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The Ironworks Bakers

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Location: Tennesseemap
Surname/tag: Baker
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This page is devoted to genealogical research of a group of six Bakers who lived in Carter County, Tennessee, and then Campbell County, Tennessee. Four of the individuals were partners in the business of Bakers Forge in Campbell County. Two other Bakers were closely associated. Due to their associations with ironworking, this group is called the “Ironworks” Bakers.

George Baker — George had been a constable of Carter County, in 1819-20 (see court minutes below). George seems to have been the leading partner of the four Bakers who owned Bakers Forge. He died young in a horse-riding accident about 1826. He left a widow, Elizabeth, and two young sons.

William Baker — born between 1790 and 1800. He was one of the four partners of Bakers Forge.

James Baker — born between 1790 and 1800. He was one of the four partners of Bakers Forge. Later, in the 1840s, he migrated to Nodaway County, Missouri, leaving children.

Bowling Baker — born c. 1795 in Tennessee. He was one of the four partners of Bakers Forge. He eventually migrated to Stone County, Missouri, where he died in 1864, leaving several children. His name is spelled "Bowling," Bolling," "Bolen," "Bolin," etc. (Though some modern genealogies include a middle for him, no middle name is found for him in Tennessee records.)

Thomas Baker — born in Tennessee c. 1791. He was the guardian of George Baker’s son Ewins. Later, in the 1840s, Thomas moved to Platte County, Missouri. In the 1850s to Osage County, Missouri. He had several children.

John Baker — born between 1780 and 1790. He married Barbary Heaton in Carter County and moved to Campbell County. Later, in 1850, his widow appeared in Ray County, Missouri, with eight of their children. Note that he was also called “Jack” and “Jackson.”

Contents

General Notes

No records from the 1700s or 1800s indicate any familial relationships among these six men. However, it seems very likely that most or all of them were brothers. They were all of the same generation, born mostly between 1790 and 1800, though John was older and James possibly younger. Later census records show that Bowling and Thomas were born in Tennessee in the early 1790s.

Y-DNA evidence shows that descendants of James Baker, Thomas Baker and John Baker share a recent common paternal ancestor. No Y-DNA evidence is currently known for descendants of George, William or Bowling. The Y-DNA shows that this family of Bakers was not genetically related to another large family of Bakers with which they are sometimes genealogically connected. (See “Y-DNA Evidence” below.)

Records pinpoint precisely where they lived. In the 1810s, the records show them living on “Little Doe" creek. “Little Doe” is today called “Doe Creek" and is located in present-day Johnson County, Tennessee. From 1777 to 1796, the creek was part of Washington County, Tennessee. From 1796 to 1836 it was part of Carter County, Tennessee. Since 1836 it has been part of Johnson County. Records show that in the 1810s and 1820s the "Ironworks" Bakers lived in iron-rich land, near the forge of Thomas Johnson (an early settler for whom Johnson County was later named). Details in a deed for Thomas Baker, described below, indicates a location at 36.4236°, -81.9442°.

In the 1820–40s, in Campbell County, Bakers Forge was located in Sugar Hollow, where Cedar Creek met Powell's River. The location is now under Norris Lake at 36.3505°, -84.033° (see more details below).

Among the abundance of records for the Bakers, two are especially critical in establishing their identity and movement. First, there are county minutes in Carter County that list George, William, James and Bowling in succession. Second, these same four names appear on a deed in Campbell County, when they purchased the forge that would become know as Bakers Forge. Other records support and add detail, and tie John and Thomas to the others.

The records also show their relationships with numerous other individuals and families. Among them: Thomas Johnson, William Lindsay, Jacob Perkins, the Crosswhite family, the Stout family, the Heatherly family and the Heaton family. Some of these individuals also made the move in the 1820s from Carter County to Campbell County. In Campbell County, the Bakers were closely associated with the Housley family who also lived in Sugar Hollow.

There is no conclusive evidence regarding a parent for any of the six "Ironworks" Bakers. Two older Bakers appear in the 1790s in the Little Doe community where the six "Ironworks" Bakers first appeared in records in the 1810s (see discussion below), but their relationship is not known.

Y-DNA Evidence

There is a site devoted to the Y-DNA of the surname Baker at www.bakerdna.net.[1] This site shows the "Ironworks Bakers", Haplogroup I1, in a small cluster of their own (#29) with Y-DNA unrelated to other clusters.

Genealogical evidence connects three of the “Ironworks” Bakers by Y-DNA: James (through his son Joseph), Thomas (through his son Bolen) and John (through his son Alvis).

Y-DNA data also indicates that another family of Bakers fall within the "Ironworks" Baker cluster: descendants of a certain John Baker of Hancock County, Tennessee, through his son William (who married Patience Rice) and through his son Henry (who married Millie Cox). The precise relation between this John Baker of Hancock County and the "Ironworks" Bakers is not known.

Some genealogies assert that the "Ironworks" Bakers were in some way descendants of John "Renta" Baker of North Carolina. Y-DNA flatly contradicts this assertion. The Y-DNA of their respective descendants shows that the "Renta" Bakers and the "Ironworks" Bakers differ on 10 of 37 markers[2], meaning there is no chance that these two families of Bakers were patrilineally related.

In a typewritten document from 1949 called "Families of Norris Reservoir Area," about 270 or 280 pages long, three pages are devoted to the Bakers of Bakers Forge.[3] This document asserts that five of the Bakers were brothers (John is not mentioned) and that their father was a Bowling Baker of Clay County, Kentucky, who was the son of John "Renta" Baker. As discussed in the previous paragraph, Y-DNA contradicts this assertion.

Little Doe

Context

Little Doe was a creek where a community of early settlers in northeastern Tennessee had settled. From 1777 to 1796, the creek was part of Washington County. From 1796 to 1836 it was part of Carter County. Since 1836 it has part of Johnson County. The following excerpt is taken from Godspeeds History of Johnson County, published in 1886 (source). [4]

Johnson County is the extreme eastern county of the State. It is bounded on the north by Virginia and on the cast and southeast by North Carolina. The area in acres is 249,600, or in square miles about 390, It is well watered by springs and streams. The Watauga River forms the dividing line between this county and Carter for a short distance, and receives the principal stream of the former, Roane Creek. The remaining streams of the county are Little Doe River, a tributary of Roane Creek, and Laurel Fork and Beaver dam Creek, which waters enter the Holston River. The surface of the county is usually broken. The Iron Mountain traverses it from northeast to southwest, and Stone Mountain marks the boundary of North Carolina. Doe Mountain lies wholly within the county, and extends a distance of about twelve miles. The most fertile lands lie along Little Doe, Roane Creek and the district known as Shady. The mineral resources are exceedingly valuable. This is especially true of iron ore, which exists in extensive beds, and for nearly a hundred years has been worked, in a small way.
The first settlement in Johnson County is said to have been made about 1770, on Roane Creek, near its confluence with the Watauga, by a man named Honeveut. Other settlements were made soon after farther up Roane Creek, and on Little Doe and the Laurel. Shady was also settled at a comparatively early day. Among the pioneers who had found homes in the territory now embraced in Johnson County prior to 1778, were Joseph Hoskins, George and Samuel Heatherly, Thomas, John and Charles Asher, Richard and Benjamin Wilson, John and Henry Grimes, Joseph Gentry, John, Jesse and Josiah Hoskins and John Higgins. At that time the entire population of this section did not exceed 150. Among those who came during the next twenty years and located in Little Doe were Jacob Perkins, George Brown, George Crosswhite, Ed. Polly, Joseph Tompkins and David Stout. . . . Of the settlers on Roane Creek, during the period from 1773 to 1798 may be mentioned, Leonard Shown, John Barry, John Vaught, David Wagner, Jacob and Michael Slimp. Vaught had a mill and “still-house” which he left to his son, Joseph Vaught. Shown located at the cross roads, which has long borne his name. David Wagner lived east of Shown’s Cross Roads. He was the father of Mathew, David H., Jacob and John Wagner. At a very early day Nathaniel Taylor erected iron works on Roane Creek. He afterward transferred them to his son, James P. Taylor, who sold them to David Wagner.

Early Records

Before the first records appear of the six "Ironworks" Bakers, there were other Bakers in the Little Doe community in the 1790s and early 1800s.

In the Washington County tax lists of 1790[5], 1791[6], 1792[7] and 1793[8], a William Baker is listed near names like Ewins Heatherly and George Perkins, men associated with the community at Little Doe. Samual Garland and William Lindsay are also among the names in the 1791 list. Note that this William Baker had no land of his own in these records.

In the 1794 Washington County tax list, a John Baker, who owned 100 acres, is listed among names including Heatherly, Perkins, Garland, Stout, Heaton, Slimp, Shown, etc.[9] A 1795 Washington County deed dated 15 August 1795 shows John Baker buying 150 acres from Samuel Garland on "Rones Creek" with William Mourland as a witness.[10] In the 1795 Washington County tax list, John Baker (155 acres) is listed among the Little Doe community.[11]

In 1796 Little Doe is included in the tax lists of Carter County, but the Carter County tax lists were alphabetized from 1796 and 1799 and include the entire county, so it is not possible to determine which individuals were part of the Little Doe community. The 1796 Carter County tax list includes a John Baker (who owned 155 acres) and a William Baker (no land).[12] The 1797 Carter County tax list includes one John Baker (with 155 acres) and another John Baker (with 125 acres).[13] A 1798 county tax list includes a John Baker (with 125 acres) and a William Baker (no acreage).[14] A 1799 county tax list includes a John Baker (with 125 acres).[15]

The 1800 Carter County tax list (not alphabetized) shows William Baker listed near Ewins Heatherly, Jacob Perkins, Thomas Johnson, George Crosswhite, etc.[16] On the following page, Andrew Baker and John Baker are listed. [17]

County court minutes from 1802 include a passage that shows an Andrew Baker and a John Baker among a group of men not associated with Little Doe. [18] What this record seems to indicate is that this Andrew Baker and John Baker were associated with a different community than the William Baker and John Baker of Little Doe.

In summary, what these records from 1790 to 1802 seem to show is that a William Baker and John Baker lived among the community at Little Doe. Then, beginning in 1797, another Andrew Baker and a second John Baker lived nearby in Carter County, but not in Little Doe. It seems very likely that the William Baker and John Baker that appear in Little Doe in the 1790–96 tax lists are an older generation of the "Ironworks" Bakers, but their precise relationship to the "Ironworks" Bakers cannot be determined.

Deeds

The first records unquestionably related to the "Ironworks" Bakers are deeds in Carter County that locate the Bakers near “Little Doe” (today called Doe Creek in Johnson County). A deed shows that in February 1813, George Crosswhite sold land to William Baker, 130 acres on the waters of Little Doe neighboring Jacob Perkins and Thomas Johnson.[19]deed shows that in November 1813 George Baker was a witness to another deed involving George Crosswhite and Robert Houston on the waters of Little Doe.[20] Two records (here and here) in 1814 show George Baker as a witness in a transaction between Jacob Perkins and William Lindsey.[21] [22] In the mid 1810s, the Bakers would have been in their 20s.

Land Entries

In a collection of archives on Ancestry.com called “Tennessee, Early Land Registers, 1778-1927” there are six records that mention Thomas Baker in Carter County. In entry 3242[23], in 1816, “Thomas Baker, assignee of William B. Carter, assignee of Alfred M. Carter, assignee of James P. Taylor locates and enters 40 acres of land in Carter County Sixth District on Campbells Creek waters of little Doe Beginning on a white oak corner to Thomas Johnson’s pine Cabbin tract… Entered April 8th 1816.”

This means that Thomas Baker acquired 40 acres from William B. Carter (who, in turn, had acquired the land from Alfred M. Carter, etc.) and that Thomas Baker was Thomas Johnson's neighbor. The location of Campbell Creek in that record is here: 36.4236°, -81.9442°.

Five other entries, from 1817 to 1819, show Jacob Slimp acquiring small 1-5 acre tracts from Thomas Baker. All of those tracts contained banks of iron ore. Entry no. 3686[24] involves 2.5 acres and mentions the north side of stone mountain and bank of iron ore. Entry no. 3843[25] involves three acres and mentions the north side of Stone Mountain, "waters of dry run," and includes "a large iron ore bank found by Joel Baker." It is not known who this Joel Baker is. Entry no. 3844[26] involves one acre and mentions Doe Mountain. Entry no. 4436[27] involves one acre and mentions Doe Mountain. Entry no. 4868[28] involves five acres of land on "south side of rones Creek." This notes that Peter Parkey was already living on that land.

Court Minutes

Carter County court minutes from 1819–20 are a valuable source of information about the Bakers. Note that in two different minutes, the four Bakers that were later partners in Bakers Forge are listed together.

On page 57 (circa 1819): “Ordered by the court that John Shoun be appointed overseer of the public Road leading up little Doe of Roans creek from the river near Henry D. Johnstons lain [lane] to Garland Wilson’s still house branch and that the following be his hands to wit: George Baker, Wm. Baker, James Baker, Bolin Baker, John Crosswhite, George Crosswhite, Dave Crosswhite, James Harden, Jesse Lane, Henry D. Johnston, William and Jesse Tompkins, Stephen Jackson, James Moorley, Garland Wilson, Andrew Wilson, Benjamin Gentry be the hands to work under said Shoun together with all other hands that may live in said bounds.”[29][30]

On page 81: “Ordered by the court that Geo. Baker, Joseph [sic] Baker, Wm Baker, Bolin Baker and Jesse Lane be added to the hands of William Lindzey overseer of the Public road.”[31]

On page 100, in a list of jurors, John Baker is listed with “(of Little Doe)” in parentheses following his name.[32]

On page 108: “George Baker appointed constable come into open court and took an oath to support the constitution of the united States the constitution of the State of Tennessee and an oath as Required by Law for a constable and Entered into bond with Michl. Smithpeter and William Lindzey his securitys with Condition.”[33]

On page 190: “Ordered by the court that Garland Wilson be appointed overseer of the public road Leading up little doe of rones creek from the Drain near Henry D. Johnsons dam to Garland Wilsons Still house branch and that the Following be his hands to wit, Geo. Baker, Wm Baker, Jas Baker, Bolen Baker, John Crosswhite, Geo. Crosswhite [?] Jas. Moorley, Henry D. Johnson, Wm. & Jesse Tompkins, Stephen Jackson, Andw Wilson, Benja Gentry be the hands to work in said Road together.”[34]

Also on page 190: “Ordered by the court that Vaught Heaton be appointed overseer of the public road up little doe from this spring up to Johnsons forge taking the lower division of hands including [?] W. Lindzey, David Stout and all the hands that formerly worked on said road under said Lindzey.” (This item mentions Vaught Heaton, brother-in-law of John Baker.)[35]

A partial transcript of more Carter County minutes of this period can be found here.

John Baker

record in Carter County dated 1823 shows that John Baker received 68 acres from the estate of John Heaton on behalf of his wife Barbary Heaton.[36]Several pages in the records show that John's lot of land was one of several distributed to the heirs of John Heaton; John Heaton's son Vaught Heaton also inherited one lot.

(The above record is critical in establishing the relation of John Baker's branch who later migrated to Ray County, Missouri. A 1916 Missouri death certificate of John's son Alvis Baker shows his parents as "Jackson" Baker and Barbary Heaton.[37]

A deed in Carter County dated 4 November 1826 shows that by that date John Baker was residing in Campbell County.[38] This record shows while he lived in Campbell County, he sold land that he still owned in Carter County on the waters of Little Doe. The deed mentions that the land neighbored the land of Thomas Johnson and Jacob Perkins. It mentions George Crosswhite. Witnesses include two Stouts.

Campbell County

1822 Deed

The first record in Campbell County related to this family comes in 1822. A deed appears in the records of Campbell County recording the acquisition of several acres, a forge and a house located on Grants Creek (later called Cedar Creek). Haris Ryan conveyed the property to George Baker, James Baker, William Baker and Bowling Baker. Following is a rough transcript.

This indenture made this 15th day of May 18[22] between Haris Ryan of the county of Campbell and state of Tennessee on the one part and George James William and Bowling Baker of the — witnesseth that the said Haris Ryan — consideration of the sum of the sum [sic] of — and fifty dollars to him in hand paid the receipt is hereby acknowledged hath bargained sold and delivered confirmed and hereby conveyed unto said George James William and Bowling Baker — heirs and assigns forever a certain tract of land lying and being in the county of Campbell and state of Tennessee, a part of a certain tract that said Rian bought of Cunningham — in Richard Henderson and Companys Powell Valley and bounded as follows viz beginning on the west side of Grants Creek twenty five poles below the iron works at a stake on the bank of said creek, thence near a west corner so as to take the house in where Baker now lives — twenty poles to a stake thence north twenty five poles to a stake, & thence east twenty five poles so as to include the forge and thence to the beginning of wich said bounds or at least the fourth of said bounds and also three fourths of said forge I Haris Ryan do convey or otherwise — priveledge to said tract of land containing four acres be the — more or less to have and to hold the same in maner and form hereof — together with all and singular the woods water water courses minerals — and — belonging or in any — unto said George James William and Bowling Baker their heirs and assigns forever and the said Haris Ryan for himself and heirs hereby covenant to warrant & forever defend the said three fourths of said four acres of land here conveyed from the trust claim right title of all and every person or persons and thereby from him self and heirs unto the said George James William and Bowling Baker their heirs & assigns as an estate — in fee simple for ever in witness whereof the said Haris Ryan doth hereunto set his name and seal this day and year above written in the presents of [signatures]
2nd September 1822. The execution of the forgoing deed of conveyance from Haris Ryan to George, James, William, and Bowling Baker for four acres land was this day sworn in open court by the oaths of John Walker and Thomas Moad subscribing witness thereto. Let it be regi[s]tered. ...

Bakers Forge

A description of the history of Bakers Forge, including previous owners and details of operation, can be found here. Following are excerpts regarding the Bakers:

. . . And on May 15, 1822, Ryan sold to George, James, William and Bowling Baker a parcel of land, which he bought from Cunningham's heirs. This parcel of land began on the west side of Grant's (Cedar) Creek twenty-five poles below the iron works and then near a west course so as to take in the house where the Baker's lived. From this time on the location was known as Bakers Forge.
A rather crude accident happened to George Baker in the summer of 1826 when he was returning from Jacksboro riding a rather energetic black horse. As he crossed the divide from Sweaton Spring Hollow to Sugar Hollow, the horse bucked and refused to continue past a scrubby post oak. Baker and the horse made several tries to pass the tree by the path. The horse suddenly reared and bolted through the heavy timber hitting Baker's head on a giant oak tree. He was dead on impact. . . .
Baker's Forge was not as profitable after the death of George Baker due to the difficulties of mining the ore and the declining supply of appropriate wood for charcoal, along with the added operating expense in hauling the ore. . . .

Records Following the Death of George Baker

George Baker, one of the four partners invested in the forge, died sometime before September 1826.

After George Baker's death, an inventory was taken of the joint property of George, William, James and Bowling.[39] Following is a rough transcript of the record:

A inventory of the estate of George Baker deceased [gather?] with the estate of James Baker, William Baker and Bowling Baker surviving copartners with the said estate is as follows (viz)
September 7th 1826
one negro woman and child 3 wagons and the woodwork of one wagon 4 horses 5 pair horse gear and 2 pair drawing chains 2 bellows 1 set blacksmith tools 1 pair of mill stones about 20 sides of leather 4 raw hides 5 saddles 3 saddle blankets 10 head of cattle 4 work steers about 50 head of hogs or upwards 7 bedsteads 4 pair of pot hooks two iron shovels 1 large pot 1 small kettle and lid 1 [oven?] and lid 1 small kettle 1 flat iron 2 pot trammels 1 set dog irons 1 flax wheel 2 cotton wheels 3 pair of cotton cards 3 dressers and furniture 3 chairs 10 pails 2 washing tubs 2 still tubs 1 pickling tub and 1 tarr barrel 2 check reels [7 or 17?] chairs 2 tables 20 warping spools 2 beds and furniture 5 pair [bedsteads?] 3 half bushel 1 peck 1 half peck 2 tin trunks 1 [slate?] one cross cut saw 1 hand saw 1 foot adds [adze] 1 broad ax 2 augurs 2 chisels 1 iron square 1 drawing knife 3 mattocks 2 weeding hoes 3 bells 8 axes 2 iron wedges 2 sithes [scythes] 1 cradle

A probate record dated 8 September 1828 shows the settlement of the estate and gives sums of the account.[40]

Bowling Baker Recpt. 9th June 1827 —$384.15 3/4
Elizabeth Baker Recpt. 9 June 1827 — $192.07 1/2
James Baker Recpt. 9 June 1827 — $384.15 3/4
William Baker Recpt. 9 June 1827 — $384.15 3/4
Thomas Baker Recpt. guardian — $192.07 1/2
[total] $1536.62 1/4

What seems to have occurred in probate records after George's death is that the inventory of the whole forge was taken in total, of which George's share was one fourth. The value was then redistributed assigning James, William and Bowling their rightful shares and then dividing the remaining one fourth between George's widow (Elizabeth Baker) and George's son's guardian (Thomas Baker).

George was known to have two sons. Ewing ("Ewins," "Ewens," etc) was placed under the guardianship of Thomas Baker. George Washington Baker was his other son. It is not clear why one son was placed in a guardianship and one was not.

Deeds show that by February 1830 George's widow Elizabeth Baker was called Elizabeth Comer. She had married John Comer who was involved in the work at the forge.

A June 1830 probate record in Campbell County shows that Thomas Baker was "guardian of Ewing Baker minor and orphan of George Baker decd."[41] Details in the record show transactions regarding iron, and mentions James Baker, William Baker, Bowling Baker. The transactions relate to Ewing's inherited share in Bakers Forge. Also mentioned in the account of transactions are John Comer, Phillip Mallicoat, Thomas Nations, William York, John Maddren and William Stanley.

Censuses of 1830 and 1840

The censuses of 1830 and 1840 are important resources in establishing the ages of the "Ironworks" Bakers.

In the 1830 census in Campbell County, page 221 includes the names (heads of households) John Baker (40–50), Bowling Baker (30–40), James Baker (30–40) and John Comer (30–40).[42] (John Comer was husband of George Baker's widow Elizabeth.)

On page 222 William Baker (30–40) is listed.[43]

Thomas Baker (30–40) appears on page 214.[44]

In the 1840 census in Campbell County, page 10 includes Thomas Baker and "Boling" Baker.[45] Thomas Baker (40–50) appears to have been married with 4 boys in the household. "Boling" Baker (40–50) appears to have been married with 11 children in the household.

William Baker (40–50) is listed on page 11 and appears to have been married with 8 children in the household.[46]

John Baker (50–60) is listed on page 22 and appears to have been married with 8 children in the household.[47]

James Baker (30–40) is listed on page 23 next to Joseph Housley and John Madron. James had 9 others in his household.[48]

Land Deeds

There are many land deeds in Campbell County from the 1820s, 1830s and 1840s that show transactions involving James, William, Bowling, John and Thomas — and in the 1840s James Baker, Junior, as well. The deeds often involved land located on the Powell River, on Cedar Creek, and in Sugar Hollow. Some deeds explicitly mention the forge. An index to those Baker deeds can be found beginning on this page. Following are a sampling of those deeds:

A record dated 5 October 1826 shows an indenture between Thomas Baker and Bowling Baker regarding $600 for 250 acres on the south bank of Powell River.[49] A deed dated 12 September 1829 shows that Thomas Baker and Bowling Baker together sold land to Reuben Craig: $600 for 125 acres on the south bank of Powell River.[50] A deed in 1834 shows a transaction of land from James, William and Bowling to John.[51] A deed dated 17 October 1837 shows that Thomas Baker sold 150 acres; Bowling Baker was a witness and the deed indicates Joseph Housley and Joseph Smith owned neighboring land.[52] A deed dated 28 May 1839 shows that Thomas Baker purchased land from John Baker: $480 for 150 acres on the north bank of Powell River; the deed was witnessed by Bowling Baker and William (M. or N.?) Baker.[53]

A deed in Campbell County dated 9 August 1841 shows the sale of James Baker, Senior's one-fourth part of the four-acre "bakers forge" to James Baker, Junior for $500.[54] An 1841 deed in Campbell County shows a sale of land on both sides of Cedar Creek by Bowling Baker to Barnabas Craven for $1500; the deed mentions "Bowling Bakers Smith Shop"; witnesses included Joseph Smith and James Baker.[55] An 1841 deed shows Bowling Baker selling to James Baker, Junior, 197 acres and "one half and one eighth" of the forge for $1000; witnessed by William Heatherly, Joseph Smith, James Baker.[56] A deed in Campbell County dated 4 June 1842 shows the sale of 75 acres of land for $300 by James Baker (Junior) to Jeremiah Wilson, Elie Wilson and Henry Wilson; the deed mentions a forge and "Shugar Hollow." A deed dated 17 August 1843 shows that Thomas Baker sold land to Samuel Brown: $140 for 50 acres on a river; the deed mentions John Baker and William Housley.[57]

Deeds involving these Bakers appear to end in the early 1840s, when it is known that Thomas, Bowling and James migrated to different counties in Missouri. Land deeds after the early 1840s continue to show activity of George Baker's two sons (Ewing Baker and George Washington Baker) in Campbell County.

Location of Bakers Forge

The references in land deeds to Powell River, Cedar Creek, and Sugar Hollow, along with a location given in a map in "Families of Norris Reservoir Area" (1949) indicate the forge was located on Cedar Creek at the mouth of a creek in Sugar Hollow that emptied into Cedar Creek. That location is at 36.3505°, -84.033°. A post office called "Boy," established near the forge when it operated, provides another reference for the same location. Between 1933 and 1936, Norris Dam was built and Norris Lake was formed. The site of Bakers Forge is now under water. Burials near Bakers Forge were moved to a new site and reinterred at the newly created Bakers Forge Cemetery on a ridge two or three miles from the site of the original Bakers Forge.

Later Records

Bowling Baker eventually lived in Stone County, Missouri, where he died in 1864. A listing in the 1860 census indicates he was born in Tennessee about 1790.[58]

Thomas Baker, migrated in the 1840s to Platte County, Missouri, and then in the 1850s to Osage County, Missouri. He died there in the 1860s. The 1850[59] and 1860[60] censuses indicate that he was born in Tennessee about 1791 or 1793. Y-DNA analysis (see above) connects descendants of Thomas with descendants of James and John.

John Baker's widowed wife Barbary and their children appear in Ray County, Missouri, in the 1850[61] and 1860[62] censuses. Y-DNA analysis (see above) connects descendants of John and Barbary with descendants of Thomas and James.

James Baker appears to have migrated in the 1840s to Nodaway County, Missouri. Descendants say he died there in 1849. His wife Tempy remarried in 1849. Y-DNA analysis (see above) connects descendants of James and Tempy with descendants of Thomas and John.

George Baker's two sons George W. Baker and Ewing Baker continued to live and have families in Campbell County. Each has a gravestone at the modern Bakers Forge Cemetery.[63][64]

Oral Tradition

Descendants of Thomas Baker and John Baker who lived in Ray County, Missouri, were aware in the 1900s of their kinship and of their family’s association with ironworking in Tennessee.

Probable Relatives

In Campbell County records, there were two female Bakers who married into the Housley family, a family closely associated with the Ironworks Bakers.

Mary Jane Baker

Mary Jane Baker (born circa 1815) was the wife of William Housley/Owsley. They were probably married in the early 1830s. The Housleys also lived in Sugar Hollow and appear in deeds with the Bakers. Mary Jane died in 1872 and is buried in Pulaski County, Missouri.[65]

Nancy Baker

Nancy Baker was the wife of Joseph Smith (the son of Elizabeth Housley). A record in Campbell County shows their marriage in 1840.[66] Later records show that Nancy and Joseph migrated with Thomas Baker's family from Campbell County to Platte County, Missouri, to Osage County, Missouri, so she was likely a daughter or niece of Thomas.

Sources

  1. Information from website: "BAKER Family Y-STR DNA study & Lineages" at http://www.bakerdna.net/ retrieved March 2021
  2. Information from website: "BAKER Family Y-STR DNA study & Lineages" at http://www.bakerdna.net/ retrieved March 2021
  3. "Families of Norris reservoir area," Marshall A. Wilson, 1949. See page 40 (image 30 of 275 of the Family Search document) https://www.familysearch.org/library/books/records/item/234858-families-of-norris-reservoir-area?viewer=1&offset=0
  4. Godspeeds History of Johnson County, published in 1886, source: https://tngenweb.org/johnson/godspeeds-history-of-johnson-county-1886/ source
  5. Washington County tax books. Film #007902182, image 165 of 1012. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4Y-DQPF-V
  6. Washington County tax books. Film #007902182, image 178 of 1012. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4Y-DQPF-H
  7. Washington County tax books. Film #007902182, image 195 of 1012. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4Y-DQP6-Q?i=194
  8. Washington County tax books. Film #007902182, image 200 of 1012. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4Y-DQPD-Q
  9. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4Y-DQPC-N
  10. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKX-KJXN
  11. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4Y-DQ2G-S?i=253
  12. Carter County 1796 Tax List. Ancestry.com. "Tennessee, U.S., Early Tax List Records, 1783-1895." Image 3 of 15. https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/2883/images/33119_290482-00301?pId=94420
  13. Carter County 1797 Tax List. Ancestry.com. "Tennessee, U.S., Early Tax List Records, 1783-1895." Image 3 of 8. https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/2883/images/33119_290482-00312?pId=94420
  14. Carter County 1798 Tax List. Ancestry.com. "Tennessee, U.S., Early Tax List Records, 1783-1895." Image 2 of 9. https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/2883/images/33119_290482-00320?pId=94420
  15. Carter County 1799 Tax List. Ancestry.com. "Tennessee, U.S., Early Tax List Records, 1783-1895." Image 4 of 10. https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/2883/images/33119_290482-00331?pId=95576
  16. Carter County 1800 Tax List. Ancestry.com. "Tennessee, U.S., Early Tax List Records, 1783-1895." Image 7 of 12. https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/2883/images/33119_290482-00344?pId=94420
  17. Carter County 1800 Tax List. Ancestry.com. "Tennessee, U.S., Early Tax List Records, 1783-1895." Image 8 of 12. https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/2883/images/33119_290482-00345?pId=94420
  18. "Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, 1804-1829" http://files.usgwarchives.net/tn/carter/court/cpqs1804.txt
  19. Carter County deeds. Deed Book C. Film #008151159, image 84 of 606. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKN-BS72-B?cat=236733
  20. Carter County: Deeds v. C-D 1814-1836. Film #008151159, image of 84 of 606. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKN-BS72-B?cat=236733
  21. Carter County: Deeds v. C-D 1814-1836. Film #008151159, image of 208 of 606. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKN-BS7C-M?cat=236733
  22. Carter County: Deeds v. C-D 1814-1836. Film #008151159, image of 217 of 606. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKN-BS7H-L?cat=236733
  23. Ancestry.com. "Tennessee, U.S., Early Land Registers, 1778-1927" Image 393 of 606. https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/3658/images/41659_290556-00392
  24. Ancestry.com. "Tennessee, U.S., Early Land Registers, 1778-1927" Image 420 of 606. https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/3658/images/41659_290556-00419
  25. Ancestry.com. "Tennessee, U.S., Early Land Registers, 1778-1927" Image 429 of 606. https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/3658/images/41659_290556-00428
  26. Ancestry.com. "Tennessee, U.S., Early Land Registers, 1778-1927" Image 430 of 606. https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/3658/images/41659_290556-00429
  27. Ancestry.com. "Tennessee, U.S., Early Land Registers, 1778-1927" Image 469 of 606. https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/3658/images/41659_290556-00468
  28. Ancestry.com. "Tennessee, U.S., Early Land Registers, 1778-1927" Image 469 of 606. https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/3658/images/41659_290556-00468
  29. Carter County court minutes. Film #008151157, image 193 of 755. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKJ-M9X8-M?i=192&cat=286697
  30. Typewritten transcript of Carter County court minutes. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TJFF?i=464&cc=1909088&cat=237895
  31. Typewritten transcript of Carter County court minutes. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TJF5?i=473&cc=1909088&cat=237895
  32. Typewritten transcript of Carter County court minutes. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TJN9?i=480&cc=1909088&cat=237895
  33. Typewritten transcript of Carter County court minutes. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKJ-M9XC-1?i=218&cat=286697
  34. Digital transcript of Carter County court minutes. http://files.usgwarchives.net/tn/carter/court/cpqs1804.txt
  35. Digital transcript of Carter County court minutes. http://files.usgwarchives.net/tn/carter/court/cpqs1804.txt
  36. Carter County, Tennessee. Deeds v. C-D 1814-1836. Film #008151159 , image 322 of 606. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKN-BS4Y-V?i=321&cat=236733
  37. Missouri death certificate for Alvis Baker, 1916, Ray County. https://www.sos.mo.gov/images/archives/deathcerts/1916/1916_00043377.PDF
  38. Carter County, Tennessee. Deed Book J. Page 33. Film #008151160, image 612 of 838. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKN-YWCL-5?i=611&cat=236733
  39. Probate records, 1806-1911. Campbell County, Tennessee. Film # 007642985, image 93 of 237. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9PS-L8PZ?cat=197393
  40. Campbell County, Tennessee. Probate records, 1806-1911. Film #007642985, image 129 of 237. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9PS-L8P2?mode=g&cat=197393
  41. Campbell County probate records, 1806-1911. Estate book 1806-1841. Film #007642985, image 141 of 237. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9PS-L8KL?cat=197393 probate record
  42. 1830 census, Campbell County, Tennessee. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GYB9-4L8?cc=1803958&wc=35YC-C6J%3A1588478503%2C1588471601%2C1588469601
  43. 1830 census, Campbell County, Tennessee. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9YB9-H9V?cc=1803958&wc=35YC-C6J%3A1588478503%2C1588471601%2C1588469601
  44. 1830 census, Campbell County, Tennessee. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9YB9-4L3?i=7&wc=35YC-C6J%3A1588478503%2C1588471601%2C1588469601&cc=1803958
  45. 1840 census, Campbell County, Tennessee. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9YYF-215?i=20&cc=1786457&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AXHT1-43X
  46. 1840 census, Campbell County, Tennessee. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GYYF-2BT?i=22&cc=1786457&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AXHT1-4QS
  47. 1840 census, Campbell County, Tennessee. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GYYF-LML?i=45&cc=1786457&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AXHT1-4V2
  48. 1840 census, Campbell County, Tennessee. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9YYF-2XR?i=47&cc=1786457&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AXHT1-4KM
  49. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS54-77PT-T?i=242&cat=298267
  50. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-C39N-B9ZC-2?cat=347598
  51. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSJ1-71S5?i=259&cat=347598
  52. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSJ1-712H?cat=347598
  53. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKX-N3ZJ-D?cat=347598
  54. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKX-N3Z4-R?cat=347598
  55. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKX-N3Z8-N?mode=g&cat=347598
  56. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKX-N3Z4-R?i=297&cat=347598
  57. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKX-N3CG-W?cat=347598
  58. "United States Census, 1860", database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MHZJ-KJF : 18 February 2021), Bowling Baker, 1860.
  59. "United States Census, 1850," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MDZJ-JMH : 12 April 2016), Thomas Baker in household of Thomas Baker, Weston, Platte, Missouri, United States; citing family 14, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  60. "United States Census, 1860", database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MH87-TCW : 14 December 2017), Thomas Baker, 1860.
  61. "United States Census, 1850," database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MDZK-NXT : 22 December 2020), Barbara Baker, Ray, Missouri, United States; citing family , NARA microfilm publication (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  62. "United States Census, 1860", database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MHZM-WW4 : 18 February 2021), Barbary Baker, 1860.
  63. Burial of George W. Baker at findagrave: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/24881560/george-w.-baker
  64. Burial of Ewing Baker at findagrave: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/25169399/ewing-baker
  65. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/15338897/mary-jane-ousley
  66. "Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1950", database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XD3J-J5N : 16 March 2020), Joseph Smith, 1840.




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