Muhlberg_Scherbakovka.jpg

Muhlberg/Scherbakovka

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Date: [unknown] [unknown]
Location: [unknown]
Profile manager: Lana H private message [send private message]
This page has been accessed 1,283 times.

According to I. Pleve "Einwanderung in das Wolgagebiet 1764-1767" T.4 page 245-257 Scherbakovka founders are:

Sebastian Afner, Johann Aganberg?, Melchior Bauer, Ludwig Beck, Joseph Berkl, Georg Blehm, Valentin Braun, Balthasar Briltimann?, David und Georg David Dietz, Christoph Ehrhardt, Philipp Eifert, Andreas Frankfurt, Conrad Gans, Johann Philipp Hammer, Johann Peter und Johannes Hanschuh, Bernhard und Ferdinand Iphöfer, Martin Kagel / Nagel, Johann Adam Kaufmann, Jakob Kraft, Christoph Krieger, Matthias Krug, Christoph Lang, Daniel Laubhan, Heinrich May, Adam, Christoph, Leonhard und Martin Meier, Leonhard Menges, Conrad Müntermann , Georg Niesin?, Conrad Obländer, Gottlieb Prester, Wilhelm Reis, Georg Adam Riffel, Andreas und Conrad Schäfer, Johannes Magall Schmidt, Martin Speldecker, Christian und Georg Steinert, Christian Stoppel, Johannes Michael Stricker, Anna Margarethe Stripper, Johann Peter Wassenmüller, Jakob Weiss, Georg Winter, Johannes Wohlhauer, Georg Zweizig.





Memories: 2
Enter a personal reminiscence or story.
http://www.lowervolga.org/hoak.html

Interesting report from researchers visiting the lower Volga villages including Muhlberg, Alexandertal, Rosenberg, Galka, Stephen, Holstein, Dreispitz, Dobrinka, and Schwab. Lots of family names if you have any ancestors from there.

posted 9 Apr 2014 by Lana (X) H   [thank Lana]
My Aunt Mary Weitzel (husband David Meier) lived in Scherbakovka before being deported to Siberia in 1941. She had four children who she had to give away because she no longer could feed them. Her parents sent her relief packages, but it is not known if she received them. After a few letters, my grandparents heard no more from her, so it is doubtful she survived. She was the only one who stayed in Russia when the rest of the family emigrated to the US in 1912. They worried and wept for her and vowed to bring her and her children to the US, but there was nothing they could do.

Nearly everyone was deported unless they were elderly. Men and women went to different camps, so we don't know what happened to David either or where any of them went. We know Mary and the kids were on a train going north of Omsk.

I often wonder what happened to the four children and if we still have cousins in Russia.

posted 9 Apr 2014 by Lana (X) H   [thank Lana]
Login to add a memory.
Collaboration
  • Login to edit this profile and add images.
  • Private Messages: Send a private message to the Profile Manager. (Best when privacy is an issue.)
  • Public Comments: Login to post. (Best for messages specifically directed to those editing this profile. Limit 20 per day.)
Comments

Leave a message for others who see this profile.
There are no comments yet.
Login to post a comment.