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Montgomery Manuscript Magill

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Date: 1600 to 1800
Location: County Downmap
Surname/tag: Magill
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This will summarize any mention of Magill, McGill, Tullycairn, Gill Hall, Gilford in this manuscript.

Magill Mentions

  • Page 123.
As curate therein. — David McGill belonged to a well- known family in Scotland, the founder of which appears to have been James McGill, a merchant in Edinburgh. A son of the latter, known as David McGill of Nisbet, became a celebrated lawyer, and was appointed lord advocate and a judge of the court of session, in the reign of James VI. In the Historic oj the Kennedyis, he is styled "aduocatt to his Majestic." He died in 1596, leaving two daughters, Mary and Elizabeth. The elder, mar- ried lord William Cranstoun, and Elizabeth married first, Robert Logan of Restalrig, and secondly sir Thomas Kennedy of Culzean, son of the third earl of Cassilis. David McGill left also three sons, one of whom, named James, was created baron Oxenford by Charles I., and viscount Oxenford, in 1 65 1, by Charles II. He died in 1663. His son, Robert, died without issue, in 1706, and the title became extinct. — Scots Rudiments of Honour, pp, 396, 397. The family Arms were Ruby, Three Martlets, Topaz. Crest. — a Phienix in Flames; Motto — Sine Fine. The chief family seat was Cranstoun-Magill, county of Edinburgh, three miles east of Dalkeith. The estate passed into a collateral branch of the family named Dalrymple in which it now remains. Nnv Statistical A ccount of Scotland, Edinburh, vol. i., p. 191. Mr. David McGill, mentioned in the text as curate of Greyabbey, was either a son or nephew of David McGill, lord advo- cate and judge. He was most probably his son. He is evidently the person named in the will of Symon Fer- guson of Kilkerran, who died in 1591, and who appears to have been a family connexion. In one passage of that document, the testator "requeyris and nominats Bernard Fergussone, his father, sir Thomas Kennedy of Culzean, knight, and Elizabeth McGill, his spous, to be or'sears to his said bairnes. Item, he levis in legacie to the said Christian his spouse, his hors and his naig. Item, he levis to the bairn his said spous is now with, incaice it be a femall, the sowme of ane thousand punds money, and or- dainis his air to pay the same befoir yir witness Mr. David M'^gill, Younger." — Paterson's Parishes and Faiiiilies oJ Ayrshire, vol. i., p. 391. Before coming to Ireland, Mr, David McGill liad married Elizabeth Lindsay whose mother was a sister of the first viscountess Montgomery of the Ards. He died in 1633. Harris mentions, p. 55, that

"under the Coat of Arms of the Rev. David Magill, minister of this and the neiglibouring parishes, within the church (of Greyabbey), on a Stone in the South Wall, is this Inscription : —

" Voce gregem, vitaqiie Deo, Letlioque fideles. Qui pavit, placuit qui criiciavit, hie est. Obiit 15° Octobris, Anno 1633."

  • p. 135.
39 Edward Johnston. — Several families of this surname were early settled in the Ards and Castlereagh. James Johnston the elder and James Johnston the younger are mentioned in a Deposition, referring to events in 1641, as having been engaged in a massacre of the Irish which took place in the barony of Castlereagh. This Deposition is printed in the Notes connected with the author's Memoir of sir James Montgomery. See infra. A respectable family of title name of Johnston was settled at Kirkistown, in the parish of Ardkeen. Mr. Edward Johnston, of Kirkistown was married to a daughter of captain James Magill, of Ballyvester. This Mr. Johnston's son, named Robert, inherited the house and lease of Ballyvester at the death of his grandmother, Mrs. Jane McGill, which happened in January, 1711-12, his sister, Mrs. Madden of Fennan- getting the chattels and personal property. — MS,preserved at Greyabbey.
  • Page 251.
Capt James M'Gill. — Captain James M'Gill was eldest son of Mr. David M'Gill, curate of Greyabbey. See p. 123, supra. This gentleman's residences, after the wars, were Kirkistown and Ballynester. Of Kirkistown, Harris says, pp. 67, 269, it "is an English Castle, surrounded by a high wall, strongly built, and containing within the circuit of it a good dwelling house of Mrs. Lucy Magil, now (1744) the Widow Savage Kirkistown and Ballygalgot Castles were built since the accession of King James I. , by Rowland Savage of Archin." Mrs. Lucy Magill, afterwards Mrs. Savage, was grand-daughter of captain James M'Gill mentioned in the text. The latter received, as a 1649 officer, the two sums of £6,^00 and ;i^"i,392 lis. id., secured from the 'savings,' through two grants made in the names of Hugh Montgomery of Bally magoun, and Hugh McGill, his own hxo\.h.sx.— -Irish Recoi'd Commissioti Reports, vol. iii., pp. 29s. 303-
  • Page 281 (This refers to the Jacobite Williamite War)
Dissipating our forces. — This defeat, which befel the Protestant forces on the 14th March, completely broke up their organization. The army sent by Tyr- connell against them, from Dublin, was numerous and well-disciplined, the infantry being commanded by lieute- nant-general Richard Hamilton, and the cavalry by colonel Dominick Sheldon. On the arrival of this force at Newry, sir Arthur Rawdon and sir John MagiU, who had garrisons in Loughbrickland and Rathfriland, withdrew them from these places and fell back on Dromore. The latter tov^Ti was supposed to be a favourable position at which to concentrate the northern forces; but although captain Hugh Magill, from the Ards, and major Baker, led their troops there to support sir Arthur Rawdon, the enemy advanced too rapidly to permit a sufficient number to assemble. On the 14th, lord Mount-Alexander and colonel Upton advanced from Hillsborough on Dromore, but they came to witness the rout of their comrades, and had only time to turn with them and make their escape, the larger portion hurrying away in the direc- tion of Coleraine and Derry. In Story's Impartial Account of the Affairs of Ireland, p. 4, we have the follow- ing reference to this defeat: — -"A little before this, the Pi'otestants of Ireland were in daily expectation of arms, ammunition, commissions, and some forces from England, and it's more than probable that, if they had got them, the business had cost neither so much blood nor treasure as since it has ; yet some advised not to make any show of discontent till they had an opportunity, and were in a condition to make their party good by the arrival of suc- cours from England ; but the greater part, impatient of delays, begin to list men, and with what they could get, to make a show of forming an army. Against those in the North, Lieutenant-General Hamilton marched with about one thousand of the standing army, and nigh twice as many Rapparrees, in a distinct body ; they met at Dro- more, in the county of Down, and, on the 14th March, the Protestants were routed with no great difficulty ; and
  • Page 283
The Isle of Man. — Among those who fled on that occasion from the county of Down were the earl of Mount-Alexander, Thomas Herrington of Comber, William Herrington, jun., of Comber, John Griffith of Comber, John Magill of Tullycarne, William Magill, son and heir to captain James Magill, Francis Annesly, jun., of Cloughmagherycatt, Alexander Brown of Magannon, Hugh Montgomery of Ballymalady, Charles Campbell of Donaghadee, John Farrell of Dromore, Henry Gardiner of Newry, and Samuel Waring of Waringston. — King's State of the Protestants, ^. 227.
  • Page 289
On the 25th September: — "I am glad that all things below are safe. My Lady Antrim was safely delivered last Tuesday of a fine boy, to the great pleasure of Mr. Magill." (This lady was Rachel Clot- worthy, who married as her first husband the fourth earl of Antrim, and after his death became the wife of John Hawkins Magill, esq.) On the 7th December: — " 'Tis hard for me to know what sort of Bullocks Lawnies can bee, if he had sent you word what the price of them were and what size, I could have given a more particular guess what to write to your Lordsp about them, I doe not pro- pose paying for them Immediately nor in less than four months after delivery, w'^ if Lawnie likes you may send to see what sort of cattle they are, and one may easy judge whether he asks too dear for them or not. " — MS. Letters preserved at Donaghadee.
  • Page 314
Newcastle. — "The ancient name of Newcastle was Ballaghbeg, Bealacbeag 'the little road' or highway, which is still the name of the townland wherein it is situated. It is said to derive its present name from the castle erected by Felix Magenis, in 1588; but this is not reconcileable with histoiy, for we find mention made of it by the name Newcastle ( Fearsat an Chaisleiji mii, ' the ford or pass of the new castle') in the An?!als of the Four Masters, at the year 1433, — a century and a half before the erection of the castle by Felix Magenis ; but the probability is that a castle existed here before that time, and in all likelihood on the site of the latter, which guarded thePass. . . . The castle here spoken was, some few years ago, in excellent preservation, and rented by the Board of Customs for the accommodation of officers of the revenue. It was situated, as Harris observes, close to the sea-shore, but it has been pulled down, and on its site the late Earl Annesley erected that splendid edifice now known as the Hotel Bnildings. — The late J. A. Pilson's Account of Neii'castle, printed in the Downpatrick Recorder. Prior to 1641, the town and castle belonged to sir Con Magennis, but after the rebellion of that year, the property was confiscated, and granted to William Hawkins, great grandfather to Robert Hawkins, who assumed the surname of Magill, and was married first to Rachael Clotworthy, fourth countess of Antrim, and secondly to the lady Anne Bligh, daughter of John, earl of Darnley. The date 1588 was inscribed on a stone placed over the front entrance of the castle, built by Felix Magenis at Newcastle. — Harris, County of Down, p. 80.
  • Page 437
List of Sheriffs of County Down, by year. Several Magill were mentioned

Page 123

"As curate therein. — David McGill belonged to a well- known family in Scotland, the founder of which appears to have been James McGill, a merchant in Edinburgh. A son of the latter, known as David McGill of Nisbet, became a celebrated lawyer, and was appointed lord advocate and a judge of the court of session, in the reign of James VI. In the Historic oj the Kennedyis, he is styled "aduocatt to his Majestic." He died in 1596, leaving two daughters, Mary and Elizabeth. The elder, married lord William Cranstoun, and Elizabeth married first, Robert Logan of Restalrig, and secondly sir Thomas Kennedy of Culzean, son of the third earl of Cassilis. David McGill left also three sons, one of whom, named James, was created baron Oxenford by Charles I., and viscount Oxenford, in 1651, by Charles II. He died in 1663. His son, Robert, died without issue, in 1706, and the title became extinct. — Scots Rudiments of Honour, pp, 396, 397. The family Arms were Ruby, Three Martlets, Topaz. Crest. — a Phoenix in Flames; Motto — Sine Fine. The chief family seat was Cranstoun-Magill, county of Edinburgh, three miles east of Dalkeith. The estate passed into a collateral branch of the family named Dalrymple in which it now remains. New Statistical Account of Scotland, Edinburh, vol. i., p. 191. Mr. David McGill, mentioned in the text as curate of Greyabbey, was either a son or nephew of David McGill, lord advocate and judge. He was most probably his son. He is evidently the person named in the will of Symon Fer- guson of Kilkerran, who died in 1591, and who appears to have been a family connexion. In one passage of that document, the testator "requeyris and nominats Bernard Fergussone, his father, sir Thomas Kennedy of Culzean, knight, and Elizabeth McGill, his spous, to be or'sears to his said bairnes. Item, he levis in legacie to the said Christian his spouse, his hors and his naig. Item, he levis to the bairn his said spous is now with, incaice it be a femall, the sowme of ane thousand punds money, and or- dainis his air to pay the same befoir yir witness Mr. David M'^gill, Younger." — Paterson's Parishes and Families of Ayrshire, vol. i., p. 391. Before coming to Ireland, Mr. David McGill had married Elizabeth Lindsay whose mother was a sister of the first viscountess Montgomery of the Ards. He died in 1633. Harris mentions, p. 55, that

"under the Coat of Arms of the Rev. David Magill, minister of this and the neighbouring parishes, within the church (of Greyabbey), on a Stone in the South Wall, is this Inscription : —

" Voce gregem, vitaqiie Deo, Letlioque fideles. Qui pavit, placuit qui criiciavit, hie est. Obiit 15° Octobris, Anno 1633."





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