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Lizzie’s Story

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Date: [unknown] [unknown]
Location: Ontario, Canadamap
Surname/tag: Taber
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Contents

Lizzie's Story

The story of Elizabeth Seager's attempts and final success in getting out of the Ontario Hospital at Cobourg, is told through family letters written 1912 to 1922 in the possession of her gg-niece Joan Gardner Moore

The correspondents - connected in a partial family tree

a LIZZIE - Elizabeth Anne Taber (1842-1925)
- - - - - married Edmund Seager (1838 -1922)
aa daughter - Sarah Bertha Seager (1870 -1918)
ab daughter POLLY - Mary Elizabeth Seager (1873 -1956)
- - - - - married STEPHEN - Stephen Binnington (1849 -1921)

b sister - LALLIE - Sarah Taber (1847-1909)
- - - - - married DAVID - David Rubidge (1846 - 1923)
ba nephew ALFRED Alfred Justice David Rubidge (1873 - 1916
- - - - - married GRACE - Olive Amelia Victoria Meikle (abt 1867 - 1909)
bab great-niece Mary Rubidge (1897 - 1979)
bb niece EDITH - Edith Spalding Rubidge (1880 -1956)
- - - - - married Wallace Patten Cohoe (1875 - 1966)
bba great-niece Eleanor Rubidge Cohoe (1908-1981)
- - - - - married George Henry Gardner Jr. (1908 -1962)
bbaa gg-niece Joan Cohoe Gardner

BEFORE

2 Jul 1877 LIZZIE at Taber House. Scarboro to DAVID in Denver CO
(Background: David's wife Lallie had returned to her home in Scarboro for the birth of her 3rd child, Frederick, born June 29, 1877)
Taber House, July 2, 1877, My dear Brother
Your good darling wife is improving fast but today the dear Babe is not so well as we would wish to see it. We will send for the Dr. to come and see it soon if there is not a a change for the better. I went to look at it just now and find it improving slowly. I will write only a few lines today - so pardon haste and bad pen. Lallie desired very best love to you also Ernest. Your dear boys are well and are so delighted with Baby. All unite me(?) in kind love to you.
I remain Ever your loving Sister, Lizzie
P.S. I wrote you last Friday night, the 29 th, I hope you got it.

3 Jan 1912, ALFRED at a Sanitarium to LIZZIE in Toronto
Evergreen Place Sanitarium , Leavenworth, Kansas, January 3, 1912 My dear Aunt Lizzie
Well I have been here 20 twenty weeks today - as I came here Sept 12, 1911. Were my oldest boy were to have been born (instead of still born) had he lived till to day he would have been 17 seventeen years old - so I am getting near forty - and am glad to say are feeling fine & hope to soon be able to leave here and come to Toronto to see you and cousin Bertha & visit my sister Edith where I will see my baby daughter Queenie.
I know from your letter written me January the twelfth you will be more than pleased to see me.
I have a great deal to tell you of and will ask your advice for I look as you as my foster mother.
I must also go and see some of dear Grace's relatiions. Those whom I have never met and take Queenie with me so they can see her - Her Ottawa sister once lived in Denver for a while & visited us with her little girl, Irene and her 2nd Husband a Mr. Arthur Hudson - she was a Miss Jeannie Meikle - her 1st Husband was Octavius Fortier and I understood was Postmaster of Ottawa for many many years & died several years ago - her present husband is younger by many years than Jeannie - she has a sister Mrs Major Cooke & also one in Bradford Mrs May Jermyn whom I wish to see and a brother somewhere in Pennsylvania.
Well dearest Aunt I know very little to write of, Hope soon to see you and have our talk.
Am glad to hear you are both well that is nice.
Am glad you are pleased with my girl - she should be a good girl as was her Mother - she poor child was left motherless at ten years of age her father I believe was a Mechanic(?) as is one of her brother or half brothers named Wm Meikle - I know not whether he is alive or not - as I was never informed on the subject. I do know Grace's half brother John L Meikle of Port Arthur, Ontario Canada & some day I hope to visit him soon he attended Graces funeral in Denver as he seems so deeply affected at her death - but I wish to do what I can towards locating him if it be known not of his death - be he what he may, cri???cal man or a religious one. Mercy(?) many have gone astray - a word of his disease has soon ? me most has denied(?) of sinners.
It is what I live for to save the poor and afflicted so ? ? in life - I too have had a hard twice Gods ? - but I heath which is more than great riches
Best love and wisher to Bertha & not forgetting yourself,
Believe me, ever your fond and loving nephew
Alfred J D Rubidge

17 Feb 1919, LIZZIE at home, Queen St, Toronto to DAVID in Denver
999 Queen St, Toronto, Feb 17th 1917
My dear brother David,
I recieved your very welcome letter ot the 11nth by today's mail. I am very glad to know that you are now recovering favorably from the operation and able to return to your own apartment. Surely you must have had a serious experience of pain in the operation and owing to your not getting much sleep. You had suffered from an attack of that shocking nightmare which was quite like the real scenes of murders that occurs in Europe. I see it is stated in the Globe newspaper all about how the Ex tsar of Russia and all his family were murdered in A Cellar where they were forced to be shot. I think you may have had a full account of it in your Denver newspaper. I am very glad to know that dear Harold is better and he must have had a very serious illness. I hope he will soon be strong and well.
Dear brother I wrote to you a few days ago but it musr have cross your letter on the 11nth in the mail. Tell dear Willlie I got his letter last Friday morning. And I was very glad to know he said you was so much better and had been at the office,
Dear brother you mention in your letter that your friend Dr Rogers has had an operation for cancer but is now getting better poor man he has serious troubles too. Still he has his wife to comfort him, Dear brother do be very careful abour catching cold in your face and neck of course your doctor has told you about it. I will wish you goodbye for this evening hoping to hear that you are entirely well.I am you ever loving sister, Lizzie
(sideways at top of letter) With best love to both yourself and dear Willie
Your loving sister, Lizzie

COMMITTED - Sometime in 1919

10 Nov 1920 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID at Edith's in NYC
Ontario Hospital, Coburg, Nov 10th 1920
My Dear Brother David,
I recieved your very kind letter which was mailed just as you was leaving Denver. Also I got your kind letter while you stopped at Chicago. I hope you have enjoyed your journey and have found dear Edith and family all well. Also dear Fred and his family. I hope you had a very pleasant evening on the occasion of the aniversary of your friends birthday. I am very happy just now with my dear daughter and she thinks that she may spend three weeks in Cobourg. I must tell you Polly is fortunate in her choice of a nice lady (Miss Green) who makes everything home like and comforrtable and Polly enjoyed her quiet visit here. I was out this morning to see her and I am going now at 2 P.M. to see her and we shall go for a walk and I will post my letter to you. Please write soon. Goodbye dear brother for this time. With best wishes and love . Polly sends you her love.
Always your lovong sister, Lizzie

19 Nov 1920 STEPHEN at Union Printers Home to LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital
Union Printers Home, Colorado Springs Colo U.S.A., Nov 19th 1920
Dear Mother,
"A fellow feeling makes us wondrous kind"
I am led to such an introduction by the fact that both you and myself, through some inscrutable dispensation of a all wise Providence have been consigned to an exile which has separated us from all those we love and from the familiar scenes and faces of a lifetime. And so the bond of sympathy which exists between us leads us to thoughts of that better life which is promised to those who put their faith in God - that home not made with hands - eternal in the heavens. So let us be of good cheer and cling steadfast to the Rock of Ages.
Dear Polly tells me that her visit has already done her great benefit and given her a rest that she badly needed, in addition to the sweet satisfaction of comforting her dear mother, and her trip is going to prove of mutual benefit, I am sure.
IF I ever travel East again (which seems unlikely at the present time) rest assured that I will return by such a route that will take me to Cobourg in order to visit you. And now, dear mother, let me say au revoir , with my best of love and good wishes.
Your loving son, Stephen

29 Nov 1920 POLLY at home in Brooklyn to DAVID ℅ Ontario Hospital
253 Bainbridge St, Brooklyn, N.Y., Nov 29th, 1920
Dear Uncle David,
By this time you are in Cobourg. I hope it has not snowed much and that you will not feel the cold there. I expect Mother was very glad to see you; it would quite take away the sadness of her separation from me. And she did look sad poor Mother, when the train pulled out.
Did you go to the "British" Hotel.
Cobourg is dead this time of year, but is very lively they say in the summer time when all the American visitors are there. I found the Sweeneys very glad to see me. They had quite a house party over Thanlsgiving and the house was still crowded.
I wish you would go to see Stephen when you go back, Some one was out there, saw him, and on their return told the Sweeneys he was very weak, though around and emaciated. They never told me till just now and it has somewhat worried me, I do hope you will enjoy your visit and I know it will bring great happiness to poor Mother.
Please write to me soon, and believe me,
Always, your lovong niece, Polly
Best love to Mother. I wrote her yesterday.

7 Dec 1920 LIZZIE Ontario Hospital to DAVID at home in Denver
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, Dev 7th, 1920
(postscript turned along top) Dear brother please get Polly to write at home to Osgoode Hall. You know I feel very anxious to be free from here.
My dear brother David
This moment I got your very kind letter. I am so glad you thought of me while you were at the Walker House. I wrote a letter to you yesterday and likely you will get this letter at the same time soon after you arrive at your office. I am very lonesome here since parting with you. I did enjoy your company very much and I am in hopes that we may meet again before many months may pass away.
Dear brother I thank you sincerely for all your goodness to me. I wrote to dear Lalla and I told her that possibly I might go with you to see them the very next time that you go to visit them and I am pleased to think of seeing her and Wilfred and the dear children in their own pleasant home in beautiful California.
Dear brother I am very glad you saw Mr. Dunlop and that he showed you the papers concerning the houses. It was too bad you were disappointed in not seeing Mr. Knight at Osgoode Hall. You had better arrange with Polly to enquire for the statement at Osgoode and you will tell her how to write to Mr. Knight. I hope you can do so very seen
With best love I am ever your loving Sister, Lizzie
(On separate sheet) Dear brother you understand the state of the matter from what you have learned from the Inspector Mr. Dunlop and you see it is wise to give your attention to the business at once. Please write to Polly and explain the matter to her and show her how to make her inquiries in her letter to Mr. Knight at Osgoode Hall. Dear brother urge Polly to write at once. The Trust company are slow and after a little time there will be no money.

20 Dec 1920 LIZZIE Ontario Hospital to DAVID at home in Denver
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, Dec. 20th, 1920
My dear brother David,
I received your precoius and welcome letter of the 16th today. I also got your kind letter of the 9th some days ago. I wrote you two letters hoping that you might get them just when you arrived at your office in Denver. I see you mention that you got one letter from me then quite likely you will get the other letter. Dear brother I am very sorry that your cold troubles you so much and I hope the new prescription you are getting will do you good. Dear brother I am hoping that you will come in June 1921 and take me out with you for sure. I am very tired of living in this sad place that is lacking in all that is of vital interst to me and amid surroundings of sickness and death. Polly does not write to me as often as she might. Have you any news about poor Stephen? The weather here is very much colder with local snow flurries.
Dear brother Christmas is drawing near. GIve my love and best wishes to your dear brother Alfred wishing him a happy Xmas. Dear brother I wish you and all your children and grandchildren a very happy Christmas and a bright New Year. With kind love to you and dear Willie
I am ever your loving Sister Lizzie

16 Jan 1921 POLLY Macon St, Brooklyn to DAVID in Denver
76 Macon St, Jan 16th 1921
Dear Uncle David
So happy to get your letter and to hear that you are so far improved. I do hope you will continue to feel better and be careful of yourself. I would not have Dr. Rogers again, if I were you, but would stick to the doctor who did you good. I have not heard from Stephen in almost three weeks. I fear he may not be so well.
The weather here is pretty cold just now, but has been very mild.
I hope you will make everything as easy for yourself in business as possible and be careful not to subject yourself to too much stress or worry.
I hope you will make up your mind to come east. I think the New York climate agress with you because you always seem to pick up when you come.
I have been very busy getting things straight in the house, had my two large turkish chairs recovered everything looks very nice - also bought a new reading lamp for the parlor. Hope you will see it all soon.
Please write soon, and let me know how you are feeling - Wiht very best love and wishes -
Always your loving niece, Polly

29 Jan 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID at Edith's in NY
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, Jan 29th 1921
My dear brother David
I am very glad to get your very kind letter. I got it yesterday at noon. I see you wrote while you were in Chicago. Dear brother I am very sorry that you have been so very ill but I hope you will soon feel better and that with the care of your dear family present with you will help you to regain your strength and health. Dear brother I always think of you in my prayers and let us all trust God may grant comfort and His loving kindness and mercy shall be with you.
Dear brother I see you think that you "hardly remember dates" Now I wish to tell you not to fret over any subject but take thought every day to read some beautiful verses by some one of your favorite poets then try to recite just one verse every morning. Through this exercise you may strengthen your memory. Dear brother you are wise to give up all business for the present time and take a good rest.
Today the weather is almost like Spring. No ice or snow in Cobourg. The mid-winter here is very changeful. The temperature has been intensely cold. Dear brother I hope to get a letter with the good saying that you are recovering.
With kindest love Ever Your loving Sister Lizzie
(At top) Dear brother give my love to Edith

18 Feb 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID at Edith's in NY
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, Feb 18th 1921
My dear brother David
I have just recieved your very kind letter this morning and I am so glad that you are progressing so favorably and are able to go out motoring with your friend Mr. Arundell. <re/>I hope you will very soon will recover your health and strength. When the lovely Spring Season comes you can enjoy going out to the sea-side and there you will get the benefit of strengthening air. The weather today is almost like Spring the clear blue sky and the sunshine makes it seem beautiful. I will go out and post the letter to you then you will get it soon. Dear brother I got your kind letter with 6 post stamps enclosed and I am pleased to get them accept my thanks. I got a letter from Polly with one dollar enclosed. I took it to the Bank here and the teller said American money and Canadian money are now the same value. Certainly it is better for the intersets of the public financially.
Dear brother I am sure Willie feels lonely being in the office without your supervision and company. I hope you do not feel Anxious to return to Denver because you are resting in New York and you can consult the best of doctors to help you there and with dear Edith's care you will I trust very soon be well. Dear brother with very kind remembrance and love
I am ever your loving Sister Lizzie.

1 Mar 1921 POLLY at home Brooklyn to DAVID at Edith's in NY
76 Macon St, Mar 1 1921
Dear Uncle David
Your very welcome letter came this morning. I am sorry that you do not feel better the weather has been miserable. I feel sure you will be yourelf again, when the weather is fine.
Everything has been so damp that almost everyone with any tendancy that ever has had rheumatism or neuritis. So you must not get discouraged. I hope to get out to see you in a few days. Will phone and let Edith know.
I keep busy all the time and with so many people around, it is a duty to appear cheerful. I had a very nice letter from dear Mother.
I enclose a copy of the Resolutions drawn up by the men who were poor dear Stephen's associates on the Journal of Commerce. Mr. Valentine brought them last night.
Take good care of yourself.
With best love to you and Edith & Eleanor
I am always your loving niece, Polly

5 Mar 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID at Edith's in NY
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, March 5th, 1921
My dear brother David
I received your kind and very welcome letter this afternoon it came to Cobourg P.O. March 4th. Your letter was delayed in the U.S. Mail for I see you wrote your letter on Feb 25 however it is all right for I got your letter safely.
I got a letter form Poly yesterday with In Memoriam enclosed which dear Stephen's friends at the office have so kindly expressed their very deep regret of Stephen's death and expressed their very kindest tribute to his memory. I am sure Polly is quite consoled to receive the kindest regard and sympathy Stephen's friends extend to her. I felt very sorry that poor Stephen suffered so much but he was resigned and he loved God faithfully.
Dear brother I hope you are feeling better & will soon be able to motor over to the City every day along with Edith when they are taking dear little Eleanor to her school. The lovely Spring is coming now the days are passing and in the month of May we hope you will be stronger and dear brother keep up your spirits be brave that is a great forte to enable one to regain health. You know that God helps you all the time we are assured of His loving goodness. Dear brother I would be thankful if you send the $5 in care of Dr. McNaughton. Dear brother with love and very kindest wishes for your speedy recovery. I am ever your lovong sister Lizzie.

Dear Brother, Sunday Morning (March 6)
There was a nice service in the Hall one of the Salvation Army Officers gave a good discourse and another officer sang a solo and that beautiful Hymn "What a friend we have in Jesus". The weather here is like a warm bright day in April. I will go out and post this letter so you may get it soon. Very recently there was a fire that destroyed part of the Asylum in Hamilton. A large number if inmates were sent to this Hospital so now there is a big crowd here. I wish myself out of here so often.
Dear brother there are only two Doctors here to look after about 600 patients and the Doctors are doing the best they can for all the patients.
Dear brother I hope you will be able to come in June. Cheer up and get well.
(On separate page) Please address Dr. MacNaughton Supt. Ontario Hospital, Cobourg Ont.
(across top) Your loving Sister Lizzie

11 Mar 1921 Dr MacNaughton at Ontario Hospital to DAVID at Edith's in NY
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, Ont.
March 11th, 1921
David Rubidge, Esq.,
"Stoneycrest"
Riverdale-on-Hudson
New York City, U.S.A.

Re.- Mrs. E.A. Seager
Dear Sir,-
In answer to your letter of March 8th, I would say that Mrs. Seager is much the same, up and about in very good physical health, eating and sleeping well. She is a privileged case, out every day unless the weather is very bad.
I thank you very much for the five dollars enclosed, and I have handed it to Miss Johns, our nurse, who will see that Mrs. Seager spends it properly for things that she requires.
Again thanking you, and pleased to hear that your heath is improving, I am
Yours very truly,
P MacNaughton
Medical Superintendent.

11 Mar 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID at Edith's in NY
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, March 11th, 1921
My dear brother David
I recieved your very welcome letter yesterday and today Miss Johns the principal lady here told me that Doctor McNaughton recieved a registered letter with $5 enclosed for me from you. The Doctor gave it to me so you see I got the five dollars safely. I gave him a receipt for the money as usual. Dear brother accept many thanks for your kindness in thinking about what I need. Today it is very bright and quite mild and I will go out and mail this letter so you will get soon. The Lenten Service is at 4:30 every Friday afternoon. I go to the service at the Sunday School of St. Peters Church. Mr. Sawer always gives a nice sermon. Dear brother I shall not forget the very pleasant days I spent with you while you were here. I am so glad you are getting well and are able to enjoy motoring with the family. I hope you will soon see dear Fred. I wonder how he is not giving you messages concerning why he has been too busy to go to visit you. Dear brother kindly excuse a short letter this time and wishing that you will continue to improve and soon be well. With best love I am ever
Your loving Sister

24 Mar 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, March 24th, 1921
My dear brother David </br>I was indeed sp glad to get your very kind letter of recent date and I did answer it at once but I failed to mail it so I now write you a short letter instead.
I am glad Polly went to visit you. I got a letter from her saying that she thinks you look poorly and not so strong as usual but I hope that you will soon be as strong and well as usual dear brother keep up your spirits. I am sure you are brave and now that the lovely Spring is here you will be able to go out often. I wish you a very happy Easter and may you enjoy many happy returns of the season with the continued gracious blessing of Jesus Christ our Lord.
Dear brother please excuse a hurried letter I am going out to mail it so you may get it soon. I always think of you in my prayers hoping you will soon be well. With best love
I am ever you loving Sister Lizzie

29 Mar 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID at Edith's in NY
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, March 29th, 1921
My dear brother David
I hope you continue to improve in your health and that you enjoy going out motoring. The weather is wonderful it is so clear and mild and with the bright Sunshine it is very nice. On Easter Sunday I went to St Peters Church and I attended the service of the Holy Commumion at 8 o'clock a.m. of course I had to hurry to get out in due time as I had only 20 minutes after breakfast to get there. In church I sat in the seat where you sat when you and I attended Church the last Sunday before you left Cobourg and went to Toronto. I thought of that pleasant Sunday very often. I am in hopes you may come to see me before very long. I got a nice letter from Willie today saying he had been out to the Cemetery and put roses on his dear Mother's grave. He enclosed a part of one of the roses in his letter and I put it in my Prayer Book the one you gave me some time ago.
Dear brother cheer up and I anticipate you may soon be quite strong and well. God loves you and helps you constantly That is a very comfortable happy thought, Dear brother I wish you all a very pleasant Easter Tide Give my love to Edith and her family are well I hope.
Adieu Dear brother with best love I am ever your loving Sister Lizzie

3 Apr 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, April 3rd, 1921
My dear brother David
I am very glad to receive your nice letter of the 30th mentioning that your Doctor had told you that he thought your heart is better. This must be a favorable change in your state of health and I hope dear brother that your Doctor's prescription will cure the trouble in your throat and mouth. I am very sorry that you suffer and cough so much which has disturbed your rest at night. May the Doctor's prescription do you good soon. Edith is giving you the kindest care dear brother it is I think fortunate that you came there. I am pleased to know you had a nice visit from dear little Mary and that you spent a pleasant Easter but it was too bad you was too poorly to attend Church on Easter Sunday. The weather here is lovely and here they are beginning to fix up the grounds.
Dear brother Willie is ever thinking of your wishes and he misses your company so it appears to me from his letter. I wrote to Polly and mailed it on the 2nd. She will get my letter on the 4th which is the Anniversary of her birthday. I know she is very busy and has no time to write often for that reason I must wait for her letters. Dear brother take good care of yourself about catching cold when out motoring. Adieu with best love.
Ever your loving Sister Lizzie

6 Apr 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, April 6th, 1921
My dear brother David
I was very glad to receive your very kind letter of the 1st. I am in hopes that you continue to improve and will soon be well. The walks you take out in the woods are beneficial to you certainly out there the air must be invigorating and pure. The weather here is today lovely.
Ever green trees are nice but the other trees are not out in leaf yet. They are later here than where you are in New York for you mention the leaves are out on the trees over there. I enclose the envelope of your last letter to show you there is no extra postage. If Mr Arundel thinks that it is just that he has been mixed in some other letters that may have beem overweight. Dear brother don't feel worried all your letters to me are duly stamped. Miss Johns is getting up sort of a masked Ball for the amusement of the patients which will take place to night.
Dear brother I do hope you will soon be well.
good bye for this morning. With best wishes and kindest love.
I am ever your loving Sister Lizzie

20 Apr 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, April 20th, 1921
My dear brother David
I have not received a letter from you recently that is since you wrote saying that you intended going to visit your dear Son Fred at Jersey. I hope you were able to go to Jersey as you anticipated. Last Sunday the weather here was quite a return of winter it was a snow and hale storm and a cold wind. Today we have bright sunshine and mild air. Some of the Cobourg Citizens are now fixing up their gardens. Dr McNaughton's gardener is busy now. I am sorry to say Miss Johns is very ill from a very bad cold so Dr Abraham says. I hope your finger is not sore from the bite or sting of the hornet which you mentioned about in your last letter. One poor patient from Hamilton who came here lately just a few days ago when coming out of the dining room she fell down and died on the hall floor. She was a nice looking woman about forty years old. Oh dear brother I feel very tired of living in this mournful place. There is always some one passing away. Dear brother please write soon if you can. I am well as usual amd I hope you are improving in health. Adieu with best wishes and love. I am ever your loving Sister Lizzie

25 Apr 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, April 25th, 1921
My dear brother David
Your very welcome letter I received by this morning's mail. I got two letters dated 6th and 7th. All your letters that you send me always come safely. You mentioned in one letter that you intended to visit your dear Son Fred.
Dear brother you see I began this letter on the wrong side of the note paper so now I must turn and write on this side since I cannot afford conveniently to get a fresh one. It must be very pleasant for you to be able to enjoy motoring through the City so often. Taking your grand child to and from her School. Dear little Eleanor is very likely a nice interesting girl. I notice in your letter that you are fond of dear Eleanor. Polly mentioned in her letter how tall she is for her age and she may soon be quite as tall as her Mamma. Dear brother I am very sorry that you are still seriously troubled with sore throat and Rheumatism also in your hand - it must be hard for you th write letters and I feel very sorry for you but I hope that you will be able to get well Dear brother I always think of you as being my only surviving brother and I am very anxious about you. Please excuse haste I am going out and will post this letter. Adieu dear brother. With kindest love and good wishes. I am ever your loving Sister Lizzie

30 Apr 1921 and Sun. May 1 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, April 30th, 1921
My dear brother David
I received your very kind letter of the 22nd. I am very glad you are able to enjoy the motoring every day to the City as you go with Edith and the others. I think that from your description of the surrounding scenery where you go out for your walks is a most charming place add to that you have the pure air. Dear brother I sincerely hope that you are regaining your health. Did you enjoy your visit to dear Fred? please tell me as you did not mention it in your letters recently. I got a letter from Polly Friday and says she is very busy but will likely go to see you some day soon. On Friday morning I had two visitors - My nephew Frank Taber and his wife motored down from Toronto. They told me they did not know where I was till lately or they would have come to see me sooner. They asked me when I intended to leave the Hospital of course I could not tell them exactly when. They were very nice and brought fruit, candies and cakes.
I have to stop I am called away and will finish my letter later.

Sunday Afternoon May 1, 1921
Dear brother
I shall now write you a few more items. then conclude for Miss Lyon called me away and I had no time to finish the letter. This Sunday I went to the service in the Auditorium. There two Salvation Army Officers came and they gave a really impressive address and sang several of their own hymns. I noticed that Dr Abraham felt deeply touched by the Officer's address. Dear brother I hope you continue to get well. Adieu with kindest love I am ever
Your loving Sister Lizzie

17 May 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, May 17th, 1921
My dear brother David I received your recent letter and I do appreciate all your very kind letters. i may say that I have waited to get another letter from you but I fear you are not feeling well and I am sorry I didn't write to you before this letter. Dear brother I hope that your dear son Fred's family are recovering from their illness and I am very sorry they have so much trouble to get a maid for when Fred's dear ones are very much in need of one under the circumstances it is really too bad. Girls ofter find employment in factories which they like better than housework.
Dear brother I hope you are still able to go out motoring and that you are able to enjoy taking walks. Is there a nice Park near Edith's residence? I have not had any letters from Polly and I wrote twice to her well I suppose she is very busy. I feel anxious always to get letters from her and from you also. Today the weather is bright and lovely. I did not go out downtown during last week for the weather was chilly and it rained about every day. but it made the trees and grass more beautiful.
Dear brother do you think you will ever be able to come to see me agaim in Cobourg? I am well and I trust dear brother you are getting better. Adieu with kindest wishes and love
I am ever your loving Sister Lizzie

24 May 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, May 24th, 1921
My dear brother David
I recieved your very kind and very welcome letter of the 21st and I am glad you enjoy going out motoring and enjoy your walks. I do thank you very much for your nice kind letters and dear brother todayis dear old 24th of May it brings very pleasant memories and I look back to the times when our dearly beloved Lallie was with me and we used to have a very enjoyable 24th attending the Military reviews and bands of music always with them. If I remember well you must have been with us once and dear Sister Lallie and her lover (David) spent a happy 24th which I think quite likely you may remember. To day the weather being so chilly but bright and clear it favors the sports. There is a Base Ball match so they say between Peterborough and Cobourg. Dear brother I am not caring at all to go out today but if you were here I am sure I might enjoy the day.
Dear brother I am very sorry you still have so much trouble with sore throat and sore mouth but I trust you will soon feel better of course. Your physician cam relieve you and dear brother I think of you always in my prayers. Your dear son Willie reports in his letters to you faithfully how business is progressing. How is dear Lalla and her husband and children? Please tell her to write to me. Adieu my dear brother hoping you are better and with best love I am ever your loving Sister
(At top) I am very glad Fred's family are well
Lizzie

8 June 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, June 8th, 1921
My dear brother David I received your very kind letter this morning I am glad that you are so much better and enjoy the pleasant weather that we have now I think every one should feel very sorry for the poor people who live in Pueblo Colorado. I have read a long account about their suffering and the loss of many lives The poor people were panic stricken and seemed slow in trying to escape. Just imagine the country around Pueblo being one huge lake - which has caused some several thousands to be homeless and there are estimates of dead being up to 1000. This is so stated in the Globe paper of June 6th. Dear Willie no doubt has sent you the Denver Papers which would contain the fullest descriptions. Dear brother I am glad you feel able to enjoy motoring and the little Poinie (?). Your dear little Eleanor will be sure to take a merry part in the trip with you and I suppose you will miss her quite a bit after she goes away on her holidays. Will she go someplace near her home? I am sorry your hands pain when writing letters and that you are still troubled with neuritis in your hands.
Mrs. Cruickshank wife of Brig. Gen Cruickshank was sitting in a motor car at Niagara - watching the sun set on the Military Commons at Niagara-on-the-lake "died suddenly". She was well and had attended Club meetings and had intended going to historical Society meeting at St Catherines. The Lady was born in New York state and married her husband while he was on business in Buffalo. She took a kindly interest in Canada at the war time and she was the author of several books.
Dear brother I am quite well and I trust you will improve in heath every day.
With love and good wishes I am ever you loving Sister Lizzie
(At top) I was glad to see my neice Maud and George called here on Sunday noon. They motored from Toronto.
(At top in David's hand) Read 10am June 11/21 in woods above Stoneycrest & motoring Riverdale.

21 June 1921 POLLY in Brooklyn to DAVID at Edith's in NY
76 Macron St, June 21, Saturday evening
Dear Uncle David
I got a very nice letter from Mother some days ago, and she said that Uncle Will's girls had been to see her.
Later I got a letter from Lulu and she wrote that Maud was taking a summer home in Cobourg and they intended to take Mother out and make it pleasant for her.
I was very pleased to get these letters.
I have taken over another house (furnished) in addition to the one I have - and have been more than busy But I hope to have more time a little later on. If you should feel able to go to Canada I would go at the same time and stay a week - but if you do not feel able - as long as the girls will take her out, I would postpone going a little while.
I hope you are by this time very much better. With best love to Edith & Eleanor and hoping they all have been well. And with much love and best wishes to yourself
I am always your loving niece, Polly
P.S. They write that Mother is looking very well. P

23 June 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, June 8th, 1921
My dear brother David I am very glad to receive your very kind and interesting letter of the 20th. I am so glad you are getting quite well again and that you are thinking of coming over to Cobourg and Port Hope. All around Cobourg the scenery is beautiful with the lovely Park and the grand view of Lake Ontario adds greatly to the beauty of Cobourg at the present season. I am glad you enjoy the scenery around Riverdale and the view of the Hudson. So Polly wrote and told you about brother Will's daughter's intentions of spending holidays in Cobourg. Maude and George called here to see me 3 weeks ago. George seems like a nice man and they are very happy. I am glad to know that dear Fred's wife in much better. I hope they may get the maid that dear Edith has mentioned to you. The Summer is quickly passing by. Dr McNanghton said he is thinking of writing to you about your visit here in November 1920 and in the early part of December 1920. When you applied to him for my release and that he had granted my release also that he gave you a letter and then requested you to see thee Inspector W.W. Dunlop at the Parliament Buildings Toronto. Dr McNanghton says that Mr. Dunlop has expressed his approval of my release and he mentions that the only thing left to do is for Mr Wright at Osgoode Hall to withdraw my money from the Toronto General Trust Company. I wrote to Polly and told her but she cannot come her hands are full with her own efforts to make her living. You can easily attend to the business much better than she could and you can go with me to see Mr Wright.
(across top) Please write to me soon. With kindest love I am ever your loving Sister Lizzie

(On separtate sheet, undated)
Dear brother
You know that the only thing left to do is now for you to see Mr Wright at Osgoode Hall and Mr Wright will withdraw my money from the Toronto Trusts Company. Also he will have their accounts duly investigated. You learned from Inspector Mr. Dumlop of the slowness that the Trusts Company have had in making payments.
I know Mr Dunlop personally and he is a candid person to talk with over my business. Mr Dunlop told me when I met him just the same as he mentioned to you that the Trusts Company were slow in their payments.
Dear brother I trust you will feel able to come soon. I can accompany you to see Mr Wright at Osgoode Hall. We shall have no difficulty in getting my money withdrawn. Always your loving Sister

28 June 1921 POLLY in Brooklyn to DAVID at Edith's in NY
June 28th '21, 76 Macron St
Dear Uncle David
Your very welcome letter reached me a few days ago
I think it would be very nice for us to go together. I think I could manage to go for two weeks. How would the two last weeks in July or the last week in July and the first week in August suit. Either way that would suit you I could manage. I think that Cobourg must be a very beautiful place in the summer time and the change would probably do us both good. I am so rejoiced that you feel able to travel, but fear Denver would be a little far and the climate so trying.
I sent money for them to put flowers on Stephen's grave on Decoration Day and got a letter from Mr Akyers the friend of Stephen's whom I met while there that it had been attended to.
I think, while there, we might manage to go to Scarboro again. I did so enjoy attending the old church. Dear Uncle David, if you really feel able to go, I will try to make everything as easy and pleasant for you as I can. Write soon & let me know so I can arrange.
Best love to Edith and Eleanor - and much love for yourself.
Always your affectionate Niece Polly
P.S. just wrote mother but said nothing for sure as she would be so disappointed of we did not come. P.

25 July 1921 POLLY in Brooklyn to DAVID at Edith's in NY
76 Macron St, Monday afternoon
Dear Uncle David
Your very welcome letter came a few days ago - and would have been answered sooner only I have been so busy getting the decorators work out of the way so that I could start on our journey with an easy mind. I have had three rooms done, scraped wall paper and painted some of the wood-work myself so that the cost would not be so high.
I hope you are feeling better and will be well enough to go. I got a letter from Mrs Chester of Scarboro - she wants us to be her guests for the time we remain in Scarboro. This is indeed lovely of her.
I got a letter from mother but have not yet heard from Miss Greene, where I stopped in Cobourg, but perhaps will hear to-morrow.
I called Edith up to-day twice, but could not get her, so will try again to-night or to-morrow. I do hope you will be able to go and that we shall have pleasant weather for the trip.
I had a very nice letter form mother in answer to the letter I wrote to her we were coming.
With best love to you, Edith & Eleanor
As ever, your loving niece, Polly

2 August 1921 Nurse at Ontario Hospital to DAVID in Cobourg
Aug 2nd 21
Recieved from David Rubidge the sum of ten dollars to get delicacies for Elizabeth Seagar
Florence Johns

3 August 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID in Cobourg
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, August 3rd, 1921
My dear brother David
I expect you will with Polly's assistance finish the settlement about taking me out of this Hospital. You have only one thing left to do now because you did go to the Parliament Building and talked with the Inspector Mr W.W. Dunlop who showed you the papers and then told you that the next one for you to see was Mr Wright at Osgoode Hall. You told me in the letter which you wrote on December 6th 1920 while you were staying at the Walker House Toronto - that you had called at Osgoode Hall but the attendant said Mr Wright was not in and that the office was not in Session. You know that Mr Wright is the one to investigate the Trusts Co "accounts"
Ever your loving Lizzie

4 August 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID in Cobourg
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, Aug. 4th, 1921
My dear brother David
Being as you are not so strong and well now I will only need Polly to help me get things settled and to withdraw my money from the Toronto Trust Company. Mr Dunlop will explain the matter to her, therefore she will not have any trouble. You know that you mentioned to me that you thought that Polly would be likely one to make the inquiries about the accounts. I think that she can do so naturally and claim it as her duty being my daughter. I can go with her to the Parliament Buildings and also to see Mr. Wright at Osgoode Hall. I know about what is to be done and I can be there and they will need to see me in Mr. Wright's office also.
Your loving Sister Lizzie

5 August 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID in Cobourg
Aug 5 '21
Mr. D. Rubidge
I am writing this in order not to tire you with talk so please excuse it.

Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, August 5th, 1921
My dear brother David
Dr. McNaughton is the person for you to speak to abour my parol, and he will comply with your request. You know there is nothing the matter with me. I am perfectly healthy Dr. McNaughton will tell you so. You seem to think I am better off staying here so speak and get me the usual privilege of parol so I can go down town for walks and go to church and to the Park.
Dear brother do get my parol at once. Do not delay to speak about it for you are wise and know that I do not expect those who are not related to me to feel the same kind interest in my life which you and Polly feel towards me and I know it is the truth that if you get the privilege of parol for me at once they will do as you kindly request about it and I can enjoy coming over to see you often while you are in Cobourg. As it is I cannot see you often.
Your loving Sister Lizzie

10 August 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, August 10th, 1921
My dear brother David
Please give your kind attention to this matter. I want you to speak to Dr McNaughton about giving me back my privilege of going out the same as usual. I think it is much better that you should speak to him for he will be sure to give you satisfaction more so than any one else. You know that only for having the privilege of going to church and doing a little shopping down town I would be very lonely and miserable in this sad place.
With kindest wishes and love
I am ever your loving Sister Lizzie

13 August 1921 Nurse at Ontario Hospital to DAVID in Cobourg
Aug 13th
Recieved from Mr Rubidge $5.00 for Mrs Seagar
Florence Johns

17 August 1921 POLLY in Brooklyn to DAVID at Edith's in NY
76 Macron St, Aug. 17th '21
Dear Uncle David
I was so glad to get your letter and learn that you were feeling well and rested after your trip. Everyone says I look so much better for it, and I know I feel rested and better able to take hold again. I have just finished writing to mother and have asked her to be nice to the doctor & nurses so that she may get parole and be able to use her dinner tickets.
I found everything all right at home, only the butcher bill had gone too high.
Margaret said she couldn't write she "was too busy studying". I think it strained her brain to the utmost to manage. She had kept track of the dinners and had the money exactly.
I was pretty well tired out on Sunday as I had to see quite a few people & tell them what sort of time I had had - so I went to bed at 7.30 & slept through till seven the next morning.
I hope you feel better for the trip - now that you are rested. We certainly did have a delightful time, and not the least pleasant, was the sail homeward over the lake. I hope Edith thinks I took good care of you & finds you better for it. Maude Taber's address is
Mrs. Geo. Bestwetherick
Glen Dover Apts
751 Carlow Ave
Toronto
Clara's address is
Mrs B S Blackwell
238 Grace St
Toronto
I am sure they would be pleased to hear from you.
Now, dear Uncle David, I must say Goodbye with much love to you & Edith & Eleanor & thank you for your kindness in giving me this trip.
Always your loving niece Polly

19 August 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID at Edith's in NY
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, August 10th, 1921
My dear brother David
I am very glad to receive your kind letter saying that you and Polly arrived in New York safely and that you had a pleasant journey. I have not yet received a letter from Polly but I expect that as soon as she gets her house in order again upon her return home then she will write. Our Nieces and Nephews say they were very glad that they had the pleasure of meeting you and Polly and they hope to see you when you come again to Canada. Maud and George talk of buying a house here for a summer home in Cobourg. Dear brother I feel very much depressed about the circumstances which Polly has left me in because I had anticipated that with you she fully intended to go to Osgoode Hall and see Mr Wright about the settlement of my affairs. You can easily understand how seriously I feel disappointed about it. Hoping you are well and with best wishes and love. I am ever your Sister Lizzie

27 August 1921 POLLY in Brooklyn to DAVID at Edith's in NY
76 Macron St, Aug. 27th '21
Dear Uncle David
Your welcome letter came two days ago. I am so glad to know that you continue so well and are enjoying yourself. I hope you will continue to improve.
I had a letter from Mother not like the one she wrote to you however. I gather from it that she has not yet got parole, and probably is a little discontented.
I think if I were you, I would ignore that part of her letter referring to Toronto and Osgoode Hall & just write her a cheerful letter telling her of your own life. I am sorry she is not more settled down, however no doubt she will get more reconciled and be happier.
I have just finished writing her a long letter. I have been very busy as I gave Margaret one week's vacation with pay. I have been working pretty hard myself.
I hope you will excuse a short and uninteresting letter to-night, as I am very tired and it is getting late. Shall hope to hear from you very soon.
With best love to you and Edith and Eleanor
As always, your loving niece, Polly

5 September 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID at Edith's in NY
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, September 5th, 1921
My dear brother David
I received your very welcome letter this morning and a few days ago I got your very kind letter of the 23rd. I am very glad you have enjoyed going to the sea side as the air would strengthen you. I am in hopes that you may recover health and strength. i know that all your loved ones are in hopes that you will get well. What does your physician say about the heart trouble since you returned home?
I think dear Willie is feeling lonely in the office when he looks at the office chair where you always used to sit. I am sure you must feel sometimes quite anxious to be back in your office because you have for very many years had an active life in the Real Estate and Investments Co. I see in your letter you are feeling anxious about the Annual Report and Meeting & Election that in October the month in which you used to attend the business.
Dear brother keep up your spirits and you will be able to come over again in the Autumn. So little Mary is wishing to come to Toronto and College in order to get her Degree. I hope she will be successful. Dear brother I am very lonely here, but I am very glad that I am always well. Dear brother I must close my letter for it is tea time now. With best love, I am ever
your loving Sister Lizzie
(across top)Please write soon. i wish so often to know how you are.

10 September 1921 POLLY in Brooklyn to DAVID at Edith's in NY
76 Macron St, Sept 10th '21
Dear Uncle David Your welcome letter came this morning. I think I answered your letter, giving the cousins addresses but forgot to tell you which was the eldest. Clara (Mrs Blackwell) is the oldest.
I got a letter from mother a few days ago in which she complained that she had not yet gotten parole and could not use the dinner tickets which you know she wa anxious to have, and she asked me to write Dr. McNaughton about the parole.
I did so asking him if he possibly could give her parole or failing that let some one go with her to take the dinners. I expect he will anser my letter but it is too soon yet to expect a reply.
I have a large room vacant on the third flooor and would very much like to have you come and stay with me for a few days, We could visit the beaches around here and it would be a little change for you. Let me know if you would like to come. I am so glad you continue to feel better.
With fondest love to you & Eleanor and dear Edith. Kindest regards to Mr Cohoe.
I am ever your loving niece Polly

22 September 1921 POLLY in Brooklyn to DAVID at Edith's in NY
76 Macron St, Sept 22nd '21
Dear Uncle David
Your very welcome letters came this afternoon and I am relieved to hear that you have given up the Denver trip. I think it would be very foolish for you to attempt it. You might get there and have to start right back again, as I did, and then it would put you back so much. It took me really all summer to recover from the effects of my trip there.
I am sure Edith will feel much happier to have you stay right there with her. Perhaps when you go to Canada next May, I shall be able to go too. I got a letter from Dr. McNaughton and he will allow mother to go out to take the dinners, accompanied by a nurse, but I think they are too afraid of her running away again to let her have parole until they know she is quite settled in her mind. And they must know best.
I would like very much to spend the day with you and Edith soon, but just now are getting some new boarders in, and things are a little upset, but shall hope to come out before very long.
The meal business is a little slower than is usual at this time of year. So much "light house-keeping" being done by way of economy.
I do hope you are feeling better by this time. Please write soon and let me know.
With best love to you & dear Edith and little Eleanor. I am ever your loving niece, Polly
P.S. I think better send mother something from yourself & I will send a little gift also. P. (Note Lizzie's birthday is Oct 2)

26 September 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID at Edith's in NY
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, Sep 26th, 1921
My dear brother David
I received your very welcome letter this morning. I am very glad you are feeling so much better. No doubt you are disappointed about not being able to return to Denver for the Meeting of your Real Estate Co. but I hope that you may be well before the time of the next meeting comes and may then go to Denver.
So dear Mary has resumed her situation which after all may prove better for her health than being pressed with so much hard studies in College at Toronto.
We are enjoying very fine Autumn weather though it is quite chilly early in the mornings. The flowers are still in beauty's bloom. Dear brother October is near and I do wish you a very nice anniversary of your happy wedding day which will be next Sunday.
Polly mentions in her letter that she hopes to come to Cobourg in the Spring. I think that would be a very long time for me to wait still the days are very lonely for me but it is wise to be cheerful and hopeful and keep well. I am so qualified for to be like that naturally.
Now dear brother I will close my letter with kindest wishes and love hoping you may continue better in health.
Ever your loving Sister Lizzie

1 October 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID at Edith's in NY
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, October 1st, 1921
My dear brother David
I received your very kind and very welcome letter just this moment and I wish to send you my very sincere appreciation of your nice cheerful letter and I thank you so much for kindly remembering me amd for writing a letter to the Medical Supt enclosing a gift of $5 which I am very glad of. Yoday I will go to the Hopper's Jewelry store and buy a pair of new glasses which I need just now. Mr Hopper is well spoken of for giving good satisfaction in testing the eyesight as a good optometrist or optician.
(some missing)…you phone to my dear Godson and Nephew. Your dear son Fred be sure to give him my love and kindest wishes. Give my love to dear Edith and I wish her many bright and happy returns of her birthday. And I sincerely hope you may feel well and very happy in your happy memories of our dearly loved Lallie on the memorable wedding day that comes to remind you again….
(across top) With kindest love I am ever your loving Sister
I remember meeting Miss Hume in Port Hope
Enclosures from the Cobourg Sentinel Star, Thursday, September 29: Article on John Hume entitled "Port Hope man leaves $512,000" and "Railway Time-Tables, Canada Pacific Railway"

7 October 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID at Edith's in NY
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, Oct. 7th, 1921
My dear brother David
I received your very kind and very welcome letter of the 4th. And I am indeed very sorry that you are not feeling well but we must all hope that after you go to the Springs which was formerly the Water Cure at Clifton Springs Sanitarium. Dear brother I trust that you will recover your health when time and due medical care at the Cure is constantly given to you by your Doctors there. I remember the time in 1866 when you were at Clifton Springs. You held a position there, My very dear Sister Lallie then received many love letters from you and I suppose you got many love letters from her and now when you go there to see the place all those dear memories of the days when you and beloved Lallie were two young lovers so glad and hopeful in possessing each other's love. My dear sister used to sing a beautiful song entitled "Love I dream of thee" perhaps you may remember it. Dear brother I am sorry you didn't get my letters that I trusted to Dr. Abraham to mail hoping you would get them for the "2".
With best love I am ever your lovong Sister
(at top) Dear brother I hope to get good news from you soon. >br/>I will wait till you come about getting the glasses.

10 October 1921 LIZZIE at Ontario Hospital to DAVID at Edith's in NY
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, Oct. 10th, 1921
My dear brother David I have just this moment received you very welcome letter. I am very glad that you are now feeling much better. I wrote you on the 7th but as I thought that you might quite likely write again I didn't get it mailed then. You see Dr Abraham was slow about sending my letter of the 1st and for that reason I didn't hand it to him and the weather has been raining every day lately so could not post it myself however I will enclose it with this of course you will know that it is a reply to your letter of the 4th in which you mentioned that you might decide to go to Clifton Springs for a change of medical treatment. Do you now decide not to go there?
Dear brother I must now tell you how I spent my birthday. Dr McNaughton wished me to go to the Arlington for dinner and then to motor to some place so Miss Johns and I went to Port Hope. I had the tickets left which I had still so I thought I had better go and take Miss Johns with one. Miss Johns said that she enjoyed the dinner very much and I did enjoy it too. We had a nice drive through the town of Port Hope and the day was very nice and pleasant. I hope dear brother that you spent a very happy day on the "2" and I wish you may spend a very happy day on the 14th which will soon come. I wish you many happy returns of the 14th with the blessing of restored health.
(At top) Dear brother excuse this very hurried letter. I had so much interruptions and they are noisy today.
With best wishes and love I am ever your loving Sister

ESCAPED TO TORONTO 12 OCTOBER 1921

15 October 1921 Dr Mac Naughton, Ontario Hospital to DAVID
Ontario Hospital, Cobourg, Ont.,
October 15, 1921
David Rubidge, Esq.,
"Stoney Crest,"
Riverdale-on-Hudson
New York, U.S.A.
Re,- Mrs. Seager.
Dear Sir,-
I beg to inform you that the above-named patient has broken her parole. She was allowed out door privileges, the same as before, and has gone to Toronto. We have not as yet been able to locate her bur steps have been taken to do so, and as soon as she is returned to the Institution, we will let you know.
Yours very truly,
P Mac Naughton
Medical Superintendent

16 October 1921 LIZZIE in Toronto to POLLY (Copy in David's handwriting)
Sunday Oct 16th/21
My own dear Polly
I left Cobourg with parole for Toronto. Arrived in Toronto on the 12th. Now I am busy getting my affairs fixed which is very soon to be settled permanently. Dear Polly dear Uncle David wrote me that he was wishing to go to Clifton Springs in hopes that at the Sanitarium there he could get better. Dear Polly I hope you are well and that your business is good.
I have nothing to do with Mr. Snow. I have not even met him. Give my kindest wishes to dear Uncle David. I am feeling well and active. I wish you to hear it and please do not feel in any way anxious about me and I will write you soon again. With fondest love I am ever your loving Mother

19 October 1921 POLLY to DAVID
76 Macron St, Wed Oct. 19th '21
Dear Uncle David
Yesterday i received the enclosed letter from Mother. She gives no address and I cannot imagine where she is. I do not think she has gone to any of her nieces. I do not see where she got the money from as I have not given her any in a long time.
I feel a little better since receiving this letter as I know at any rate that she is well and nothing so far has happened to her.
I was so busy I forgot the date of your birthday Oct 14th - but hope it is not too late to wish you many happy returns and increasing happiness with each year.
I hope you will continue to feel well - wish I could come to see you but have retrenched on help and am very busy. Hope I see you all soon, however.
With best love to you and Edith & Eleanor and hoping you will excuse this hurried scrawl.
I am ever Your loving niece, Polly

26 October 1921 LIZZIE in Toronto to DAVID
Temple Building, Toronto, Oct. 26th, 1921
My dear brother David
I have written to Polly telling her that I hope to live with her. I am getting my money released from the Ontario Institution. I have a good Lawyer attending to my interest. I feel very glad and happy to have my personal liberty. You cannot form the least idea of the terrible state of the surroundings which were very heartsickening to me. Indeed it was impossible for me to endure any longer in that place.
Dear brother I know you felt sorry for me and Polly thought that it was impossible to get me over to Brooklyn.
Please send your letter to me in an envelope sealed and enclosed inside of an envelope addressed to
Miss Clara B Martin, Barrister
Temple Building
Toronto
Dear brother please write very soon. I hope you are well. With love and best wishes. Ever your loving Sister.
(At top)Excuse a short letter. Please write soon

31 October 1921 LIZZIE in Toronto to POLLY
Temple Building, Toronto, Oct. 31st, 1921
My own dear Daughter
Please write to me soon and tell why you are not giving any kind of an answer to the letter Miss Clara Bret Martin Barrister wrote to you a week ago in which she told you that she can send me to you if you are willing to have me, and would if you are willing to have me. You see it it is necessary that you would send to Miss Martin the sum of Fifty Dollars in order to pay the expense of sending me to Brooklyn. You see that Miss Martin is able to get me over which is a fine thing for me. And I do feel very anxious to get a letter from you very soon.
I wrote two letters to dear Uncle David but he has not responded. Dear Polly do you hear from him by phone is he better?
Dear Polly I am waiting for Uncle David to send me some money for I need money until Miss Martin gets my money withdrawn from the Institution. Dear Polly be sure to write soon for I am anxious to know how I am to get along. That is I wish to know if you are willing to have me go and live with you as you are the only Child I have. When you write seal yourletter and enclose it inside of an envelope addressed to
Miss Clara B. Martin, Barrister
Temple Building, Toronto
With fond love I am ever your loving Mother
(At top) Please send me 10 dollars. I have (ink splodge) money need money badly. I will starve. Mother. I will starve for Gods sake.

3 November 1921 POLLY to DAVID at Clifton Springs
76 Macron St, Tuesday Night (Nov 3/21 in David's hand)
Dear Uncle David
I wrote Dr. McNaughton asking him as to whether it would be wise to undertake to bring Mother here and if he thought I should be able to manage her. The letter must have reached him Monday morning but so far have received no answer. I enclosed the letter written by Clara Brett Martin, lady lawyer.
I wrote to mother on Tuesday and sent her two dollars, thought it wise to send a small sum until we find out more about it.
This morning, I received a letter from her which I enclose. Am glad I sent the two dollars as she should have it by now.
Shall write to her to-night. The letter she writes is very pathetic. I don't know what to do. Do you think I had better go to Toronto.
Please write me as soon as you get this. I shall write to her that I am willing to have her, but cannot believe that Miss Martin could get her across the border, when I myself failed. I shall send her five dollars and ask her for her address.
She is anxious that you should write. You had better also ask her for her address. In the intervals of working, I have worried about this all day.
I hope you like Clifton Springs and that the change is doing you good. I am sorry to worry you about this, but I know it is in your mind as well as mine.
With much love ever Your affectionate niece, Polly.
(Crossed at top) I have asked her for her address promising her that she should not go back if she did not wish to but asked her in good faith, as I have never broken my word to her.

7 November 1921 POLLY to DAVID at Clifton Springs
76 Macron St, Monday Night
Dear Uncle David
I received your special delivery letter containing the draft yesterday and thank you very much.. I got letter also this afternoon. I telephoned Edith this morning, and she thinks the Walker House would be a good place for you to stop at in Toronto. I told her we found it very comfortable when we were there before.
We talked it over and both thought that there was nothing left to do but for me to go on to Toronto. She also thought it would be best for you to stay in the background and not see Mother or this lady-lawyer until things are settled. I should very much like you to come, as your presence, advice and sympathy would mean so much to me, and I think Edith feels the same way about it, and wants me to take good care of you, and see that you do not over exert or excite yourself.
I shall try to leave some day this week, have to get in extra help to tide over, while I am away, as I have been running the house very short-handed. Edith said you would have to remain where you are until next Monday to finish your week out - or they would make you an allowance. I shall write again & let you know just what day I shall leave. Edith thought best for me to go right to this Walker House. I enclose letter from Mother which came this afternoon. Hoping you are feeling well. With much love - always - Your affectionate niece, Polly.

8 November 1921 EDITH to DAVID at Clifton Springs
Tuesday Nov. 8-
My dear Daddie:-
Received a letter from you to-day. I mailed a letter to you early this morning. It was only a note enclosing a letter from Lalla.
Polly phoned me yesterday that she had heard from you & that you had asked her to meet you in Toronto to settle about Aunt Lizzie. Polly told me she would try to leave in a few days for Torontp. Polly said she would not try to bring her mother back to N.Y. but would try yo get her into a Sanitarium in Canada, where she could have a separate room. I told her there was a Sanitarium in Guelph but I believed any sanitariun which had separate rooms would prove to be an expensive place. Polly will have to interview that woman lawyer alone, so as to find out where her mother really is. I'm sorry you feel you need to go to Canada about it, because Polly could handle the matter alone much better than a man could, in a matter which concerns a woman.
I was glad when Polly told me she wouldn't try to bring her mother across the Border - for if she did you would only have trouble - they would probably demand a 20 or 15 thousand dollar bond - & then that bond would tie up all your estate so long as Aunt Lizzie lived. Such institutions and sanitariums are much cheaper in Canada than here in N.Y. anywhere. And when she is placed back in an sanitarium there should be no parole of any kind.
Fred told me that you told him that the Dr there in Clifton said he didn't see any reason why you shouldn't go to Denver. If that is the case I suppose you will be wanting to go out to Denver soon.
We are having good weather - motored to town twice to-day.- Wallace is in New Brunswick to-day - goes to Providence to-night & then to Haverhill, Mass. the next day & home on Friday.
I haven't a cook yet - All well here - with much love your fond daughter, Edith

9 November 1921 EDITH to DAVID at Clifton Springs
Wed. Evening
My dear Daddie:-
Polly has just phoned me that she has had another letter from her Mother - And this letter has made her change her idea of going to Toronto now. She is not going to go now, as she feels her mother would not have anything to do with her if she went & her trip would be useless. Her mother writes that the lady lawyer is so kind to her & gives her everything she needs etc. And that she will soon be getting back all her property etc & that she will remain under this lady lawyer's care until she does get back her property. Polly feels it would be useless in going to Toronto & I agree with her about it. So Daddie, Polly does not want you to write to her mother at all - or send her any money. So you must not go to see the lady lawyer or try to see Aunt Lizzie at all. Polly is handling the whole matter as she thinks best. It is her mother & she is trying to do what is right & best about it.
Now that matters have taken this turn, you will probably be returning to N.Y. after your two weeks stay at Clifton is up. Let us know when to meet you.
I was called to the phone about 8:30 last night & the operator said Clifton Springs wants to talk to Mrs. Wallace P. Cohoe - After waiting a couple of minutes, the operator said, I'm sorry I troubled you, for I find that the party in Clifton Springs has cancelled his call.
Polly thinks she will have to let matters simmer along a bit in Toronto, so that her mother will learn she really hasn't and property etc & then Polly says it will be time for her to go up to see her. But it will take some weeks yet for that to be accomplished. Her mother states she is happy and that the lady lawyer is looking after her etc. - So be sure to do as Polly wants - not to write her mother - or communicate with the lady lawyer at all - and above all do not send money.
It rained most of the day to-day - but is clearing up now. We had to motor to town twice to-day, in the rain.-
I sent 4 Denver papers to you this morning,-
All well here - Let us know when to meet you. I think your train arrives about 6 o'clock Grand Central Station - but let us know for sure - All well - much love your fond daughter Edith.

19 November 1921 POLLY to DAVID
76 Macron St, Nov, 19th '21
Dear Uncle David
I have thought it over & decided to postpone going to Toronto for a little while - Mother has not yet sent me her address and seems to stick so to that lady-lawyer.
If I went there now, and she refused to go with me or to place herself in my hands - I should have no way of compelling her to do so. I think the best way is to send her no more money until she sends her address and is willing to give up this lady-lawyer - and place her somewhere. Her last letter which I enclosed to you was really very unsatisfactory, and I think if I went there and found her stubborn it would simply be a journey wasted. Write me what you think about it.
Edith says she heard from Dr MacNaughtin and that Miss Martin had called him up on the phone & abused him for not letting mother out long ago.
I am sorry you are not feeling better. I fear the journey to Toronto would be to much for you the way you are feeling at present. I do hope you will feel better before very long.
Please write very soon and tell me what you think. I am holding the draft, have not cashed it.
Do you think the place there agrees with you?
With fondest love & best wishes
Ever Your loving niece, Polly

5 December 1921 LIZZIE in Toronto to DAVID
Monday Evening, Dec. 5th, 1921
My dear brother David
I sincerely hope you are recovering your health and strength. It appears strange to me that you do not write to me as usual surely because I have been happily given chance to regain my liberty. I trust you feel very much pleased and very glad to know that I am now in pleasant surroundings but I do miss getting your kind brotherly letters indeed I feel bad because I never hear from you dear brother since I left the Hospital. Just before I left Cobourg I wrote a letter to my faithful friend Mr. W.W. Dunlop the Inspector and after that I came here so the I got the lawyer Miss Martin who went to see Mr. Dunlop and the lawyer merely took the business to conclude which you had no time to conslude owing to the absence of Mr. Wright at Osgoode Hall. You will remember that this was in December 2020 when you came to Toronto and Mr. Dunlop talked over my affairs. Mr. Dunlop now has told the lawyer to go to Osgoode Hall and see Mr. Wright because Mr. Dunlop informed her that he had sent the money and the accounts to Osgoode Hall 2 years ago. Mr. Dunlop is very kind to me... (? something missing)
I know that you and Polly have been already informed by Dr. McNaughton that I have Probation Bond, he told me so.
Dear brother I hope to hear good news from you and when I receive your welcome letter I will respond at once. Good bye at present. With Kindest love I am ever Your loving Sister
Dear brother please write very soon. I am very anxious to know how you are. Please address your letters to me in care of
Miss Martin L.L.B.
Temple Building
Bay and Richmond Sts
Toronto

23 December 1921 DAVID to POLLY (David's carbon copy)
Stoneycrest, Riverdale-on-Hudson, New York City
Noon Dec 23, 1921
My dear Niece Polly,
Jusr a short letter dear Polly to wish you a merry Xmas and a Happy New Year & send also with my love this small draft for $25 which I have endorsed payable to your order ....... I merely write the above to keep record of it as a carbon sheet.
I hope it may reach you tomorrow. I have been feeling rather miserable but hope maybe (unreadable) for Xmas. I do feel so sorry I am not able to add to your dear mother's happiness for Xmas. Put it the other way not being permitted to write her or send her some money or other (unreadable) grace for Xmas. Surely Miss Martin has told her Dr. McN the Supt has told us not to write her. It would have given me pleasure to be able to write her. Have not heard from dear (Thal?) for some days except a letter that was delayed. I will write you soon again dear Polly. Expect dear Mary tomorrow. Edith has not been well for some days and is now lying down.
Goodbye dear Polly with my sincere love & best wishes for a Merry Xmas & Happy New Year. I am ever your loving Uncle David

3 January 1922 POLLY to DAVID
76 Macron St, Jan 3rd '22
Dear Uncle David
I received your very kind letter on Monday Christmas Day. And was so pleased with your kind remembrance of me. I sent you a tie as a small remembrance I hope you get it safely.
I know how you feel about Mother. Christmas for me too was clouded by the thought we had no knowledge of where she was or what she was doing. I have had no word from her or from anbody - And feel very much worried over it - but what can we do?
I hope Edith is feeling better. I was quite sick last week - and have been very busy too.
I have thought of you every day. I hope you had a very happy Christmas and that you are feeling better.
With much love to you and Edith and Eleanor.
Always your loving niece, Polly
P.S. Please tell Edith the name of the small electric cleaner is "The Lerrington" but have heard that it is not very good.
Had a nice letter from Mrs Seaten(?) & she enclosed views (snap shots) of of Clover House - the church and their house - I was very glad indeed to get them and hear from her - Let me know if you have heard again from Mother.

25 January 1922 POLLY to DAVID
76 Macron St, Jan 25th '22
Dear Uncle David
I am very sorry to hear that you have not been well. However this weather has been very trying. The doctors say half of Brooklyn has been sick.
I was quite sick with bronchitis for two weeks, but feel better now. Also as Edith told you, I have better help. And more time to rest in.
It puzzles me very much that Mother has not written and on Saturday last I wrote to her in care of Clara Brett Martin, telling her that I had been sick and would like to know if she were well, and comfortable. The fifty dollars must surely be gone by this time, and I cannot imagine how she lives - I am anxiously awaiting a reply.
It is very nice that Fred is going to Denver, because he will see all your old friends and bring you news of everything. To-day, in re-arranging some drawers, I came across the picture you gave me of the stained glass window you had put in St. John's Cathedral in memory of dear Aunt Lallie, and it did bring her so strongly to my mind - and poor Stephen. It must make dying easier when we have our loved ones on the other shore.
I hope Edith and Walace will have a very pleasant trip, but am afraid you will miss her. I wish I had more room and more time so that I could invite you here. Well dear Uncle David I must say goodbye. Do take good care of yourself. I hope you will be able to go to Canada again with me next summer. With fondest love to you and Edith & little Eleanor. As always your loving niece, Polly

1 February 1922 POLLY to DAVID
76 Macron St, Feb 1st '22
My dear Uncle David
Your very welcome letter came a few days ago - am sure you must miss dear Edith, as your letter says, but the days will swiftly pass and bring her back again.
SInce writing you I received the enclosed letter from Mother, which tells nothing of her whereabouts. At any rate she says she is well and comfortable, so it seems, we need not worry. I had a little return of the bronchitis, so last night rubbed on Camphorated oil and went early to bed, and to-day feel much better. I wrote yesterday to Mrs Chester thanking her for the snapshots, and saying we hoped, if you were well enough, to come again next summer.
So many people are sick with colds. I hope you will be very careful of yourself. Wirh best love to you and Eleanor. Always Your loving niece, Polly

20 February 1922 LIZZIE to POLLY
Tuesday Evening, Feb. 20th 1922
My dear Daughter
I received your ver precious letter a few days ago. I am so glad to know that you are better. I think you did wisely by consulting Stephen's physician Dr. Forgarty and I hope you have learned from the Doctor how very important it is for you to take good care of yourself to avoid catching cold and to consider always the necessity of dressing in wool underwear be sure to do this.
I wish to tell you that I have not seen either Clara or Lulu or Maud since I came to Toronto. Infact I am always busy besides there is so much very cold weather and often stormy that I think I shall wait till the time comes when the nice mild Spring weather prevails. I hope that I may be able to go around visiting my friends. Polly I have the $50 you sent me and I can go over to visit you if you will invite me to come and stay for awhile with you. I feel sure that you willl be glad to see me and I anticipate that the visit to you would make me very happy. I am ever your loving Mother.

25 February 1922 POLLY to DAVID
76 Macron St, Feb 25th '22
Dear Uncle David
I have not heard from you in some time and hope you have been well and happy.
Edith has been back from Florida some time now I suppose. And you are not so lonesome as when you wrote. I had a letter from Mother a few days ago and enclose it. I have just answered it and told her to come if she feels that she wants to do so. Whether she will really try to come on not I don't know. I think she is attached to Toronto.
I hope Edith and Wallace enjoyed their trip and that Fred is doing better. Business had been slow everywhere.
I am coming out to see you soon but would like to hear from you first how you have been. With love to all and very best love to you.
Always Your loving niece Polly

REUNITED WITH FAMILY 5 APRIL 1922

5 April 1922 POLLY to DAVID
76 Macron St, April 5th '22
Dear Uncle David
I received your very welcome letter a few days ago. Am sending this in care of Edith as by this time you may have returned from your visit to Fred. I am sorry you do not feel better, I am feeling very well again. I have a surprise for you -
Last night I got a telegram from Buffalo, saying that mother was on her way here. And this morning I met her at N.Y.C. Station & brought her home. She is now resting after her journey.
Just think, she did not take a pullman, but sat up in the coach car all night. She seemed very bright after such a journey and very happy to get here. I think she will get along here all right.
I am sorry you are not feeling better as I would so love to have you come to see her. But I do hope you will be able to do so before long. Dear Uncle David, I know how happy and glad you will feel over it.
Please write soon and I do earnestly hope and pray that you will soon feel better,
With love to you & Edith and little Eleanor.
I am always Your loving niece Polly
P.S. She has been all this time with Miss Martin. P.

13 April 1922 Clara Brett Martin, Barrister to DAVID
Clara Brett Martin B.A. L.L.B., B.C.L.
Barrister, Solicitop, &O., Notary Public
Temple Bldg. - Bay & Richmond Streets
Toronto, April 13th 1922.

D. Rubidge Esq.
c/o Mrs. Wallace Cohoe,
Stoney Crest
Riverdale-on-Hudson
N.Y.City, U.S.A.
Dear sir:-
your sister-in-law, Mrs. Seager who was an inmate of the Cobourg Hospital for insane was discharged from the said institution last month. In October last she called at my office and asked me for assistance which I rendered her. I wrote her daughter requesting her to take her mother and that I would see that she crossed the line to the United States without difficulty but her daughter sent my letter to Cobourg and instructed the Institution to take her mother back as an inmate. I threatened to issue a writ of Habeas Corpus if they did, the result of which the Institution has discharged your Sister-in-law and declared her sane. I took her into our own home, where she remained for five months under the observation of myself and my family. During that time there was a average of four people working in the house and not one of them thought for a moment that Mrs. Seager was in any Institution nor did she at any time during the said five months show any symptoms of insanity. Your sister-in-law is not insane and any one who says so is telling what is untrue.
I am advised by Mr. Snow, a relative of your late wife that you are considered a wealthy man and no doubt would provide a home or the means of obtaining a home for Mrs. Seager during the balance of her short life as I am advised she is quite up in years and cannot, except under extraordinary circumstances, live very long.
She at one time was the owner of a property on Mutual St which was sold by the government for $2500, but which was in two years thereafter re-sold for $7000. Do you not think the relatives of this woman should have seen that justice was meted out to her at the time she was under a disability to act for herself. No doubt, you had no knowledge of the transfer but certainly some of her people must have been consulted before the sale took place.
I am writing to assure you that the mental condition of your Sister-in-law and sincerely trust that if your financial position warrants, you will provide her with a home for the balance of her life, even if it were only a room in the Aged Women's Home.
I would be very sorry indeed if my letter should cause you any worry as Mrs. Seager tells me you have not been well and worry does not help one to keep well.
Yours truly,
Clara Brett Martin

17 April 1922 LIZZIE at Polly's home to DAVID at Edith's home
76 Macron St, Brooklyn, April 17th 1922
My dear brother David
I am in hopes of having the pleasure of seeing you before long as you have said in your kind letter to Polly that you will aim to come here to see me soon. Dear brother today I attended the Easter service at St. Mathews Church. I enjoyed the service very much the hymns were beautiful and the singing and music was perfect. I would like to go to that Church every Sunday and it is quite near here. Dear Polly is too busy to get time to attend the morning service but can go with me to the Evening Service. In the morning I can manage to go so then I will enjoy the Morning Service and also go with Polly in the Evening to Church. On Easter Sunday I always think and recall the memories of our beloved Sister Mary who passed to the Holy City on Easter Sunday. You and our dearly loved Lallie were both present when Sister Mary passed calmly away from this world. Well dear brother it is getting late and I must say good night, hoping you are quite well and with best wishes and love
I am ever your loving sister Lizzie

21 April 1922 POLLY to DAVID
76 Macron St
Friday Night (4/21/22 added)
Dear Uncle David
I am just writing a few lines to let you know that so far all is going well. Mother is very gentle, and seems so happy and contented to be here. I hope this state of mind will continue.
I am so sorry you do not feel better.
I have ben very busy. Let my two in help go to economize, and am doing my own cooking - have an Irish woman now helping. If I need extra help later can easily get it.
I hope business will brighten up soon, as so many are out of positions.
I am feeling very well now. I trust that with the warm weather you may feel better.
Dear Uncle David, I have thought of you every day but delayed writing until I saw how Mother would be. Now I must say goodbye with much love to you and dear Edith & Eleanor
Always Your loving niece, Polly
P.S. We expext to go to Lar Rockaway the latter part of May
1501 New Haven, Conn, P.





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