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Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber 1888-1950 - Research Notes

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Surname/tag: Kenneth_Martin_Henry_Cumber
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Biography

Born 16 April 1888. St Peter Port, Guernsey, Channel Islands. [1][2][3][4][5][6][7]

Died Y. 9 AUG 1950. Avondale, Auckland, New Zealand. [8][9][10][11][12]

Event: Departure 26 JUN 1908. London, England. [13][14][15][16] Kenneth smoked heavily. He did not drink alcohol. Habits New Zealand. [17] Dark brown hair and blue eyes. Physical description. 1940 Auckland, New Zealand. [18] Guernesiaias (Patois), French, English. Language Guernsey, Channel Islands, United Kingdom. [19] Left: 1. Quaker heritage 2. Left wing: As per Wellington Workers' Education Association. Political view. ABT 1937. New Zealand. [20][21] Family Story: Ken left Guernsey due to being allergic to daffodils and Lilies. According to correspondence within his medical records, he did have pollen poisoning at some point. Physical health. c.1908 Guernsey, Channel Islands. [22][23] Initiatory (LDS). 23 SEP 1920. Whangaroa, Auckland, New Zealand. [24] Kenneth built this inter-denominational church with the assistance of the publican Mr Goodhue, storekeeper Mr Andrewes and the fundraising efforts of the ladies. Establishment of Community Church. 1929 Taheke, Far North, Northland, New Zealand. [25][26] Mr Cumber built a two story house, blasting the rock at the quarry himself and the house still stands in what is known as Cumber Rd. A time capsule was put in one of the front porch pillars. Stone House. 1920s Kaikohe, Bay of Islands, Northland, New Zealand. [27][28] Writing Various New Zealand. [29][30][31][32][33][34][35][36] Exempt from military service due to occupation. He also had an injured shoulder from childhood and around this time had his first breakdown. Military Service. 1918 New Zealand. [37][38][39][40] As Kenneth's mother Eliza and other female relatives worked in the postal service they would have been aware of all shipping times. I doubt they would have approved of their main income earner leaving... so he probably did stow away!. Family story: Stowaway on sailing ship. 1908 Guernsey to London. [41] Travel via horse and cart. Left Pahiatua, New Zealand. Kaikohe, Bay of Islands, Northland, New Zealand. [42] As per printout of death certificate from New Zealand BDM ... and medical records obtainable through the Auckland District Health Board. Hospitalisation 16 DEC 1940. Auckland[43][44] Agricultural Science, current affairs, education, church, community building, economics, psychology. Interests BET 1920 AND 1937. New Zealand. [45][46][47][48][49][50][51] Church Layreader. 1910 St Peter's Anglican Church, Pahiatua. [52][53][54]

Occupation: Nursey Gardener- see marriage certificate obtainable through New Zealand BDM. 24 January 1911. Pahiatua, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand. [55] Head Teacher 1921-1938. BET 1921 AND 1938. Taheke School, Northland, New Zealand. [56][57][58][59][60][61][62][63][64][65][66][67] Schoolmaster. 1915 Ohautira Native School, Raglan. [68][69][70][71][72][73] Head Master. 1918 Te Pupuke Native School. [74][75][76][77][78][79] Farmer. 1908[80][81][82]

Religion: Anglican. 1910 Pahiatua, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand. [83][84][85][86][87][88][89][90]

Residence ABT 1919. [91][92][93][94] 1914[95][96] 1911[97][98][99] ABT 1918. [100][101][102] ABT 1916. [103][104][105][106][107][108] c.1920[109] 1908 1928[110][111][112] 1891[113][114]

Physical Description: <DSCR><HEIGHT>5 Feet 6 inches OR 5 Feet 8 inches- varies on hospital documents.<HEIGHT><DSCR>.

Buried Public Lawn, Block A, Plot 82. 24 AUG 1950. Public Lawn, Block A, Plot 82., Kaikohe Cemetery, Bay of Islands, Northland, New Zealand. [115][116][117]

Education: Teacher examinations. Various New Zealand. [118][119][120][121][122][123][124][125][126][127][128]

Census: After his father died, Kenneth had to leave school early and work to support the family. 1901 174 Courtillets - Civil Parish of St Mary-de-Castro, Ecclesiastical Parish of Castel, Village of Houmets, Guernsey, Channel Islands. [129][130][131]

Emigration: See gallery for records. 1908 New Zealand. [132][133][134][135]

Probate: 1951 Auckland, New Zealand. [136]

Will: Available on public domain. 28 December 1925. Kaikohe, New Zealand. [137]

Note: KENNETH MARTIN HENRY CUMBER

<p> <p>Around1888 Kenneth was born into a Quaker family of long-established chemists inGuernsey, Channel Islands. They were descended from Dr Henry Cumber of Englandwho arrived in Guernsey at the beginning of the nineteenth century. He marrieda Grocer's daughter and In those days, grocers supplied the chemists'trade so it is likely this was how the Cumber dynasty began there. <p>

There were two "Cumbers"chemists in St Peter Port; one at 4 Fountain St and the other at 3 Pollet. Everybody knew each other and peopleoften visited their chemist as first port-of-call rather than the doctor. Chemists pulled teeth, fitted glasses, applied leeches as part of their “Cupper”role, made and dispensed medicine, ran photography businesses, tended to sickanimals and sold other items such as perfumes and toiletries. Medicinesincluded herbs, plant bulbs, cocaine, heroin and other opiates, morphine, zinc, copper, silver, gold and so on. Many of the medicines worked; manydidn't. Chemists worked amidst various epidemics at a time when many peopledied before their time; including young children. In fact Kenneth's father Henry had died in1895 at the age of about 38 when Kenneth was only about 7 years old. <p>

Kenneth had three older sisters, two younger sisters and a youngerbrother. By the time he was 12 years old he was the oldest male in thehousehold. Many young men emigrated from Guernsey at this time dueto poor economic times which affected the British Isles as a whole. Kenneth migrated to New Zealand in 1908 at the age of about 20"because I was allergic to daffodils" (as told to a relative!)Perhaps this is a reference to perhaps having worked in the bulb trade...ormaybe to some of the chemists' potions which for along time did include daffodils ... or maybe the annual "Battle of the Flowers" didn’t interest him... we may never know. We do know however that he did retainan interest in science and the natural world for the rest of his life. <p>

In 1911 in New Zealand Kenneth married Mabel Ransom of the wealthy and politically famous Ransom family. Their weddingwas described in the papers as "quiet". Later that year their firsts on Kenneth was born. They had two more children; Dulcie and Ron. In about 1925-1926 he and Mabel separated. <p>

In the meantime Kenneth hadt rained as a Science Teacher and taught at "Native Schools" duringthe 1920s. Kennethwas passionate about agricultural science, economics, psychology and teaching.He was intensely interested about maximising the ability of people to learn. Inhis correspondence he talked about the poor conditions in which people livedand worked in the Hokianga. "...The school had had nineteachers in eighteen months... The school room was a shed. Many pupils looked unhealthyand most had bad teeth. Moral was low. Thieving was common. My predecessor hadhad his nose bitten off by a burglar." He taught in poor conditions; amongstpoverty and ill-health of many students and their families which also includedpakeha students. He was also a skilled farm worker and travelled around doingfarm work during the Depression years, like many others. His working life wascharacterised by both teaching and farm labouring assignments. Kenneth was interested in current affairs, building community and health;especially that of school children. During the 1920s and 1930s' he wroteseveral letters to newspapers. In 1933 he published a book in 1933 entitled"The Call to Freedom from Debt and in 1934 in the middle of the EconomicDepression he was one of many people who made a submission to the Government'sMonetary Committee (his suggestion was to eliminate interest rates). It was atime when people were keen for answers and debated many ideas in the publicarena. For example, noting the battles the farming community was facing, heonce wrote: ""A man cannot spend his life working hard with nosuccess without the development of mental conflicts". <p><p>In 1937 while Head teacher at the Taheke School in Hokianga and working18 hours per day, Kenneth published a Survey re- soil acidity and he wrote to the Department ofScientific and Industrial Research. This correspondence details his observations over 16 years withregard to his views on the relationships between soil quality, plant diseases,animal health and associated consequences for people. Kenneth also onceforwarded a "peculiarly-shapedlava formation" to the Auckland Museumfor further examination (see article at end of profile). This is significantbecause his son Sgt. Prof. Ron Cumber became an eminent Entomologist and"rockhound". <p>

In 1940 Kenneth became ill and was hospitalised for the next ten years. He died of cardiac problems in 1950. His descendants include teachers, photographers, professors, farmers, animal workers, conservation volunteers, artists and musicians. <p>.

Marriage Husband Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber. Wife Mabel Clarice Ransom. Child: Dulcie Cumber. Marriage 24 JAN 1911. St Peter's Anglican Church, Pahiatua, New Zealand. [138][139][140][141] Event: Separation[142][143]

Husband Henry Cumber. Wife Eliza Jane Burgess. Child: Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber. Marriage Guernsey[144]

Sources

  1. Source: #S-1000000 http://www.myheritage.com/research/collection-10155/1891-england-wales-census?s=293330771&itemId=29960192-&groupId=aeab272fcf2587e36e4b7b7b40d42ef0&action=showRecord&indId=individual-293330771-1500090 Certainty: 0

    Kennith MH Cumber
    Gender: Male
    Birth: Circa 1889 - St Peter Port, Guernsey

    Father: Henry Cumber
    Mother: Eliza J Cumber
    <a id="household"></a>Household
    Relation to head; Name; Age
    Head; <a href="research/collection-10155/1891-england-wales-census?s=293330771&itemId=29960188-&groupId=aeab272fcf2587e36e4b7b7b40d42ef0&action=showRecord">Henry Cumber</a>; 34
    Wife; <a href="research/collection-10155/1891-england-wales-census?s=293330771&itemId=29960189-&groupId=aeab272fcf2587e36e4b7b7b40d42ef0&action=showRecord">Eliza J Cumber</a>; 37

    Father in Law; <a href="research/collection-10155/1891-england-wales-census?s=293330771&itemId=29960194-&groupId=aeab272fcf2587e36e4b7b7b40d42ef0&action=showRecord">John Burgess</a>; 72
    Servant; <a href="research/collection-10155/1891-england-wales-census?s=293330771&itemId=29960195-&groupId=aeab272fcf2587e36e4b7b7b40d42ef0&action=showRecord">Louisa G Collenette</a>; 20

  2. Source: #S-1000000 http://www.myheritage.com/research/collection-10156/1901-england-wales-census?s=126234902&itemId=102395899-&groupId=ded00dbfcdea533e2b6fe9ae1b9c7f3d&action=showRecord&indId=individual-126234902-1000108 Certainty: 0 1901

    The National Archives, London, England

  3. Source: #S2 Ancestry Family Tree Certainty: 0 http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=0&pid=16
  4. Source: #S3 Class: RG12; Piece: 4706; Folio: 149; Page: 15; GSU roll: 6099816 Certainty: 0
  5. Source: #S139 Private- contact writer Certainty: 0
  6. Source: #S147 Medical Records Certainty: 0 BET 1940 AND 1950 Private Note: Available for free for relatives who can prove their descent. I have copies from the Auckland District Health Board. Note: http://www.adhb.govt.nz/documents/Information_Sheet_Release_of_Information.pdf
  7. Source: #S140 Library and Museum of Freemasonry; London, England; Freemasonry Membership Registers; Description: Membership Registers: Country G 1841-2037 to Country H 2051-2314; Reel Number: 63 Certainty: 0
  8. Source: #S71 Cemetery and burial details for Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber Certainty: 0 2015 Cemetery : KAIKOHE CEMETERY Division : PUBLIC LAWN Block : A Plot : 82 Notes : SHARED CONCRETE SLAB & HEADSTONE WITH CROSS Date Of Death : 09/08/1950 Burial or Ashes : Burial Note: Age: 62 [Mabel is also buried here]. Note: http://www.fndc.govt.nz/search/search-cemetery-record?sq_content_src=%2BdXJsPWh0dHAlM0ElMkYlMkZ3ZWJkYXRhLmZuZGMuZ292dC5ueiUyRkNlbWV0ZXJ5JTJGQ1JpbnRlcnJlZEhUTUwucGhwJTNGd2FycmFudCUzRDY1NzQmYWxsPTE%3D#a0
  9. Source: #S2 Ancestry Family Tree Certainty: 0 http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=0&pid=16
  10. Source: #S5 Certainty: 0
  11. Source: #S9 Certainty: 0 Record for Mabel Clarice Cumber Note: http://search.ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=NewZealandCemetery&h=584444&indiv=try
  12. Source: #S147 Medical Records Certainty: 0 BET 1940 AND 1950 Private Note: Available for free for relatives who can prove their descent. I have copies from the Auckland District Health Board. Note: http://www.adhb.govt.nz/documents/Information_Sheet_Release_of_Information.pdf
  13. Source: #S-1000000 http://www.findboatpics.com.au/spss.html Certainty: 0 ABT 1906

    Picture of the ship "Mamari"

  14. Source: #S-1000000 https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QJDJ-6B3C Certainty: 0 10 AUG 1910

    Passenger lists from Ancestry.com and familysearch.org

  15. Source: #S60 The Ship "Mamari" - Steamship Line: Shaw, Savill & Albion Coy Ld. Certainty: 0 1904 Note: http://www.findboatpics.com.au/spss.html
  16. Source: #S37 Certainty: 0
  17. Source: #S147 Medical Records Certainty: 0 BET 1940 AND 1950 Private Note: Available for free for relatives who can prove their descent. I have copies from the Auckland District Health Board. Note: http://www.adhb.govt.nz/documents/Information_Sheet_Release_of_Information.pdf
  18. Source: #S147 Medical Records Certainty: 0 BET 1940 AND 1950 Private Note: Available for free for relatives who can prove their descent. I have copies from the Auckland District Health Board. Note: http://www.adhb.govt.nz/documents/Information_Sheet_Release_of_Information.pdf
  19. Source: #S66 Certainty: 0 Note: Left (interested in Wellington Workers' Education Association] RIN: MH:N637
  20. Source: #S-1000000 http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=q&hs=1&r=1&results=1&t=0&txq=kenneth+cumber&pbq&dafdq&dafmq&dafyq=1931&datdq&datmq&datyq=1948&tyq&o=100&sf&ssnip&e=-------10--1----0--&x=42&y=21 Certainty: 0 1931

    This page of search results includes various letters to the Editor in 1931. There were also other letters referred to his correspondence.

  21. Source: #S65 Correspondence with Mr K.M.H. Cumber (R20468460) Certainty: 0 1937 Correspondence between Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber and the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research [record group] Note: http://www.archway.archives.govt.nz/ViewFullItem.do?code=20468460
  22. Source: #S147 Medical Records Certainty: 0 BET 1940 AND 1950 Private Note: Available for free for relatives who can prove their descent. I have copies from the Auckland District Health Board. Note: http://www.adhb.govt.nz/documents/Information_Sheet_Release_of_Information.pdf
  23. Source: #S66 Family Certainty: 0
  24. Source: #S140 Library and Museum of Freemasonry; London, England; Freemasonry Membership Registers; Description: Membership Registers: Country G 1841-2037 to Country H 2051-2314; Reel Number: 63 Certainty: 0
  25. Source: #S65 Correspondence with Mr K.M.H. Cumber (R20468460) Certainty: 0 1937 Correspondence between Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber and the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research [record group] Note: http://www.archway.archives.govt.nz/ViewFullItem.do?code=20468460
  26. Source: #S164 Public domain Certainty: 0
  27. Source: #S65 Correspondence with Mr K.M.H. Cumber (R20468460) Certainty: 0 1937 Correspondence between Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber and the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research [record group] Note: http://www.archway.archives.govt.nz/ViewFullItem.do?code=20468460
  28. Source: #S150 Private letter Certainty: 0
  29. Source: #S-1000000 http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=q&hs=1&r=1&results=1&t=0&txq=kenneth+cumber&pbq&dafdq&dafmq&dafyq=1931&datdq&datmq&datyq=1948&tyq&o=100&sf&ssnip&e=-------10--1----0--&x=42&y=21 Certainty: 0 1931

    This page of search results includes various letters to the Editor in 1931. There were also other letters referred to his correspondence.

  30. Source: #S-1000000 http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs?a=d&d=AJHR1934-I.2.1.3.8&cl=&srpos=0&e=--1908---1950--10--11----on--0cumber--&st=1 Certainty: 0 1934

    During the Depression of of the 1930s Kenneth made a submission into  the Monetary Committee of 1934. The first page of the Minutes is below. (See link)

  31. Source: #S-1000000 http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&cl=search&d=WDT19101203.2.16&srpos=8&e=--1908---1948--100-%2cAMBPA%2cALG%2cAHCOG%2cAMW%2cAG%2cAS%2cBPB%2cBOPT%2cBH%2cBA%2cCHARG%2cCL%2cTC%2cDSC%2cDTN%2cDOM%2cEG%2cEP%2cFP%2cFS%2cNZFL%2cGRA%2cHAEATA%2 Certainty: 0 6 DEC 1910

    "The Bishop of Wellington has licensed Mr Kenneth Cumber as a lay reader for Pahiatua" [St Peter's Anglican Church].

  32. Source: #S67 AtoJs Online > Search > Search Results Certainty: 0 BET 1915 AND 1924 Lists of teaching appointments. (After 1930 they were kept elsewhere). Note: RIN: MH:N500605 Note: http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs?a=q&r=1&results=1&stq=Education&e=--1915---1934--10--1----on--0Cumber--
  33. Source: #S65 Correspondence with Mr K.M.H. Cumber (R20468460) Certainty: 0 1937 Correspondence between Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber and the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research [record group] Note: http://www.archway.archives.govt.nz/ViewFullItem.do?code=20468460
  34. Source: #S67 Various records relating to teaching appointments and submission to Monetary Committee Certainty: 0 BET 1915 AND 1923 Search results for "cumber" filtered by "Education". Records of teaching appointments. Note: Appointments after this time were recorded and kept elsewhere. See Archives New Zealand Research Resources: http://archives.govt.nz/resources/research-resources http://archives.govt.nz/education Note: http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs?a=q&r=1&results=1&stq=Education&e=--1915---1934--10--1----on--0Cumber--
  35. Source: #S139 Private- contact writer Certainty: 0
  36. Source: #S147 Medical Records Certainty: 0 BET 1940 AND 1950 Private Note: Available for free for relatives who can prove their descent. I have copies from the Auckland District Health Board. Note: http://www.adhb.govt.nz/documents/Information_Sheet_Release_of_Information.pdf
  37. Source: #S-1000000 http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs?a=q&r=11&results=1&e=--1908---1950--10--1----on--0cumber-- Certainty: 0

    See below:

    p> </p>li>lists of teachers 1914-1924.
  38.  </p>p;</p>
  39. Source: #S61 Exemptions from military service Certainty: 0 1918 Note: http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&cl=search&d=DOM19180802.2.7&srpos=2&e=--1908---1948--100-%2cAMBPA%2cALG%2cAHCOG%2cAMW%2cAG%2cAS%2cBPB%2cBOPT%2cBH%2cBA%2cCHARG%2cCL%2cTC%2cDSC%2cDTN%2cDOM%2cEG%2cEP%2cFP%2cFS%2cNZFL%2cGRA%2cHAEATA%2cHAST%2cHNS%2cHBH%2cHBWT%2cHIIR%2cHOKIOI%2cHC%2cHLC%2cHUIA%2cHN%2cHVI%2cIT%2cJUBIL%2cKAHITI%2cKT%2cKWE%2cKOP%2cKCC%2cKORIM%2cLWM%2cLTCBG%2cLT%2cMH%2cMS%2cMT%2cMMTKM%2cMW%2cMEX%2cMATAR%2cME%2cMIC%2cMTBM%2cNEM%2cNENZC%2cNZABIG%2cNZCPNA%2cNZGWS%2cNZH%2cNZI%2cNZSCSG%2cNZT%2cNZ%2cNOT%2cNA%2cNZTR%2cOAM%2cTO%2cOG%2cODT%2cOW%2cOSWCC%2cOO%2cPAKIOM%2cPIHOI%2cPBH%2cCHP%2cP%2cPUKEH%2cPWT%2cROTWKG%2cSTSSA%2cSTSSG%2cSWH%2cSAMZ%2cST%2cTS%2cSUNCH%2cTAKIT%2cTDN%2cTH%2cTAN%2cTPT%2cTHA%2cTHS%2cTHD%2cTT%2cUHWR%2cVT%2cWCHG%2cWCHT%2cWHDT%2cWT%2cWDA%2cWAG%2cWDT%2cWAIST%2cWAKAM%2cWANANG%2cWC%2cWH%2cWI%2cWCT%2cWEST%2cWHETU-1--on--0Kenneth+Cumber-- RIN: MH:N500112
  40. Source: #S1 Certainty: 0
  41. Source: #S147 Medical Records Certainty: 0 BET 1940 AND 1950 Private Note: Available for free for relatives who can prove their descent. I have copies from the Auckland District Health Board. Note: http://www.adhb.govt.nz/documents/Information_Sheet_Release_of_Information.pdf
  42. Source: #S66 Certainty: 0 Note: Left (interested in Wellington Workers' Education Association] RIN: MH:N637
  43. Source: #S66 Family Certainty: 0
  44. Source: #S139 Private- contact writer Certainty: 0
  45. Source: #S147 Medical Records Certainty: 0 BET 1940 AND 1950 Private Note: Available for free for relatives who can prove their descent. I have copies from the Auckland District Health Board. Note: http://www.adhb.govt.nz/documents/Information_Sheet_Release_of_Information.pdf
  46. Source: #S-1000000 http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=q&hs=1&r=1&results=1&t=0&txq=kenneth+cumber&pbq&dafdq&dafmq&dafyq=1931&datdq&datmq&datyq=1948&tyq&o=100&sf&ssnip&e=-------10--1----0--&x=42&y=21 Certainty: 0 1931

    This page of search results includes various letters to the Editor in 1931. There were also other letters referred to his correspondence.

  47. Source: #S-1000000 http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&cl=search&d=WDT19101203.2.16&srpos=8&e=--1908---1948--100-%2cAMBPA%2cALG%2cAHCOG%2cAMW%2cAG%2cAS%2cBPB%2cBOPT%2cBH%2cBA%2cCHARG%2cCL%2cTC%2cDSC%2cDTN%2cDOM%2cEG%2cEP%2cFP%2cFS%2cNZFL%2cGRA%2cHAEATA%2 Certainty: 0 6 DEC 1910

    "The Bishop of Wellington has licensed Mr Kenneth Cumber as a lay reader for Pahiatua" [St Peter's Anglican Church].

  48. Source: #S-1000000 http://ndhadeliver.natlib.govt.nz/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE12115559&dps_custom_att_1=tapuhi Certainty: 0

    Punakitere/Taheke and Otaua in the Hokianga. Beck, Martin James, 1953- : Papers. Ref: MSDL-1993. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand.  <a style="color: #222222; font-family: ProximaNova, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 15px;" href="http://natlib.govt.nz/records/30633179">http://natlib.govt.nz/records/30633179</a> 

    y - The North. TAHEKE PIRATES. A TALE of a TerribleTurmoil -</strong></p>ied that the Punakitere School would receive its death-knell within six weeks. I have been informed by Mr Goodhew (Chairman of Punakitere School Committee) thatword has been received from the Education Board that the school is to be removed to Taheke – so someone losses a suit of clothes which someone bet someone – savvy ? I am informed however that already the receipt of the intelligence has caused a girding of lions and also a gnashing of teeth (some of which were broken in the operation) One gentleman told me that he was ordering a steel helmet – I dunno why. It is further reported that an agitation is on foot to secure the release of Rua to act as organizer of a rebellion which will break out. Armours are beingcollected and one valiant bought a copy of the ―Three Musketeers under the impression that it dealt with Shillelaghs ? Tactics. The Punakitere folk (or some, at least) accuse Tahekeites of being robbers of their school. The ites in turn, place their thumbs or their noses and extend their fingers in a vulgar manner. Lifelong friendships have been severed and happy homes broken asunder thro‘ the turmoil arising from the Taheke school question. The question arises, Why? The reason is not for to seek. The claim of Taheke to a school is beyond question. A school established there would in a very short time be entitled to an assistant which means greater efficiency. Had Punakitere admitted the need of Taheke and when the old committee had the opportunity, recommended the Board to open aschool at Taheke, then even if the request had not been granted the sweet spirit of coalition would have melted the heart of Taheke and the war which is being raged with such spleen would have been avoided. There appears to be too much regard for the local school as a recreational hall, but it should be borne in mind that Lincoln‘s formula, the greatest good for the greatest number still holds with it old force. That greatest number will be found at Taheke where the Punakitere School is going.</p>ted to be availing 101 themselves of the recent few fine days by plowing and discing... </p>> Mr J. D. McKenzie Chairman of the Education Board visited the Taheke and Punakitere districts last week to inquire into the merits of the local school site dispute. In conversation with Mr McKenzie it was gathered that to his mind the solution of the difficulty is to be found in a re-spacing of the schools; to which the district lends itself. ―The Taheke-Punakitere district is one of growing importance, said Mr McKenzie, ―and settlement will be progressive. A school must be established at Taheke, probably across the river, removing it to the furthest convenient distance from Punakitere. The Punakitere School would remain where it is and the Otaua Native School removed to a site higher up the valley...</p> DEPTUATIONS AND COUNTER ATTACKS. Taheke School Question.</strong> When it was made known that School Inspector Jas G. T. Cox was to pay a visit to the Punakitere School the local armies girded their loins and looked to their gas retorts. So in the glorioustwilight of the evening of October 9th long queues of eager deputaionists wended their victorious pilgrimage to the temporary Inspectorial shrine to lay siege to the citadel of omnipotence. How‘s that for a metaphor ? The deputation of Tahekeites consisted of Messes E. Goodhew (Chairman Taheke School Committee) G. Bott (Secretary ditto) Cope (Member of same) the whole being reinforced by MrH. M. Webster J P, and Mr A. L. Bradbury (Postmaster) With concise brevity these gentlemen spoke of needs of Taheke in the scholastic line and the surfeit at Punakitere side where two schools stand within a mile or so of each other. It was pointed out that some thousands (exact number forgotten by this scribe) of children were growing up in Taheke, who were of school age yet debarred from the elemental privilege of primary education. The deputation made a sporting offer I understand to produce by hook or by crook 34 Maori children and 14 European youngsters and because 34 and 14 make 48 they considered that to make the equation complete the identity should be supplemented by 48 kids equal 1 school. Now since this may be execrable maths but darned good logie, so the Inspector said in effect ―Yessirs― The free site donated by Mr Herenaiaia Hori was mentioned and next day inspected whilst the proposal to commence the school immediately in Mr Webster‘s Hall came under discussion. The inspector was non-committal of course but the deputation smiles and winks knowingly, whilst the statement that the Education Board‘s architect (Mr J. Farrell) was coming to the district shortly to inquire as to the means of removing the Punakitere School to Taheke, has caused audible merriment among certain pasture.</p>r deputation consisting of several well known residents and hot teaand cakes visited the inspector the next day and showed him how indispensible the Punakitere School was in its present site. How can we have socials if you take it away? What about services ? Besidesit has been here for years it‘s a landmark. It will affect the valuation of our property.. Punakitere Correspondent.</p>trong>1917 October 25th Northern Advocat.e.</strong> The chairman of the Auckland Education Board (Mr J. D. McKenzie) has just returned from a visit to the North, where he has been inspecting the Taheke district, Hokianga, with regard to the establishment of a school. There has been some difference of opinion lately amongst the settlers as to the location of the new school. There are already schools at Punakitere and Otaua, and the trouble has been in regard to placingthe new school in a position to serve the district and yet meet the requirements of the Board's regulations. Mr McKenzie, has decided to recommend that the new school be built upon the west side of the river from Taheke, leaving the central school at Punakitere, and shifting the Otaua school two miles further up the valley to suit the requirements of the new settlers. The schools will thus be about four miles apart. It is rarely possible to make such an arrangement, but the 102 district lends itself admirably to the alteration and all scholars in the locality will thus be placed within reach of educational facilities... </p>/strong> ...  A member of the Education Board in a letter to another gentleman states the Board proposes opening a school in Taheke immediately and to close the Punakitere School forthwith... </p> 'im...</p>>1918 May 3rd Friday, The Luminary - The North. ANNUAL SPORTS AT PUNAKITERE – Meeting of Householders. What was probably the largest gathering in local history took place in the Punakitere School on Monday April 27th for the purpose of electing a school committee. The election was fought out on the question of the Punakitere-Taheke School site... It was evitable from the outset of the meeting that the considerable feeling was lying but dormant, and required but a spark to ignite the gathering to complete combustion and "bust-up." Mr E. Goodhew, chairman of the outgoing committee called for nominations for chairman of the meeting and Mr Gubb was elected by an overwhelming majority, but was subjected to a good deal of heckling until the interrupters were put into good humour by reference to photographs. During the election several electors were challenged by those present. This caused much heat; some swear words and much merriment. One person called another one "a scoundrel" a second referred to another party as "a low down creature." One irate individual told the chairman that he (the speaker) had his eye on him. The Chairman retorted by advising the heckler to always obey his instincts to look upon the noble things of life...</p>ed a step further. The secretary of the Education Board,writing to local folk on the question, advises that the Board has decided in accordance with the advisory inspector's recommendations, which were, that the Punakitere School be opened at Taheke Hall for a time pending decision as to a suitable building site at Taheke and that the Punakitere School be closed. This is the solution of the difficulty, and is the one for long advocated by many in a position to judge, since it will result in the minimum of inconvenience.</p>RE Pars – The Punakitere School now situated at the Taheke Hall has a roll number of 60 scholars.</strong> Noted in the Herald that City Council claims to own the old Punakitere School. This would seem to place the building in Mr W. Penney‘s property. Some fun. Mr J. Fell held Devine Service in the school on Sunday August 4. There was a satisfactory attendance. A good few damaged tins have been found near the Otaua School. Why ? </p>n> -</strong> to distance them selves from the disgruntled Punakitere folk who had objected to the school being moved, but was probably the one and same William Gordon Jones. </em></p>>TAHEKE TALK - The School. It is interesting to note that the Taheke School transferred from Punakitere now has a roll number sufficiently large to quantify for an assistant and one has been advertised for.</strong> This is a decided answer to those who maintained that a school at Taheke was not justified... </p>Mrs. McBeth a wee daughter. Good luck to her.</p>ost war Influenza Epidemic</strong> with disinfections hit the Far North as the rest of New Zealand, but the littlePunakitere Settlement seem to fare well.</p>picture]</strong></p>ile a new Punakitere District School was later built at Parahekeheke - possibly on the section next to William McLeod‟s second holding and it was opened in 1922. The old Punakitere Schoolhouse became obsolete and had been built on land that was owned by the Auckland City Council; it had recently been painted and it was eventually sold in February 1920 for £50.00 and became a private residence – a fine two-storied house now occupies the site.</em></p>kitere Special Settlement had declined, and there was an exodus oflocal residents who moved into the Taheke Township where they had set-up another temporary school in the Hall with a roll of 60 pupils in 1918.</em></p>
  49. Source: #S65 Correspondence with Mr K.M.H. Cumber (R20468460) Certainty: 0 1937 Correspondence between Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber and the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research [record group] Note: http://www.archway.archives.govt.nz/ViewFullItem.do?code=20468460
  50. Source: #S-1000000 http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=27693 Certainty: 0 ABT 1910

    Contents

    St Peter's Church, Anglican, Pahiatua, [ca 1910]

    : #faebd3;">Reference Number: PA1-o-966-047</p>h: normal; line-height: 1.5em; font-family: 'Trebuchet MS', Arial, sans-serif; color: #1e1e1e; background-color: #faebd3;">St Peter's Anglican Church in Pahiatua, photographed by Muir and Moodie, circa 1910.</p>
  51. Source: #S67 Various records relating to teaching appointments and submission to Monetary Committee Certainty: 0 BET 1915 AND 1923 Search results for "cumber" filtered by "Education". Records of teaching appointments. Note: Appointments after this time were recorded and kept elsewhere. See Archives New Zealand Research Resources: http://archives.govt.nz/resources/research-resources http://archives.govt.nz/education Note: http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs?a=q&r=1&results=1&stq=Education&e=--1915---1934--10--1----on--0Cumber--
  52. Source: #S147 Medical Records Certainty: 0 BET 1940 AND 1950 Private Note: Available for free for relatives who can prove their descent. I have copies from the Auckland District Health Board. Note: http://www.adhb.govt.nz/documents/Information_Sheet_Release_of_Information.pdf
  53. Source: #S-1000000 http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&cl=search&d=WDT19101203.2.16&srpos=8&e=--1908---1948--100-%2cAMBPA%2cALG%2cAHCOG%2cAMW%2cAG%2cAS%2cBPB%2cBOPT%2cBH%2cBA%2cCHARG%2cCL%2cTC%2cDSC%2cDTN%2cDOM%2cEG%2cEP%2cFP%2cFS%2cNZFL%2cGRA%2cHAEATA%2 Certainty: 0 6 DEC 1910

    "The Bishop of Wellington has licensed Mr Kenneth Cumber as a lay reader for Pahiatua" [St Peter's Anglican Church].

  54. Source: #S-1000000 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederic_Wallis Certainty: 0 1910

    The Bishop of Wellington in 1908 was The Rt Rev Frederic Wallis, MA, DD (1854, Hastings - 24 June 1928, Bournemouth). 

  55. Source: #S-1000000 http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=27693 Certainty: 0 ABT 1910

    St Peter's Church, Anglican, Pahiatua, [ca 1910]

    : #faebd3;">Reference Number: PA1-o-966-047</p>h: normal; line-height: 1.5em; font-family: 'Trebuchet MS', Arial, sans-serif; color: #1e1e1e; background-color: #faebd3;">St Peter's Anglican Church in Pahiatua, photographed by Muir and Moodie, circa 1910.</p>
  56. Source: #S61 Papers Past > Search > Search Results Certainty: 0 BET 1916 AND 1918 Teacher's examinations- as reported in papers Note: http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=q&hs=1&r=1&results=1&t=0&txq=Kenneth+Cumber+examination&x=0&y=0&pbq=&dafdq=&dafmq=&dafyq=&datdq=&datmq=&datyq=&tyq=&o=10&sf=&ssnip=&ssnip=on&e=-------10--1--on--0Kenneth+Cumber+exam-- RIN: MH:N500185
  57. Source: #S-1000000 http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs?a=q&r=11&results=1&e=--1908---1950--10--1----on--0cumber-- Certainty: 0

    See below:

    p> </p>li>lists of teachers 1914-1924.
  58.  </p>p;</p>
  59. Source: #S-1000000 http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs Certainty: 0

    Lists of teachers at Native Schools up until 1930 (listed elsewhere thereafter- see guide notes at NZ Archives: Archway).

  60. Source: #S61 Papers Past > Search > Search Results Certainty: 0 BET 1916 AND 1918 Teacher's examinations- as reported in papers Note: http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=q&hs=1&r=1&results=1&t=0&txq=Kenneth+Cumber+examination&x=0&y=0&pbq=&dafdq=&dafmq=&dafyq=&datdq=&datmq=&datyq=&tyq=&o=10&sf=&ssnip=&ssnip=on&e=-------10--1--on--0Kenneth+Cumber+exam-- RIN: MH:N500185
  61. Source: #S67 AtoJs Online > Search > Search Results Certainty: 0 BET 1915 AND 1924 Lists of teaching appointments. (After 1930 they were kept elsewhere). Note: RIN: MH:N500605 Note: http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs?a=q&r=1&results=1&stq=Education&e=--1915---1934--10--1----on--0Cumber--
  62. Source: #S-1000000 http://ndhadeliver.natlib.govt.nz/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE12115559&dps_custom_att_1=tapuhi Certainty: 0

    Punakitere/Taheke and Otaua in the Hokianga. Beck, Martin James, 1953- : Papers. Ref: MSDL-1993. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand.  <a style="color: #222222; font-family: ProximaNova, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 15px;" href="http://natlib.govt.nz/records/30633179">http://natlib.govt.nz/records/30633179</a> 

    y - The North. TAHEKE PIRATES. A TALE of a TerribleTurmoil -</strong></p>ied that the Punakitere School would receive its death-knell within six weeks. I have been informed by Mr Goodhew (Chairman of Punakitere School Committee) thatword has been received from the Education Board that the school is to be removed to Taheke – so someone losses a suit of clothes which someone bet someone – savvy ? I am informed however that already the receipt of the intelligence has caused a girding of lions and also a gnashing of teeth (some of which were broken in the operation) One gentleman told me that he was ordering a steel helmet – I dunno why. It is further reported that an agitation is on foot to secure the release of Rua to act as organizer of a rebellion which will break out. Armours are beingcollected and one valiant bought a copy of the ―Three Musketeers under the impression that it dealt with Shillelaghs ? Tactics. The Punakitere folk (or some, at least) accuse Tahekeites of being robbers of their school. The ites in turn, place their thumbs or their noses and extend their fingers in a vulgar manner. Lifelong friendships have been severed and happy homes broken asunder thro‘ the turmoil arising from the Taheke school question. The question arises, Why? The reason is not for to seek. The claim of Taheke to a school is beyond question. A school established there would in a very short time be entitled to an assistant which means greater efficiency. Had Punakitere admitted the need of Taheke and when the old committee had the opportunity, recommended the Board to open aschool at Taheke, then even if the request had not been granted the sweet spirit of coalition would have melted the heart of Taheke and the war which is being raged with such spleen would have been avoided. There appears to be too much regard for the local school as a recreational hall, but it should be borne in mind that Lincoln‘s formula, the greatest good for the greatest number still holds with it old force. That greatest number will be found at Taheke where the Punakitere School is going.</p>ted to be availing 101 themselves of the recent few fine days by plowing and discing... </p>> Mr J. D. McKenzie Chairman of the Education Board visited the Taheke and Punakitere districts last week to inquire into the merits of the local school site dispute. In conversation with Mr McKenzie it was gathered that to his mind the solution of the difficulty is to be found in a re-spacing of the schools; to which the district lends itself. ―The Taheke-Punakitere district is one of growing importance, said Mr McKenzie, ―and settlement will be progressive. A school must be established at Taheke, probably across the river, removing it to the furthest convenient distance from Punakitere. The Punakitere School would remain where it is and the Otaua Native School removed to a site higher up the valley...</p> DEPTUATIONS AND COUNTER ATTACKS. Taheke School Question.</strong> When it was made known that School Inspector Jas G. T. Cox was to pay a visit to the Punakitere School the local armies girded their loins and looked to their gas retorts. So in the glorioustwilight of the evening of October 9th long queues of eager deputaionists wended their victorious pilgrimage to the temporary Inspectorial shrine to lay siege to the citadel of omnipotence. How‘s that for a metaphor ? The deputation of Tahekeites consisted of Messes E. Goodhew (Chairman Taheke School Committee) G. Bott (Secretary ditto) Cope (Member of same) the whole being reinforced by MrH. M. Webster J P, and Mr A. L. Bradbury (Postmaster) With concise brevity these gentlemen spoke of needs of Taheke in the scholastic line and the surfeit at Punakitere side where two schools stand within a mile or so of each other. It was pointed out that some thousands (exact number forgotten by this scribe) of children were growing up in Taheke, who were of school age yet debarred from the elemental privilege of primary education. The deputation made a sporting offer I understand to produce by hook or by crook 34 Maori children and 14 European youngsters and because 34 and 14 make 48 they considered that to make the equation complete the identity should be supplemented by 48 kids equal 1 school. Now since this may be execrable maths but darned good logie, so the Inspector said in effect ―Yessirs― The free site donated by Mr Herenaiaia Hori was mentioned and next day inspected whilst the proposal to commence the school immediately in Mr Webster‘s Hall came under discussion. The inspector was non-committal of course but the deputation smiles and winks knowingly, whilst the statement that the Education Board‘s architect (Mr J. Farrell) was coming to the district shortly to inquire as to the means of removing the Punakitere School to Taheke, has caused audible merriment among certain pasture.</p>r deputation consisting of several well known residents and hot teaand cakes visited the inspector the next day and showed him how indispensible the Punakitere School was in its present site. How can we have socials if you take it away? What about services ? Besidesit has been here for years it‘s a landmark. It will affect the valuation of our property.. Punakitere Correspondent.</p>trong>1917 October 25th Northern Advocat.e.</strong> The chairman of the Auckland Education Board (Mr J. D. McKenzie) has just returned from a visit to the North, where he has been inspecting the Taheke district, Hokianga, with regard to the establishment of a school. There has been some difference of opinion lately amongst the settlers as to the location of the new school. There are already schools at Punakitere and Otaua, and the trouble has been in regard to placingthe new school in a position to serve the district and yet meet the requirements of the Board's regulations. Mr McKenzie, has decided to recommend that the new school be built upon the west side of the river from Taheke, leaving the central school at Punakitere, and shifting the Otaua school two miles further up the valley to suit the requirements of the new settlers. The schools will thus be about four miles apart. It is rarely possible to make such an arrangement, but the 102 district lends itself admirably to the alteration and all scholars in the locality will thus be placed within reach of educational facilities... </p>/strong> ...  A member of the Education Board in a letter to another gentleman states the Board proposes opening a school in Taheke immediately and to close the Punakitere School forthwith... </p> 'im...</p>>1918 May 3rd Friday, The Luminary - The North. ANNUAL SPORTS AT PUNAKITERE – Meeting of Householders. What was probably the largest gathering in local history took place in the Punakitere School on Monday April 27th for the purpose of electing a school committee. The election was fought out on the question of the Punakitere-Taheke School site... It was evitable from the outset of the meeting that the considerable feeling was lying but dormant, and required but a spark to ignite the gathering to complete combustion and "bust-up." Mr E. Goodhew, chairman of the outgoing committee called for nominations for chairman of the meeting and Mr Gubb was elected by an overwhelming majority, but was subjected to a good deal of heckling until the interrupters were put into good humour by reference to photographs. During the election several electors were challenged by those present. This caused much heat; some swear words and much merriment. One person called another one "a scoundrel" a second referred to another party as "a low down creature." One irate individual told the chairman that he (the speaker) had his eye on him. The Chairman retorted by advising the heckler to always obey his instincts to look upon the noble things of life...</p>ed a step further. The secretary of the Education Board,writing to local folk on the question, advises that the Board has decided in accordance with the advisory inspector's recommendations, which were, that the Punakitere School be opened at Taheke Hall for a time pending decision as to a suitable building site at Taheke and that the Punakitere School be closed. This is the solution of the difficulty, and is the one for long advocated by many in a position to judge, since it will result in the minimum of inconvenience.</p>RE Pars – The Punakitere School now situated at the Taheke Hall has a roll number of 60 scholars.</strong> Noted in the Herald that City Council claims to own the old Punakitere School. This would seem to place the building in Mr W. Penney‘s property. Some fun. Mr J. Fell held Devine Service in the school on Sunday August 4. There was a satisfactory attendance. A good few damaged tins have been found near the Otaua School. Why ? </p>n> -</strong> to distance them selves from the disgruntled Punakitere folk who had objected to the school being moved, but was probably the one and same William Gordon Jones. </em></p>>TAHEKE TALK - The School. It is interesting to note that the Taheke School transferred from Punakitere now has a roll number sufficiently large to quantify for an assistant and one has been advertised for.</strong> This is a decided answer to those who maintained that a school at Taheke was not justified... </p>Mrs. McBeth a wee daughter. Good luck to her.</p>ost war Influenza Epidemic</strong> with disinfections hit the Far North as the rest of New Zealand, but the littlePunakitere Settlement seem to fare well.</p>picture]</strong></p>ile a new Punakitere District School was later built at Parahekeheke - possibly on the section next to William McLeod‟s second holding and it was opened in 1922. The old Punakitere Schoolhouse became obsolete and had been built on land that was owned by the Auckland City Council; it had recently been painted and it was eventually sold in February 1920 for £50.00 and became a private residence – a fine two-storied house now occupies the site.</em></p>kitere Special Settlement had declined, and there was an exodus oflocal residents who moved into the Taheke Township where they had set-up another temporary school in the Hall with a roll of 60 pupils in 1918.</em></p>
  63. Source: #S65 Correspondence with Mr K.M.H. Cumber (R20468460) Certainty: 0 1937 Correspondence between Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber and the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research [record group] Note: http://www.archway.archives.govt.nz/ViewFullItem.do?code=20468460
  64. Source: #S33 1928 Certainty: 0
  65. Source: #S33 1938 Certainty: 0
  66. Source: #S61 Papers Past > New Zealand Herald > 13 April 1933 > Page 12 > INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS Certainty: 0 13 APR 1933 When the Hon. R. Masters, Minister for Education visited Kenneth's school in April 1933, he reported that although he "arrived at the Taheke School an hour after closing time and did not expect to meet the children, he found them, he found them waiting to see him" Note:

    Note: http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&cl=search&d=NZH19330413.2.114&srpos=2&e=--1911---1940--10--1--on--2Taheke+school--
  67. Source: #S67 Various records relating to teaching appointments and submission to Monetary Committee Certainty: 0 BET 1915 AND 1923 Search results for "cumber" filtered by "Education". Records of teaching appointments. Note: Appointments after this time were recorded and kept elsewhere. See Archives New Zealand Research Resources: http://archives.govt.nz/resources/research-resources http://archives.govt.nz/education Note: http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs?a=q&r=1&results=1&stq=Education&e=--1915---1934--10--1----on--0Cumber--
  68. Source: #S139 Private- contact writer Certainty: 0
  69. Source: #S147 Medical Records Certainty: 0 BET 1940 AND 1950 Private Note: Available for free for relatives who can prove their descent. I have copies from the Auckland District Health Board. Note: http://www.adhb.govt.nz/documents/Information_Sheet_Release_of_Information.pdf
  70. Source: #S-1000000 http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs?a=q&r=11&results=1&e=--1908---1950--10--1----on--0cumber-- Certainty: 0

    See below:

    p> </p>li>lists of teachers 1914-1924.
  71.  </p>p;</p>
  72. Source: #S-1000000 http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs Certainty: 0

    Lists of teachers at Native Schools up until 1930 (listed elsewhere thereafter- see guide notes at NZ Archives: Archway).

  73. Source: #S61 Papers Past > Search > Search Results Certainty: 0 BET 1916 AND 1918 Teacher's examinations- as reported in papers Note: http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=q&hs=1&r=1&results=1&t=0&txq=Kenneth+Cumber+examination&x=0&y=0&pbq=&dafdq=&dafmq=&dafyq=&datdq=&datmq=&datyq=&tyq=&o=10&sf=&ssnip=&ssnip=on&e=-------10--1--on--0Kenneth+Cumber+exam-- RIN: MH:N500185
  74. Source: #S67 AtoJs Online > Search > Search Results Certainty: 0 BET 1915 AND 1924 Lists of teaching appointments. (After 1930 they were kept elsewhere). Note: RIN: MH:N500605 Note: http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs?a=q&r=1&results=1&stq=Education&e=--1915---1934--10--1----on--0Cumber--
  75. Source: #S65 Correspondence with Mr K.M.H. Cumber (R20468460) Certainty: 0 1937 Correspondence between Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber and the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research [record group] Note: http://www.archway.archives.govt.nz/ViewFullItem.do?code=20468460
  76. Source: #S67 Various records relating to teaching appointments and submission to Monetary Committee Certainty: 0 BET 1915 AND 1923 Search results for "cumber" filtered by "Education". Records of teaching appointments. Note: Appointments after this time were recorded and kept elsewhere. See Archives New Zealand Research Resources: http://archives.govt.nz/resources/research-resources http://archives.govt.nz/education Note: http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs?a=q&r=1&results=1&stq=Education&e=--1915---1934--10--1----on--0Cumber--
  77. Source: #S-1000000 http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs?a=q&r=11&results=1&e=--1908---1950--10--1----on--0cumber-- Certainty: 0

    See below:

    p> </p>li>lists of teachers 1914-1924.
  78.  </p>p;</p>
  79. Source: #S61 Exemptions from military service Certainty: 0 1918 Note: http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&cl=search&d=DOM19180802.2.7&srpos=2&e=--1908---1948--100-%2cAMBPA%2cALG%2cAHCOG%2cAMW%2cAG%2cAS%2cBPB%2cBOPT%2cBH%2cBA%2cCHARG%2cCL%2cTC%2cDSC%2cDTN%2cDOM%2cEG%2cEP%2cFP%2cFS%2cNZFL%2cGRA%2cHAEATA%2cHAST%2cHNS%2cHBH%2cHBWT%2cHIIR%2cHOKIOI%2cHC%2cHLC%2cHUIA%2cHN%2cHVI%2cIT%2cJUBIL%2cKAHITI%2cKT%2cKWE%2cKOP%2cKCC%2cKORIM%2cLWM%2cLTCBG%2cLT%2cMH%2cMS%2cMT%2cMMTKM%2cMW%2cMEX%2cMATAR%2cME%2cMIC%2cMTBM%2cNEM%2cNENZC%2cNZABIG%2cNZCPNA%2cNZGWS%2cNZH%2cNZI%2cNZSCSG%2cNZT%2cNZ%2cNOT%2cNA%2cNZTR%2cOAM%2cTO%2cOG%2cODT%2cOW%2cOSWCC%2cOO%2cPAKIOM%2cPIHOI%2cPBH%2cCHP%2cP%2cPUKEH%2cPWT%2cROTWKG%2cSTSSA%2cSTSSG%2cSWH%2cSAMZ%2cST%2cTS%2cSUNCH%2cTAKIT%2cTDN%2cTH%2cTAN%2cTPT%2cTHA%2cTHS%2cTHD%2cTT%2cUHWR%2cVT%2cWCHG%2cWCHT%2cWHDT%2cWT%2cWDA%2cWAG%2cWDT%2cWAIST%2cWAKAM%2cWANANG%2cWC%2cWH%2cWI%2cWCT%2cWEST%2cWHETU-1--on--0Kenneth+Cumber-- RIN: MH:N500112
  80. Source: #S-1000000 http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs Certainty: 0

    Lists of teachers at Native Schools up until 1930 (listed elsewhere thereafter- see guide notes at NZ Archives: Archway).

  81. Source: #S61 Papers Past > Search > Search Results Certainty: 0 BET 1916 AND 1918 Teacher's examinations- as reported in papers Note: http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=q&hs=1&r=1&results=1&t=0&txq=Kenneth+Cumber+examination&x=0&y=0&pbq=&dafdq=&dafmq=&dafyq=&datdq=&datmq=&datyq=&tyq=&o=10&sf=&ssnip=&ssnip=on&e=-------10--1--on--0Kenneth+Cumber+exam-- RIN: MH:N500185
  82. Source: #S67 AtoJs Online > Search > Search Results Certainty: 0 BET 1915 AND 1924 Lists of teaching appointments. (After 1930 they were kept elsewhere). Note: RIN: MH:N500605 Note: http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs?a=q&r=1&results=1&stq=Education&e=--1915---1934--10--1----on--0Cumber--
  83. Source: #S67 Various records relating to teaching appointments and submission to Monetary Committee Certainty: 0 BET 1915 AND 1923 Search results for "cumber" filtered by "Education". Records of teaching appointments. Note: Appointments after this time were recorded and kept elsewhere. See Archives New Zealand Research Resources: http://archives.govt.nz/resources/research-resources http://archives.govt.nz/education Note: http://atojs.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/atojs?a=q&r=1&results=1&stq=Education&e=--1915---1934--10--1----on--0Cumber--
  84. Source: #S-1000000 https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QJDJ-6B3C Certainty: 0 10 AUG 1908

    Passenger list states occupation as farmer. It may be that he worked on one of the Dutch flower-frowing farms which operated between 1900-1910 in Guernsey... this may account for him saying that heleft because he was "allergic to daffodils" (!?)

  85. Source: #S65 Correspondence with Mr K.M.H. Cumber (R20468460) Certainty: 0 1937 Correspondence between Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber and the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research [record group] Note: http://www.archway.archives.govt.nz/ViewFullItem.do?code=20468460
  86. Source: #S37 Certainty: 0
  87. Source: #S-1000000 http://www.fndc.govt.nz/search/search-cemetery-record?sq_content_src=%2BdXJsPWh0dHAlM0ElMkYlMkZ3ZWJkYXRhLmZuZGMuZ292dC5ueiUyRkNlbWV0ZXJ5JTJGQ1JpbnRlcnJlZEhUTUwucGhwJTNGd2FycmFudCUzRDY1NzQmYWxsPTE%3D#a0 Certainty: 0

    Record of Internment

  88. Source: #S71 Cemetery and burial details for Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber Certainty: 0 2015 Cemetery : KAIKOHE CEMETERY Division : PUBLIC LAWN Block : A Plot : 82 Notes : SHARED CONCRETE SLAB & HEADSTONE WITH CROSS Date Of Death : 09/08/1950 Burial or Ashes : Burial Note: Age: 62 [Mabel is also buried here]. Note: http://www.fndc.govt.nz/search/search-cemetery-record?sq_content_src=%2BdXJsPWh0dHAlM0ElMkYlMkZ3ZWJkYXRhLmZuZGMuZ292dC5ueiUyRkNlbWV0ZXJ5JTJGQ1JpbnRlcnJlZEhUTUwucGhwJTNGd2FycmFudCUzRDY1NzQmYWxsPTE%3D#a0
  89. Source: #S-1000000 http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&cl=search&d=WDT19101203.2.16&srpos=8&e=--1908---1948--100-%2cAMBPA%2cALG%2cAHCOG%2cAMW%2cAG%2cAS%2cBPB%2cBOPT%2cBH%2cBA%2cCHARG%2cCL%2cTC%2cDSC%2cDTN%2cDOM%2cEG%2cEP%2cFP%2cFS%2cNZFL%2cGRA%2cHAEATA%2 Certainty: 0 6 DEC 1910

    "The Bishop of Wellington has licensed Mr Kenneth Cumber as a lay reader for Pahiatua" [St Peter's Anglican Church].

  90. Source: #S-1000000 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederic_Wallis Certainty: 0 1910

    The Bishop of Wellington in 1908 was The Rt Rev Frederic Wallis, MA, DD (1854, Hastings - 24 June 1928, Bournemouth). 

  91. Source: #S-1000000 http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=27693 Certainty: 0 ABT 1910

    St Peter's Church, Anglican, Pahiatua, [ca 1910]

    : #faebd3;">Reference Number: PA1-o-966-047</p>h: normal; line-height: 1.5em; font-family: 'Trebuchet MS', Arial, sans-serif; color: #1e1e1e; background-color: #faebd3;">St Peter's Anglican Church in Pahiatua, photographed by Muir and Moodie, circa 1910.</p>
  92. Source: #S4 Certainty: 0
  93. Source: #S9 Certainty: 0 Record for Mabel Clarice Cumber Note: http://search.ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=NewZealandCemetery&h=584444&indiv=try
  94. Source: #S147 Medical Records Certainty: 0 BET 1940 AND 1950 Private Note: Available for free for relatives who can prove their descent. I have copies from the Auckland District Health Board. Note: http://www.adhb.govt.nz/documents/Information_Sheet_Release_of_Information.pdf
  95. Source: #S-1000000 http://ndhadeliver.natlib.govt.nz/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE12115559&dps_custom_att_1=tapuhi Certainty: 0

    Punakitere/Taheke and Otaua in the Hokianga. Beck, Martin James, 1953- : Papers. Ref: MSDL-1993. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand.  <a style="color: #222222; font-family: ProximaNova, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 15px;" href="http://natlib.govt.nz/records/30633179">http://natlib.govt.nz/records/30633179</a> 

    y - The North. TAHEKE PIRATES. A TALE of a TerribleTurmoil -</strong></p>ied that the Punakitere School would receive its death-knell within six weeks. I have been informed by Mr Goodhew (Chairman of Punakitere School Committee) thatword has been received from the Education Board that the school is to be removed to Taheke – so someone losses a suit of clothes which someone bet someone – savvy ? I am informed however that already the receipt of the intelligence has caused a girding of lions and also a gnashing of teeth (some of which were broken in the operation) One gentleman told me that he was ordering a steel helmet – I dunno why. It is further reported that an agitation is on foot to secure the release of Rua to act as organizer of a rebellion which will break out. Armours are beingcollected and one valiant bought a copy of the ―Three Musketeers under the impression that it dealt with Shillelaghs ? Tactics. The Punakitere folk (or some, at least) accuse Tahekeites of being robbers of their school. The ites in turn, place their thumbs or their noses and extend their fingers in a vulgar manner. Lifelong friendships have been severed and happy homes broken asunder thro‘ the turmoil arising from the Taheke school question. The question arises, Why? The reason is not for to seek. The claim of Taheke to a school is beyond question. A school established there would in a very short time be entitled to an assistant which means greater efficiency. Had Punakitere admitted the need of Taheke and when the old committee had the opportunity, recommended the Board to open aschool at Taheke, then even if the request had not been granted the sweet spirit of coalition would have melted the heart of Taheke and the war which is being raged with such spleen would have been avoided. There appears to be too much regard for the local school as a recreational hall, but it should be borne in mind that Lincoln‘s formula, the greatest good for the greatest number still holds with it old force. That greatest number will be found at Taheke where the Punakitere School is going.</p>ted to be availing 101 themselves of the recent few fine days by plowing and discing... </p>> Mr J. D. McKenzie Chairman of the Education Board visited the Taheke and Punakitere districts last week to inquire into the merits of the local school site dispute. In conversation with Mr McKenzie it was gathered that to his mind the solution of the difficulty is to be found in a re-spacing of the schools; to which the district lends itself. ―The Taheke-Punakitere district is one of growing importance, said Mr McKenzie, ―and settlement will be progressive. A school must be established at Taheke, probably across the river, removing it to the furthest convenient distance from Punakitere. The Punakitere School would remain where it is and the Otaua Native School removed to a site higher up the valley...</p> DEPTUATIONS AND COUNTER ATTACKS. Taheke School Question.</strong> When it was made known that School Inspector Jas G. T. Cox was to pay a visit to the Punakitere School the local armies girded their loins and looked to their gas retorts. So in the glorioustwilight of the evening of October 9th long queues of eager deputaionists wended their victorious pilgrimage to the temporary Inspectorial shrine to lay siege to the citadel of omnipotence. How‘s that for a metaphor ? The deputation of Tahekeites consisted of Messes E. Goodhew (Chairman Taheke School Committee) G. Bott (Secretary ditto) Cope (Member of same) the whole being reinforced by MrH. M. Webster J P, and Mr A. L. Bradbury (Postmaster) With concise brevity these gentlemen spoke of needs of Taheke in the scholastic line and the surfeit at Punakitere side where two schools stand within a mile or so of each other. It was pointed out that some thousands (exact number forgotten by this scribe) of children were growing up in Taheke, who were of school age yet debarred from the elemental privilege of primary education. The deputation made a sporting offer I understand to produce by hook or by crook 34 Maori children and 14 European youngsters and because 34 and 14 make 48 they considered that to make the equation complete the identity should be supplemented by 48 kids equal 1 school. Now since this may be execrable maths but darned good logie, so the Inspector said in effect ―Yessirs― The free site donated by Mr Herenaiaia Hori was mentioned and next day inspected whilst the proposal to commence the school immediately in Mr Webster‘s Hall came under discussion. The inspector was non-committal of course but the deputation smiles and winks knowingly, whilst the statement that the Education Board‘s architect (Mr J. Farrell) was coming to the district shortly to inquire as to the means of removing the Punakitere School to Taheke, has caused audible merriment among certain pasture.</p>r deputation consisting of several well known residents and hot teaand cakes visited the inspector the next day and showed him how indispensible the Punakitere School was in its present site. How can we have socials if you take it away? What about services ? Besidesit has been here for years it‘s a landmark. It will affect the valuation of our property.. Punakitere Correspondent.</p>trong>1917 October 25th Northern Advocat.e.</strong> The chairman of the Auckland Education Board (Mr J. D. McKenzie) has just returned from a visit to the North, where he has been inspecting the Taheke district, Hokianga, with regard to the establishment of a school. There has been some difference of opinion lately amongst the settlers as to the location of the new school. There are already schools at Punakitere and Otaua, and the trouble has been in regard to placingthe new school in a position to serve the district and yet meet the requirements of the Board's regulations. Mr McKenzie, has decided to recommend that the new school be built upon the west side of the river from Taheke, leaving the central school at Punakitere, and shifting the Otaua school two miles further up the valley to suit the requirements of the new settlers. The schools will thus be about four miles apart. It is rarely possible to make such an arrangement, but the 102 district lends itself admirably to the alteration and all scholars in the locality will thus be placed within reach of educational facilities... </p>/strong> ...  A member of the Education Board in a letter to another gentleman states the Board proposes opening a school in Taheke immediately and to close the Punakitere School forthwith... </p> 'im...</p>>1918 May 3rd Friday, The Luminary - The North. ANNUAL SPORTS AT PUNAKITERE – Meeting of Householders. What was probably the largest gathering in local history took place in the Punakitere School on Monday April 27th for the purpose of electing a school committee. The election was fought out on the question of the Punakitere-Taheke School site... It was evitable from the outset of the meeting that the considerable feeling was lying but dormant, and required but a spark to ignite the gathering to complete combustion and "bust-up." Mr E. Goodhew, chairman of the outgoing committee called for nominations for chairman of the meeting and Mr Gubb was elected by an overwhelming majority, but was subjected to a good deal of heckling until the interrupters were put into good humour by reference to photographs. During the election several electors were challenged by those present. This caused much heat; some swear words and much merriment. One person called another one "a scoundrel" a second referred to another party as "a low down creature." One irate individual told the chairman that he (the speaker) had his eye on him. The Chairman retorted by advising the heckler to always obey his instincts to look upon the noble things of life...</p>ed a step further. The secretary of the Education Board,writing to local folk on the question, advises that the Board has decided in accordance with the advisory inspector's recommendations, which were, that the Punakitere School be opened at Taheke Hall for a time pending decision as to a suitable building site at Taheke and that the Punakitere School be closed. This is the solution of the difficulty, and is the one for long advocated by many in a position to judge, since it will result in the minimum of inconvenience.</p>RE Pars – The Punakitere School now situated at the Taheke Hall has a roll number of 60 scholars.</strong> Noted in the Herald that City Council claims to own the old Punakitere School. This would seem to place the building in Mr W. Penney‘s property. Some fun. Mr J. Fell held Devine Service in the school on Sunday August 4. There was a satisfactory attendance. A good few damaged tins have been found near the Otaua School. Why ? </p>n> -</strong> to distance them selves from the disgruntled Punakitere folk who had objected to the school being moved, but was probably the one and same William Gordon Jones. </em></p>>TAHEKE TALK - The School. It is interesting to note that the Taheke School transferred from Punakitere now has a roll number sufficiently large to quantify for an assistant and one has been advertised for.</strong> This is a decided answer to those who maintained that a school at Taheke was not justified... </p>Mrs. McBeth a wee daughter. Good luck to her.</p>ost war Influenza Epidemic</strong> with disinfections hit the Far North as the rest of New Zealand, but the littlePunakitere Settlement seem to fare well.</p>picture]</strong></p>ile a new Punakitere District School was later built at Parahekeheke - possibly on the section next to William McLeod‟s second holding and it was opened in 1922. The old Punakitere Schoolhouse became obsolete and had been built on land that was owned by the Auckland City Council; it had recently been painted and it was eventually sold in February 1920 for £50.00 and became a private residence – a fine two-storied house now occupies the site.</em></p>kitere Special Settlement had declined, and there was an exodus oflocal residents who moved into the Taheke Township where they had set-up another temporary school in the Hall with a roll of 60 pupils in 1918.</em></p>
  96. Source: #S62 Certainty: 0
  97. Source: #S62 Certainty: 0
  98. Source: #S33 1919 Certainty: 0
  99. Source: #S33 1914 Certainty: 0
  100. Source: #S33 1914 Certainty: 0
  101. Source: #S-1000000 http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&cl=search&d=WDT19101203.2.16&srpos=8&e=--1908---1948--100-%2cAMBPA%2cALG%2cAHCOG%2cAMW%2cAG%2cAS%2cBPB%2cBOPT%2cBH%2cBA%2cCHARG%2cCL%2cTC%2cDSC%2cDTN%2cDOM%2cEG%2cEP%2cFP%2cFS%2cNZFL%2cGRA%2cHAEATA%2 Certainty: 0 6 DEC 1910

    "The Bishop of Wellington has licensed Mr Kenneth Cumber as a lay reader for Pahiatua" [St Peter's Anglican Church].

  102. Source: #S-1000000 http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=27693 Certainty: 0 ABT 1910

    St Peter's Church, Anglican, Pahiatua, [ca 1910]

    : #faebd3;">Reference Number: PA1-o-966-047</p>h: normal; line-height: 1.5em; font-family: 'Trebuchet MS', Arial, sans-serif; color: #1e1e1e; background-color: #faebd3;">St Peter's Anglican Church in Pahiatua, photographed by Muir and Moodie, circa 1910.</p>
  103. Source: #S33 1911 Certainty: 0
  104. Source: #S62 Certainty: 0
  105. Source: #S62 Certainty: 0
  106. Source: #S62 Certainty: 0
  107. Source: #S62 Certainty: 0
  108. Source: #S62 Certainty: 0
  109. Source: #S-1000000 http://ndhadeliver.natlib.govt.nz/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE12115559&dps_custom_att_1=tapuhi Certainty: 0

    Punakitere/Taheke and Otaua in the Hokianga. Beck, Martin James, 1953- : Papers. Ref: MSDL-1993. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand.  <a style="color: #222222; font-family: ProximaNova, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 15px;" href="http://natlib.govt.nz/records/30633179">http://natlib.govt.nz/records/30633179</a> 

    y - The North. TAHEKE PIRATES. A TALE of a TerribleTurmoil -</strong></p>ied that the Punakitere School would receive its death-knell within six weeks. I have been informed by Mr Goodhew (Chairman of Punakitere School Committee) thatword has been received from the Education Board that the school is to be removed to Taheke – so someone losses a suit of clothes which someone bet someone – savvy ? I am informed however that already the receipt of the intelligence has caused a girding of lions and also a gnashing of teeth (some of which were broken in the operation) One gentleman told me that he was ordering a steel helmet – I dunno why. It is further reported that an agitation is on foot to secure the release of Rua to act as organizer of a rebellion which will break out. Armours are beingcollected and one valiant bought a copy of the ―Three Musketeers under the impression that it dealt with Shillelaghs ? Tactics. The Punakitere folk (or some, at least) accuse Tahekeites of being robbers of their school. The ites in turn, place their thumbs or their noses and extend their fingers in a vulgar manner. Lifelong friendships have been severed and happy homes broken asunder thro‘ the turmoil arising from the Taheke school question. The question arises, Why? The reason is not for to seek. The claim of Taheke to a school is beyond question. A school established there would in a very short time be entitled to an assistant which means greater efficiency. Had Punakitere admitted the need of Taheke and when the old committee had the opportunity, recommended the Board to open aschool at Taheke, then even if the request had not been granted the sweet spirit of coalition would have melted the heart of Taheke and the war which is being raged with such spleen would have been avoided. There appears to be too much regard for the local school as a recreational hall, but it should be borne in mind that Lincoln‘s formula, the greatest good for the greatest number still holds with it old force. That greatest number will be found at Taheke where the Punakitere School is going.</p>ted to be availing 101 themselves of the recent few fine days by plowing and discing... </p>> Mr J. D. McKenzie Chairman of the Education Board visited the Taheke and Punakitere districts last week to inquire into the merits of the local school site dispute. In conversation with Mr McKenzie it was gathered that to his mind the solution of the difficulty is to be found in a re-spacing of the schools; to which the district lends itself. ―The Taheke-Punakitere district is one of growing importance, said Mr McKenzie, ―and settlement will be progressive. A school must be established at Taheke, probably across the river, removing it to the furthest convenient distance from Punakitere. The Punakitere School would remain where it is and the Otaua Native School removed to a site higher up the valley...</p> DEPTUATIONS AND COUNTER ATTACKS. Taheke School Question.</strong> When it was made known that School Inspector Jas G. T. Cox was to pay a visit to the Punakitere School the local armies girded their loins and looked to their gas retorts. So in the glorioustwilight of the evening of October 9th long queues of eager deputaionists wended their victorious pilgrimage to the temporary Inspectorial shrine to lay siege to the citadel of omnipotence. How‘s that for a metaphor ? The deputation of Tahekeites consisted of Messes E. Goodhew (Chairman Taheke School Committee) G. Bott (Secretary ditto) Cope (Member of same) the whole being reinforced by MrH. M. Webster J P, and Mr A. L. Bradbury (Postmaster) With concise brevity these gentlemen spoke of needs of Taheke in the scholastic line and the surfeit at Punakitere side where two schools stand within a mile or so of each other. It was pointed out that some thousands (exact number forgotten by this scribe) of children were growing up in Taheke, who were of school age yet debarred from the elemental privilege of primary education. The deputation made a sporting offer I understand to produce by hook or by crook 34 Maori children and 14 European youngsters and because 34 and 14 make 48 they considered that to make the equation complete the identity should be supplemented by 48 kids equal 1 school. Now since this may be execrable maths but darned good logie, so the Inspector said in effect ―Yessirs― The free site donated by Mr Herenaiaia Hori was mentioned and next day inspected whilst the proposal to commence the school immediately in Mr Webster‘s Hall came under discussion. The inspector was non-committal of course but the deputation smiles and winks knowingly, whilst the statement that the Education Board‘s architect (Mr J. Farrell) was coming to the district shortly to inquire as to the means of removing the Punakitere School to Taheke, has caused audible merriment among certain pasture.</p>r deputation consisting of several well known residents and hot teaand cakes visited the inspector the next day and showed him how indispensible the Punakitere School was in its present site. How can we have socials if you take it away? What about services ? Besidesit has been here for years it‘s a landmark. It will affect the valuation of our property.. Punakitere Correspondent.</p>trong>1917 October 25th Northern Advocat.e.</strong> The chairman of the Auckland Education Board (Mr J. D. McKenzie) has just returned from a visit to the North, where he has been inspecting the Taheke district, Hokianga, with regard to the establishment of a school. There has been some difference of opinion lately amongst the settlers as to the location of the new school. There are already schools at Punakitere and Otaua, and the trouble has been in regard to placingthe new school in a position to serve the district and yet meet the requirements of the Board's regulations. Mr McKenzie, has decided to recommend that the new school be built upon the west side of the river from Taheke, leaving the central school at Punakitere, and shifting the Otaua school two miles further up the valley to suit the requirements of the new settlers. The schools will thus be about four miles apart. It is rarely possible to make such an arrangement, but the 102 district lends itself admirably to the alteration and all scholars in the locality will thus be placed within reach of educational facilities... </p>/strong> ...  A member of the Education Board in a letter to another gentleman states the Board proposes opening a school in Taheke immediately and to close the Punakitere School forthwith... </p> 'im...</p>>1918 May 3rd Friday, The Luminary - The North. ANNUAL SPORTS AT PUNAKITERE – Meeting of Householders. What was probably the largest gathering in local history took place in the Punakitere School on Monday April 27th for the purpose of electing a school committee. The election was fought out on the question of the Punakitere-Taheke School site... It was evitable from the outset of the meeting that the considerable feeling was lying but dormant, and required but a spark to ignite the gathering to complete combustion and "bust-up." Mr E. Goodhew, chairman of the outgoing committee called for nominations for chairman of the meeting and Mr Gubb was elected by an overwhelming majority, but was subjected to a good deal of heckling until the interrupters were put into good humour by reference to photographs. During the election several electors were challenged by those present. This caused much heat; some swear words and much merriment. One person called another one "a scoundrel" a second referred to another party as "a low down creature." One irate individual told the chairman that he (the speaker) had his eye on him. The Chairman retorted by advising the heckler to always obey his instincts to look upon the noble things of life...</p>ed a step further. The secretary of the Education Board,writing to local folk on the question, advises that the Board has decided in accordance with the advisory inspector's recommendations, which were, that the Punakitere School be opened at Taheke Hall for a time pending decision as to a suitable building site at Taheke and that the Punakitere School be closed. This is the solution of the difficulty, and is the one for long advocated by many in a position to judge, since it will result in the minimum of inconvenience.</p>RE Pars – The Punakitere School now situated at the Taheke Hall has a roll number of 60 scholars.</strong> Noted in the Herald that City Council claims to own the old Punakitere School. This would seem to place the building in Mr W. Penney‘s property. Some fun. Mr J. Fell held Devine Service in the school on Sunday August 4. There was a satisfactory attendance. A good few damaged tins have been found near the Otaua School. Why ? </p>n> -</strong> to distance them selves from the disgruntled Punakitere folk who had objected to the school being moved, but was probably the one and same William Gordon Jones. </em></p>>TAHEKE TALK - The School. It is interesting to note that the Taheke School transferred from Punakitere now has a roll number sufficiently large to quantify for an assistant and one has been advertised for.</strong> This is a decided answer to those who maintained that a school at Taheke was not justified... </p>Mrs. McBeth a wee daughter. Good luck to her.</p>ost war Influenza Epidemic</strong> with disinfections hit the Far North as the rest of New Zealand, but the littlePunakitere Settlement seem to fare well.</p>picture]</strong></p>ile a new Punakitere District School was later built at Parahekeheke - possibly on the section next to William McLeod‟s second holding and it was opened in 1922. The old Punakitere Schoolhouse became obsolete and had been built on land that was owned by the Auckland City Council; it had recently been painted and it was eventually sold in February 1920 for £50.00 and became a private residence – a fine two-storied house now occupies the site.</em></p>kitere Special Settlement had declined, and there was an exodus oflocal residents who moved into the Taheke Township where they had set-up another temporary school in the Hall with a roll of 60 pupils in 1918.</em></p>
  110. Source: #S65 Correspondence with Mr K.M.H. Cumber (R20468460) Certainty: 0 1937 Correspondence between Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber and the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research [record group] Note: http://www.archway.archives.govt.nz/ViewFullItem.do?code=20468460
  111. Source: #S33 1938 Certainty: 0
  112. Source: #S147 Medical Records Certainty: 0 BET 1940 AND 1950 Private Note: Available for free for relatives who can prove their descent. I have copies from the Auckland District Health Board. Note: http://www.adhb.govt.nz/documents/Information_Sheet_Release_of_Information.pdf
  113. Source: #S150 Private letter Certainty: 0
  114. Source: #S-1000000 http://ndhadeliver.natlib.govt.nz/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE12115559&dps_custom_att_1=tapuhi Certainty: 0

    Punakitere/Taheke and Otaua in the Hokianga. Beck, Martin James, 1953- : Papers. Ref: MSDL-1993. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand.  <a style="color: #222222; font-family: ProximaNova, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 15px;" href="http://natlib.govt.nz/records/30633179">http://natlib.govt.nz/records/30633179</a> 

    y - The North. TAHEKE PIRATES. A TALE of a TerribleTurmoil -</strong></p>ied that the Punakitere School would receive its death-knell within six weeks. I have been informed by Mr Goodhew (Chairman of Punakitere School Committee) thatword has been received from the Education Board that the school is to be removed to Taheke – so someone losses a suit of clothes which someone bet someone – savvy ? I am informed however that already the receipt of the intelligence has caused a girding of lions and also a gnashing of teeth (some of which were broken in the operation) One gentleman told me that he was ordering a steel helmet – I dunno why. It is further reported that an agitation is on foot to secure the release of Rua to act as organizer of a rebellion which will break out. Armours are beingcollected and one valiant bought a copy of the ―Three Musketeers under the impression that it dealt with Shillelaghs ? Tactics. The Punakitere folk (or some, at least) accuse Tahekeites of being robbers of their school. The ites in turn, place their thumbs or their noses and extend their fingers in a vulgar manner. Lifelong friendships have been severed and happy homes broken asunder thro‘ the turmoil arising from the Taheke school question. The question arises, Why? The reason is not for to seek. The claim of Taheke to a school is beyond question. A school established there would in a very short time be entitled to an assistant which means greater efficiency. Had Punakitere admitted the need of Taheke and when the old committee had the opportunity, recommended the Board to open aschool at Taheke, then even if the request had not been granted the sweet spirit of coalition would have melted the heart of Taheke and the war which is being raged with such spleen would have been avoided. There appears to be too much regard for the local school as a recreational hall, but it should be borne in mind that Lincoln‘s formula, the greatest good for the greatest number still holds with it old force. That greatest number will be found at Taheke where the Punakitere School is going.</p>ted to be availing 101 themselves of the recent few fine days by plowing and discing... </p>> Mr J. D. McKenzie Chairman of the Education Board visited the Taheke and Punakitere districts last week to inquire into the merits of the local school site dispute. In conversation with Mr McKenzie it was gathered that to his mind the solution of the difficulty is to be found in a re-spacing of the schools; to which the district lends itself. ―The Taheke-Punakitere district is one of growing importance, said Mr McKenzie, ―and settlement will be progressive. A school must be established at Taheke, probably across the river, removing it to the furthest convenient distance from Punakitere. The Punakitere School would remain where it is and the Otaua Native School removed to a site higher up the valley...</p> DEPTUATIONS AND COUNTER ATTACKS. Taheke School Question.</strong> When it was made known that School Inspector Jas G. T. Cox was to pay a visit to the Punakitere School the local armies girded their loins and looked to their gas retorts. So in the glorioustwilight of the evening of October 9th long queues of eager deputaionists wended their victorious pilgrimage to the temporary Inspectorial shrine to lay siege to the citadel of omnipotence. How‘s that for a metaphor ? The deputation of Tahekeites consisted of Messes E. Goodhew (Chairman Taheke School Committee) G. Bott (Secretary ditto) Cope (Member of same) the whole being reinforced by MrH. M. Webster J P, and Mr A. L. Bradbury (Postmaster) With concise brevity these gentlemen spoke of needs of Taheke in the scholastic line and the surfeit at Punakitere side where two schools stand within a mile or so of each other. It was pointed out that some thousands (exact number forgotten by this scribe) of children were growing up in Taheke, who were of school age yet debarred from the elemental privilege of primary education. The deputation made a sporting offer I understand to produce by hook or by crook 34 Maori children and 14 European youngsters and because 34 and 14 make 48 they considered that to make the equation complete the identity should be supplemented by 48 kids equal 1 school. Now since this may be execrable maths but darned good logie, so the Inspector said in effect ―Yessirs― The free site donated by Mr Herenaiaia Hori was mentioned and next day inspected whilst the proposal to commence the school immediately in Mr Webster‘s Hall came under discussion. The inspector was non-committal of course but the deputation smiles and winks knowingly, whilst the statement that the Education Board‘s architect (Mr J. Farrell) was coming to the district shortly to inquire as to the means of removing the Punakitere School to Taheke, has caused audible merriment among certain pasture.</p>r deputation consisting of several well known residents and hot teaand cakes visited the inspector the next day and showed him how indispensible the Punakitere School was in its present site. How can we have socials if you take it away? What about services ? Besidesit has been here for years it‘s a landmark. It will affect the valuation of our property.. Punakitere Correspondent.</p>trong>1917 October 25th Northern Advocat.e.</strong> The chairman of the Auckland Education Board (Mr J. D. McKenzie) has just returned from a visit to the North, where he has been inspecting the Taheke district, Hokianga, with regard to the establishment of a school. There has been some difference of opinion lately amongst the settlers as to the location of the new school. There are already schools at Punakitere and Otaua, and the trouble has been in regard to placingthe new school in a position to serve the district and yet meet the requirements of the Board's regulations. Mr McKenzie, has decided to recommend that the new school be built upon the west side of the river from Taheke, leaving the central school at Punakitere, and shifting the Otaua school two miles further up the valley to suit the requirements of the new settlers. The schools will thus be about four miles apart. It is rarely possible to make such an arrangement, but the 102 district lends itself admirably to the alteration and all scholars in the locality will thus be placed within reach of educational facilities... </p>/strong> ...  A member of the Education Board in a letter to another gentleman states the Board proposes opening a school in Taheke immediately and to close the Punakitere School forthwith... </p> 'im...</p>>1918 May 3rd Friday, The Luminary - The North. ANNUAL SPORTS AT PUNAKITERE – Meeting of Householders. What was probably the largest gathering in local history took place in the Punakitere School on Monday April 27th for the purpose of electing a school committee. The election was fought out on the question of the Punakitere-Taheke School site... It was evitable from the outset of the meeting that the considerable feeling was lying but dormant, and required but a spark to ignite the gathering to complete combustion and "bust-up." Mr E. Goodhew, chairman of the outgoing committee called for nominations for chairman of the meeting and Mr Gubb was elected by an overwhelming majority, but was subjected to a good deal of heckling until the interrupters were put into good humour by reference to photographs. During the election several electors were challenged by those present. This caused much heat; some swear words and much merriment. One person called another one "a scoundrel" a second referred to another party as "a low down creature." One irate individual told the chairman that he (the speaker) had his eye on him. The Chairman retorted by advising the heckler to always obey his instincts to look upon the noble things of life...</p>ed a step further. The secretary of the Education Board,writing to local folk on the question, advises that the Board has decided in accordance with the advisory inspector's recommendations, which were, that the Punakitere School be opened at Taheke Hall for a time pending decision as to a suitable building site at Taheke and that the Punakitere School be closed. This is the solution of the difficulty, and is the one for long advocated by many in a position to judge, since it will result in the minimum of inconvenience.</p>RE Pars – The Punakitere School now situated at the Taheke Hall has a roll number of 60 scholars.</strong> Noted in the Herald that City Council claims to own the old Punakitere School. This would seem to place the building in Mr W. Penney‘s property. Some fun. Mr J. Fell held Devine Service in the school on Sunday August 4. There was a satisfactory attendance. A good few damaged tins have been found near the Otaua School. Why ? </p>n> -</strong> to distance them selves from the disgruntled Punakitere folk who had objected to the school being moved, but was probably the one and same William Gordon Jones. </em></p>>TAHEKE TALK - The School. It is interesting to note that the Taheke School transferred from Punakitere now has a roll number sufficiently large to quantify for an assistant and one has been advertised for.</strong> This is a decided answer to those who maintained that a school at Taheke was not justified... </p>Mrs. McBeth a wee daughter. Good luck to her.</p>ost war Influenza Epidemic</strong> with disinfections hit the Far North as the rest of New Zealand, but the littlePunakitere Settlement seem to fare well.</p>picture]</strong></p>ile a new Punakitere District School was later built at Parahekeheke - possibly on the section next to William McLeod‟s second holding and it was opened in 1922. The old Punakitere Schoolhouse became obsolete and had been built on land that was owned by the Auckland City Council; it had recently been painted and it was eventually sold in February 1920 for £50.00 and became a private residence – a fine two-storied house now occupies the site.</em></p>kitere Special Settlement had declined, and there was an exodus oflocal residents who moved into the Taheke Township where they had set-up another temporary school in the Hall with a roll of 60 pupils in 1918.</em></p>
  115. Source: #S65 Correspondence with Mr K.M.H. Cumber (R20468460) Certainty: 0 1937 Correspondence between Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber and the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research [record group] Note: http://www.archway.archives.govt.nz/ViewFullItem.do?code=20468460
  116. Source: #S33 1928 Certainty: 0
  117. Source: #S-1000000 http://www.myheritage.com/research/collection-10155/1891-england-wales-census?s=293330771&itemId=29960192-&groupId=aeab272fcf2587e36e4b7b7b40d42ef0&action=showRecord&indId=individual-293330771-1500090 Certainty: 0

    Kennith MH Cumber
    Gender: Male
    Residence: 1891 - Rue Poudreuse RD, St Martin's, Guernsey, Channel Islands
    Age: 2
    Father: Henry Cumber
    Mother: Eliza J Cumber
    Census: Island:GuernseySeries:RG12Line:27 Parish:St Martin'sPiece:4706Image:15 Registrationdistrict:Guernsey, Saint MartinEnumerated by:Mathew Jehan County:GuernseyEnum. District:4 C Country:Channel IslandsPage:149 Date:1891-00-00Family:112 See household members
    <a id="household"></a>Household
    Relation to head; Name; Age
    Head; <a href="research/collection-10155/1891-england-wales-census?s=293330771&itemId=29960188-&groupId=aeab272fcf2587e36e4b7b7b40d42ef0&action=showRecord">Henry Cumber</a>; 34
    Wife; <a href="research/collection-10155/1891-england-wales-census?s=293330771&itemId=29960189-&groupId=aeab272fcf2587e36e4b7b7b40d42ef0&action=showRecord">Eliza J Cumber</a>; 37
    Daughter; <a href="research/collection-10155/1891-england-wales-census?s=293330771&itemId=29960190-&groupId=aeab272fcf2587e36e4b7b7b40d42ef0&action=showRecord">Dorothy D Cumber</a>; 5
    Daughter; <a href="research/collection-10155/1891-england-wales-census?s=293330771&itemId=29960191-&groupId=aeab272fcf2587e36e4b7b7b40d42ef0&action=showRecord">Marjorie M Cumber</a>; 4
    Son; <a href="research/collection-10155/1891-england-wales-census?s=293330771&itemId=29960192-&groupId=aeab272fcf2587e36e4b7b7b40d42ef0&action=showRecord">Kennith Mh Cumber</a>; 2
    Daughter; <a href="research/collection-10155/1891-england-wales-census?s=293330771&itemId=29960193-&groupId=aeab272fcf2587e36e4b7b7b40d42ef0&action=showRecord">Kathleen C Cumber</a>; 1
    Father in Law; <a href="research/collection-10155/1891-england-wales-census?s=293330771&itemId=29960194-&groupId=aeab272fcf2587e36e4b7b7b40d42ef0&action=showRecord">John Burgess</a>; 72
    Servant; <a href="research/collection-10155/1891-england-wales-census?s=293330771&itemId=29960195-&groupId=aeab272fcf2587e36e4b7b7b40d42ef0&action=showRecord">Louisa G Collenette</a>; 20

  118. Source: #S3 Class: RG12; Piece: 4706; Folio: 149; Page: 15; GSU roll: 6099816 Certainty: 0
  119. Source: #S-1000000 http://www.fndc.govt.nz/search/search-cemetery-record?sq_content_src=%2BdXJsPWh0dHAlM0ElMkYlMkZ3ZWJkYXRhLmZuZGMuZ292dC5ueiUyRkNlbWV0ZXJ5JTJGQ1JpbnRlcnJlZEhUTUwucGhwJTNGd2FycmFudCUzRDY1NzQmYWxsPTE%3D#a0 Certainty: 0

    Record of Internment

  120. Source: #S71 Cemetery and burial details for Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber Certainty: 0 2015 Cemetery : KAIKOHE CEMETERY Division : PUBLIC LAWN Block : A Plot : 82 Notes : SHARED CONCRETE SLAB & HEADSTONE WITH CROSS Date Of Death : 09/08/1950 Burial or Ashes : Burial Note: Age: 62 [Mabel is also buried here]. Note: http://www.fndc.govt.nz/search/search-cemetery-record?sq_content_src=%2BdXJsPWh0dHAlM0ElMkYlMkZ3ZWJkYXRhLmZuZGMuZ292dC5ueiUyRkNlbWV0ZXJ5JTJGQ1JpbnRlcnJlZEhUTUwucGhwJTNGd2FycmFudCUzRDY1NzQmYWxsPTE%3D#a0
  121. Source: #S9 Certainty: 0 Record for Mabel Clarice Cumber Note: http://search.ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=NewZealandCemetery&h=584444&indiv=try
  122. Source: #S66 Certainty: 0 Note: Left (interested in Wellington Workers' Education Association] RIN: MH:N637
  123. Source: #S61 Papers Past > Search > Search Results Certainty: 0 BET 1916 AND 1918 Teacher's examinations- as reported in papers Note: http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=q&hs=1&r=1&results=1&t=0&txq=Kenneth+Cumber+examination&x=0&y=0&pbq=&dafdq=&dafmq=&dafyq=&datdq=&datmq=&datyq=&tyq=&o=10&sf=&ssnip=&ssnip=on&e=-------10--1--on--0Kenneth+Cumber+exam-- RIN: MH:N500185
  124. Source: #S62 Certainty: 0
  125. Source: #S62 Certainty: 0
  126. Source: #S62 Certainty: 0
  127. Source: #S62 Certainty: 0
  128. Source: #S62 Certainty: 0
  129. Source: #S62 Certainty: 0
  130. Source: #S62 Certainty: 0
  131. Source: #S62 Certainty: 0
  132. Source: #S62 Certainty: 0
  133. Source: #S-1000000 http://www.myheritage.com/research/collection-10156/1901-england-wales-census?s=126234902&itemId=102395899-&groupId=ded00dbfcdea533e2b6fe9ae1b9c7f3d&action=showRecord&indId=individual-126234902-1000108 Certainty: 0 1901

    The National Archives, London, England

  134. Source: #S66 Certainty: 0 Note: Left (interested in Wellington Workers' Education Association] RIN: MH:N637
  135. Source: #S139 Private- contact writer Certainty: 0
  136. Source: #S-1000000 http://www.findboatpics.com.au/spss.html Certainty: 0 ABT 1906

    Picture of the ship "Mamari"

  137. Source: #S-1000000 https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QJDJ-6B3C Certainty: 0 10 AUG 1910

    Passenger lists from Ancestry.com and familysearch.org

  138. Source: #S60 The Ship "Mamari" - Steamship Line: Shaw, Savill & Albion Coy Ld. Certainty: 0 1904 Note: http://www.findboatpics.com.au/spss.html
  139. Source: #S37 Certainty: 0
  140. Source: #S59 Will of Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber Certainty: 0 23 DEC 1925
  141. Source: #S59 Will of Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber Certainty: 0 23 DEC 1925
  142. Source: #S-1000000 http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&cl=search&d=WDT19101203.2.16&srpos=8&e=--1908---1948--100-%2cAMBPA%2cALG%2cAHCOG%2cAMW%2cAG%2cAS%2cBPB%2cBOPT%2cBH%2cBA%2cCHARG%2cCL%2cTC%2cDSC%2cDTN%2cDOM%2cEG%2cEP%2cFP%2cFS%2cNZFL%2cGRA%2cHAEATA%2 Certainty: 0 6 DEC 1910

    "The Bishop of Wellington has licensed Mr Kenneth Cumber as a lay reader for Pahiatua" [St Peter's Anglican Church].

  143. Source: #S-1000000 http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&cl=search&d=MS19110128.2.22&srpos=8&e=-------10--1----0cumber+quiet+wedding-- Certainty: 0 28 JAN 1911

    <a href="http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&cl=search&d=MS19110128.2.22&srpos=8&e=-------10--1----0cumber+quiet+wedding--">Wedding</a> 24 Jan 1911

  144. Source: #S-1000000 http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=27693 Certainty: 0 ABT 1910

    St Peter's Church, Anglican, Pahiatua, [ca 1910]

    : #faebd3;">Reference Number: PA1-o-966-047</p>h: normal; line-height: 1.5em; font-family: 'Trebuchet MS', Arial, sans-serif; color: #1e1e1e; background-color: #faebd3;">St Peter's Anglican Church in Pahiatua, photographed by Muir and Moodie, circa 1910.</p>
  145. Source: #S4 Certainty: 0
  146. Source: #S139 Private- contact writer Certainty: 0
  147. Source: #S147 Medical Records Certainty: 0 BET 1940 AND 1950 Private Note: Available for free for relatives who can prove their descent. I have copies from the Auckland District Health Board. Note: http://www.adhb.govt.nz/documents/Information_Sheet_Release_of_Information.pdf
  148. Source: #S2 Ancestry Family Tree Certainty: 0 http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=0&pid=1412

No SOUR record found with id S-1000000.

  • Source: S1 Ancestry.com New Zealand Army WWI Reserve Rolls, 1916-1917 Publication: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.
  • Source: S139 Private- contact writer
  • Source: S140 Ancestry.com England, United Grand Lodge of England Freemason Membership Registers, 1751-1921 Publication: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.
  • Source: S147 Avondale Hospital - Medical Records 1940-1950 from Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber Note: Contact the ADHB for details. Proof of descent required (birth/marriage certificates).
  • Source: S150 Private handwritten family records
  • Source: S164 Public domain
  • Source: S2 Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.
  • Source: S3 Ancestry.com 1891 Channel Islands Census Publication: Ancestry.com Operations Inc
  • Source: S33 Ancestry.com New Zealand, Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981 Publication: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.
  • Source: S37 Ancestry.com UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960 Publication: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.
  • Source: S4 Ancestry.com New Zealand, Marriage Index, 1840-1934 Publication: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.
  • Source: S5 Ancestry.com New Zealand, Death Index, 1848-1964 Publication: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.
  • Source: S59 Kenneth Martin Henry Cumber Will and Probate records Publication: Archives New Zealand Probate Records, 1843-1998: Whangerei Court Note: Public domain- free access
  • Source: S60 Google
  • Source: S61 PAPERSPAST
  • Source: S62 Ancestry.com New Zealand, Teacher and Civil Service Examinations and Licenses, 1880-1920 Publication: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.
  • Source: S65 Archives New Zealand Archway Publication: Archives New Zealand Note: OPEN ACCESS <p>Anyone can order this record. Ph: 04 499 5595

    Email: research.archives@dia.govt.nz

    Action File - Kenneth Henry Cumber of Auckland Farm Hand v Daniel Smith of Te Atatu near Henderson Dairyman (R23580838) Certainty: 0 1935 Note: OPEN ACCESS Note: http://www.archway.archives.govt.nz/ViewFullItem.do?code=23580838
  • Source: S66 Word of mouth
  • Source: S67 AtoJsOnline Publication: New Zealand Government Note: This website contains digitised reports from selected volumes of the Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives and the Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives.
  • Source: S71 newzealand.govt.nz Far North District Council Publication: newzealand.govt.nz Note: "Disclaimer : This service is provided by the Far North District Council to assist you with Genealogy / whakapapa research. The data has been collected from various sources over more than 100 years. The Council cannot guarantee its accuracy and therefore accepts no responsibility for any consequences arising from information errors or omissions."
  • Source: S9 Ancestry.com New Zealand, Cemetery Records, 1800-2007 Publication: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.


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