty
  2. An Historical Sketch, Guide Book, and Prospectus of Cushing's Island, Casco ...By William Mitchell Sargent as found at [1]
  3. A Genealogist's Sketch-Book by Nat Taylor as found at [2]
  4. York Deeds, Volume 2 as found at [3]
  5. York Deeds, Volume 2 as found at [4]
  6. "England Marriages, 1538–1973 ", database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NKG1-LQX : 13 March 2020), Samuell Androwes, 1605.
  7. Documentary history of the state of Maine by Maine Historical Society Volume III, the Trelawny Papers. Publication date 1869 as found at [5]
  8. The History of Portland, from 1632 to 1864: With a Notice of Previous ... By William Willis as found at [6]
  9. The History of Portland, from 1632 to 1864: With a Notice of Previous ... By William Willis as found at [7]
  10. The History of Portland, from 1632 to 1864: With a Notice of Previous ... By William Willis as found at [8]
  11. Documentary history of the state of Maine by Maine Historical Society. cn Volume III as found at [9]
  12. The History of Portland, from 1632 to 1864: With a Notice of Previous ... By William Willis as found at [10]
  13. Documentary history of the state of Maine by Maine Historical Society. cn Volume III as found at [11]
  14. Documentary history of the state of Maine by Maine Historical Society. Volume III as found at [12]
  15. The History of Portland, from 1632 to 1864: With a Notice of Previous ... By William Willis as found at [13]
  16. Documentary history of the state of Maine by Maine Historical Society as found at [14]
  17. The History of Portland, from 1632 to 1864: With a Notice of Previous ... By William Willis as found at [15] and Documentary history of the state of Maine, Volume III, the Baxter Manuscripts by Maine Historical Society Publication date 1869-1916 as found at [16]
  18. The History of Portland, from 1632 to 1864: With a Notice of Previous ... By William Willis as found at [17]
  19. Documentary history of the state of Maine by Maine Historical Society Volume III, the Trelawny Papers. Publication date 1869 as found at [18]
  20. Collections of the Maine historical society by Maine Historical Society Publication date 1831 as found at [19]
  21. Collections of the Maine historical society by Maine Historical Society Publication date 1831 as found at [20]
  22. Collections of the Maine historical society by Maine Historical Society Publication date 1831 as found at [21]
  23. Documentary history of the state of Maine .. Volume IV by Maine Historical Society Publication date 1869-1916 as found at [22]
  24. The History of Portland, from 1632 to 1864: With a Notice of Previous ... By William Willis as found at [23]
  25. The History of Portland, from 1632 to 1864: With a Notice of Previous ... By William Willis as found at [24]
  26. York Deeds, Volume 2 as found at [25] & [26]
  27. The History of Portland, from 1632 to 1864: With a Notice of Previous ... By William Willis as found at [27]
  28. Collections of the Maine historical society by Maine Historical Society Publication date 1831 as found at [28]




Collaboration
  • Login to edit this profile and add images.
  • Private Messages: Send a private message to the Profile Manager. (Best when privacy is an issue.)
  • Public Comments: Login to post. (Best for messages specifically directed to those editing this profile. Limit 20 per day.)


Comments: 1

Leave a message for others who see this profile.
There are no comments yet.
Login to post a comment.
Bertram, thanks for putting this together. There is some key information here that is NOT on Jane's profile like the fact that she had four children with Mackworth. Did you plan on putting some of that on the profile too?
posted by Brad Stauf