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Origins of William Harvey

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Surname/tag: Harvey
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The following was provided to the Puritan Great Migration project in October 2018 by William L. Harvey, researcher and descendant of the following, with major contributions by Kerry Petersen, dated 5 Dec 2017. With their permission, the PGM project has created this Freespace Page to hold their combined research notes. Please contact William if you have any questions. We have formatted the notes for easier reading on this wiki.

Contents

Summary of Harvey Y-DNA test results as of 08/10/2018 : (by WLH)

William Harvey bapt. in 1610 d. 1691

is documented as having married Joane Hucker in 1639 in Plymouth. He is currently assumed to have a Y-DNA STR developed genetic signature in the "E" haplogroup via very strong matching by the independently developed genealogies of four male direct line Harvey descendants of three sons of Zachariah Harvey 1711-1801. This assumption has been confirmed further by Big Y testing by two of the above mentioned four descendants with SNP tests which revealed a matching SNP signature of E-M123....E-L795....E-Y5427....E-Y5435....E-FGC18413....E-Y81676 = Terminal SNP. Taunton, MA VRs firmly indicate that William Harvey 1610-1691 is the gr-grandfather of Zachariah Harvey. Of course there could be a case of mis-attributed paternity involved here but thus far there is no indication of such having occurred. William Harvey 1610-1691 and Thomas Harvey 1617-1651 (below) could be "brothers" and both named Harvey if one of them had had a different mother, previously married, who had brought a son along when she subsequently married Thomas Harvey and an informal adoption took place - giving the Harvey surname to a non-paternally related male. If this truly occurred we are unable at this time to positively identify any such adoption. Additional Y-DNA testing needs to be done on descendants of Zachariah's father (Thomas Harvey 1682-1770) or, better yet, on descendants of his grandfather (Thomas Harvey 1641-1728).

Thomas Harvey 1617-1651

has a Y-DNA signature (via STR results) of R-M269 . This is based on the independently developed genealogies of seven male direct line Harvey descendants of two sons of Thomas Harvey 1617-1651. As well, there are five other non-Harvey surname matches who show close paternal relationship to this Harvey line. At this juncture there is no documentation as to when/how this non-surname relationship came to be. The STR test results have been confirmed further by Big Y SNP testing by one of the above mentioned seven descendants of two sons of Thomas Harvey 1617-1651 matching with one of the matching non-Harvey surnames. These two Big Y SNP tests show a matching SNP signature of R-M343....R-M269....R-U106....R-Z381....R-Z18(Z19)....R-BY62546 = Terminal SNP. Thomas Harvey 1617-1651 and William Harvey 1610-1691 (above) could be "brothers" and both named Harvey if one of them had had a different mother, previously married, who had brought a son along when she subsequently married Thomas Harvey and an informal adoption took place - giving the Harvey surname to a non-paternally related male. If this truly occurred we are unable at this time to positively identify any such adoption.

Two William Harveys in Early New England  ?

a great amount of conflation has occurred over many years between the William Harvey "of Taunton" bpt. 1610-d. 1691 who married Joane Hucker in 1639 and the William Harvey b. ? - d. 1658 "of Boston" who married Martha Copp in 1650. Y-DNA test results (Haplogroup R-M269) indicate that this second William Harvey is not thought to be related to either of the assumed Harvey "brothers". This is based on the independently developed genealogies of five male direct line Harvey descendants of this William Harvey b. ?-d. 1658. The Y-DNA signature of this William Harvey is R-M269 but it is far removed from being a match with the Y-DNA STR signature of Thomas Harvey 1617-1651 (with at least 11 mutations occurring in 37 markers from one test case and 18 mutations occurring in 67 markers in the second test case) .

Discussion of Prior & Recent Research : (by KP)=

An analysis of new evidence into the origins of William Harvey (1610-1691), the immigrant to America, prepared by Kerry Petersen, 5 Dec 2017.

The English ancestry of the Taunton, Massachusetts, immigrant William Harvey does not seem to have been fully resolved in the past. Due to limited and scanty data, it has been subject to ongoing conjecture. This paper adds new perspective to that conversation while providing new sources and analysis that helps both to dismiss some previously held opinions and to give new direction for further research.

What We Know : (by KP)

Will of Agnes Clarke

1. NEHGS Register 46:453-4, “Genealogical Gleanings of England,” is the first source that provided us with the 1647 will of Agnes Clarke, widow of John Clarke, of Ashill, Somerset, England:

"Agnes Clarke of Ayshill, Somerset, widow, 20 October 1647, proved 10 May 1648. My body to be buried in the churchyard of Ayshill near unto John Clarke my deceased husband. To the poor of the parish and to the church.
I give and bequeath unto William Harvey, the son of Thomas Harvey deceased, my kinsman now in New England, eighteen pounds, being parcel of thirty five pounds which is owing unto me by Richard Parker of Ayshill upon his bond, which sum is to be paid as soon as it can be recovered if he shall come to demand it any time within four years, but if he come not then my will is that William Harvey the son of James Harvey shall have the said money at such time as he shall be of lawful age to give a discharge.
I give to the said William son of James Harvey fifteen pounds parcel of the said thirty five pounds, when of age; and my desire is that Richard Harvey, John Witherall and Richard Crabbe shall put it forth to use to the best benefit of the said William Harvey.
I give to John Wytherall the elder of Cudworth twenty shillings and to Mary, wife of Francis Moore of Bicknell twenty shillings.
I give and bequeath unto William Harvey in New England all my household stuff during his life if he come to claim it, and after his decease to remain in the house to the use of James Harvey, his brother, and the said James to make use of it until William, his brother, shall come to claim it.
I give to Ellen Vyle the wife of Robert Vyle the elder of Strotten my best coffer.
To the two children of John Vyle of Donniett to each a pewter platter.
To William Clarke of Sommerton and to my goddaughter Deanis Nicholls, to each twenty shillings, to be paid them within one year &c. by John Clarke of Donnyett out of the ten pounds he oweth me.
The other eight pounds I give to the said John Clarke and Katherine his wife.
To my kinswoman Edith Mitchell of Churchstock twenty shillings.
To Elizabeth wife of Richard Harvey, Lucrece wife of William Curtis and Deanes Nicholles, my said god daughter, twenty shillings apiece.
To Elizabeth Dyke servant of the said Richard Harvey ten shillings.
To Deaues Hay ball two shilling six pence and to Anne wife of John Pitman twelve pence.
The residue to my kinsman Richard Harvey whom I make sole executor. Essex, 86.

Comments on Will of Agnes Clarke: (by KP)

A. This will establishes a close and probable familial connection of Agnes to Thomas Harvey, deceased, who had at least two sons named William and James. William is in New England and James is presumably in Ashill with a son named William. Agnes also has a “kinsman” Richard Harvey who acts as executor for her will and is married to a wife named Elizabeth.

B. This paper will further explore John and Agnes Clarke’s relationship with the Harveys, but unfortunately it will not fully resolve her exact Harvey origin. It is strongly inferred by this will that her maiden name was Harvey. This paper will add the will of her husband John Clarke for the first time in print.


Extraction of some Harvey vital records in Ashill, Somerset parish: (by KP)

The following is my extraction of all Harveys in the Ashill, Somerset, parish register from 1558 to 1653 taken from extractions of Findmypast.com. Original images are available on FHL film 1,517,680, Item 55. (Note: Parish records are either illegible or missing from 1588 to 1595 and from 1625 to 1653, which is very unfortunate.)

1 Dec 1597, James Harvie buried.
17 Feb 1597[/8], Thomas Harvey was married [no bride's name given].
20[29?] Jan 1599[/1600?], Agnes d/o Thomas Harvie baptized.
10 Mar 1601[/2], Inscription on four-sided Church monument: "Here lies William Harvei, who died 10 March 1601." The exact wording of the entry on Findmypast:
“Chest Tomb (south, north and west panels are blank), east panel (in latin): Hic jacet cor/ pus Willmi: HARVEI / qui obiit decimo die/ Martii, Anno Do:/ 1601 (Here lies William Harvei, who died 10 March 1601) (oddly PR: omits to give him, presumably defective. Rechecked the memorial, but inscription is deep cut and quite clear).” The source quoted is “Somerset Monumental Inscriptions” for St. Mary’s Church in Ashill.
27 Sep 1601, William s/o Richard Harvie baptized; 5 Oct 1601 buried.
12 Mar 1601[/2], Thomasine d/o Thomas Harvie baptized and buried.
12 Jul 1603, Matthew s/o Thomas Harvie baptized; 10 Jul 1603 buried. [Apparently a clerical error in either baptismal or burial date.]
13 Mar 1605[/6], Agnes[/Annes], wife of Thomas Harvie buried.
11 Jul 1609, Alice d/o Thomas Harvie baptized and buried.
19 Aug 1610, William s/o Thomas Harvie baptized.
21 Sep 1610, Agnes, wife of Thomas Harvey buried.
22 Jun 1612, Thomas Harvye and Joan Collis married.
11 Jun 1613, Marie d/o Thomas Harvie baptized.
5 Apr 1615, James s/o Thomas Harvie baptized.
20 Jun 1618, Thomazine Harvie "the younger" of Ashill and Anthonie Poole of Whitelackington, Somerset married.
Jan 1623, Bridget Harvie and William Hodges married.
8 Jan 1624[/25], Richard s/o Joan Harvey, widow, buried.
15 Nov 1624, George Poole and Christian Harvie married.
31 Mar 1625, William Harvie buried. [Not noted to be a son of anyone and therefore an adult.]

Comments and observations: re; VRs extractions (by KP)

A. There are many Harvey families throughout Somerset County which I did not systematically search parish by parish (except as noted later in this paper). Even though we lack absolute proof, there is convincing similarity of these Ashill Harveys to the family of whom Agnes Clarke describes in her will.

B. Surprisingly for the almost 100 years of extractions above, there are very few Harveys in Ashill and they are all tightly grouped to a single time period. Even though the records start in 1558, it is noteworthy that we do not find any Harvey entries until 1597, which would indicate they probably moved into the parish from another parish. Which parish though is currently unknown. This sudden appearance of all Ashill Harveys would seem to indicate they were all closely related. The main family is anchored by Thomas Harvey who we deduce to have married three times: Agnes in 1598, Agnes again circa 1607/8, and finally Joan Colles in 1612. Thomas appears to have died before 1625 when Joan as a widow had a son Richard buried. With the first wife he had children Agnes, Thomasine, and Matthew; with the second wife he had Alice and William; and with the third wife he had Marie, James, and Richard.

C. The Harvey contemporaries of Thomas’ generation appear to be Thomasine who married in 1618, Bridget who married 1623 and William who died in 1625. Richard who had a son William born in 1601 also appear to be of the same generation. This paper will resolve the three women, but it will only add new information to Richard without finding his exact familial connection.

D. Of a preceding generation, there appears to be William Harvey (who I designate as Sr.) who died in 1601/2 with a substantial burial monument. Also we can suppose an older Thomasine Harvey inferred by a Thomasine "the younger" who married in 1618. Probate for this William Harvey Sr. who died 1601/2 has been found and will be abstracted here for the first time. It will confirm that his wife was in fact named Thomasine who apparently was alive in 1618 as the elder of the two Thomasines. The probate will also confirm Thomas to be William Sr.’s son while introducing other siblings for Thomas including William (who I designate as Jr.) who most likely is the same William who died in Ashill 1625. Another probate found and abstracted later in this paper for the first time in print is for Christian Harvey, the wife to William Jr., who had the following three daughters whose marriages are recorded in Ashill per the above extraction: Thomazine who married in 1618, Bridget who married in 1623, and Christian who married in 1624. The baptisms for these three daughters were not found and perhaps they may have been born in the time period from 1588 to 1595 for which records do not exist in Ashill; however, considering later children of this couple were born in Trent, Somerset, beginning in 1604, it is more likely that these daughters were born no later than sometime between about 1598 to 1604 in a yet another parish.

E. James Harvey who died in 1597 may have been a contemporary of our Thomas Harvey or of a previous generation. His death predates mentions in any of the probates I will later detail in this paper. Even though there is not enough information from this early date, I tentatively place him as another brother to Thomas. He probably died unmarried since there are no mentions of any spouse or children.

F. No Coles/Collis family was found for Joan Colles who married Thomas in 1612. Many less informed researchers have incorrectly rendered this name as Collier and it has taken on a life of its own on the Internet, but the record is clear in its spelling and there are Collier names to be found in the area.

G. We can deduce William Harvey, who immigrated to Taunton in New England, to be the William baptized in 1610 as a son to Thomas. According to most published Harvey genealogies, the immigrant William had a younger brother named Thomas born ca. 1617 who also immigrated to New England. We find no such Thomas in this Ashill parish extraction. On the other hand, we also find neither a burial record in 1601/2 for William Harvey Sr nor a baptismal record for Richard, son of the widow Joan Harvey, who is recorded as having died in 1624[/25] -- this opens the door to the possibility of some deficient or sloppy original record keeping with the possibility that Thomas’s baptism was not recorded. If so, the sequencing of the children lends itself well with Thomas being fitting in 1617 and Richard from 1619 to 1625. Alternatively, I have looked at the published literature concerning the two immigrants William and Thomas -- even though generally they are suggested as brothers, I find no document that proves this to be the case. Their only shared commonalities are the same surname, contemporary presence in Taunton, Mass., and William named as appraiser of Thomas’s probate inventory. The appraisers of inventory are generally named by the Court from local reliable citizens and the duty is not considered a kinsman’s responsibility. Indeed, it is rare that a close relative would be the appraiser so as to avoid conflicts of interest. Thomas may not therefore be closely related at all to William, which may explain his lack of presence in the Ashill parish record. In this light, I found one early and limited DNA study reported on the Internet that suggests they are not related (see www.geni.com/people/Thomas-Harvey-of-the-Plymouth-Colony/6000000015182405693 accessed 9 Nov 2018). Even though I doubt the relationship, I temporarily place Thomas as a 1617 unrecorded brother of William, I make this placement only in deference to past momentum very much subject to further DNA testing and additional research.

H. The only other entry in the above extractions not accounted for is Richard who had a son baptized in 1601. He is described as a kinsman and executor in Agnes Clark’s 1647 will. We will also see him mentioned in Agnes’ husband John Clarke’s will of 1629 and William Jr.’s widow Christian Harvey’s will of 1637. He also appears as the Ashill Church Warden in 1606 (Thomas Harvey appears in the same capacity in 1605.) His exact relationship will continue to prove unknown, but there is more on Richard later in this paper.

What we Don't Know : (by KP)

Discussion on Harvey & Slocum Genealogies: (by KP)

1. Published genealogies and histories for both the Harvey and Slocum families for more than a century have inferred that William Harvey, the immigrant to Taunton, Massachusetts, is identified as brother-in-law of Anthony Slocum (a surname with various spellings), thereby making Slocum’s wife a sister of William. Any name for Anthony’s wife or wives has never been found to date. A representative example of this assertion is found in "The Harvey Book," by Oscar Jewell Harvey, 1899:

"___ HARVEY, daughter of (1) Thomas Harvey, and who was born in Somersetshire about 1610, was married in England to Anthony Slocum, presumably of Somersetshire. She came with her husband to America about 1636, and it is believed that they settled at Dorchester. Anthony was one of the forty-six "first and ancient purchasers" in 1637 of Taunton, Mass. where he resided from 1638 to 1662, when, having united with the Society of Friends, he disposed of his rights in Taunton and removed with his family to that part of New Plymouth incorporated later under the name of Dartmouth township. He and one Ralph Russell were the first settlers there. A fragment of a letter written by Anthony at Dartmouth (the date is torn off, but it was probably about 1670) to his "brother-in-law, William Harvey in Taunton" has been preserved. In it is this paragraph: "Myself, wife and sons, and daughter Gilbert who hath four sons, remember our respects and loves, and my sons are all married."

Comments on Harvey & Slocum genealogies: (by KP)

A. The source and a verbatim transcript of the full letter can be found published in the FHL typescript 929.273 SL53 www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/126824. “Giles Slocum, Peleg Slocum and Anthony Slocum,” pg. 17, by Bertha Winifred Clark (Self-published; 1955), digital copy available at https://dcms.lds.org/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE111224. It presents a different picture and the inference of Harvey kinship is not warranted. It was recorded verbatim in the Taunton Old Proprietor's book, pg. 14. It was solicited for and used as a supporting document of a 25 Oct 1681 settlement recorded by Shadrach Wilber, town clerk, of land boundaries involving a portion of property in Taunton previously owned by Anthony Slocum before he moved to Albemarle in North Carolina. The letter is fully reproduced and there is no corner with the date ripped off as suggested by less-informed family historians. William Harvey was one of three Taunton Selectmen tasked with resolving the boundary problem and so the letter was addressed to him. The letter is lengthy and goes into great detail about Anthony's land transactions and the bounds thereof. What pertains to us is the way it is addressed and signed. It refers to the dispute and starts: "An difference which I understand is unhappily, Brother Harvey, the occasion of my writing to you at this time is a contest risen..." In the letter Anthony uses a lot of prefixes before names such as Capt. Poole, Mr. Shove, Mr. Increase Robinson, and "daughter Gilbert." In only one occasion does he use a name, Nicholas White, with no prefix. After all of the legal descriptions and a remark about the welfare of his family, he ends his letter with "this being all at present from your Co. friend, Anthony Slookum. To Mr. Wm. Harvey, living at Taunton in New England. with care." No where does the words "brother-in-law" occur. I am not sure what "Co." means in his signing his name (perhaps "Covenant"), but he clearly shows himself as a friend at that point. To address a letter to "Brother Harvey" rather than "William, my brother" is more akin to a religious greeting. Evidently they were good friends.

B. The children of Anthony Slocum and their ages are given in the following article from the periodical "New England Ancestors," of the New England Historical and Genealogical Society, vol. 4.4 [Fall 2003], pp. 49-50, "Anthony and Giles Slocum Have the Same Y-DNA Pattern," by Judy L. Slocum and Melville C. Brown:

“…Anthony Slocum, born about 1590, appeared in Taunton in 1637 as one of the first forty-six purchasers in the settlement of Cohannet. He settled near the party of Mistress Elizabeth Poole, daughter of the antiquary Sir William Pole, from Devon, Somerset, and Dorset. In August 1643, he was on a list of men able to bear arms. He was a shareholder in the ironworks there between 1652 and 1656, and served as a surveyor or highways in 1662. After 1662 Anthony sold his land in Taunton -- he was not included on the July 2, 1666, tax list. He may have moved to Dartmouth on the Pascamanset River, in the area known as Slocums Neck. He probably had become a Quaker. Anthony disappeared from Massachusetts, but was later found in Albemarle County in the Province of Carolina (now North Carolina). A 1680 deposition there established his advanced age of "ninety years or thereabouts" and proved that he was not a younger relative of the same name. Anthony Slocum's will of November 26, 1688, was proven in Albemarle County on January 7, 1689/90. His known children were:
1. Martha, married Joseph Gilbert of Taunton.
2. John, born Taunton 1641, died Taunton 1650
3. Joseph, born Taunton ca. 1644. He married Margaret ___, lived in Albemarle County, and probably died before 1688 because he is not in his father's will, while his sons are.
4. John (again), born Taunton ca. 1653, married Elizabeth Mundy, lived in Albemarle County, died about 1692…”

Additional Comments on the above. (by KP) Judging from the birthdates of the children who were born circa 1639 to 1653 and assuming a maximum child-bearing age of 40 to 45, Anthony’s wife’s birth would not have been before about 1608 to 1613 (if we accept the birth year of her last son John in 1653). If in fact John was born say 1651 (no earlier than 1650 since a previous son also named John died in 1650), then the mother’s birth year would calculate from 1603 to 1608. The baptisms in Ashill are well-defined from 1598 to 1615 and the only possibility in the parish records of a sister to William the immigrant (bapt. 1610) and daughter of Thomas would be Agnes who was baptized 20/29 Jan 1599[/1600]. We also know from the 1629 will of John Clarke in Ashill that Agnes was unmarried in 1629. Unfortunately the Ashill records are non-existent 1625 to 1653, so we have a black hole with that source that could have helped us know what happened to Agnes Harvey.

C. Since the whole case for a ___ Harvey having been a wife to Anthony Slocum is now determined to have been based on the sloppy inference from the Taunton letter of Anthony to Wm. Harvey, then we have to now dismiss this premise as not being viable. Apparently the Ashill parish records also were not fully available to those early authors. Now that we also have a fuller picture of the siblings of the immigrant William Harvey, this dismissal is more certain in light of the bad age for child bearing of Agnes, the only sister of William who survived childhood.


Discussion on two William Harveys in Early Boston : (by KP)

2. There is some question as to which of two William Harveys in New England is referred to in the 1647 will of Agnes Clark.

A. According to the “The Harvey Book”: “The two Williams then in New England, were (1) William of Taunton, whose wife was Joanna Hucker, and (2) William of Boston, who married Martha Copp.” Most every published Harvey genealogy has purported the Taunton man to be the correct William and not the William of Boston who married Martha Cobb.

B. FHL book 929.273 P646h"Ancestry of Charles Stinson Pillsbury and John Sargent Pillsbury," by Mary Lovering Holman, 1938, 2 volumes, pp. 673-75, stands out as the lone exception to other authors by purporting that the non-Taunton William is the correct man. Holman is a well-respected and reliable genealogist, but it does not appear that she had access to the full Ashill parish record nor to the additional data used in this paper. If her opposing rationale is countered, than William of Taunton, Mass. remains as the accepted beneficiary of Agnes Clarke. As I will comment below, Holman’s reasoning is faulty. Her quotes:

“WILLIAM1 HARVEY (?Thomas, Thomas), probably born in Ashill, Somerset, Eng., about 1620, died in Boston, Mass., 15 Aug. 1658. He married in Boston about 1650, Martha Copp, born about 1630, possibly died 12 Jan. 1729-30 in Amesbury, Mass., daughter of William Copp. She married secondly in Boston, 10 Nov. 1659, Henry Tewksbury."

"There were two William Harveys early in the colonies. One who settled in Taunton and one the above immigrant to Boston. The will of Agnes Clarke of Ashill gives a legacy to William Harvey of New England and this is claimed to be the William of Taunton but a careful study of such records as are to be found in print point to it being William of Boston who came from Ashill."

William Harvey of Taunton was in the colonies as early as 1639 for in that year he married "Joan Hucker of Cohannet." He must have been born about 1605 to 1611. With him in Taunton was his brother Thomas Harvey and his brother-in-law Anthony Slocum. A careful study of the will of Agnes Clarke, the transcripts of Ashill, and the Somerset Marriages indicate that the English ancestry that can be deduced from them belongs to the younger man. [Quotes the will of Agnes Clarke.]"

"The Transcripts give:

Thomas Harvie was married 17 Feb. 1598.
Anthonie Poole of Whitelackington and Thomazine Harvie the younger.
William Hodges and Bridget Harvie.
Thomas Harvye and Joan Colles, married 22 June 1612.
Agnes, daughter of Thomas Harvye, bapt. 29 Jan. 1598-99.
Thomas Harvye, Church warden, 1605.
Richard Harvey, Church warden, 1606."

(Wells Transcripts, Ashill.)…

"From these scanty records it is seen that there was a family of Harveys in Ashill and from the Will that one of them came to America. It seems scarcely possible that in so careful a will as that of Agnes Clarke with its mentions of many undoubted kin, she would have omitted Thomas Harvey of Taunton and the wife of Anthony Slocum who were the same degree of kinship as William of Taunton would be if he were her relative. Another angle of the case is that William Harvey of Taunton moved to Boston in 1643, being admitted with his wife, Joan, to the First Church in that year. They had born in Boston, (1) Abigail, b. 25 Apr. 1640; (2) Thomas, b. 13 Dec. 1641; (3) Experience, b. 4 Mar. 1643-44; and (4) Joseph, b. 8 Dec. 1645. They then returned to Taunton. In 1651, the other William appears with his wife Martha in the records, having four children recorded between 1651 and 1657. From this some writers have made the two Williams into one and given him two wives. There can be no doubt that William of Boston, who married Martha Copp, was the one mentioned by Agnes Clarke and that he came to the colonies from Ashill, Somerset. From such records as are found the following pedigree has been constructed..."

[The author then provides a pedigree for William of Boston extending back through Thomas and Joan Collis and then Thomas and Annis]:

"Thomas[A] Harvey Born about 1590, probably Ashill. Died before 1647. He probably m. Joan Collis, 16 June 1612 who also probably died before 1647. Children:
a. Thomas Harvey.
b. William Harvey.
c. James Harvey. Born say 1622. In 1647 he had a minor son, William."
"Thomas[B] Harvey. Born about 1560 and died after 1605. He m. (1) ___ and probably (2) Annis ___, 17 Feb. 1597/8, Ashill, who was bu. there 13 Mar. 1605. He was church warden in 1605. Children:
a. Thomas Harvey.
b. Agnes Harvey. Bapt. 29 Jan. 1598/9, Ashill. Her will dated 20 Oct. 1637, proved 1 May 1648. She was an aunt of William Harvey of New England, and she bequeathed to him all of her household goods, if he returned to England to claim it.
c. Richard Harvey. He may have had a son, Richard who was executor of the estate of Agnes Clark in 1648."

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Comments re: Two William Harveys : (by KP)

1. I don’t believe this quote resolves the problem of the two immigrants named William Harvey as definitively as Holman would have us believe in spite of her statement:

“There can be no doubt that William of Boston, who married Martha Copp, was the one mentioned by Agnes Clark and that he came to the colonies from Ashill, Somerset.”

Holman was unaware of the 1629 will in Ashill of Agnes’ husband John Clarke, which I provide for the first time in print below in a separate note. John was very specific in bequesting his estate to the same Harveys mentioned later in Agnes’ 1647 will, but those bequests were conditioned on his widow having full use of the same until her death. The 1629 date precedes the later emigration in the mid to late 1630s of William Harvey to New England. Agnes’ will simply parroted the same bequests and was never intended to add any other Harveys not already mentioned in her husband’s earlier will.

2. Holman’s contention that the Boston William Harvey was the correct one because all the William’s potential siblings in New England were not mentioned by Agnes in her will did not consider the validity of whether or not William truly had siblings with him in New England. In the notes above, I have already dismissed the notion of Anthony Slocum’s wife being a sister to William Harvey. I have also already raised doubts about the fraternal nature of the immigrant Thomas Harvey’s relationship with William Harvey.

3. Holman’s suggested pedigree of William1, Thomas A, Thomas B is too contrived introducing data not in the parish records while ignoring other data. Holman may not have had a full extraction to work with -- my observations above with my extraction are more realistic. I cannot see evidence of two generations of Thomas [A and B] and believe the evidence only shows one Thomas with three very consecutive wives. Also to make her premise work, Holman adds a son William after 1612 for which there is absolutely no evidence. She then misses the William born in 1610 while introducing an imaginary son Richard for Richard for which again there is no evidence. Holman has so many pedigree errors that her premise as a whole is discredited.

4. Holman’s suggestion that Agnes Harvey, daughter of Thomas Harvey, who was bapt. 29 Jan 1598/9, as potentially the wife of John Clarke and the testator of 1647 is completely wrong. Agnes the testator does not use the terms “father” for the deceased Thomas nor “brother” for his sons William and James as would be the case in this scenario. More importantly, her husband John Clarke in the newly found 1629 will abstracted below names Agnes Harvey, daughter of Thomas Harvey deceased of Ashill - this unequivocally eliminates the 1598/9 Agnes from being John Clarke’s wife Agnes.

5. As one avenue of research, I looked at the naming of the children of each William to see if there was a correlation with the names of Thomas Harvey of Ashill. William of Taunton had children Abigail b. 1640, Thomas b. 1641, Experience b. 1644, Joseph b. 1645, and Jonathan b. abt. 1647. The only similarity in this sequence is the naming of the eldest son as Thomas. William of Boston had children William b. 1651, Thomas b. 1652, and John b. 1654 [and a daughter Mary]. There are two similarities with the names William and Thomas. Family Search Wiki provides the following naming practice which was admittedly not universal throughout Great Britain: the first son was named after the paternal grandfather; the second son was named after the maternal grandfather, and the third son was named after the father. If this practice applied here, then William of Taunton would be the best choice.

Unfortunately, these names are rather common and the application of the practice is uncertain. On the other hand, the sequence of birth dates is perhaps more helpful. The immigrant William Harvey was baptized in Ashill in 1610. The birth date of William of Boston is unknown. Having a family with children born 1640 to 1647 is more conducive to a birth date of 1610 than children born 1651 to 1654. With this “soft” reasoning of names and birth dates, William Harvey of Taunton is the more likely candidate for William of Ashill.

3. The following is from the book "Thirty-one English Emigrants who Came to New England by 1662," by Dorothy C. and Gerald E. Knoff (Baltimore; 1989), pp. 118-123:

"This summary of the Harvey lineage in England needs a word of explanation. My chief source for the foregoing account of the Harvey family has been "The Harvey Book" by Oscar J. Harvey From Thomas Harvey, the father of the emigrants to Massachusetts, there is firm evidence of descent[Subsequent Y-DNA testing disputes this statement} . For the generations earlier than Thomas, the evidence rests on [Oscar J.] Harvey's quotations from "Reminiscences of the Harvey Family, by General Thomas W. Harvey', published in March of 1839. Perhaps the lineage as General Harvey gave it would be of value to a present-day researcher who could find available records that document General Harvey's statements. Until then, Reminiscences may be considered more authentic than tradition, but not on the level with documented proof.

Proposed lineage of Immigrant Harvey "brothers" by Oscar J Harvey

With this caution in mind, I begin the lineage with Humphrey Harvey whose three sons were: Richard of Brockley, his heir; William of Folkestone in Kent; and the youngest, Turner.

Turner was born about 1485. He was, "the mightiest man with the long bow in all England and that at his death there was no man in the country who could spring his bow." This unusual strength brought him to the attention of the king, Henry VIII, who valued his skill very highly. "The date of his death is not known, but it is said that he lived to a great age." Turner had a son, William (Reminiscences, pp. 700-703).

William Harvey was born about 1510. He lived in Somerset. On the 18th of June 1536 he was appointed Blue-mantle Pursuivant in-ordinary, a minor official of the Herald's College. In 1545 he was appointed by Henry VIII to the office of Somerset Herald. In 1550 King Edward VI made him Norroy King-of-Arms. On the 21st of November 1557 he was appointed Clarencieux King-of-Arms by Queen Mary, and remained in that position until his death. He died in Oxfordshire the 27th of February. 1567. Among his children was a son named William.

William Harvey was born in Somerset about 1560. By 1630 he had moved to Bridgewater. His sons were William, Henry and Thomas.

Thomas Harvey lived in Ashill, Somerset, and died in Somerset prior to 1647. He was mentioned in the "will of Agnes Clark of Ayshill [Ashill], Somerset, widow ... Thomas Harvey deceased ..." There are records of four of his children. There may have been others.

Children of Thomas Harvey:

i. (___), a daughter, born about 1610, married in England Anthony Slocum.
ii. James was born about 1612.
iii. William was born about 1614.
iv. Thomas was born in 1617.

The daughter, Mrs. Anthony Slocum, William and Thomas went to the Colony of Massachusetts Bay on or near the date of 1636.



Notes, Comments, and Source References : Used for Supporting the above Discussions, Comments and Conclusions

NEWLY FOUND WILLS AND PROBATE FOR THIS FAMILY: (by KP)

The Will of William Harvey Sr.,

Yeoman of Ashill Somerset, PROB 11/99/235, date: 2 April 1602, filed in Canterbury. The original images of the will can be viewed on Ancestry.com at cestry.com/interactive/5111/40611_311367-00457?pid=925308&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?_phsrc%3DAqe281%26_phstart%3DsuccessSource%26usePUBJs%3Dtrue%26indiv%3D1%26db%3DCanturburyPrerogativeCourt%26gss%3Dangs-d%26new%3D1%26rank%3D1%26msT%3D1%26gsfn%3Dwilliam%26gsfn_x%3DNP_NN%26gsln%3Dharvey%26gsln_x%3D0%26msddy%3D1602%26MSAV%3D1%26uidh%3D3v2%26pcat%3D36%26fh%3D0%26h%3D925308%26recoff%3D7%25208%252020%26ml_rpos%3D1&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&_phsrc=Aqe281&_phstart=successSource&usePUBJs=true#?imageId=40611_311367-00457 https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/5111/40611_311367-00457?pid=925308&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?_phsrc%3DAqe281%26_phstart%3DsuccessSource%26usePUBJs%3Dtrue%26indiv%3D1%26db%3DCanturburyPrerogativeCourt%26gss%3Dangs-d%26new%3D1%26rank%3D1%26msT%3D1%26gsfn%3Dwilliam%26gsfn_x%3DNP_NN%26gsln%3Dharvey%26gsln_x%3D0%26msddy%3D1602%26MSAV%3D1%26uidh%3D3v2%26pcat%3D36%26fh%3D0%26h%3D925308%26recoff%3D7%25208%252020%26ml_rpos%3D1&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&_phsrc=Aqe281&_phstart=successSource&usePUBJs=true#?imageId=40611_311367-00457.

Extract of Will of William Harvey Sr. & Comments (by KP)

The will is dated 7 Mar 1601[/2?] at Ayshill. William, a yeoman, gives money to the poor of Ayshill, and desires burial at Ayshill. Bequests a tenement in the parish of Isle Brewers and a tenement called Whitmore in the parish of Curry Rivel to son Robte. Bequest to Ursula Markes, daughter of Margaret Markes. Bequest to ffraunces Bishop, daughter of Elinor Bishop [no relationship stated]. Bequest to son William of payments from John Hobman of Durkington and Thomas Durke of Lambridge, money owed the testator by the testator’s son Thomas, some livestock on his grounds at Earnshill, and an obligation of George Spoke, Esq. A bequest to daughter Margaret Markes dependent on whether or not she marries a second husband and to his granddaughter Ursula Markes. Names his wife Thomasine as executor. Witnesses: John Standerbirk, William Harvey Jun., Thomas Harvey, and Margaret Markes. Probated 2 Apr 1602.

This will establishes four children for William: Thomas who is most likely the one above of Ashill; William Jr. who is most likely the same who was buried 31 Mar 1625 in Ashill; Robert who has no presence in the Ashill parish records (hopefully more research may find him in a neighboring parish); and Margaret who married ___ Markes.

It was hoped that there would be two additional children, but there is no mention of either Agnes (Harvey) Clarke who was the 1647 Ashill testator and Richard Harvey who had a son born 1601 in Ashill (plus additional children later in Trent) and was mentioned in three wills: as a kinsman to Agnes (Harvey) Clark in her 1647 will, by name residing in Ashill in Agnes’ husband John’s 1629 will, and by name in Christian Harvey’s 1637 will in Trent (she is the widow of William Jr. above. More on Agnes and Richard elsewhere in this paper.

This will also mentions a grand-daughter named Ursula Markes. The Ashill parish record provides us a 14 Jun 1625 marriage of Ursula Markes and John Crabbe. A will dated 16 Aug 1653 in Ayshill for John Crabbe is found in Canterbury in which he mentions his wife Ursula, a brother-in-law Robert Markes, several children, and his father Walter Crabbe of Netherbury, Dorset, England. (Note: There may be some kind of relationship of these Crabbes with the trustee named Richard Crabbe in Agnes (Harvey) Clarke’s 1647 will.) The images are on Ancestry.com at https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/5111/40611_310696-00405/438406?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fdb%3dCanturburyPrerogativeCourt%26gss%3dsfs28_ms_r_db%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26gsfn%3djohn%26gsfn_x%3d0%26gsln%3dcrabbe%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d1%26uidh%3d3v2&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults#?imageId=40611_310696-00405.


The Will of Christian Harvey,

widow of William Harvey, 10 July 1637 at Trent in Somerset filed in Canterbury under “Christiana Harvey.” (Trent is 22 miles east of Ashill.) William, who died in 1602 in Ashill per the above will, names his son William Jr., who I surmise to be the William who died in Ashill 31 Mar 1625. In fact, Christian’s will confirms this connection as will be explained below. The original images of the will can be viewed on Ancestry.com at https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/5111/40611_310917-00181/878419?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fdb%3dCanturburyPrerogativeCourt%26gss%3dsfs28_ms_r_db%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26gsln%3dharvey%26gsln_x%3d0%26msddy%3d1635%26msddy_x%3d1%26msddp%3d10%26msrpn__ftp%3dSomerset%252C%2520England%26msrpn%3d5283%26msrpn_PInfo%3d7-%257C0%257C0%257C3257%257C3251%257C0%257C0%257C0%257C5283%257C0%257C0%257C0%257C%26MSAV%3d1%26uidh%3d3v2&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults#?imageId=40611_310917-00181.

Extract of Will of Christian Harvey & comments (by KP)

The will is dated 10 July 1637 at Trent in Somerset. Christian Harvey of Trent widow. Bequests for the repairs and poor of the churches of Trent, Ayshill, and Seavington Maria (all three in the county of Somerset). Bequest to grandson Anthony Poole, son of Anthony Poole deceased. Bequest to daughter Thomasine Poole, the mother of Anthony Poole (Jun.) as long as she remains unmarried. Bequests to my three daughters Thomasine, Christian, and Bridget. Bequest to grandchild Christian Poole when she turns 21. Bequest to daughter Margaret Harvey of land called Spoateshill at Northfield, and Corfe? Pood? being in the parish of Ayshill granted by Sir George Spoke, Knight, to “William Harvey my late husband.” Bequest to granddaughter Thomasine Poole. Bequests to the three children of her daughter Thomasine Poole: George, Thomasine, and William. Bequests to the four children of her daughter Christian Poole [not named]. Bequest to Margery Marshe, daughter of William Marshe of Chilton, who was her past servant. Names her daughter Margaret Harvey as executor. Names “my loving friend” Richard Harvey and John Shottswell “the younger” as overseers. Witnessed by John Shotwell, Robart ffourrant, and John Watts. Probated 31 Oct 1637.

This will confirms William (Jr.) Harvey was deceased before 1637, that Christian was his wife, and that they had at least four daughters. The marriages of three of these daughters are listed in Ashill parish records as Thomasine and Anthony Poole in 1618, Bridget and William Hodges in 1623, and Christian and George Poole in in 1624. By the naming of land associated with Sir George Spoke mentioned in both the 1602 will of William Harvey and this will, we prove William Jr. was the son of William who died 1602 in Ashill.

This will of Christian Harvey also introduces a connection of our Harveys to the parish of Trent, Somerset. The Trent parish registers begin in 1558; indeed we find what appears to be two more children for William Harvey Jr. and his wife Christian as well as the burial record for Christian herself. Unfortunately, we do not find a marriage record for this William Jr. and Christian nor do we find the baptismal records for their other three daughters Thomasine, Christian, and Bridget for whom we have marriage records in Ashill:

2 Feb 1603[/4] Margaret d/o of William and Christian Harvie baptized. (Margaret Harvey is listed as the executor in Christian’s will.)
8 Dec 1605 Mary d/o Willea Harvey baptized; bur. 3 Nov 1606. (She died before the will and is therefore not listed therein.)
5 Aug 1637 Christian Harvey buried.

With a connection now established of William and Christian Harvey of Ashill to Trent, it merited further analysis of other Harveys in Trent. (Note that Trent is listed as being in both Somerset and Dorset counties depending on the era.) Extracting Harvey records from 1558 to the mid-1600s, I find the following family groupings:

A. John Harvey who married Johane Fathers 24 Nov 1562. She is bur. 15 Aug 1594. They have the following children: Edith bapt. 25 Apr 1563; John bapt. 20 Jul 1565; Robert bapt. 21 Mar 1567; Alice bapt. 9 Aug 1570; Richard bapt. 10 Jun 1573; William bapt. 19 Mar 1574/5.

B. William Harvey with unknown wife. They have the following children: William bapt. 31 Mar 1567; Margaret bapt. 3 Mar 1569; Thomas bapt. 20 Feb 1571/2; Richard bapt. 20 Jul 1575; Anne bapt. 25 Jan 1577/8, bur. 28 Feb 1578/9; James bapt. 29 Feb 1579/80; Robert bapt. 29 Nov 1582, bur. 24 Nov 1586.

C. Christian (aka “Xpian) and unknown wife. He is buried 18 mar 1587/8. They have one child Richard who is buried 4 Feb 1572/3.

D. Nicholas Harvey and unknown wife. They have one child Anne baptized 21 Oct 1576.


E. Richard Harvey and unknown wife or wives. They have Richard bapt. 19 July 1607 and Elizabeth bapt. 13 Mar 1613[/14].

Even though it seems likely that there should be some close relationship of our William Jr. and Christian Harvey to the above Harveys, the connection is not apparent. The will of William Harvey (Sr.), who is buried 1602 in Ashill, identifies children Robert, William, Thomas, and Margaret. William Sr. should be of the generation where he would be identified as the same William who is father of family group B; however, even though that family group has the requisite children William, Thomas, and Margaret, it does not have a Robert who is the first son listed in the will and who receives considerable property. The Robert in Family Group B is dead in 1586 and if there had been a Robert born thereafter in that family group, he would not have been older than 14 at the time of his father’s 1602 will. There is no mention of Robert being a minor in the 1602 will of William Sr. In short, the origin of our William Sr. who died 1602 in Ashill is not among the Trent families.

In looking at Family Group E above, we can probably assume that the father Richard is the same man who had a child bapt. and bur. in Ashill in 1601 and was also named in the wills of John Clarke (1629, Ashill) as Richard Harvey, Christian Harvey (1637, Trent) as “my loving friend”, and Agnes Clarke (1647, Ashill) as “kinsman.” John Clarke in 1629 notes Richard’s “now” wife as Elizabeth, which supposes an earlier wife - if this is in fact the case, then Richard’s child Elizabeth b. 1614 could very well be named after the second wife Elizabeth. Agnes Clarke in her 1647 will calls Richard “kinsman” but the nature of kinship is unknown. He could very well be one of the two Richards listed in either Family Group A or B above;

Even with this new will and new records at Trent, we still cannot place exactly how Agnes (Harvey) Clark, who died in 1647, fits into the family. We find no child in Trent named Agnes unless she could possibly the Anne bapt. 1576 in Family Group D above with a father named Nicholas Harvey.

In Christian’s will above, she mentions leaving bequests to three parishes (Ayshill, Trent, and Seavington Maria [St. Mary]); however, I find no Harveys in Seavington St. Mary.


The Will of John Clarke,

Husbandman of Ayshill, Somerset, date: 5 Oct 1629, filed in Canterbury. Agnes Clarke, whose 1647 will originally established the link between William Harvey of New England and Thomas Harvey his father of Ashill, was married to John Clarke. The original images can be viewed at Ancestry.com at https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/5111/40611_310895-00268?pid=806264&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?_phsrc%3DAqe304%26_phstart%3DsuccessSource%26usePUBJs%3Dtrue%26indiv%3D1%26db%3DCanturburyPrerogativeCourt%26gss%3Dangs-d%26new%3D1%26rank%3D1%26gsfn%3Djohn%26gsfn_x%3DNP_NN%26gsln%3Dclarke%26gsln_x%3D0%26msddy%3D1630%26msddy_x%3D1%26msddp%3D10%26msrpn__ftp%3DSomerset,%2520England%26msrpn%3D5283%26msrpn_PInfo%3D7-%257C0%257C0%257C3257%257C3251%257C0%257C0%257C0%257C5283%257C0%257C0%257C0%257C%26MSAV%3D1%26uidh%3D3v2%26pcat%3D36%26fh%3D0%26h%3D806264%26recoff%3D7%25208%252019%252020%26ml_rpos%3D1&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&_phsrc=Aqe304&_phstart=successSource&usePUBJs=true#?imageId=40611_310895-00268.

Extract of Will of John Clarke & Comments (by KP)

The will is dated 5 Oct 1629 at Ayshill in Somerset. John Clarke (filed under Johannis Clarke) notes himself as a husbandman and desires to be buried at Ayshill. Bequest to the poor of Ayshill. Bequest to the children of Robert ___ of the parish of Donyatt and of Ellen my sister’s daughter. Bequest to cousin Thomas Clarke of Ayshill and his brother William. Bequest to the sons of his deceased brother William Clarke of Donyatt: Richard, William, John, and Osmond. Bequest to Agnes Harvey the dau. of Thomas Harvey, deceased, of Ayshill. Bequest household furniture to William Harvey, son of the same deceased Thomas Harvey, to be given after the death of the testator’s wife Annes; if William Harvey is deceased at that time then the same to go to William’s brother James. Bequest to Elizabeth Harvey, the “now wife” of Richard Harvey of Aishill, of personal items subject to his wife Annes using same until her death. Balance of all to Annes his wife who is named as executor. Witnesses: William Curtis “Scriptor” and Richard Meade. Probated 18 Nov 1631.

Many of the same bequests that his wife makes in 1647 were initiated in this will. She is basically parroting the same bequests her husband made. Apparently John and his wife Annes/Agnes had no surviving children. This will confirms that the Agnes Harvey, dau. of Thomas Harvey who was baptized Jan. 1599[/1600] was unmarried in 1629 and definitely not the wife of this John Clarke. It would appear that his wife was more likely the sister to the deceased Thomas Harvey whose death we also confirm as prior to 1629. (Actually we know Thomas Harvey’s wife Joan was a widow in 1625 when their son Richard was buried; also the parish record must be deficient since it does not show this obvious death of Thomas.) We again see the same Richard Harvey (and his “now”) wife Elizabeth of Ashill in this will as we do later in Agnes Clarke’s will of 1647. We also see Richard named in the 1637 will of Christian Harvey of Trent. According to our extract of the parish records, Thomas Harvey also should have had a daughter named Marie, who was born in 1613, alive at this point since no death has been found for her (unless she died after the 1625 loss of the Ashill parish record. What is lacking here as it was in Agnes Harvey’s 1647 will is any mention of a son of the deceased Thomas Harvey also named Thomas Harvey who we see later in New England with William Harvey the immigrant. Could the relationship between the two immigrants William and Thomas have been as cousins and not brothers?



Working Summary and Theory

Subject to additional research, the following may be the best solution in light of the new findings above yet in spite of the scarcity of complete records:

1. Considering the uniqueness of the Harvey family of this era in Ashill and the sequencing of wives and children for Thomas Harvey in the Ashill records, it is apparent there is only one Thomas with three wives as follows: Agnes in 1598, Agnes again circa 1607/8, and finally Joan Colles in 1612. He had children with all of these women from about 1599 to about 1619 - the normal child-bearing spread. Thomas appears to have died before 1624 when Joan as a “widow” had a son buried. With the first wife he had Agnes, Thomasine, and Matthew; with the second wife he had Alice and William; and with the third wife he had Marie, James, and Richard. He was also listed as Church Warden for one year in 1605 as noted by signing the parish record. Church Wardens are church Elders who sign the records annually attesting to their accuracy. Some less informed individuals often confuse church wardens with vicars or clergy, which they were not. With Thomas having acted in this position, it perhaps indicates why his family is so well delineated in the parish records. Richard Harvey follows in 1606 as Church Warden. Others served in this capacity in other years.

2. According to the parish record, the Harveys apparently did not have a “church” presence in Ashill prior to 1597 (perhaps as early as 1588 since the parish records are missing from 1588 to 1595), yet we find several contemporaneous Harveys thereafter in short order. They are most likely all related. The illegibility and lack of parish records from 1588 to 1595 and after 1625 to 1653 greatly hinders our research, but the probate records abstracted above do fill in some gaps. We need to look elsewhere besides Ashill for our Harvey origin. The parish of Trent 20 miles to the east partially helps, but does not solve the problem of origin.

3. William Sr. who was buried 10 Mar 1601/2, had a prominent chest tomb in Ashill. Chest tombs are massive memorial structures resembling a rectangular box. The chest tomb or sarcophagus as it was called, had a removable lid. Due to the prominence of this monument in Ashill, William Sr. is most likely the patriarch of our Harveys in Ashill. His will confirms this premise and gives us the children Robert, William Jr., Thomas, and Margaret who married ___ Markes. We have no further record for Robert in Ashill; Thomas is the Ashill man with three wives and with the son William who immigrated to New England; William Jr. married Christian ___ and had some children born in Trent and three daughters married in Ashill; Margaret’s daughter Ursula Markes married John Crabbe in Ashill. I tentatively place James Harvey who died in 1597 as another son to William Sr. The origin of William Sr. who died 1602 remains unknown; however, we can eliminate Ashill, Trent, and Seavington St. Mary parishes. We can definitively dismiss the undocumented assertion of “The Harvey Book” that our William Sr. is the same as WilliamB Harvey (WilliamC, TurnerD, HumphreyE) who was of Bridgewater, Somerset, in 1630. Our current pedigree ends with the William Harvey Sr. who died in 1602.

4. I cannot exactly connect Richard Harvey who has a presence in both Ashill and Trent and is listed in three wills. He may be one of the two Richards christened in Trent per the extraction and comments above.

5. Even though the 1647 Ashill will of Agnes (Harvey) Clarke is what started us on this research path, I cannot connect her in spite of her and her husband’s close association with the family of Thomas Harvey. There is no church record for her. She and her husband died within the 1625 to 1653 period when there were no church records in Ashill. The 1602 will of William Harvey Sr. in Ashill makes no mention of her as one of his children, which eliminates here as a sibling to Thomas. There was a possibility that she may have been the Agnes who was born to Thomas in 1599; however, her husband’s 1629 will names that young Agnes thereby eliminating that option. Our best speculation for now would be as a possible sister to William Sr.


Research Sources & Comments:

"Harvey, Oscar Jewell, The Harvey Book, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, 1899."

Two Exerpts from "The Harvey Book," Oscar Jewell Harvey, 1899

accessed online 30 Jul 2010 at http://mdhervey.com/archives/HERVEY/HBOOK.PDF

: "(1st Exerpt)" History of William Harvey b. ~1610 - d.1691 WILLIAM HARVEY, 2 (Thomas, 1), was born in Somersetshire, England, about 1614. Accompanied by his brother Thomas he came to America in 1636, and settled at Dorchester. In 1637 he was one of the company of the forty-six "first and ancient purchasers," so called, who, "feeling much straitened for want of room", purchased from Massasoit, the chief sachem of the Wampanoag tribe of Indians, whose seat was Mount Hope, the Indian title to Cohannet, lying thirty-two miles south of Boston, in the colony of New Plymouth.

"In the Summer of 1638," says Winthrop, "there came over [from England] twenty ships and at least 3000 persons, so as they were forced to look out new plantations." Thereupon the proprietors of Cohannet removed from Dorchester to their new plantation. As a number of these proprietors had come to America from the Ancient town of Taunton, and its neighborhood, in Somersetshire, they gave to their new purchase on the 3 March, 1639, the name of Taunton -- "in honor and love to our dear native country. ** and owning it a great mercy of God to bring us to this place, and settling of us, on lands of our own bought with our money in peace, in the midst of the heathen, for a possession for ourselves and for our posterity after us," as they afterwards declared.[1]
William Harvey's name appears in the list of original proprietors." [See Baylies' "Old Colony Memoirs," I:286.] He was the owner of eight shares in the new purchase.
The first recorded marriage occurred in the new settlement 8 Nov. 1638, and in the following Spring the second marriage took place. It was that of William Harvey, and is recorded upon the court records of New Plymouth thus: "At a Court of Assistants, William Harvey and Joane Hucker of Cohannet were maryed the 2 of Aprill 1639." At that time marriage was quite an undertaking, since both parties must travel to the town of Plymouth if inhabitants of Plymouth Colony, or to Boston if inhabitants of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and have the ceremony performed by the Governor or one of the magistrates.[2]
In the latter part of 1639, or early in 1640, William Harvey and his wife removed to Boston, where they remained until 1646--during which period four children were born to them. [See The N.E. Hist & Gen. Reg. II.: 189, and VIII.: 38, 350.] The family then returned to Taunton.
In 1648 William was one of the heirs named in the "will of Agnes Clark of Ayshill [Ashill], Somerset, widow." The will was executed 20 Oct., 1647, and proved 10 May, 1648, and from it the following paragraphs have been taken:
"I give and bequeath unto William Harvey the son of Thomas Harvey, deceased, my kinsman now in New England, eighteen pounds, being parcel of thirty-five pounds which is owing unto me by Richard Parke of Ayshill upon his bond, which sum is to be paid as soon as it can be recovered, if he shall come to demand it at any time within four years, but if he come not then my will is that William Harvey the son of James Harvey shall have the said money at such time as he shall be of lawful age to give a discharge. "I give and bequeath to the said William, son of James Harvey, fifteen pounds parcel of the said thirty-five pounds, when of age.
"I give and bequeath unto William Harvey in New England all my household stuff during his life, if he come to claim it; and after his decease to remain in the house to the use of James Harvey his brother, and the said James to make use of it until William his brother shall come to claim it." [See "Genealogical Gleanings in England," New Engl. Hist & Gen. Reg., XLVI: 453]
"At an orderly town-meeting warned by the constable," and held in Taunton 28 Dec 1659, it was voted that there should be a general division of land to every inch and to whom rights of division shall belong"; and it was agreed that the apportionment should be made upon the following plan: "two acres to the head[3], two acres to the shilling[4], and two acres to the lot.[5]
In the list of those who participated in this distribution of Taunton lands the name of William Harvey appears, and he is charged with at "rate" of fourteen shillings and credited with seven "heads"--himself, his wife and five children. According to the plan of apportionment "two acres to the head" gave him fourteen acres and "two acres to the shilling" twenty-eight acres. Adding the "two acres to the lot" made a total of forty-four acres--which was the quantity of land that William Harvey received. [See "Quarter- Millennial Celebration of Taunton," 1889, p 243.]
His "home" lot was on the north side of what is now Cohannet street, between what is known as Taunton Green (formerly the town's commons or training-field), and Mill River. A description of the lots is to be found in Taunton Prop. Rec., IV.: 59,&c.
In 1661 William Harvey was Excise Commissioner. [See Plym. Records, XI:133] In 1664 he was a Representative to the General Court. This latter office he held again in 1677.
The law requiring towns in Plymouth Colony to elect selectmen, and giving them many judicial powers and duties, was passed in 1665, and the first "Celect Men" chosen in Taunton under that law were William Harvey and four others -- who were approved by the General Court 5 June, 1666. [See Plym. Col. Recl, IV.: 124.] In 1666 and '7, and in 1671 and other years later, William Harvey was a selectman. 10 Jany, 1669, he was one of ten men chosen by the town "to draw [up] a list of the purchasers or free inhabitants" in Taunton.
He was one of a committee of seven appointed 2 Sept., 1672, to manage for the "free inhabitants" the purchase of a certain tract of land from "Philip, alias Metacum, Chief Sachem," who was the son and successor of Massasoit, heretofore mentioned, and is known in history as King Philip, the most wily and sagacious Indian of his time. The committee immediately attended to their duty and soon obtained from Philip, in consideration of £143, a deed for a tract of land "lying three miles along ye Great River," and extending westerly four miles.
The year 1675 brought with it the gloom and horror of an Indian War. After nearly forty years of quiet, following the vindictive struggle with the Pequots, the Colonies were terror struck with the news that a wide-spread combination of Wampanoags, Narragansetts and other tribes of savages had been formed under the leadership of King Philip with the design of exterminating the white race from the land.
The first overt act of hostility by Philip was committed on Sunday, June 24, 1675, when several houses were burned and men slaughtered at Swanzey, about twelve miles from Taunton. During the Summer the principal seat of the war was in the interior of Massachusetts, and from its central position Taunton was the chosen rendezvous of the troops from Plymouth, Boston, and elsewhere. For the same reason it was a constant point of attack by the savages, and several of its dwellings were consumed and their inmates butchered. In the Spring of 1676 the danger of the entire destruction of the village was so imminent that the Cape towns invited the people of Taunton to take up their abode with them until the war should be ended. The offer was declined in a remarkable letter "subscribed in the name of the town" by William Harvey and three other inhabitants. The following paragraphs are from the letter, which is printed in full on page 325 of the "Quarter-Millennial Celebration of Taunton."
"Our sins are already such as might render our friends (did they know us) afraid to entertain us; and what can we expect as the issue of such an addition thereunto, but that the hand of the Lord would follow us, and find us out wheresoever we fled. * * * The Lord do with us as seemeth good in His sight. Here we have sinned, and here we submit ourselves to suffer, except the Lord's Providence, and order or advice of Authorities, should plainly determine us to removal. * * * We are willing, if it may be judged convenient by you, to secure some of our cattle in your parts, that they may be no booty or succor to the enemy, if the Lord spare them so long as that we may have opportunity to convey them, in which we desire your speedy advice. And beseeching you not to cease to pray for us that the Lord would heal our backslidings, and prepare us for what measure of the cup of His indignation it may seem good to Him to order us to drink."[6]
In March, 1677, "William Harvey of Taunton" received £10 from contributions made by "Christians in Ireland" for the relief of those "impoverished by the late Indian War."[7]
Assonet Neck, a peninsula about two miles long and less than one broad, lying near Taunton and belonging to the Indians, having been seized by the Colony to pay the expenses of the Indian Wars, was ordered to be sold by the General Court in July, 1677. In the following November Constant Southworth, the Colony Treasurer, conveyed the land to William Harvey and five other Taunton men; and in 1682 the tract was annexed to and made a part of Taunton.
In January, 1678, William Harvey was named as the first member of a committee of seven of the inhabitants of Taunton appointed to regulate the settlement of lands, and to attend to the confirmation of titles to purchasers and the ratification of supposed lost grants and town orders.
About this period, and during some years later, William's name appears often in connection with important affairs of the town; which indicates that he continued to be a man of character and influence in the community.
In 1689 Maj. Wm. Bradford having made some claim to all the territory comprehended within the limits of Taunton, the town paid him £20 for his alleged rights, and he gave a deed of release and confirmation, to John Poole, William Harvey, Thomas Harvey, Sr., Thomas Harvey, Jr., and others, "proprietors" [See original deed in possession of the Old Colony Historical Society, Taunton.] William Harvey's death occurred at Taunton in the Summer of 1691. As the name of his wife is not mentioned in his will it is supposed that her death took place some time before. The following is a copy of his will taken from the Bristol county (Mass.) Probate Records, Book I., page 41:
"In ye Name of God Amen. I WILLIAM HARVEY, being growne to a considerable age through ye patience of God and now being sick and weake in Body though of sound memory & judgemt [sic] blessed be God Doe [sic] make & constitute this my last Will & Testamt [sic].
Impe. Doe commit my Soule to ye Lord Jesus Christ my Redeemer in hopes of acceptance thro free Grace & my Body to be Decently buryed by my Execr. in hopes of a joyfull Resurrection through Christ our Lord --------
Secondly to my son Thomas Harvey I give ye house and land he lives upon from ye River up to ye Highway & another parcell at ye higher end of my Land that runneth home to Joseph Willis Land bounded against my other lands by a samll white oake by yt [sic] side next ye Cart path on ye Swampe side by a Tree yt lyes along & so [sic] home to Joseph Willis his land. Also to Thomas I give three score acres of land lying by Three mile River Bridge. Also a Lott of meadow at Scaddin's should be about four acres. Also one half of my late fifty acre Division lying easterly from ye three mile River. All sd [sic] parcells of Land to be my son sd Thomas Harvey & his heirs and assigns forever.
Thirdly to my son Jonathan the remiander of this my home lott at Towne with ye house thereon & Barne to Jonathan allso all my Land upland and meadow lying up by Three mile River on ye Easterly side thereof & a small parcell of meadow lying by Winnicunnitt Ponds, a small quantity of meadow lying at ye Brooke called Rumford Brooke with all my share of Land yt is called ye North Purchase. Also to Jonathan ye other half of my late fifty acre Division.
Fourthly to ye children of my son Joseph Harvey Deceased a parcell of land Lying at a place called ye streights being about eight acres more or less & another parcell of land being about nine acres more or less lying near a place called ye Wolfe pitt swamp --- the sd parcells to be equally Divided amongst the children of my son Joseph. Alsoe the meadow at ye west side of three mile River to ye sd children of my son Joseph.
Fifthly to Nathan Thare, Junr I give a parcell of land about or three acres lying at ye Norwest from ye meadow which we usually mow at three mile River.
Sixthly -- my comon Rights and all future Divisions to be my two Sons Thomas & Jonathan to be equally divided.
Seventhly all ye rest of my movable estate I give unto my Son Jonathan whom I Doe hereby Constitute ye sole Exectr of this my last Will & Testamt who is to receive any Debts due to me & to pay what is due from me. In Witness hereof I ye sd William Harvey have hereunto sett my hand and Seal this twelfth Day of June sixteen hundred Ninety one.
Signed & sealed in William Harvey
presence of us,
Joseph + Willis
his mark
Henry Hodges
Samuel Danforth
Children of William and Joanna (Hucker) Harvey:
+ 6. i. ABIGAIL, b: 25 April 1640; d. 20 Aug 1691
+ 7. ii. THOMAS, b: 18 Dec, 1641; d: 1728
- 8. iii. EXPERIENCE, b: 4 March 1644; married (11) Thomas, q. v.
+ 9. iv. JOSEPH, b: 8 Dec, 1645 d: 1691
+10. v. JONATHAN, b:1647 d: 1691

: "(2nd Exerpt)" Analysis of Facts, by: Oscar Jewell Harvey, 1899, pp.34 & 35:

Note.-- I deem it proper and necessary, at this point, to make some references to a genealogy of certain branches of the Harvey family to be found in a "History of Sutton, New Hampshire," published a few years ago by Mrs. Augusta Harvey Worthen.

The author says (page 745): "Thomas and William Harvey, brothers, were in this country previous to 1640. Thomas married in 1643 Elizabeth, daughter of James Wall, of Hampton, and resided in Hampton and Amesbury. William married Joan ______ and in 1639 was living in Plymouth. He removed to Taunton. * * *

"Children by first wife :

i. Abigail, b. 25 Apl., 1640.
ii. Thomas, b. 18 Dec., 1641.
iii. Experience, b. 10 Mar., 1644. [Should be 4. She was baptized the 10th.]
iv. Joseph, b. 14 Dec., 1645. [Should be 8. He was baptized the 14th.]

"His wife Joan died in 1649, and he married, 2nd, Martha Slocum, sister to Anthony Slocum. "Children by second wife :

v. William, b. 27 Aug., 1651.
vi. Thomas, b. 16 Aug., 1652.
vii. John, b. Feby., 1655.

"William the father died 15 Aug., 1658, and his widow married Henry Tewksbury 10 Nov., 1659. It is believed that (vi.) Thomas and (vii.) John are the Thomas and John Harvey found on the early Amesbury records. * * From (vii.) John Harvey the descent is clearly traced to the Harveys of Nottingham, Northwood, Warner and Sutton [New Hampshire}." * * * *

It is very certain, I think, that the Thomas first named by Mrs. Worthen, and who married Elizabeth Wall, was not the Thomas who was settled at Cohannet or Taunton in 1638, and was not the brother of William who "married Joan" [Hucker].

As we have shown on page 28 ante, William, the first, resided at Cohannet, and not at Plymouth when he was married in 1639 to Joane Hucker; and soon thereafter he and his wife removed temporarily to Boston, where within the next six years four of their five children were born. They then returned to Taunton, where in 1647 their fifth child was born. The whole family continued to reside in Taunton for many years.

Mrs. Worthen says William's wife Joane died in 1649 and he married (2nd) Martha Slocum. She bases this statement, without doubt, upon what Savage says in his "Genealogical Dictionary," viz.: "And it is supposed the same man [i. e., William of Boston, 1640-'5, whose wife was Joane] by wife Martha had :

William, b. 27 Aug., 1651.
Thomas (again), b. 16 Aug., 1652. (Thomas, b. 18 Dec., 1641, son of William and Joanna (Hucker) Harvey, was alive at this date, and it is hardly probable that another son would be named Thomas when there was already one bearing that name among the children of the family.)
John, b. Feby., 1655.

The facts in the case are these: In 1650 there was residing in Boston a certain William Harvey, who was married in that year to Martha Copp, daughter of William Copp, of Boston, cordwainer. They became the parents of four children: i. William, b. 27 Aug., 1651; ii. Thomas, b. 16 Aug ., 1652; iii. John, b. 5 Feby., 1654; iv. Mary, b. 1656 or '7. In 1654 the first three of these children were baptized in Boston. [See "Report of the Record Comsrs. of Boston," pp. 46 and 49.]

William the father died 15 Aug., 1658. [See "Report of Record Comsrs., p. 66.] His widow, Martha married Henry Tewksbury, 10 Nov., 1659. [See "Report of Record Comsrs., p. 72.]

William Copp, father of Martha (Copp, Harvey) Tewksbury, died in 1662, and his will was probated 31 October. He named therein his "daughter Tewksbury" and grandchildren William, Thomas, John and Mary Harvey. [See New England Hist. & Gen. Reg., XLVIII: 459]

In commenting upon the will of Agnes Clark (mentioned on page 29 ante) the editor of the N.E. Hist & Gen. Reg. said (Vol. XLV1., p. 453): "Savage gives two persons by the name of William Harvey who were then [1647] in New England. One was of Boston and had by wife Joane * * *. A person of this name, probably the same, by wife Martha had * * *. The other William was of Plymouth [sic?]; married Joanna, 1639; removed to Taunton. Query: May not the Plymouth man be the same as the Boston man, and the Taunton man be a different person?"

I think it is very clearly proved by the public records herein referred to, and by other records, that there was no William Harvey residing at Plymouth in 1639, and that the two Williams "then in New England" were: (1) William of Taunton, whose wife was Joanna Hucker, and (2) William of Boston, who married Martha Copp."

"At a later date, when the Colony of Massachusetts was divided into counties, another Somersetshire name -- Bristol -- was selected for the county of which Taunton was to be, and is, the sire-town.
In the south-western part of this county is the town of Somerset.
The ancient town of Bridgewater (another Somersetshire name with an "e" inserted in the middle of it) was the first interior settlement in the county of Plymouth, Mass. It adjoined Taunton, was incorporated in 1656, and embraced within its limits the four towns now known as Bridgewater, North, East and West Bridgewater."
[2] Ministers of the gospel were not allowed to solemnize marriages in the early colonial days. The Puritans had firmly implanted in the social soil of New England the strict Protestant principle that marriage is purely a civil rite. Throughout all New England previous to 1680 the marriage rite was performed by magistrates, or by persons specially empowered by the colonial authorities. Hutchinson supposes that in Massachusetts there was no instance of a marriage by a clergyman during the existence of their first charter-- that is to say, previous to 1684.
It was not until 1692 that the Provincial statute provided the "every Justice of the Peace within the county were he resides, and every settled Minister in any town, shall and are hereby respectively empowered and authorized to solemnize marriages."
[3] Each member of the family of a proprietor or holder of a right in the purchase was regarded as a "head". An unmarried man was "to be looked upon as two heads".
[4] Refers to the tax or rate levied in shillings against every inhabitant by the duly appointed "raters" or "listers".
[5] The "home" lot which each of the "first purchasers" took possession of, and which was charged against him as an advancement.
[6] See sketch of John Harvey, part III, post. for further references to King Philip's or the Narragansett War.
[7] See NEHGR Reg., II.: 245 and 8."

4. Jerry Thayer <hjthayer@aol.com>, a family historian of the Thayer Family Association (TFA) [website http://www.thayerfamilies.com, by email dated 3 Jun 2010 provided me the following:

"Unfortunately all of the records for Taunton were burned in a courthouse fire in 1838 and that is why that region is so difficult. The current published records of Taunton are a reconstruction from various sources but are far from complete."

He also provides the following on the Harveys:

"Abt 1660 when Nathaniel [Thayer] was 19, he married Abigail HARVEY in (of) Taunton, Bristol, MA. Born on 25 Apr. 1640 in Boston, Suffolk, MA. Abigail died in Taunton, Bristol, MA, on 20 Aug 1691; she was 51. Buried in Summer St. Burying Grd., Taunton, MA. DEATH: Taunton Published Vital Records. Daughter of William HARVEY & Joan HUCKER. Granddaughter of Thomas HARVEY & Joan COLLER."

6. NEHGS Register 46:453-4, Genealogical Gleanings of England:

"Agnes Clarke of Ayshill, Somerset, widow, 20 October 1647, proved 10 May 1648. My body to be buried in the churchyard of Ayshill near unto John Clarke my deceased husband. To the poor of the parish and to the church. I give and bequeath unto William Harvey, the son of Thomas Harvey deceased, my kinsman now in New England, eighteen pounds, being parcel of thirty five pounds which is owing unto me by Richard Parker of Ayshill upon his bond, which sum is to be paid as soon as it can be recovered if he shall come to demand it any time within four years, but if he come not then my will is that William Harvey the son of James Harvey shall have the said money at such time as he shall be of lawful age to give a discharge. I give to the said William son of James Harvey fifteen pounds parcel of the said thirty five pounds, when of age; and my desire is that Richard Harvey, John Witherall and Richard Crabbe shall put it forth to use to the best benefit of the said William Harvey. I give to John Wytherall the elder of Cudworth twenty shillings and to Mary, wife of Francis Moore of Bicknell twenty shillings. I give and bequeath unto William Harvey in New England all my household stuff during his life if he come to claim it, and after his decease to remain in the house to the use of James Harvey, his brother, and the said James to make use of it until William, his brother, shall come to claim it. I give to Ellen Vyle the wife of Robert Vyle the elder of Strotten my best coffer. To the two children of John Vyle of Donniett to each a pewter platter. To William Clarke of Sommerton and to my goddaughter Deanis Nicholls, to each twenty shillings, to be paid them within one year &c. by John Clarke of Donnyett out of the ten pounds he oweth me. The other eight pounds I give to the said John Clarke and Katherine his wife. To my kinswoman Edith Mitchell of Churchstock twenty shillings. To Elizabeth wife of Richard Harvey, Lucrece wife of William Curtis and Deanes Nicholles, my said god daughter, twenty shillings apiece. To Elizabeth Dyke servant of the said Richard Harvey ten shillings. To Deaues Hay ball two shilling six pence and to Anne wife of John Pitman twelve pence. The residue to my kinsman Richard Harvey whom I make sole executor. Essex, 86.

(Savage gives two persons by the name of William Harvey who were then in New England at that time. One was of Boston, and had by wife Joan, children Abigail b. 1640, Thomas b. 1641, Experience b. 1644, and Joseph b. 1646. A person of this name, probably the same, by wife Martha, had children William b. 1651, Thomas b. 1652, and John b. 1653. He died Aug. 15, 1658, and his widow married Henry Tewksbury, Nov. 10, 1659. The other William Harvey was of Plymouth, married Joanna, 1639; removed to Taunton; was rep. 1664 and 13 years after. Query: May not the Plymouth man be the same as the Boston man and the Taunton man be a different person?—Editor.)"


7. FHL book 929.273 Sn61s "Snow-Estes Ancestry," vol. 2, by Nora E. Snow (Hillburn, NY; 1939), pp. 299-301:

"WILLIAM, s. Thomas Harvey, b. Somersetshire, England, about 1636, d. Taunton, Mass., 1691; m. Cohonnet, Mass., Apr. 2, 1639, JOANE HUCKER.
Accompanied by his brother, Thomas Harvey, Jr., William Harvey came to America in 1636 and settled at Dorchester. A William Harvey of Langton, Dorchester, Eng., is listed by Rev. John White, of Dorchester, as one of his "adventurers," 1623-1628, to New England, in an "answer" dated Oct. 12, 1634, to recover the value of some salt said to have been seized at Cape Anne by the agents of the "adventurers." He settled at Dorchester, but in 1637 he was one of the company of forty-six "first and ancient purchasers," so called, who, "feeling much straitened for want of room," purchased from Massasoit, the chief sachern of the Wainpanoag tribe of Indians, whose seat was at Mount Hope, the Indian title to Cohonnet, lying thirty-two miles south of Boston, in the colony of New Plymouth. He was the owner of eight shares in the new purchase.
Nov. 8, 1638, the first recorded marriage occurred in the new settlement, and William Harvey's marriage the following Spring was the second, recorded thus on the New Plymouth Court Records: "At a Court of Assistants William Harvey and Joane Hucker of Cohannet were maryed the 2 of April 1639." At that time marriage was quite an undertaking since both parties must travel to the town of Plymouth if inhabitants of Plymouth Colony, or to Boston if inhabitants of Mass. Bay Colony, and have the ceremony performed by the the Governor or one of the magistrates.[2]
In the latter part of 1639, or early in 1640, William Harvey and his wife removed to Boston, where they remained until 1646--during which period four children were born to them. [See The N.E. Hist & Gen. Reg. II.: 189, and VIII.: 38, 350.] The family then returned to Taunton.
In 1648 William was one of the heirs named in the "will of Agnes Clark of Ayshill [Ashill], Somerset, widow." The will was executed 20 Oct., 1647, and proved 10 May, 1648, and from it the following paragraphs have been taken:
"I give and bequeath unto William Harvey the son of Thomas Harvey, deceased, my kinsman now in New England, eighteen pounds, being parcel of thirty-five pounds which is owing unto me by Richard Parke of Ayshill upon his bond, which sum is to be paid as soon as it can be recovered, if he shall come to demand it at any time within four years, but if he come not then my will is that William Harvey the son of James Harvey shall have the said money at such time as he shall be of lawful age to give a discharge. "I give and bequeath to the said William, son of James Harvey, fifteen pounds parcel of the said thirty-five pounds, when of age.
"I give and bequeath unto William Harvey in New England all my household stuff during his life, if he come to claim it; and after his decease to remain in the house to the use of James Harvey his brother, and the said James to make use of it until William his brother shall come to claim it." [See "Genealogical Gleanings in England," New Engl. Hist & Gen. Reg., XLVI: 453]
"At an orderly town-meeting warned by the constable," and held in Taunton 28 Dec 1659, it was voted that there should be a general division of land to every inch and to whom rights of division shall belong"; and it was agreed that the apportionment should be made upon the following plan: "two acres to the head[3], two acres to the shilling[4], and two acres to the lot.[5]
In the list of those who participated in this distribution of Taunton lands the name of William Harvey appears, and he is charged with at "rate" of fourteen shillings and credited with seven "heads"--himself, his wife and five children. According to the plan of apportionment "two acres to the head" gave him fourteen acres and "two acres to the shilling" twenty-eight acres. Adding the "two acres to the lot" made a total of forty-four acres--which was the quantity of land that William Harvey received. [See "Quarter- Millennial Celebration of Taunton," 1889, p 243.]
His "home" lot was on the north side of what is now Cohannet street, between what is known as Taunton Green (formerly the town's commons or training-field), and Mill River. A description of the lots is to be found in Taunton Prop. Rec., IV.: 59,&c.
In 1661 William Harvey was Excise Commissioner. [See Plym. Records, XI:133] In 1664 he was a Representative to the General Court. This latter office he held again in 1677.
The law requiring towns in Plymouth Colony to elect selectmen, and giving them many judicial powers and duties, was passed in 1665, and the first "Celect Men" chosen in Taunton under that law were William Harvey and four others -- who were approved by the General Court 5 June, 1666. [See Plym. Col. Recl, IV.: 124.] In 1666 and '7, and in 1671 and other years later, William Harvey was a selectman. 10 Jany, 1669, he was one of ten men chosen by the town "to draw [up] a list of the purchasers or free inhabitants" in Taunton.
He was one of a committee of seven appointed 2 Sept., 1672, to manage for the "free inhabitants" the purchase of a certain tract of land from "Philip, alias Metacum, Chief Sachem," who was the son and successor of Massasoit, heretofore mentioned, and is known in history as King Philip, the most wily and sagacious Indian of his time. The committee immediately attended to their duty and soon obtained from Philip, in consideration of £143, a deed for a tract of land "lying three miles along ye Great River," and extending westerly four miles.
The year 1675 brought with it the gloom and horror of an Indian War. After nearly forty years of quiet, following the vindictive struggle with the Pequots, the Colonies were terror struck with the news that a wide-spread combination of Wampanoags, Narragansetts and other tribes of savages had been formed under the leadership of King Philip with the design of exterminating the white race from the land.
The first overt act of hostility by Philip was committed on Sunday, June 24, 1675, when several houses were burned and men slaughtered at Swanzey, about twelve miles from Taunton. During the Summer the principal seat of the war was in the interior of Massachusetts, and from its central position Taunton was the chosen rendezvous of the troops from Plymouth, Boston, and elsewhere. For the same reason it was a constant point of attack by the savages, and several of its dwellings were consumed and their inmates butchered. In the Spring of 1676 the danger of the entire destruction of the village was so imminent that the Cape towns invited the people of Taunton to take up their abode with them until the war should be ended. The offer was declined in a remarkable letter "subscribed in the name of the town" by William Harvey and three other inhabitants. The following paragraphs are from the letter, which is printed in full on page 325 of the "Quarter-Millennial Celebration of Taunton."
"Our sins are already such as might render our friends (did they know us) afraid to entertain us; and what can we expect as the issue of such an addition thereunto, but that the hand of the Lord would follow us, and find us out wheresoever we fled. * * * The Lord do with us as seemeth good in His sight. Here we have sinned, and here we submit ourselves to suffer, except the Lord's Providence, and order or advice of Authorities, should plainly determine us to removal. * * * We are willing, if it may be judged convenient by you, to secure some of our cattle in your parts, that they may be no booty or succor to the enemy, if the Lord spare them so long as that we may have opportunity to convey them, in which we desire your speedy advice. And beseeching you not to cease to pray for us that the Lord would heal our backslidings, and prepare us for what measure of the cup of His indignation it may seem good to Him to order us to drink."[6]
In March, 1677, "William Harvey of Taunton" received £10 from contributions made by "Christians in Ireland" for the relief of those "impoverished by the late Indian War."[7]
Assonet Neck, a peninsula about two miles long and less than one broad, lying near Taunton and belonging to the Indians, having been seized by the Colony to pay the expenses of the Indian Wars, was ordered to be sold by the General Court in July, 1677. In the following November Constant Southworth, the Colony Treasurer, conveyed the land to William Harvey and five other Taunton men; and in 1682 the tract was annexed to and made a part of Taunton.
In January, 1678, William Harvey was named as the first member of a committee of seven of the inhabitants of Taunton appointed to regulate the settlement of lands, and to attend to the confirmation of titles to purchasers and the ratification of supposed lost grants and town orders.
About this period, and during some years later, William's name appears often in connection with important affairs of the town; which indicates that he continued to be a man of character and influence in the community.
In 1689 Maj. Wm. Bradford having made some claim to all the territory comprehended within the limits of Taunton, the town paid him £20 for his alleged rights, and he gave a deed of release and confirmation, to John Poole, William Harvey, Thomas Harvey, Sr., Thomas Harvey, Jr., and others, "proprietors" [See original deed in possession of the Old Colony Historical Society, Taunton.] William Harvey's death occurred at Taunton in the Summer of 1691. As the name of his wife is not mentioned in his will it is supposed that her death took place some time before. The following is a copy of his will taken from the Bristol county (Mass.) Probate Records, Book I., page 41:
"In ye Name of God Amen. I WILLIAM HARVEY, being growne to a considerable age through ye patience of God and now being sick and weake in Body though of sound memory & judgemt [sic] blessed be God Doe [sic] make & constitute this my last Will & Testamt [sic].
Impe. Doe commit my Soule to ye Lord Jesus Christ my Redeemer in hopes of acceptance thro free Grace & my Body to be Decently buryed by my Execr. in hopes of a joyfull Resurrection through Christ our Lord --------
Secondly to my son Thomas Harvey I give ye house and land he lives upon from ye River up to ye Highway & another parcell at ye higher end of my Land that runneth home to Joseph Willis Land bounded against my other lands by a samll white oake by yt [sic] side next ye Cart path on ye Swampe side by a Tree yt lyes along & so [sic] home to Joseph Willis his land. Also to Thomas I give three score acres of land lying by Three mile River Bridge. Also a Lott of meadow at Scaddin's should be about four acres. Also one half of my late fifty acre Division lying easterly from ye three mile River. All sd [sic] parcells of Land to be my son sd Thomas Harvey & his heirs and assigns forever.
Thirdly to my son Jonathan the remiander of this my home lott at Towne with ye house thereon & Barne to Jonathan allso all my Land upland and meadow lying up by Three mile River on ye Easterly side thereof & a small parcell of meadow lying by Winnicunnitt Ponds, a small quantity of meadow lying at ye Brooke called Rumford Brooke with all my share of Land yt is called ye North Purchase. Also to Jonathan ye other half of my late fifty acre Division.

:: Fourthly to ye children of my son Joseph Harvey Deceased a parcell of land Lying at a place called ye streights being about eight acres more or less & another parcell of land being about nine acres more or less lying near a place called ye Wolfe pitt swamp --- the sd parcells to be equally Divided amongst the children of my son Joseph. Alsoe the meadow at ye west side of three mile River to ye sd children of my son Joseph.

Fifthly to Nathan Thare, Junr I give a parcell of land about or three acres lying at ye Norwest from ye meadow which we usually mow at three mile River.
Sixthly -- my comon Rights and all future Divisions to be my two Sons Thomas & Jonathan to be equally divided.
Seventhly all ye rest of my movable estate I give unto my Son Jonathan whom I Doe hereby Constitute ye sole Exectr of this my last Will & Testamt who is to receive any Debts due to me & to pay what is due from me. In Witness hereof I ye sd William Harvey have hereunto sett my hand and Seal this twelfth Day of June sixteen hundred Ninety one.
Signed & sealed in William Harvey
presence of us,
Joseph + Willis
his mark
Henry Hodges
Samuel Danforth
Children of William and Joanna (Hucker) Harvey:
+ 6. i. ABIGAIL, b: 25 April 1640; d. 20 Aug 1691
+ 7. ii. THOMAS, b: 18 Dec, 1641; d: 1728
- 8. iii. EXPERIENCE, b: 4 March 1644; married (11) Thomas, q. v.
+ 9. iv. JOSEPH, b: 8 Dec, 1645 d: 1691
+10. v. JONATHAN, b:1647 d: 1691
Footnotes:
[1] "At a later date, when the Colony of Massachusetts was divided into counties, another Somersetshire name -- Bristol -- was selected for the county of which Taunton was to be, and is, the sire-town.
In the south-western part of this county is the town of Somerset.
The ancient town of Bridgewater (another Somersetshire name with an "e" inserted in the middle of it) was the first interior settlement in the county of Plymouth, Mass. It adjoined Taunton, was incorporated in 1656, and embraced within its limits the four towns now known as Bridgewater, North, East and West Bridgewater."
[2] Ministers of the gospel were not allowed to solemnize marriages in the early colonial days. The Puritans had firmly implanted in the social soil of New England the strict Protestant principle that marriage is purely a civil rite. Throughout all New England previous to 1680 the marriage rite was performed by magistrates, or by persons specially empowered by the colonial authorities. Hutchinson supposes that in Massachusetts there was no instance of a marriage by a clergyman during the existence of their first charter-- that is to say, previous to 1684.
It was not until 1692 that the Provincial statute provided the "every Justice of the Peace within the county were he resides, and every settled Minister in any town, shall and are hereby respectively empowered and authorized to solemnize marriages."
[3] Each member of the family of a proprietor or holder of a right in the purchase was regarded as a "head". An unmarried man was "to be looked upon as two heads".
[4] Refers to the tax or rate levied in shillings against every inhabitant by the duly appointed "raters" or "listers".
[5] The "home" lot which each of the "first purchasers" took possession of, and which was charged against him as an advancement.
[6] See sketch of John Harvey, part III, post. for further references to King Philip's or the Narragansett War.
[7] See NEHGR Reg., II.: 245 and 8."

4. Jerry Thayer (hjthayer@aol.com), a family historian of the Thayer Family Association (TFA) [website http://www.thayerfamilies.com, by email dated 3 Jun 2010 provided me the following:

"Unfortunately all of the records for Taunton were burned in a courthouse fire in 1838 and that is why that region is so difficult. The current published records of Taunton are a reconstruction from various sources but are far from complete."

He also provides the following on the Harveys: "Abt 1660 when Nathaniel [Thayer] was 19, he married Abigail HARVEY in (of) Taunton, Bristol, MA. Born on 25 Apr. 1640 in Boston, Suffolk, MA. Abigail died in Taunton, Bristol, MA, on 20 Aug 1691; she was 51. Buried in Summer St. Burying Grd., Taunton, MA. DEATH: Taunton Published Vital Records. Daughter of William HARVEY & Joan HUCKER. Granddaughter of Thomas HARVEY (1614-15 Aug 1658) & Joan COLLER."


5. Jerry Thayer <hjthayer@aol.com>, a family historian of the Thayer Family Association (TFA) [website <http://www.thayerfamilies.com/>], by email dated 26 Jul 2010 provided me the following: "I have not done a lot on the Harvey's as they are not in my direct line. I come from Nathaniel's uncle Thomas Thayer (1596-1665). William Harvey was supposed to be of Dorchester but four of his kids including Abigail were recorded in the Boston Records. I put notes as to his marriage to Joan Hucker in my notes but I really haven't followed the line. If you have problems with it let me know. According to the stuff I have seen the Harvey/Harvie family was from Somersetshire and William and a brother Thomas came to the Colonies in 1636." From Jerry's research notes: "William Harvey was born in Somersetshire, England, about 1614. Accompanied by his brother Thomas he came to America in 1636, and settled at Dorchester. In 1637 he was one of the company of forty-six "first and ancient purchasers," so called, who, "feeling much straitened for want of room," purchased from Massasoit, the chief sachem of the Wampanoag tribe of Indians, whose seat was at Mount Hope, the Indian title to Cohannet, lying thirty-two miles south of Boston, in the colony of New Plymouth. He married 2 Apr. 1639 in Plymouth, Joane Hucker. "At a Court of Assistants William Harvey and Joane Hucker of Cohannet were maryed the 2 of Aprill 1639."


NEHGS Register 46:453-4, Genealogical Gleanings of England:

"Agnes Clarke of Ayshill, Somerset, widow, 20 October 1647, proved 10 May 1648. My body to be buried in the churchyard of Ayshill near unto John Clarke my deceased husband. To the poor of the parish and to the church. I give and bequeath unto William Harvey, the son of Thomas Harvey deceased, my kinsman now in New England, eighteen pounds, being parcel of thirty five pounds which is owing unto me by Richard Parker of Ayshill upon his bond, which sum is to be paid as soon as it can be recovered if he shall come to demand it any time within four years, but if he come not then my will is that William Harvey the son of James Harvey shall have the said money at such time as he shall be of lawful age to give a discharge. I give to the said William son of James Harvey fifteen pounds parcel of the said thirty five pounds, when of age; and my desire is that Richard Harvey, John Witherall and Richard Crabbe shall put it forth to use to the best benefit of the said William Harvey. I give to John Wytherall the elder of Cudworth twenty shillings and to Mary, wife of Francis Moore of Bicknell twenty shillings. I give and bequeath unto William Harvey in New England all my household stuff during his life if he come to claim it, and after his decease to remain in the house to the use of James Harvey, his brother, and the said James to make use of it until William, his brother, shall come to claim it. I give to Ellen Vyle the wife of Robert Vyle the elder of Strotten my best coffer. To the two children of John Vyle of Donniett to each a pewter platter. To William Clarke of Sommerton and to my goddaughter Deanis Nicholls, to each twenty shillings, to be paid them within one year &c. by John Clarke of Donnyett out of the ten pounds he oweth me. The other eight pounds I give to the said John Clarke and Katherine his wife. To my kinswoman Edith Mitchell of Churchstock twenty shillings. To Elizabeth wife of Richard Harvey, Lucrece wife of William Curtis and Deanes Nicholles, my said god daughter, twenty shillings apiece. To Elizabeth Dyke servant of the said Richard Harvey ten shillings. To Deaues Hay ball two shilling six pence and to Anne wife of John Pitman twelve pence. The residue to my kinsman Richard Harvey whom I make sole executor. Essex, 86.

(Savage gives two persons by the name of William Harvey who were then in New England at that time. One was of Boston, and had by wife Joan, children Abigail b. 1640, Thomas b. 1641, Experience b. 1644, and Joseph b. 1646. A person of this name, probably the same, by wife Martha, had children William b. 1651, Thomas b. 1652, and John b. 1653. He died Aug. 15, 1658, and his widow married Henry Tewksbury, Nov. 10, 1659. The other William Harvey was of Plymouth, married Joanna, 1639; removed to Taunton; was rep. 1664 and 13 years after. Query: May not the Plymouth man be the same as the Boston man and the Taunton man be a different person?—Editor.)"


FHL book 929.273 Sn61s "Snow-Estes Ancestry," vol. 2, by Nora E. Snow (Hillburn, NY; 1939), pp. 299-301

[Comment : (by KP) There are many published accounts of the ancestry of William [Harvey], the immigrant, usually based on the “The Harvey Book”; however, this particular [following below] quote - more modern than most by well-respected authors -- properly identifies both the inconclusiveness of the pedigree beyond Thomas of Ashill as well as the lack of verifiable sources that led to the pedigree. The authors did not have the new information which I present in this paper, but did markedly express their reserve in necessarily relying on “The Harvey Book.”]

"WILLIAM, s. Thomas Harvey, b. Somersetshire, England, about 1636, d. Taunton, Mass., 1691; m. Cohonnet, Mass., Apr. 2, 1639, JOANE HUCKER.

Accompanied by his brother, Thomas Harvey, Jr., William Harvey came to America in 1636 and settled at Dorchester. A William Harvey of Langton, Dorchester, Eng., is listed by Rev. John White, of Dorchester, as one of his "adventurers," 1623-1628, to New England, in an "answer" dated Oct. 12, 1634, to recover the value of some salt said to have been seized at Cape Anne by the agents of the "adventurers." He settled at Dorchester, but in 1637 he was one of the company of forty-six "first and ancient purchasers," so called, who, "feeling much straitened for want of room," purchased from Massasoit, the chief sachern of the Wainpanoag tribe of Indians, whose seat was at Mount Hope, the Indian title to Cohonnet, lying thirty-two miles south of Boston, in the colony of New Plymouth. He was the owner of eight shares in the new purchase.

Nov. 8, 1638, the first recorded marriage occurred in the new settlement, and William Harvey's marriage the following Spring was the second, recorded thus on the New Plymouth Court Records: "At a Court of Assistants William Harvey and Joane Hucker of Cohannet were maryed the 2 of April 1639." At that time marriage was quite an undertaking since both parties must travel to the town of Plymouth if inhabitants of Plymouth Colony, or to Boston if inhabitants of Mass. Bay Colony, and have the ceremony performed by the Governor or one of the magistrates.

In the latter part of 1639 or early in 1640, William Harvey and wife removed to Boston, where they remained until 1646; both admitted to the church, 1643; then returned to Taunton, where in 1661 he was Excise Commissioner; 1664, Representative to the General Court, and again in 1677; one of the first Selectmen; Deputy, 1666-7. Apr. 5, 1664, an appraiser of the estate of John Richmond of Taunton. (July 29, 1671, William Harvey witnessed a receipt of John Hedges to his mother, Mary, wife of Peter Pitts, of Taunton. Mayflower Descendant, v. 12:246.) He died in the summer of 1691; tanner.

His grandson, Nathaniel Thayer, Jr. is remembered in his will: "Fifthly to Nath'l Thare Junr I give a parcell of land about two or three acres lying at ye Norwest. from ye meadow which we usually mow at three Mile River." His son, Thomas Harvey, deeded in Sept., 1693, certain land to Nathaniel Thayer, Sr., for the benefit of the children of said Nathaniel and his deceased wife Abigail, who was the sister of Thomas Harvey.

Although the Harvey Genealogy states that his first wife died in 1649, and that he married Martha, sister of Anthony Slocum, this cannot be, as the husband of Martha, died Boston, Aug. 15, 1658; the inventory of his estate was taken Jan. 18, 1658, amount £38. 16, and Apr. 28, 1659, Martha Harvey deposed. (She m (2) Nov 10, 1659, Henry Tewksbury. Issue, HARVEY, were William, b. Aug 27, 1651, Thomas, b. Aug. 16, 1652, John, b Feb 5, 1654, Mary, bapt Aug 2, 1657.) Apr. 29, 1659, "Power of Administration to ye Estate of William Harvy, deceased granted to Martha, his late wife, for her own vse to bring vp her fower young Children."

The will of William Harvey, dated June 12, 1691, reads:

"In ye name of God Amen I William Harvey being grown to a considerable age through ye patience of God, & now being sick & weake in Body though of sound memory & judgemt blessed be God Do make & constitute this my last Will & Testamt
Imp. I Doe Comitt my Soule to ye Lord Jesus Christ my Redeemer in hopes of acceptance thro free Grace & my Body to be Decently buryed by my Exec. in hopes of a joyfull Resurrection through Crhist our Lord. Secondly to my son Thomas Harvey I give ye house & land he lives upon from ye River up to ye Highway, & another parcell at ye higher end of my Land that runneth home to Joseph Willis's Land bounded against my other lands by a small white oake by ye side next ye Cart path & on ye Swampe side by a Tree yt lies along & so home to Joseph Willis's his land also to Thomas I give three score acres of land lying by Three mile River Bridge Also a Lott of Meadow at Scaddins should be about four Acres, also one halfe of my late fifty acre Devision lying Easterly from ye Three Mile River, all sd parcells of Land to be to son sd Thomas Harvey & his heires & Assignes for ever. Thirdly to my son Jonathan the remainder of this my home lott at Towne with ye house thereon & Barne to Jonathan allso all my Land upland & Meadow lying up by Three mile River on ye Easterly side thereof, & a small parcell of Meadow lying by Winnicunnitt ponds, a small quantity of Meadow lying at ye Brooke called Rumford Being with all my shares of Land yt is called ye North purchase Also to Jonathan ye other halfe of my late fifty-acre Devision. Fourthly to ye Children of my son Joseph Harvey Deceased a parcell of Land lying at a place called ye Streights being about eight acres more or less & another parcell of land being about nine acres more or less lying neare a place called ye Wolfe Pitt swampe the Sd parcells to be equally devided among the Children of my sd son Joseph Also the meadow at ye west side of three mile River to ye sd Children of my son Joseph. Fifthly to Nathanl Thare junr I give a parcell of land about or three Acres lying at ye Norwest from yt meadow whither wee usually mow at three mile River. Sixthly my Comon Rights & all future Devisions to be to my two sons Thomas & Jonathan to be equally between them. Seventhly all ye rest of my moveable estate I leave unto my son Jonathan whome I Doe hereby Constitute ye sole Executr of this my last Will & Testamt who is to receive any Debts due to me & to pay what is due from me in Witnesse hereof I ye sd William Harvey have hereunto sett my hand & Seal this twelfth Day of June sixteen hundred ninety one.
WILLIAM HARVEY
Signed & Sealed in presence of us JOSEPH WILLIS, HENRY HODGES, Samuel DANFORTH"

Issue, HARVEY, b. Boston,. Mass.:

1. Abigail, b. Apr. 25, 1640; m. Nathaniel Thayer, Sr.
2. Thomas, b. Dec. 18, 1641, d. 1728.
3. Experience, b. Mar. 4, 1643.
4. Joseph, b. Dec. 8, 1645, d. 1691.
5. Jonathan, b. 1647, d. 1691. [b. in Taunton]

References: Register, v. 2:189; 8:38, 350; 9:346; 61:279. The Mayflower Descendant, v. 28:249. Harvey Genealogy. Society of Colonial Wars, 1897-98, p. 480. Savage, v. 2:370. Pope, pp. 216-7."


"Thirty-one English Emigrants who Came to New England by 1662," by Dorothy C. and Gerald E. Knoff (Baltimore; 1989), pp. 118-123

"William Harvey was born probably in Ashill, Somerset, about 1614. He was the son of Thomas Harvey who died before the 20th of October 1647.(1)

William and his younger brother, Thomas, came to Dorchester, Massachusetts, about 1636. The great emigration to New England under the Massachusetts Bay Charter, which began in 1630 and continued for ten years or more, brought some 20,000 persons into the colony. New plantations were greatly needed. In Dorchester forty-six of the inhabitants decided to seek new land. In 1637 they obtained from Massasoit, Chief Sachem of the Wampanoags, the title of ownership to Cohannet. They became known as the "first and ancient purchasers." William Harvey was one of the original proprietors and owned eight shares in the new purchase.

In 1638 the proprietors left Dorchester to start their new homes in Cohannet. Many of them had come from the town or the vicinity of Taunton in Somerset. "In honor and love of our dear native country..." they changed the Indian name of Cohannet to Taunton on the 3rd of March 1639. Their new plantation was in the Colony of New Plymouth and no longer under the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Bay.

William and Thomas had an older sister whose given name is not known. She was born in Somerset about 1610 and was married in England to Anthony Slocum. They also came to New England about 1636 and it appears that they went to Dorchester, as Anthony was one of the "first and ancient purchasers" of Cohannet. The family lived in Taunton until 1662 when Anthony and a Ralph Russell became the first settlers in another part of the Colony of New Plymouth that was later incorporated as Dartmouth township. Anthony had become a member of the Society of Friends. Children of Anthony and ___ (Harvey) Slocum:

i. Giles, born about 1635 in Somerset, died in Rhode Island in 1682.
ii. Edward
iii. A daughter who married John Gilbert and had four sons, all of Dartmouth.
iv. John, born in Taunton 1642, died there March 1751.
v. ____, a son, born about 1644.(2)

Thomas Harvey was born in Somerset in 1617, the son of Thomas. As stated earlier, he came with his brother, William, to Dorchester, Massachusetts, in 1636. By 1638 he was living in Cohannet. He was not one of the "first and ancient purchasers" as he was not twenty-one years of age at the time of the purchase. He became a "proprietor of Taunton," however, between 1639 and 1642 upon payment of twelve shillings, along with thirteen other men. All, then, received a right in future divisions of land. In 1643 his name was on the list of "all males able to beare Arms from xvj Years old to 60 yeares." In Taunton, there were fifty-four names on this list that year.

Thomas married in Taunton about 1642 Elizabeth Andrews, sister of Henry Andrews. She was born about 1614 in England. Thomas died in Taunton in 1651, aged thirty-four. Elizabeth later married Francis Street and, after his death, married Thomas Lincoln, the miller. She died at Taunton in 1717, aged one hundred and three years. Children of Thomas and Elizabeth (Andrews) Harvey:

i. Thomas was born in 1643 and died in 1726.
ii. William was born in 1645.
iii. John was born in 1647 and died 18 January 1705.(3)

Returning to William Harvey, the second recorded marriage in the new settlement of Cohannet was William's.

"At a Court of Assistants William Harvey and Joane Hucker of Cohannet were married the 2 of April l639."(4)

They moved to Boston that year or early in 1640. Their first four children were born there. The family returned to Taunton in 1646. William's "home lot was on the north side of what is now Cohannet Street, between Taunton Green and Mill River."

William was one of the heirs of "Agnes Clark of Ayshill/Ashill, Somerset, widow." Her will was executed the 20th of October 1647, and proved the 10th of May 1648.

"I give and bequeath unto William Harvey the son of Thomas Harvey deceased, my kinsman now in New England, eighteen pounds, ... if he shall come to demand it at any time within four years;..." (Reg. 1892, vol. XLVI, p. 453).

In Taunton he later became active in town affairs. In 1661 he was Excise Commissioner; in 1644 and 1677 he was a representative to the General Court. In 1665, ‘66, ‘67 and ‘71 he was chosen to be a selectman. In 1672 he was on a committee of seven who purchased from King Philip, son of Massasoit, now Chief Sachem, a deed for a tract of land, "lying three miles along ye Great River" and extending westerly four miles. The cost was 143 pounds.(5)

After nearly forty years of peace, in 1675 the Wampanoags, Naragansetts and other tribes, under the leadership of King Philip, brought war to the settlements. Taunton became the central meeting place for Plymouth and Boston troops. Thus Taunton became a prime target for Indian attacks. Inhabitants of towns on the Cape offered to open their homes to those who wished to leave Taunton until the war was over. In the name of the town of Taunton, William and three other inhabitants wrote a letter declining the offer, however, and asked the Cape inhabitants, "not to cease to pray for us that the Lord would heal our backsliding, and prepare us for what measure of the cup of His indignation it may seem good to Him to order us to drink."

"In March, 1677, ‘William Harvey of Taunton' received 10 pounds from contributions made by ‘Christians in Ireland' for the relief of those impoverished by the late Indian War."

On the part of the town, he was active in land transactions after the war. In 1689 William, Thomas Harvey, Sr., Thomas, Jr., John Poole and others, "proprietors," received a deed of release and confirmation from Major William Bradford after payment of 20 pounds by the town for land that Bradford claimed.

William Harvey died in the summer of 1691, leaving a will dated the 12th of June of that year. He did not mention his wife in the will, so we can assume that she had died before that date.

Children of William and Joan (Hucker) Harvey, the first four born in Boston:

i. Abigail was born 25 April 1640, died at Taunton 20 August 1691, married prior to

1668 Nathaniel Thayer of Taunton. She was buried in Neck-of-Land burial ground at Taunton.(6)

ii. Thomas was born 18 December 1641, died at Taunton in 1728 in the 87th year of his age. He married 10 December 1679 Elizabeth, the daughter of Deacon John Willis and his wife Elizabeth (Hodgkins) of Bridgewater.(7)
iii. Experience was born 4 March 1644, married her cousin, Thomas Harvey (Thomas3, Thomas2, Thomas1). He was born in Taunton about 1643.
iv. Joseph was born 8 December 1645, died in the winter of 1690/91. He married in 1680 Esther, daughter of Richard and Abigail Stacey of Taunton. She died about 1706.(9)
v. Jonathan was born in Taunton about 1647, died before November 1691. He did not marry.(10)

This summary of the Harvey lineage in England needs a word of explanation. My chief source for the foregoing account of the Harvey family has been "The Harvey Book" by Oscar J. Harvey. From Thomas Harvey, the father of the emigrants to Massachusetts, there is firm evidence of descent. For the generations earlier than Thomas, the evidence rests on Mr. Harvey's quotations from "Reminiscences of the Harvey Family," by General Thomas W. Harvey, published in March of 1839. Perhaps the lineage as General Harvey gave it would be of value to a present-day researcher who could find available records that document General Harvey's statements. Until then, Reminiscences may be considered more authentic than tradition, but not on the level with documented proof.

With this caution in mind, I begin the lineage with Humphrey Harvey whose three sons were: Richard of Brockley, his heir; William of Folkestone in Kent; and the youngest, Turner.

Turner was born about 1485. He was, "the mightiest man with the long bow in all England and that at his death there was no man in the country who could spring his bow." This unusual strength brought him to the attention of the king, Henry VIII, who valued his skill very highly. "The date of his death is not known, but it is said that he lived to a great age." Turner had a son, William (Reminiscences, pp. 700-703).

William Harvey was born about 1510. He lived in Somerset. On the 18th of June 1536 he was appointed Blue-mantle Pursuivant in-ordinary, a minor official of the Herald's College. In 1545 he was appointed by Henry VIII to the office of Somerset Herald. In 1550 King Edward VI made him Norroy King-of-Arms. On the 21st of November 1557 he was appointed Clarencieux King-of-Arms by Queen Mary, and remained in that position until his death. He died in Oxfordshire the 27th of February. 1567. Among his children was a son named William.

William Harvey was born in Somerset about 1560. By 1630 he had moved to Bridgewater. His sons were William, Henry and Thomas.

Thomas Harvey lived in Ashill, Somerset, and died in Somerset prior to 1647. He was mentioned in the "will of Agnes Clark of Ayshill [Ashill], Somerset, widow ... Thomas Harvey deceased ..." There are records of four of his children. There may have been others.

Children of Thomas Harvey:

i. (___), a daughter, born about 1610, married in England Anthony Slocum.
ii. James was born about 1612.
iii. William was born about 1614.
iv. Thomas was born in 1617.

The daughter, Mrs. Anthony Slocum, William and Thomas went to the Colony of Massachusetts Bay on or near the date of 1636.

Notes and References:

1. Harvey, Oscar Jewell, The Harvey Book, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, 1899, p. 29.
2. Ibid., p. 27.
3. Ibid., pp. 35-37.
4. Ibid., pp. 29 and 29. Marriage was considered a civil rite in early New England and was performed, not by a clergyman, but by a civil magistrate, or "by a person especially empowered by the colonial authorities." For the ceremony, contracting parties, if inhabitants of Plymouth Colony, traveled to Plymouth# if inhabitants of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, to Boston.
5. Ibid., p. 30.
6. NEHG Reg., vol. II, p. 189.
7. Ibid., vol. II, p. 189. Ibid., vol. XVII, p. 233.
8. Ibid., vol VIII, p. 38. Harvey, O.J., op. cit., pp. 33 and 41.
9. Harvey, O.J., op. cit., p. 33. NEHG Reg., vol. VIII, p. 350.
10. Harvey, O.J., op. cit., p. 33.

See also:

Snow, Nora E., The Snow-Estes Ancestry, volume II, pp. 299, 300, 301.
Torrey, Marriages, p. 350.
Pope's Pioneers, p. 217.
Banks, Topographical Dictionary, p. 138."

The publication "Search for the Passengers of the Mary & John 1630," by Burton W. Spear (Toledo, OH; 1987), vol. 18, pp. 72-74

Author references: "Ancestry of Charles Stinson Pillsbury & John Sargent Pillsbury," by Mary L. Holman, 1938, Vol. 1, pp. 673-677; "The Harvey Book," by Oscar J. Harvey, 1899; "The Snow-Estes Ancestry," by Nora B. Snow and Myrtle Jillson, Vol. 2, 299-301. Note that the author mixes up the spouses of the son Thomas of William and the son Thomas of William's brother Thomas:

"William Harvey - Bapt. 19 Aug. 1610 Ashill, Somerset. D. 1691. He m. Joan Hucken (Hoskin?), 2 Apr. 1639, Taunton. The Harvey Book (p. 34) says Joan d. 1649 and he m. (2) Martha, sister of Anthony Slocum. However, the Snow-Estes Ancestry (p. 300) says that this is not true because her husband, another William Harvey, died, 15 Aug. 1658. The various sources disagree on William's children.

Children (Snow-Estes, p. 301):

a. Abigail Harvey - B. 25 Apr. 1640. She m. Nathaniel Thayer. Several children.
b. Thomas Harvey - B. 18 Dec. 1641. D. ___, 1728. Did he m. Experience Harvey (b. 1644) a. 1668,

Taunton? (Torrey - p. 350). Eight children (1681-1694). (Harvey Book, p.39).

c. Experience Harvey B. 4 Mar. 1644, Bapt. 10 Mar. 1644. Nothing further found.
d. Joseph Harvey B. 8 Dec. 1645. Bapt. 14 Dec. 1645. D. 1691. He m. Est. Stacey. Three children
e. Jonathan Harvey - B. 1647. D. 1691, unmarried. Nothing further found.

(1681-1685). (Harvey Book, p. 40)


FHL book 929.273 P646h "Ancestry of Charles Stinson Pillsbury and John Sargent Pillsbury," by Mary Lovering Holman, 1938, 2 volumes, pp. 673-75

has the following concerning the other William Harvey with whom our Harvey is evidently confused by some authors:

WILLIAM1 HARVEY (?Thomas, Thomas), probably born in Ashill, Somerset, Eng., about 1620, died in Boston, Mass., 15 Aug. 1658. He married in Boston about 1650, MARTHA COPP, born about 1630, possibly died 12 Jan. 1729-30 in Amesbury, Mass., daughter of William Copp. She married secondly in Boston, 10 Nov. 1659, HENRY TEWSKBURY.

There were two William Harveys early in the colonies. One who settled in Taunton and one the above immigrant to Boston. The will of Agnes Clarke of Ashill gives a legacy to William Harvey of New England and this is claimed to be the William of Taunton but a careful study of such records as are to be found in print point to it being William of Boston who came from Ashill.

William Harvey of Taunton was in the colonies as early as 1639 for in that year he married "Joan Hucker of Cohannet." He must have been born about 1605 to 1611. With him in Taunton was his brother Thomas Harvey and his brother-in-law Anthony Slocum. A careful study of the will of Agnes Clarke, the transcripts of Ashill, and the Somerset Marriages indicate that the English ancestry that can be deduced from them belongs to the younger man.

Will of Agnes Clarke of Ayshill, Somerset, widow, 20 Oct. 1637, proved 10 May 1 1648. My body to be buried in the churchyard of Ayshill near unto John Clarke, my deceased husband. To the poor of the parish and to the Church. I give and bequeath unto William Harvey, the son of Thomas Harvey deceast, my kinsman now in New England, eighteen pounds, being parcel of thirty-five pounds which is owing to me by Richard Parker of Ayshill upon his bond, which sum is to be paid as soon as it can be recovered if he shall come to demand it any time within four years but if he come not then my will is that William Harvey the son of James Harvey shall have the said money at such time as he shall be of lawful age to give a discharge. I give to the said Williamson of James Harvey fifteen pounds parcel of the said thirty five pounds when of age; and my desire is that Richard Harvey, John Witherall and Richard Crabbe shall put it forth to use to the best benefit of the said William Harvey. I give to John Wytherall the elder of Cudworth twenty shillings and to Mary, wife of Frances Moore of Bicknell twenty shillings. I give and bequeath unto William Harvey in New England all my household stuff during his life if he come to claim it, and after his decease to remain in the house for the use of James Harvey his brother, and the said James to make use of it until William his brother shall come to claim it. I give to Ellen Vyle the wife of Robert Vyle the elder of Strotten my best coffer. To the two children of John Vyle of Donniett to each a pewter platter. To William Clarke of Sommerton and to my goddaughter Deanis Nicholls, to each twenty shillings, to be paid them within one year by John Clarke of Donnyett out of the ten pounds he oweth me. The other eight pounds I give to the said John Clarke and Katherine his wife. To my kinswoman Edith Mitchell of Churchstock twenty shillings. To Elizabeth wife of Richard Harvey, Lucrece wife of William Curtis and Deanes Nicholles, my said goddaughter, twenty shillings apiece. To Elizabeth Dyke, servant of the said Richard Harvey ten shillings. To Deanes Hayball two shilling six pence and to Anne wife of John Pitman twelve pence. The residue to my kinsman Richard Harvey whom I make sole executor. Essex, 86. (Waters' Genealogical Gleanings in England, p. 645.)

The Transcripts give:

Thomas Harvie was married 17 Feb. 1598.
Anthonie Poole of Whitelackington and Thomazine Harvie the younger.
William Hodges and Bridget Harvie.
Thomas Harvye and Joan Colles, married 22 June 1612.
Agnes, daughter of Thomas Harvye, bapt. 29 Jan. 1598-99.
Thomas Harvye, Church warden, 1605.
Richard Harvey, Church warden, 1606.
(Wells Transcripts, Ashill.)
William Curteis married Lucrece Foxwell, 26 Nov. 1611, Ashill Parish.
(Somerset Marriages, v. 1, Ashill.)

From these scanty records it is seen that there was a family of Harveys in Ashill and from the Will that one of them came to America. It seems scarcely possible that in so careful a will as that of Agnes Clarke with its mentions of many undoubted kin, she would have omitted Thomas Harvey of Taunton and the wife of Anthony Slocum who were the same degree of kinship as William of Taunton would be if he were her relative. Another angle of the case is that William Harvey of Taunton moved to Boston in 1643, being admitted with his wife, Joan, to the First Church in that year. They had born in Boston, (1) Abigail, b. 25 Apr. 1640; (2) Thomas, b. 13 Dec. 1641; (3) Experience, b. 4 Mar. 1643-44; and (4) Joseph, b. 8 Dec. 1645. They then returned to Taunton.

In 1651, the other William Harvey appears with his wife Martha in the records, having four children recorded between 1651 and 1657. From this some writers have made the two Williams into one and given him two wives. There can be no doubt that William of Boston, who married Martha Copp, was the one mentioned by Agnes Clarke and that he came to the colonies from Ashill, Somerset. From such records as are found the following pedigree has been constructed... [Author then provides a pedigree for William of Boston extending back through Thomas and Annis, then Thomas and Joan Collis.]"


"Biographical Notes on Emigrant Ancestors of Thomas Bartlett Sears and Mary Katharine Wellington," by David Ripley Sears, 2nd revised edition 24 Apr. 1991

The following quote is from the above privately published book

[copy in my possession received from Joy (Morgan) Sadler, (KP) "HARVEY, WILLIAM. He married in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts, 2 April 1639, JOANNE HUCKER of Cohasset, Norfolk, Massachusetts. They moved to Boston and by 1647 he was a freeman there. Their daughter ABIGAIL HARVEY was born in Boston 25 April 1640, and married NATHANIEL Thayer, about 1665. Their son ISAAC Thayer married, as his second wife, MARTHA BONNEY, Plympton, Plymouth, Massachusetts, on 5 April 1736."





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Bill, Thank you for putting this together. I have just a few comments: A few years ago I went to the Somerset Family History Society. I was very disappointed to find that, according the librarians there, the records that they have, which are on the FHC microfilm that transcribed on findmypast.com, are incomplete, even for the time periods that are readable. Therefore, I found it difficult to make definitive conclusions about how the Harvey family there fit together. In that regard, I think the analysis in section 3, while very good, may be drawing some conclusions which are actually theories at this point. What has been presented is a story that fits and deserves to be recognized and researched, but is is not not a proof at this point, barring other information.

Thanks also to Kerry.

posted by Michael Hervey