Jehovahs_Witnesses.png

Jehovah's Witnesses

Privacy Level: Public (Green)
Date: 1870
Location: Tuxedo Park, Orange, New York, United Statesmap
Surnames/tags: Jehovahs_Witnesses WTBTS RELIGION
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Contents

Jehovah's Witnesses

Mission

The goal of this project is to gather information about Jehovah's Witnesses, with a focus on the leaders, "Bethel" volunteers and residences, and the history and genealogy of its members.

Membership

Will you join me? Please post a comment here on this page, in G2G using the project tag, or send me a private message. Thanks!

MemberWorking
Azure Robinson1930 Census
Summer (Seely) Cooper
Frances (Peasley) Robinson
Lisa Brians
Elizabeth Linderer
Daniela (Barrantes) Filmer
Ralph McGee
Brooke (Close) Meetze
Billie (Bright) Keaffaber

To Do

  1. Create profiles for:
    1. NY, USA Bethelites: 1910 | 1915 | 1920 | 1925 | 1930 | 1940
    2. USHMM Holocaust Encyclopedia ID Cards
    3. Add family to witnesses not connected to the global tree
  2. Write biographies

See Also:


... was a Jehovah's Witness
{{Religion|image=Jehovahs Witnesses.png|text=was a [[Space:Jehovahs_Witnesses|Jehovah's Witness]]}}

History

Their present understanding of Bible truths and their activities can be traced back to the 1870s and the work of Charles Taze Russell and his associates, and from there to the Bible and early Christianity. On July 26, 1931, at a convention in Columbus, Ohio, Joseph Franklin Rutherford introduced the new name – Jehovah's witnesses – based on Isaiah 43:10: "'You are my witnesses,' declares Jehovah..."

Major publishers of the Bible and Bible education literature. Currently, the Bible is available for free online and in hardcopy (in whole or in part) in over 160 languages. Bible literature is available in over 975 languages online or in hardcopy.

Governing Body

ImageWikipediaWikitreeConnected?
To Do
AssignedBirthDeathNotes
Charles Taze RussellRussell-17043Yes!Seely-210 00:35, 8 Feb 2018 UTC18521916President
Joseph Franklin Rutherford Rutherford-3100Yes!Seely-210
Robinson-27225 21:59, 20 July 2020 (UTC)
18691942President
Nathan Homer KnorrKnorr-359Yes!Robinson-27225 00:26, 20 May 2020 (UTC)19051977President
Frederick William FranzFranz-747Yes!Seely-210
Robinson-27225 06:17, 26 Jul 2021 UTC
18931992President
Milton George HenschelHenschel-55Yes!Robinson-27225 04:12, 26 Jul 2021 UTC19202003President
needs
photo
Don AdamsAdams-58134Yes!Robinson-27225 06:06, 23 Apr 2022 UTC 19252019President
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Robert CirankoCiranko-1Yes!Robinson-27225 13:22, 23 April 2022 (UTC)1947President
Alexander Hugh MacmillanMacmillan-1071Yes!Peasley-221 16:57, 24 Jul 2021 (UTC)18771966Governing body
William Van AmburghVan_Amburgh-98Yes!Robinson-27225 19:30, 25 Jul 2021 (UTC)18631947Secretary-Treasurer
needs
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Carey BarberBarber-11508Yes!Robinson-27225 16:28, 26 December 2021 (UTC)19052007Governing body
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Grant SuiterSuiter-390Yes!Robinson-27225 23:01, 18 January 2022 (UTC)19081983Secretary-Treasurer
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Daniel SydlikSydlik-1Yes!Robinson-27225 19:32, 16 January 2022 (UTC)19192006Governing body
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Karl F KleinKlein-7133Yes!Robinson-27225 17:17, 13 February 2022 (UTC)19052001Governing body

Locations

United States

At first they had headquarters offices at 101 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, and later at 44 Federal Street, Allegheny. In the late 1880’s, however, expansion became necessary. So Russell arranged to build larger facilities. In 1889 a four-story brick building at 56-60 Arch Street, Allegheny, was completed. Valued at $34,000, it was known as the Bible House. It served as the Society’s headquarters for some 19 years. As of 1890, the small Bible House family was serving the needs of several hundred active associates of the Watch Tower Society.

As the newspaper preaching gained momentum, the Bible Students looked for another location from which to originate the sermons. Why? The Bible House in Allegheny had become too small. It was also thought that if Russell’s sermons emanated from a larger, better-known city, it would result in the publication of the sermons in more newspapers. But which city? The Watch Tower of December 15, 1908, explained: “Altogether we concluded, after seeking Divine guidance, that Brooklyn, N.Y., with a large population of the middle class, and known as ‘The City of Churches,’ would, for these reasons, be our most suitable center for the harvest work during the few remaining years.”

In 1908, therefore, several representatives of the Watch Tower Society, including its legal counsel, Joseph F. Rutherford, were sent to New York City. Their objective? To secure property that C. T. Russell had located on an earlier trip. They purchased the old “Plymouth Bethel,” located at 13-17 Hicks Street, Brooklyn. It had served as a mission structure for the nearby Plymouth Congregational Church, where Henry Ward Beecher once served as pastor. The Society’s representatives also purchased Beecher’s former residence, a four-story brownstone at 124 Columbia Heights, a few blocks away.

The Hicks Street building was remodeled and named the Brooklyn Tabernacle. It housed the Society’s offices and an auditorium. After considerable repairs, Beecher’s former residence at 124 Columbia Heights became the new home of the Society’s headquarters staff. What would it be called? The Watch Tower of March 1, 1909, explained: “The new home we shall call ‘Bethel’ [meaning, “House of God”].”*

56-60 Arch Street, Allegheny
13-17 Hicks Street, Brooklyn
117 Adams St (1927 to present)
122 & 124 Columbia Heights, Brooklyn




Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Witnesses to Relocate World Headquarters", database (https://www.jw.org/ : accessed 17 Apr 2022) About Us > Activities > Construction Projects
  • McCoy, Daniel J. "The Popular Handbook of World Religions." Harvest House Publishers.
  • Chryssides, George D. "Jehovah's Witnesses: Continuity and Change"




Collaboration
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