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Jolliffe Name Study

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Location: [unknown]
Surnames/tags: Jolliffe Juleff
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Contents

How to Participate

I have listed the Category & Sticker coding under "TASKS". If you add the category above the profile's Biography, they will be added to the Joliffe (Juleff) Name Study. Don't forget that the Sticker goes under the Biography. If you have any problems, please contact the Study's coordinator Brad Cunningham or post a comment at the foot of the page. If you have any questions, just ask. Thanks!

Goals

This is a One Name Study to collect together in one place everything about one surname and the variants of that name. The hope is that other researchers like you will join our study to help make it a valuable reference point for people studying lines that cross or intersect. So please add the category tag (listed below) to any of your relatives with the Jolliffe, Juleff or any other variant to this One Name Study.

All of my Juleffs originated in Cornwall & later emigrated to Australia & Canada. There are rumours of some going to South Africa, but I haven't found them YET. Have you??

Task List

  • Category = [[Category:Jolliffe Name Study]]
  • Sticker = {{One Name Study|name=Jolliffe}}

Variations on the Name

Jolliff, Jolliffe, Juliff, Juliffe, Julef, Jolly, Jollye, Jolley, Jollie, Joly, Jollif, Jolyff, Jolyf, Julff, Jolff, Julip, Julop, Jellif, Jelf, Jilliffe, jillif, Gelef, Gellop.

Origins of "Jolliffe"

This is an English surname. It derives however from the Old French word "jolif", meaning merry, lively, happy, and was originally given as a nickname to one of cheerful disposition. Perhaps the ultimate origin of the word lies in the Old Norse "jol", the midwinter festival when people celebrated the gradual lengthening of the days. This festival was later appropriated by the Christian Church for celebration of the birth of Christ. The creation of surnames from nicknames was a common practice in the Middle Ages, and Jolliffe is found recorded all over the British Isles as would be expected of a sobriquet handed down as being complimentary. Early examples of the surname include: Walter Jolyf, (Bedfordshire, 1281); Henry Jolyffe, (London, circa 1300), and Alicia Jolyff, (Yorkshire, 1379). In the modern idiom the name has seven spelling variations; Jolliff(e), Joll(e)y, Jollie, Jolly and Joly. A notable namebearer was William George Hylton Jolliffe (1800-1876), created baronet, 1821; secretary to the treasury and conservative whip, 1858-1859, and created Baron Hylton, 1866. A Coat of Arms granted to the Jolliffe family is silver, on a green pile three dexter hands couped at the wrist and erect of the field, the Crest being a cubit arm erect, vested green and cuffed, and the sleeve changed with a silver pile, the hand grasping a sword all proper. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of John Jolyf, which was dated 1273, in "The Hundred Rolls of Huntingdonshire", during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272-1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Origins of "Juleff"

This unusual surname is of early medieval English origin, and is a good example of that sizeable group of early European surnames that were gradually created from the habitual use of nicknames. These nicknames were originally given with reference to a variety of personal characteristics, such as physical attributes or peculiarities, mental and moral characteristics, and to habits of dress and behaviour. The derivation, in this instance, is from the Middle English and Old French "joli(f)", merry, lively, happy, used to denote someone of a cheerful disposition. Perhaps the ultimate origin of the word is the Old Norse "jol", the pagan midwinter festival when people celebrated the gradual lengthening of the days. This festival was later appropriated by the Christian Church as "Yule" for celebration of the birth of Christ. Early examples of the surname include: Henry Jolyffe (London, circa 1300), and Alicia Jolyff (Yorkshire, 1379). In the modern idiom the surname has a variety of forms ranging from Jolliff, Jolliffe, Juliff(e) and Juleff, to Jolley, Jollie and Jolly(e). The forms Juliff(e) and Jul(e)ff are most widespread in Cornwall. Recordings from Cornish Church Registers include: the marriage of John Julff to Jane Rossell at Camborne, on November 7th 1568, and the marriage of James Juleff to Jane Broad at St. Neot, on June 5th 1749. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of John Jolif, which was dated 1273, in the "Hundred Rolls of Huntingdonshire", during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.





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