Paddle_to_Australia.jpg

Paddle to Australia

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Date: [unknown]
Location: Eastern Farms-Kissing Point-Ryde, New South Walesmap
Surnames/tags: Patfield O'Brien Australia
Profile manager: Kenneth Evans private message [send private message]
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This page has been created by Ken Evans, a five x great grandson of George and Mary Patfield, to honour them and their Aussie family.

Contents

Paddle to Australia

It is the contribution of folk such as George and Mary who have
forged the heritage that we today call Australia ...
the ‘fair go’ attitude and 'mateship' that blossomed into the ANZAC tradition

Paddle to Australia is the title of a manuscript written by Ken Evans. This space page is a condensed version of that manuscript. It is the contribution of folk such as George and Mary who have forged the heritage that we today call Australia; emancipated convicts, and their children and grandchildren, eeking out an existence from the hostile Australian land, that bred the ‘fair go’ attitude and 'mateship' that blossomed into the ANZAC tradition.

George Patfield (1763-1809)[1] was tried and convicted of theft at Taunton Assizes, Somerset. He is listed on the convict musters of New South Wales in 1800 and 1806. His marriage in 1793 and the births of their children are recorded on the New South Wales registers. However, no George Patfield arrived in New South Wales! A George Paddle disappeared from history after arriving in New South Wales aboard the Neptune [2] in June 1790. George Patfield's accomplice, Thomas Hill, was also aboard the Neptune, dying during the voyage. It is believed that George Paddle is George Patfield, hence Paddle to Australia. Being recognised with agricultural skills, sorely needed in the infant colony, George was promptly taken up-river to Parramatta to work on the government farms.

Mary O'Brien (c1772-1853) [3] entered the (New South Wales) scene from the Bellona [4] on 17th January 1793. The seventeen female convicts were taken that day to the female factory at Parramatta. Convicted of stealing a cotton gown, petticoat, and other goods valued at twenty-two shillings ($2.20) at the Summer Assizes held at Exeter Castle, Devon, on 22nd August 1791, Mary Brien received her sentence: 'To be transported beyond the seas to Botany Bay for seven years.' Also implicated in the crime and appearing at these Assizes were Robert Rowland, and Betty and Mary Thomas who were found guilty of receiving the stolen goods and sentenced to fourteen years of exile. Betty Thomas sailed aboard the Bellona with Mary. Why was this young colleen, Mary, of apparent Irish extraction in Exeter? Who was Robert Rowland and what happened to him? Why would an accomplice even be needed to steal such a small number of items? Mary Brien was sent to London’s Newgate Prison where she remained for eleven months until boarding the Bellona at Debtford, on the River Thames. She had initially been listed for the vastly overcrowded Royal Admiral, which sailed in May 1792.

Marriage: On 19th May 1793, George and Mary were married at Parramatta by Reverend Richard Johnson, according to Church of England (Anglican) rites. Note, that it is incorrect to say they were married in St John's Church as work had not yet commenced on such a building and the name was not declared until 1802. Mary bore George's (and her's) first child in October at the Eastern Farms (now Ryde), New South Wales. Sadly, that little girl died soon afterward, however, was at the centre of a high-profile battle of wits between the acting governor of the colony and the military chaplain. [5] Mary bore a further seven children in the following thirteen years, all of whom survived childhood. In 1795, George was free by servitude, enabling him to apply for and be granted 60 acres of land at the Eastern Farms (now part of the City of Ryde). [6] There, George and Mary lived, farmed, raised their family, and died.

George and Mary are covered in a short biography in Gwen Bruen's 1987 book (out of print), Thank You Mother England: Paul Lutherburrow and Families. [7] If other accounts have been written please let us know. We would like to do all biographical stories of our family justice. Please, if you are a descendant of this remarkable man and his equally remarkable pioneering wife, become connected with more than 1,100 descendant profiles by placing "Category: George Patfield-Mary O'Brien Descendants" on your profile above the line '== Biography =='. Add your family tales on this page as Memories (see below).

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Children of George and Mary Patfield

The nickname given to the children of the early convicts was 'currency lads' or 'currency lasses'. In the early years of the Colony of New South Wales, the term 'currency' was used to refer to any money other than pound sterling, which was the only legal tender. Owing to a shortage of sterling, 'currency' circulated freely, but was not always accepted – the term carried implications of illegality, inferior quality, and subordination. By analogy, native-born colonials came to be known as 'currency', in contrast to the British-born 'sterling'.[8] It was a derogatory term, meant to separate the children of convicts or ex-convicts from those of the so-called respectable classes. In 1832, Horatio Wills, born in Sydney in 1811 to a convict father, founded The Currency Lad; the first newspaper published in the colony which specifically set out to protect the interests of the native-born.[9]

  • Elizabeth (Oct 1793-died in infancy)
  • Ann (1796-1855) married convict William Pincham and, later, Samuel Pearce or Pierce. Settled nearby in the Pennant Hills district.
  • George Patfield (1797-1863 or 1895) married Sarah Small, daughter of First Fleet convicts. Settled at Paterson, in the Hunter Valley.
  • John (1799-1848) bachelor. Remained at Eastern Farms / Kissing Point / Ryde.
  • Elizabeth (1802-70) married John Small, son of First Fleet convicts. Settled at Woodford Island, Clarence River, in the north of New South Wales.
  • Mary (1804-72) married convict, Thomas Brown. Settled in Sydney.
  • Sarah (1805-79) married Joseph Hatton, son of First Fleet convicts. Remained in the Kissing Point / Ryde district.
  • Eliza (1807-) married convict Thomas Balden. Was at Sydney, then Bathurst, then unknown.
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Settlers and Family Life: 1793–1809

The first group of European settlers to form the Eastern Farms (from 1800 known as Kissing Point and from 1840 as Ryde) were nine ex-convicts, allocated land grants by Governor Arthur Phillip in February 1792.

The land was known originally by its Aboriginal caretakers, the Wallumettagal people, as Wallumatta. The name Wallumatta survives in the Wallumatta Nature Reserve, in North Ryde. This author here honours the traditional people of the land and their elders. Colonisation, a system used by societies since the time of Noah's Flood and brought into 'art form' by the European powers, was never right and could only bring anguish for the people dispossessed. Sadly, neither can its effects be undone! There is no evidence that the Patfield family ever brought violence against members of the Wallumettagal people.

Within the next few years the settlement grew with the addition of further land grants to emancipated convicts and free settlers, so much so that in 1800, a need was identified for a school for the children. Although a road existed from the Eastern Farms to Parramatta, the river provided the most practical and economic means of transport with regular services by ‘the Lump’ plying the river between Sydney and Parramatta from as early as 1789.

With the newly formed NSW Corps given full control of the administration of the colony with Governor Philip’s departure in December 1792, a mis-applied sense of power and sheer greed soon took hold. By mid-1793, Major Francis Grose had allotted 15,000 acres, mostly to officers of his Corps. Soldiers and free settlers were granted greater rations than the convicts. The dominant personality in Parramatta was the haughty and proud Lieutenant John Macarthur. The sense of power given him now as a junior officer would haunt the colony for years to come: Commandant of Parramatta, Regimental Paymaster, and Inspector of Public Works.

Reverend Richard Johnson stopped over at the Eastern Farms on his way back to Sydney from conducting worship services at Parramatta, Toongabbie, Prospect Hill and the Ponds, on 13th November 1793. Official records show that he did so specifically to baptise a newborn child. This was George and Mary Patfield’s firstborn, Elizabeth. Sadly, she died shortly afterward; her poor health clearly the reason for the stop-over, rather than the norm of church attendance.

‘Slops’—the name given to the convicts’ clothes—were issued in October 1794. George received a jacket, waistcoat, shirt, hat, and breeches. Mary received a petticoat, shift, stockings, cap, neckerchief, jacket, and hat.

Grose departed the colony in December 1794 to resume a military career that would eventually see him promoted Major General. He left Captain (later Lieutenant Colonel) William Paterson in command of the colony.

On the 27th March 1795, George became a free man by completing his seven-year sentence for theft.

Governors:
Captain John Hunter RN 1795 – 1800
Captain Philip Gidley King RN 1800 – 1806
Captain William Bligh RN 1806 – 1809

Co-inciding with John Hunter’s return to the colony as Governor, New South Wales became self-sufficient in grain with bountiful harvests. It had been a struggle for seven hard years, five of which George Patfield had been present for.

In September 1795, Reverend Samuel Marsden opened the first church building at Parramatta: made from two huts. He consecrated the building St John’s in honour of John Hunter, who was just that month arriving to assume office as the colony’s second Governor.

James Squire,a First Fleeter, sucessfully grew the first hops and brewed the first ale in the colony in 1795 at the Eastern Farms. It was a lucrative enterprise: he quickly became the biggest landholder in the district, acquiring the farms of some fifteen early emancipist settlers.

In December 1796, George would have been reminded of his hellish voyage to Australia when news spread of the arrival of the most notorious hell ship of all, Britannia, under her sadistic master, Thomas Dennott. This voyage was depicted well in the 1970s television mini-series, Against the Wind. As a direct result of this voyage, and to reduce future mortalities, the British government began paying surgeons for the convicts landed safely in the colony, rather than those embarked.

The Patfields received a land grant of sixty acres at the Eastern Farms. The acreage granted was based on Governor Phillip’s formula of a base thirty acres, plus twenty acres as George Patfield was married and an additional ten acres for each child; which indicates that only Ann was alive at the time of the grant (additional confirmation that Elizabeth, referred to above, had indeed passed away). The land is high up on the ridge leading from Ryde towards Eastwood; easily accessible along Blaxland Road which dissects the property to the west of Anzac Avenue. Today, people would pay dearly for the million-dollar views to the south-west over the Parramatta River and Olympic Park. The original grant is today bounded on the north by Lovell Street, Denistone East, on the south by Terry Road, and on the west by Kings Road. They had been living on the land since they married in 1793. They were there when Richard Johnson christened their firstborn daughter, Elizabeth, in the November. They had been living there for more than fifteen years at the time of George’s death in 1809. The date of registration of the grant is 10th April 1798. It would appear that they applied for the grant between Ann’s birth in March 1796 and George’s in October 1797. On 22nd August 1798, Mary completed her sentence for theft and became a free woman. As if to celebrate, young George was baptised at St Phillip’s Sydney ten days later.

In 1797, six schools were operating in the colony under the direction of the two Chaplains, Rev’ds Johnson and Marsden. They were subsidised by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. The following year, missionaries from the London Missionary Society who had been evacuated from Tahiti due to an uprising, went to work as teachers. Rowland Hassall commenced Christian worship services at the Eastern Farms. This led to a building being erected in 1800 for use as chapel, school room, and accommodation for a school master. Matthew Hughes was appointed school master and remained so until 1810, seeing attendance grow from an initial 20 to 50 children. In 1808, Hughes married Mary Small, second child of First Fleeters, John Small and Mary Small nee Parker, also settlers at the Eastern Farms. He would afterwards become brother-in-law to two of the Patfield children, George and Elizabeth, when they married Sarah and John Small respectively. Hughes was succeeded as school master by William Brown, an appointee of Rev’d Marsden. Mary Patfield’s son-in-law’s father, emancipist Paul Lutherborrow, became school master from the mid-1820s, by which time it was known as St Anne’s Parochial School.

By 1800, the population of the colony of New South Wales was 6,000; half of whom were in Sydney whilst the remaining 3,000 were settled at Parramatta, Toongabbie and the Hawkesbury area. There were some thirty families now living at Kissing Point, just five of whom were longer established than the Patfields. A further settlement was established in 1801 at Coal River (Newcastle). It was abandoned in 1802 but re-opened in 1804.

Currency in the colony had been a concern since the beginning. A shortage of coin meant that barter in rum, corn and wheat, promissory notes, and some foreign money were the principal means of exchange. In 1800, Philip Gidley King, the newly-appointed third governor of New South Wales, attempted to alleviate the problem by issuing copper coin at the fixed rate of two pence. The Commissariat paid for goods in negotiable British Treasury bills. But rum was the primary means of exchange, especially for the convicts and settlers. When William Bligh, the fourth governor of New South Wales, issued a regulation in 1807 against the use of rum as currency, the battle lines with the officers of the ‘Rum Corps’ were set.

The Settlers’ Muster 1800 show the Patfields owned three sheep and three pigs. They had 14 acres sown with wheat and 5 acres ready to be sown with maize. Whilst the subsistence farm was providing for George and Mary, they needed to draw rations from the Commissary for their three children. William Esther and Isaac Bartholomew (a Second Fleeter from aboard the Scarborough who was soon after issued a ticket-of-leave, probably on George's recommendation) were assigned as convict servants. Governor King’s Lists for 1801 indicate the Patfields owned 85 acres, 40 of which were cleared and ready for cultivation, 6 sheep, and 12 pigs.

Between 1801 and 1803, Matthew Flinders circumnavigated the continent, proving it was one landmass and not many islands. It was Flinders who suggested the name ‘Australia’ for the continent, from the Latin Terra Australis, or South Land.

Elizabeth Patfield was added to the family at Kissing Point on 6th October 1802, followed by Mary on 5th May 1804, Sarah on 6th December 1805 and Eliza on 6th April 1807. It is quite clear that George and Mary had much respect for Rev’d Johnson and not so for Marsden. Since Johnson left the colony in 1800, none of the younger four daughters were baptised.

The Land and Stock Muster for 1806 show a successful enterprise: 15 acres of wheat; 24 acres of maize; 2 acres of orchard and vegetable garden; 65 acres of pasture; 19 acres fallow; total acreage 125 acres by grant and purchase; one stallion; 75 sheep; two female goats; ten cows. As well as their six children, the Patfields had two assigned convict workers and employed two free men.

Two major events that happened in the life of the young colony were the Irish convict uprising in March 1804 and the rebellion against the Governor by the officers and supporters of the Rum Corps on the twentieth anniversary of the first settlement on 26th January 1808:

  • Irish Convict Uprising: About 300 Irish convicts rioted at Castle Hill and planned to march on Parramatta on 4th March 1804. Nine were killed when troops opened fire on them and six of their leaders were later hanged. A memorial has been erected at the site of the battle at Rouse Hill near Blacktown. There is no evidence that either George or Mary were involved in this uprising in any way.
  • Rum Corps Rebellion: Officers of the NSW Corps illegally removed Bligh from government and established their own brand of government until the arrival of Colonel Lachlan Macquarie in January 1810. The colony was administered in turn by senior officers of the NSW Corps, Major George Johnston (Jan. – Jul. 1808), Major Joseph Foveaux (Jul. 1808 – Jan. 1809), and (now) Lieutenant Colonel William Paterson (Jan. – Dec. 1809). The majority of the emancipated convicts, like George and Mary Patfield, became targets of the greedy NSW Corps, and its supporters, now a law unto itself doing all in its power to monopolise all trade. Settlers could only sell their grain to the officers, who paid them in vastly overpriced rum. Many were forced off their land and back into crime within the main settlements. Retribution was made by the Rum Corps against those small settlers, like the Patfields, who refused to sign a deposition after the event authorising the Corps to remove Bligh from office. Governor Bligh had won much support from the small settlers, sticking up for them and supporting their enterprises against the power of the Corps. The author believes it was as a result of this rebellion, and the control the Corps held over the purchase of crops, that directly led to the untimely death of George Patfield.
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Respectability Finally: Mary’s Life after George (1810–1853)

2019 view from near Patfield property

In the ten years to 1810, the colony’s population doubled to more than 10,000: Sydney 6,000, Parramatta 1,800, Hawkesbury 2,400, and Newcastle 100. About 1,000 were soldiers and some 30% were serving convicts.

The early stages of this era are portrayed well through the works of Jane Austen (Pride & Prejudice and Sense & Sensibility), Ludwig van Beethoven, and Lord Byron (Don Juan); whilst Charles Dickens (Oliver Twist and Great Expectations) admirably describes life in the latter stages.

Governors:
Colonel Lachlan MacQuarie 1810 – 1821

Rev’d William Cowper (not the well-known hymn writer and poet) arrived in the colony in August 1809 with his new bride, Ann (his first wife died shortly before his appointment), and four sons, to take up an appointment as Assistant Chaplain, Sydney. In effect, this meant he became Rector of the newly completed stone St Phillip’s Church. As Cowper retained this position for 49 years, he was the only Rector in this church. It was torn down and replaced by the present building in 1856. In the early months of 1810, upon the appointment of Macquarie as Governor and the downfall of the NSW Corps, Cowper was involved in the re-instatement of Assistant Chaplain Henry Fulton, endorsement of a request by Matthew Hughes for support from government rations, and protested regarding the use of St Phillip’s Church as a courthouse. History indicates that he established a good reputation as a godly man. Ann Cowper resigned as vice-patroness of the Female Orphan School in November 1821, clearly as a statement of disapproval of Commissioner Bigge’s report on the MacQuarie administration. The Cowpers obviously shared a close relationship with Governor and Mrs MacQuarie as their son, William Macquarie Cowper, was a godson of Lachlan MacQuarie. The Cowper family wee prominent family in Sydney life for the next 100 years. Mary allowed twelve year old daughter, Elizabeth, to work as a domestic servant for the Cowpers. Elizabeth is shown as such on the 1814 NSW Muster, and her marriage was conducted by Rev’d Cowper in St Phillip’s Church in 1820.

Ann was the first of Mary's children to marry when she wed William Pincham on 11th June 1812 at St Phillip’s Sydney. At sixteen years of age, too young to make such a commitment by today’s social standard, Ann showed she was ready to settle.

It would have been big news in the colony when word got out that Lawson, Blaxland and Wentworth had discovered a route through the previously impenetrable Blue Mountains to the west of Parramatta in 1813. This meant that rich grazing and agricultural lands would be opened thus ensuring not only the continued provision for the colony, but also prosperity. It had taken 25 years, all but five of which Mary had been present for. As Blaxland was also a Kissing Point settler, locals would be sure to say ‘well done’ when they saw him about.

The first grandchild for Mary arrived on 10th April 1814 when Ann gave birth to Mary Ann Pincham. Mary Ann would live to see Australia become a nation in 1901.

George (23) and Elizabeth (18) married the Small siblings in a double wedding ceremony on 31st October in St Phillip’s Sydney. Sarah and John were children of emancipated Kissing Point settlers, John and Mary Small.

There were many sad faces in the colony in 1821 when, arguably New South Wales’ greatest governor, Lachlan MacQuarie departed for England. He had overseen the growth of Sydney Town from bare penal settlement to young 'city', opened millions of acres to agricultural pursuit, and established regional towns in strategic centres (the five Macquarie towns (Castlereagh, Evan, Windsor, Wilberforce & Richmond) and Bathurst, joined those already established in Sydney (including Annandale, Liberty Plains & Kingsgrove), Parramatta (including Kissing Point, Field of Mars, Toongabbie, Prospect & Castle Hill), Liverpool (including Bringelly, Cook, Minto, Airds, Appin & Cabramatta), and Newcastle).

Governors:
Major General Sir Thomas Brisbane 1821 – 1825
Lieutenant General Ralph Darling 1825 – 1831

By 1821, the population of New South Wales grew to 24,000. Of these: 1,300 had came free, 1,500 were born in the colony, 3,500 were free by servitude or pardoned, 1,400 had tickets-of-leave, 9,500 were serving convicts; and almost 5,700 were children. Whilst still a penal colony, that fact was beginning to be less obvious.

Two further Patfield weddings were celebrated in 1822 when eighteen year-old Mary married Thomas Brown in St Phillip’s Church on 27th July and Eliza (fifteen years of age) married Thomas Balden four days later in St John’s Parramatta. Thomas Brown was a convict bricklayer in Sydney where Mary and he made their home. He had arrived in the colony in 1818. Thomas Balden had arrived in the colony in 1818 on a 14 year sentence. The final wedding was on 22nd September 1824 in St Phillip’s Church when Elizabeth married Joseph Hatton, son of emancipated First Fleeters and Kissing Point farming neighbours.

As Mary sailed down the Parramatta River towards Sydney on occasion, such as for her children’s marriages, she would look directly down harbour at the imposing lighthouse at South Head. Once in Sydney town, I am sure she would have admired the beautiful buildings starting to dot the landscape: such as the Governor’s House and Government House stables, now the Conservatorium of Music, opened in 1817. If she ever ventured beyond the Botanic Gardens and Government Domain to the south, Mary would have admired the grandeur of the new three two-storey colonnaded hospital, open and airy prisoners’ barracks that could accommodate hundreds, unadorned brick St James’ (Anglican) Church, and new court house in what would become Macquarie Street? Beyond these, St Mary’s (Catholic) Cathedral would later be built. To the west, just beyond her familiar sandstone St Philip’s Church with its tower clock and peal of eight bells, stood the gothic Scots (Presbyterian) Church from 1824. From 1827, when perpetual leases were introduced, Sydney would start to see the construction of many two-storey homes, and terrace houses.

Governors:
Major General Sir Richard Bourke 1831 – 1837
Major Sir George Gipps 1838 – 1846

From 1831, more efficient river transport appeared when the steam packet, The Surprize, began service between Sydney and Parramatta. When the Church of England (Anglican) opened its King’s Schools in 1832 in Sydney and Parramatta for the “sons of wealthy colonists”, Governor Bourke protested: “… whilst the children of the poor are educated in mere hovels under convict school masters.” It is easy for us today to disassociate districts like Ryde and Pennant Hills from the scourge of bushrangers. But during Mary’s lifetime such criminals were a real threat. Mary’s grandson-in-law, Samuel Holloway was convicted of aiding bushrangers in the area in 1836 and transported to Norfolk Island, where he died. Her grand-daughter always claimed that Samuel was merely a caring soul who couldn't see anyone go without the basic necessities.

Major celebrations were held in Sydney and the outlying towns in 1837 upon the coronation of the teenage queen, Victoria. A new era was beginning, the era of the British Empire and the Victorian Age.

Imagine Mary’s rejoicing when she heard, in 1840, that convict transportation to New South Wales had ceased. Towards the end of her life, in 1850, Mary would also hear that the University of Sydney had opened. Would her grandchildren’s children get to attend?

Governors:
Lieutenant Colonel Sir Charles FitzRoy 1846 – 1855

The last piece of outstanding news Mary received regards the development of her adopted country was the discovery of gold. From 1850, gold rushes appeared to spring up all over the place, from several sites around Bathurst on the western side of the Blue Mountains to far away places like Ballarat and Bendigo. The discovery of gold would change the culture of her country forever. Wealth would be generated for the government as never before. In what had been primarily an agricultural society for decades, people walked off the land to ‘strike it rich’; causing farmers to fence their properties, where once it was more economical to hire shepherds. Indeed, until 1838 most settlers received assigned convicts. Sheep would now be raised more for meat more than for their wool. The population of the Australian settlements had doubled in the decade to 1830 to 70,000, more than doubled again in the 1830s, and from 190,000 to more than 400,000 by 1850. Then the immigration boom began in earnest with the gold rushes! Education, health services, coach and rail to transport both produce and people increased dramatically.

Even the rural settlement of which Mary was an integral part for almost fifty years grew into a village and then the Municipality of Ryde from around 1840. Gregory Blaxland, the explorer who with William Wentworth and William Lawson found a way across the Blue Mountains in 1813, bought the Patfield land and built a house upon it for his son, John ‘the Hermit’ Blaxland. ‘The Hermitage’ still stands as part of the CSIRO Division of Wool Research at the corner of Blaxland Road and Anzac Avenue. Blaxland lived in the area from 1806, from when he purchased ‘Brush Farm’. In 1829, he transferred his 450 acre estate to his eldest daughter and her husband, Elizabeth and Dr Thomas Forster. Forster renamed the estate ‘Denistone House’ after his English place of birth. The hill to the east of ‘Brush Farm’ was purchased in 1835 by Forster’s brother-in-law, William Rutledge, who called his estate ‘Eastwood’. His single storey homestead became St Kevin’s Presbytery and today is part of the Marist Brothers’ school. ‘The Hermitage’, ‘Brush Farm’, ‘Ryedale House’ (now the rectory of St Columb’s Church), ‘Willandra’ (or ‘Ryde House’), ‘Eastwood House’ (St Kevin’s Presbytery), and Ryde Police Station were all built in Mary’s lifetime, as was the present stone, St Anne’s Church, albeit without its tower which was not built until three years after Mary’s death.

Mary continued to live in the region of Ryde and was listed as living in Hunters Hill as an octogenarian at the time of her death.

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Family connections

To date, the family of George Patfield-Mary O'Brien extends to more than 200 surnames, in addition to Patfield. They are listed here with links to the profile of the young lady whose marriage introduced the new name.

A
Clara Alphick nee Pollard
Emma Anderson nee Hatton
Mabel Alwin nee Cochrane
B
Adelaide Bailey nee Keogh
Eliza Balden nee Patfield
Mary Bannerman nee Pincham
Alice Bark nee Hatton
Lucy Barker nee Lutherborrow
Jane Beaumont nee Pincham
Minnie Beck nee Pincham
Clara Bellamy nee Lutherborrow
Sarah Benson nee Hatton
Eunice Boldt nee Evans
Emily Borig nee Hammond
Carol Boros nee Sheppeard
Ellen Bowrey nee Hickson
Braithwaite nee Keogh
Bridle nee Powell
Mary Brown nee Patfield
Gweneth Bruen nee Evans
Emily Bull nee Small
Nellie Burns nee Hammond
Emily Burrois nee Small
C
Edith Campbell nee Hatton
Mary Campbell nee Small
Nina Carlaw nee Hickson
Jane Carmichael nee Pincham
Florence Carney nee Hatton
Henrietta Cochrane nee Seller
Emma Cocksedge nee Pearce
Amy Collins nee Lutherborrow
Isabella Connolly nee Powell
Charlotte Cook nee Patfield
Rosemary Conway nee Bruen
Valerie Corbett nee Evans
Emily Corcoran nee Small
May Cornford nee Benson
Marion Cornwell nee Powell
Eliza Cowper nee Small
Cornelia Cree nee Pincham
D
Florence Davey nee Lutherborrow
Mabel Davidson nee Cochrane
Gwendoline Davis nee Powell
Harriett Davis nee Hatton
Minnie Davis nee Hatton
Helen Doherty nee Hickson
Theresa Douglas nee Inwood
Mary Dowdall nee Hatton
Ann Duffield nee Pincham
Mildred Duck nee Hughes
E
Barbara Eagles nee Evans
Alice Edman nee Foley
Emma Evans nee Hatton
Ruby Evans nee Hammond
Jessie Eyles nee Duffield
F
Leah Fahey nee Small
Louisa Fairbrother nee Lutherborrow
Lucy Farmer nee Duffield
Emma Flynn nee O’Neill
Alice Foley nee Shaw
Laura Fraser nee Seller
Kerri Fyfe nee Evans
G
Beryl Gearing nee White
Mary Geyer nee Jeacocke
Jane Gilbert nee Pincham
Marcia Graham nee Small
Mildred Gregory nee Duffield
Ada Greentree nee Cowper
Isabella Grime nee Small
Winifred Grimson nee Lutherborrow
Eliza Gruer nee Powell
Minnie Gunn nee O’Neill
H
Glenys Hambleton nee Evans
Marion Hamilton nee Powell
Violette Hammond nee Lutherborrow
Harriet Hardy nee Hickson
Nellie Harrop nee Hughes
Gladys Hartman nee Pincham
Mary Harvey nee Small
Sarah Hatton nee Patfield
Matilda Havinden nee Small
Ann Hickson nee Hatton
Mary Holloway nee Pincham
Norma Holtebaum nee Johnson
Henrietta Hough nee Cowper
Harriett Howard nee Small
Emma Hughes nee Hatton
I
Harriet Inwood nee Holloway
J
Mary Anne Jardine nee Pearce
Edith Jay nee Inwood
Eliza Jeacocke nee Duffield
Jenna Jenkins nee Eagles
Alice Johnson nee Powell
Anne Johnson nee Small
Frances Johnston nee Keogh
Sylvia Johnston nee Hughes
Mary Jordan nee Lutherborrow
Tammy Jordan nee Evans
K
Alice Kemp nee Small
Mona Kenny nee Cowper
Clarice Kenyon nee Powell
Rebecca Keogh nee Small
Doris Kidd nee Lutherborrow
Janet King nee McDonald
Amy Kingsbury nee Jeacocke
Clare Kristensen nee Corbett
L
Ivy Lake nee Patfield
Ellen Leayr nee Patfield
Fanny Lee nee Small
Dulcie Leonard nee Hammond
Yvonne Lewington nee Grimson
Helena Lionel nee Bark
Ada Locke nee Pincham
Jane Long nee Pincham
Mary Lutherborrow nee Pincham
M
Margaret McDonald nee Small
Mary McFadden nee Seller
Florence McIntyre nee Powell
Elsie McKendry nee Barker
Gwen McLaughlin nee Corbett
Elizabeth McPherson nee Shaw
Sarah McPherson nee Shaw
Emma Maher nee Fairbrother
Ada Martin nee Pollard
Vera Matthews nee Carmichael
Ada Mawson nee Hatton
Sarah Menmuir nee Hatton
Gwendolen Moore nee Hatton
N
Coral Newman nee Pincham
O
Mary O’Brien nee Shaw
Anne O'Connor nee Corbett
Mary O’Neill nee Keogh
Rose O’Neill nee Anderson
P
Emily Parnell nee Small
Sarah Hatton nee Patfield
Rita Peach nee Johnson
Ethel Pearce nee Hatton
Dorothy Peebles nee Hammond
Sarah Petersen nee Hatton
Catherine Phelps nee Keogh
Ann Pincham nee Patfield
Stella Pierce nee Pincham
Ann Pincham nee Patfield
Elizabeth Pinfold nee Shaw
Emma Pitt nee Rayner
Jane Pollard nee Lutherborrow
Mary Powell nee Cowper
Mary Powell nee Small
Ena Price nee Small
Ethel Punch nee Hickson
R
Sarah Rayner nee Pincham
Ada Reeves nee Powell
Pearl Rhodes nee Rayner
Rosanna Rhodes nee Rayner
Jean Robinson nee Powell
Eliza Robson nee Powell
Vera Robson nee Powell
Alice Ross nee Hickson
S
Ellen Schofield nee Carney
Ada Smidt nee Powell
Gwendoline Schwinghammer nee Greentree
Harriet Seller nee Small
Mary Shaw nee Johnson
Mary Shaw nee Patfield
Gwendoline Sheppeard nee Lutherborrow
Ada Sims nee Hatton
Elizabeth Small nee Patfield
Isabella Small nee Powell
Alice Smith nee Hickson
Hannah Smith nee Holloway
Emma Smith nee Dowdall
Jane Smith nee Pincham
Lydia Smith nee Patfield
Susannah Smith nee Patfield
Wendy Smyth OAM PhD nee Bruen
South nee Small
Laura Sproule nee Inwood
Clara Stephens nee Powell
Alma Strong nee Rose
Emily Studdert nee Patfield
T
Clara Tait nee Pearce
Zerada Taylor nee Patfield
Annie Thompson nee Pollard
Cassie Timbrell nee MacPherson
Amelia Torrance nee Pincham
Trimble nee Bailey
Victoria Tucker nee Patfield
V
Mabel Vasyli nee Hatton
Ivy Vost nee Pincham
W
Lydia Wade nee Patfield
Doris Wheatley nee Pincham
Lilian White nee Lutherborrow
Eunice Wilkinson nee Evans
Mary Williams nee Hatton
Kay Wilson nee Leonard
Jessie Woodcock nee Jeacocke
Emily Wright nee Patfield
Sarah Wright nee Pincham
Z
Clara Zeller nee Pearce
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Military Service Roll of Honour

Below is a list of each George Patfield-Mary O'Brien descendant, some 125, who has served in the Australian Defence Force. Further research is bound to produce even more folk. There must be photos out there; just a matter of locating them.

Photo Name Relationship to George & Mary War/s Event/s Unit/s
N176511 Private Wallace Sydney Butler (1914-) great x 4 grandson Second World War - 20th Employment Company, Australian Army
NX54490 Private Keith Archibald Carmichael (1916-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 2/1st Machine Gun Battalion, Second Australian Imperial Force
412391 Flight Lieutenant Reginald Carmichael (1918-43) great x 3 grandson Second World War KIA No. 467 Squadron Royal Australian Air Force
4352 Private Patrick Alfred Carney (1896-1972) great x 2 grandson First World War - 30th Infantry Battalion, AIF
3009 Private Pope Vincent 'Vince' Carney (1898-1968) great x 2 grandson First World War - 38th Infantry Battalion, AIF
NX193797 Private Ernest Collins (1910-67) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 9th Infantry Battalion, Australian Army
NX140670 Signalman Allan Cocksedge (1913-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 18th Line of Communication, Second Australian Imperial Force
NX4067 Signalman Charles Eric Cocksedge (1909-51) great x 3 grandson Second World War - Australian Signals Centre Training Battalion, Second Australian Imperial Force
NF392291 Sergeant Millicent Elsie Rose Cocksedge (1906-78) great x 3 granddaughter Second World War - Australian Women’s Army Service
NX7444 (NX200182) Signalman Reginald George Henry Cocksedge (1910-73) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 28th Line of Communication, Second Australian Imperial Force
WX2101 (22045) Sergeant Walter David Cocksedge (1913-60) great x 3 grandson Second World War POW6th Corps of Signals, Second Australian Imperial Force
NFX152966 Corporal Gweneth Violet Evans (1922-2010) great x 4 granddaughter Second World War - Royal Army Medical Women’s Service Japan
NX966 Sergeant Herbert Arthur Evans (1919-2002) great x 4 grandson Second World War - 2/1st Infantry Battalion, Second Australian Imperial Force
1205173 Bombardier Kenneth John Evans (1955-) great x 5 grandson peace - Royal Australian Artillery
NX164710 Private Edward James Eyles (1913-79) great x 3 grandson Second World War - Headquarters New Guinea Force
NX90760 Corporal Sidney Walter Eyles (1908-85) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 2nd Field Artillery Training Regiment, Second Australian Imperial Force
NX136915 Gunner Albert Raymond Fairbrother (1914-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 13th Field Regiment, Second Australian Imperial Force
Leading Aircraftman Ralph Maurice Farmer (1917-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 5 Operational Training Unit, Royal Australian Air Force
NX67855 Lieutenant Thomas Russell Hamilton (1913-) great x 2 grandson Second World War - 204 Tulip Force, Second Australian Imperial Force
NX49701 Private and 22778 Sapper Gerald Northrop Hammond (1919-90) great x 4 grandson Second World War; Korean War - Second Australian Imperial Force; Australian Ancilliary Unit Korea
NX25814 Private Henry George Hammond (1911-43) great x 3 grandson Second World War died as POW 2/18th Infantry Battalion and 1st Field Bakery, Second Australian Imperial Force
NX37011 Corporal Lindsay Worthing Hammond (1920-73) great x 4 grandson Second World War - Second Australian Imperial Force
QX20419 Private Wallace Oliver Hammond (1921-) great x 4 grandson Second World War - Second Australian Imperial Force
N270933 Private William Joseph Hammond MM (1893-1965) great x 3 grandson First World War; Second World War - 6th Light Horse and 4th Machine Gun Bn, AIF; Australian Army Medical Corps
64059 Leading Aircraftman Cyril Ernest Harding (1924-44) great x 3 grandson Second World War killed during training 5 Operational Training Unit, Royal Australian Air Force
NX50027 (N52134) Corporal John Andrew Harrop (1918-84) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 2/1st Mechanical Equipment Company, Second Australian Imperial Force
492 Shoeing Smith George Joseph Hatton (1870-1939) great grandson Second Boer War - 1st New South Wales Mounted Rifles
1111 Private Oscar Alfred Hatton (1888-1948) great grandson First World War - 3rd Infantry Battalion, AIF
3733 Private Sydney Clifford Hatton (1890-1966) great grandson First World War - 20th Infantry Battalion, AIF
N280967 Private Sydney Clifford Hatton (1890-1966) great grandson Second World War - Eastern Command Signals Training Depot, Australian Army
116 Trooper William Hatton (1880-) great grandson Second Boer War - 5th Battalion Commonwealth Light Horse
N275180 Private George Kendle Hickson (1914-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 7th Motor Regiment, Australian Army
NX23920 Private Henry Joseph Hatton Hickson (1914-45) great x 3 grandson Second World War KIA 2/19th Transport Platoon, Second Australian Imperial Force
161385 Leading Aircraftman Robert Henry Hickson (1926-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - Royal Australian Air Force
6568 Private Reginald Lester Hough (1891-1969) great x 2 grandson First World War - 19th Infantry Battalion, AIF
N191931 Private James William Inwood (1908-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 17th Works Company, Australian Army
V372210 Private and 126578 Leading Aircraftman Alfred George Jeacocke (1903-53) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 17th Battalion, Volunteer Defence Corps; 1 Operational Training Unit, Royal Australian Air Force
VX73687 Lieutenant Charles Keith Johnson (1904-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - Australia New Guinea Administration Unit
Q221682 Private William Ernest Johnson (1903-65) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 18th Battalion, Volunteer Defence Corps
QX40451 Private Reginald Lindsay Jordan (1910-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 3rd Armoured Corps Ordnance Field Park, Second Australian Imperial Force
QX10737 Private Vivian Byron Jordan (1907-88) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 2/25th Infantry Battalion, Second Australian Imperial Force
NX112957 (N232814) Captain John William Kemp (1917-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - Second Australian Imperial Force
N248462 Private Percy Gerald Kenny (1910-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 52nd Composite Anti Aircraft Regiment, Australian Army
2045 Driver Valentine John Keogh (1897-) great x 2 grandson First World War - 5th Division Ammunition Column, AIF
N335136 Signalman Victor Robert Lake (1924-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 13th Division SICT Section, Australian Army
159753 Leading Aircraftman Raymond Henry Layton (1916-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - Royal Australian Air Force
151926 Leading Aircraftman Noel Edward Liekefett (1925-2007) great x 4 grandson Second World War - Royal Australian Air Force
21340 Warrant Officer Eric Clarence Thomas Long (1907-63) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 6 Aircraft Depot, Royal Australian Air Force
5701 Private and 133 Lance Corporal Allan John Lutherborrow DCM (1896-1963) great x 3 grandson First World War; Russian Relief Force - 7th Infantry Battalion, AIF and 45th Battalion Royal Fusiliers
NX168545 Private Edgar Lutherborrow (1914-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 2/17th Infantry Battalion, Second Australian Imperial Force
6037 Corporal and N105963 Sergeant Israel Robert Leet Lutherborrow (1890-1967) great x 3 grandson First World War; Second World War - 4th Infantry Battalion, Australian Imperial Force; Camp Staff Show Ground, Australian Army
NX6911 Gunner and 412557 Corporal James Lutherborrow (1921-) great x 4 grandson Second World War - 2/15th Field Regiment, Second Australian Imperial Force and No.13 Aircraft Repair Depot, Royal Australian Air Force
NX95251 Bombardier Kelvin Lyle Lutherborrow (1916-2003) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 5th Survey Battery, Second Australian Imperial Force
NX29346 Sapper Laurence Max Lutherborrow (1906-68) great x 3 grandson Second World War POW 2/12th Field Company, Second Australian Imperial Force
70397 Leading Aircraftman Max Hilton Lutherborrow (1924-2011) great x 4 grandson Second World War - 2 Embarkation Unit, Royal Australian Air Force
N52119 Sapper Norman Edmund Lutherborrow (1917-87) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 14th Field Company, Australian Army
NX3237 Sergeant Robert Fredrick Lutherborrow (1917-87) great x 4 grandson Second World War - 2/1st Australian Convalescent Depot, Second Australian Imperial Force
NX110231 Lance Corporal Sidney John Robert Lutherborrow (1912-87) great x 4 grandson Second World War - 20th Employment Company, Second Australian Imperial Force
N456914 Corporal Wyatt Alexander Martin (1906-85) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 1st Movement Control Unit, Australian Army
4532 Private Ernest McCully (1893-1944) great x 2 grandson First World War - Machine Gun Details, AIF
N212024 Craftsman Archibald McGregor McDonald (1909-88) great x 2 grandson Second World War - 244th Light Aid Detachment, Australian Army
3341 Sergeant James McCully (1882-1945) great x 2 grandson First World War - 12th Infantry Battalion, AIF; 52nd Infantry Battalion, AIF
N154894 Private Alfred Bell Patfield (1913-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 32nd Battalion, Volunteer Defence Corps
W62256 Private Alfred Samuel Patfield (1884-1961) great x 2 grandson Second World War - 29th Garrison Battalion, Australian Army
N228050 Private Alfred William Patfield (1922-71) great x 2 grandson Second World War -
N437332 Sapper Beverley Norman Patfield (1924-86) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 2/7th Field Company, Australian Army
Q42467 Private Claremont Lawton Patfield (1909-61) great x 2 grandson Second World War - 49th Infantry Battalion, Australian Army
N441907 Private Claremont Lawton Patfield (1909-61) great x 2 grandson Second World War - 22nd Battalion, Volunteer Defence Corps
W9140 Sapper Ernest Alfred Patfield (1909-79) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 7th Transport Company, Australian Army
NX98888 Private Frank Herbert Patfield (1907-) great x 2 grandson Second World War - Second Australian Imperial Force
1985 Private George Frederick Patfield (-) - First World War - 11th Field Ambulance, AIF
782 Corporal Harry Manning Patfield (1893-1961) great x 2 grandson First World War - 2nd Infantry Battalion, AIF
84663 Leading Aircraftmen Hector Cecil Patfield (1926-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - Royal Australian Air Force
WX20096 Private John Matthew Patfield (1923-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 2/28th Infantry Battalion, Second Australian Imperial Force
N445670 Private John Thomas Patfield (1900-76) great x 2 grandson Second World War - 2nd Australian Camp Hospital, Australian Army
1736 Private Joseph Patfield (1870-1961) great grandson First World War - 15th Infantry Battalion AIF; 47th Infantry Battalion, AIF
N470252 Private Leslie Parkinson Patfield (1913-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - Volunteer Defence Corps
74232 Corporal Ronald Patfield (1924-) great x 2 grandson Second World War - 104 Fighter Control Unit, Royal Australian Air Force
Private Walter James Claremont Patfield (1890-1962) great x 2 grandson First World War - Australian Imperial Force
52796 Private William Patfield (1868-) great grandson First World War - Australian Imperial Force
1875 Private William David Patfield (-) - First World War - 16th Infantry Battalion, AIF
N459841 Private Frederick Arthur Phelps (1909-) great x 2 grandson Second World War - 1st Battalion, Volunteer Defence Corps
N452941 Gunner Arthur Frederick Pincham (1925-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 1st Heavy Anti Aircraft Battery, Australian Army
1820 Lance Corporal Claude Vincent Pincham (1895-1988) great x 2 grandson First World War - Signals Engineer Detail, AIF
20340 Sapper Cyril Archibald Neil Pincham (1897-c1992) great x 2 grandson First World War - 1st Signals Squadron, AIF
NX5387 Lance Corporal Douglas Teale Pincham (1915-87) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 2/3rd Infantry Battalion, Second Australian Imperial Force
98646 Corporal Jenny Sarah Pincham (1917-) great x 3 granddaughter Second World War - 3 Aircraft Depot Amberley, Women's Royal Australian Air Force
3511 Private John William Pincham (1899-1957) great x 2 grandson First World War - 14th Light Horse Regiment, AIF
N270316 Corporal John William Pincham (1899-1957) great x 2 grandson Second World War - Engineer Training Depot, Australian Army
NX50410 Private Leslie Roy Pincham (1918-74) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 2/3rd Pioneer Battalion, Second Australian Imperial Force
N348637 Private Norman Bruce Pincham (1913-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 25th Battalion, Volunteer Defence Corps
NX41460 Private Norman Keith Pincham (1916-76) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 7th Military District AASC HQ; 2/3rd Pioneer Battalion, Second Australian Imperial Force
S2256 Able Seaman Thomas George Pincham (1914-84) great x 3 grandson Second World War - Royal Australian Navy
N353781 Lance Corporal William Ernest Pincham (1893-1976) great x 2 grandson Second World War - 25th Battalion, Volunteer Defence Corps
130509 Leading Aircraftman Frederick Thomas Pollard (-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - Royal Australian Air Force
N438945 Lance Corporal Darcy Spellman Cowper Powell (1897-1982) great x 2 grandson Second World War - 1st Battalion, Volunteer Defence Corps
73324 Leading Aircraftman Frederick Pratley (1923-44) great x 3 grandson Second World War died of illness No.2 Operational Training Unit, Royal Australian Air Force
NX194318 Sapper Wyatt Frank Pratley (1923-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 3rd Australian Welding Platoon, Australian Engineers
133230 Leading Aircraftman Clifford Alan Rayner (1912-68) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 11 Repair & Servicing Unit, Royal Australian Air Force
N30169 Warrant Officer Class II Clifford Henry Rayner (-) - Second World War - 20th Infantry Battalion, Australian Army
NFX Captain Enid Susannah Rayner (1905-85) great x 3 granddaughter Second World War - 2/3rd Casualty Clearing Station, Australian Army Nursing Service
68187 Leading Aircraftman Reginald Maxwell Rayner (1914-78) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 2 Aircraft Depot, Royal Australian Air Force
403379 Flight Lieutenant Harold Ellis Rothwell (1918-92) great x 4 grandson Second World War - No.5 Operational Training Unit, Royal Australian Air Force
NX92166 Private Clarence Herbert Seller (1907-74) great x 2 grandson Second World War - Second Australian Imperial Force
NGX438 Warrant Officer Class II Frank Reginald Shaw (1908-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - Australian New Guinea Administration Unit
799 Sergeant 2nd Class John Frederick Shaw (1896-65) great x 3 grandson Second World War - Royal Australian Navy
NX98039 Signalman Raymond Cecil Sims (1923-88) great x 2 grandson Second World War - Second Australian Imperial Force
36536 Private Barton Harold Small (1890-1979) great x 2 grandson First World War - 11th Field Artillery Brigade, AIF
N9494 Trooper Clive Frank Small (1915-76) great x 2 grandson Second World War - 2nd Armoured Regiment, Australian Army
134775 Leading Aircraftman Colin Campbell Small (1913-) great x 2 grandson Second World War - Royal Australian Air Force
N464791 (N299344) Sapper Cyril Joseph Small (1918-) great x 2 grandson Second World War - Royal Australian Engineers, Australian Army
64854 Leading Aircraftman Frank Neville Small (1907-) great x 2 grandson Second World War - No.7 Aircraft Depot Tocumwal, Royal Australian Air Force
NX16211 Gunner Geoffrey Barton Small (1918-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 2/3rd Light Anti Aircraft Battery, Second Australian Imperial Force
NX59208 Captain James Stanley Small (1904-) great x 2 grandson Second World War - Australian Army Education Service
N176718 Private John Lindsay Campbell Small (1897-1962) great x 2 grandson Second World War - 11th Battalion, Volunteer Defence Corps
31166 Gunner Keith Campbell Small (1896-1917) great x 2 grandson First World War KIA Field Artillery Brigade, AIF
5822 Private Arthur Smith (1894-1917) great x 2 grandson First World War KIA 22nd Infantry Battalion, AIF
NX169282 (N175582) Craftsman Harry Sprowles (1922-) great x 4 grandson Second World War - 113th Brigade Workshops, Second Australian Imperial Force
73071 Sergeant Charles Frederick Stephens (1910-) great x 2 grandson Second World War - 6 Wireless Unit, Royal Australian Air Force
N303013 Lance Corporal Archie Gladstone Thompson (1899-1969) great x 2 grandson Second World War - 251st Light Aid Detachment, Australian Army
N274902 Private William Victor Tucker (1905-79) great x 2 grandson Second World War - Eastern Command Provost Company, Australian Army
NX138092 Private Cecil George White (-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - 2/2nd Guard Battalion, Second Australian Imperial Force
Warrant Officer Class II Laurence Wilkinson (1953-) great x 5 grandson peace - Royal Australian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers
21716 Pilot Officer Edward Lawrence Wright (1914-) great x 3 grandson Second World War - Royal Australian Air Force
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Notable family members

  • Elizabeth Small nee Patfield (1802-70) was the pioneering matriarch of the immense Small family of Woodford Island, Clarence River. Of all the Patfield children, Elizabeth travelled furtherest from her family and 'civilisation', raising a family of 11 children. She knew the heartache of losing two of her babies. Isolation was her norm, Maclean only being laid out as a town eight years before her demise. She was survived by her husband, nine children and 40 grandchildren.
  • Bill Hammond MM (1893-1965) was an ANZAC who served through The Great War as a member of both the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force and the Australian Imperial Force. He served at New Guinea, Gallipoli and the Western Front; being awarded the Military Medal (MM) for gallantry. During the Second World War, he served in a Convalescent Depot.
  • Fitzroy Jardine MSc BA (1896-1964) was a pilot in the Royal Air Force during The Great War. He became the longest-serving headmaster of Rockhampton Grammar School and had a significant influence on education in Central Queensland. His extensive ethnographic collection from the Rockhampton and Fitzroy region, as well as the Torres Strait Islands, the North Queensland rainforests, Central Australia, the Territory of Papua and New Guinea, and the Pacific Islands is held by the Dreamtime Cultural Centre, Rockhampton.
  • Alan Lutherborrow DCM (1896-1963) was an ANZAC who served on the Western Front during The Great War before, following the Armistice, volunteering for service in the British North Russian Relief Force. During this latter campaign he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM), equivalent to today's Star of Gallantry.
  • Doctor Wendy Smyth nee Bruen OAM PhD (1954-living) was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) for her exemplary service to nursing, especially through the Townsville University Hospital and as Adjunct Senior Research Fellow, James Cook University.

Sources

  1. Flynn, Michael. The Second Fleet: Britain’s Grim Armada of 1790. Library of Australian History. Sydney, 1993
  2. Wikipedia: Neptune; accessed 19 Nov 2018
  3. Martin, Megan. Settlers and Convicts of the Bellona 1793: a Biographical Dictionary. Bellona Muster Committee 1793-1993. North Ryde, 1992
  4. Wikipedia: Bellona; accessed 19 Nov 2018
  5. Murray, Iain H. Australian Christian Life from 1788. Banner of Truth Trust. Edinburgh, 1988
  6. Ryan, R J. Land Grants 1788-1809. Australian Documents Library. Sydney, 1981
  7. Bruen, Gweneth. Thank You Mother England: Paul Lutherburrow and Families. Self-published. Epping, 1986
  8. Molony, John N. The Native-born: The First White Australians. Melbourne University Publishing, 2000, p25
  9. McKenna, Mark. The Captive Republic: A History of Republicanism in Australia 1788-1996. Cambridge University Press, 1996, p23
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Bibliography

  • Bateson, Charles. The Convict Ships 1787-1868. Library of Australian History. Sydney, 1983.
  • Baxter, Carol. Musters and Lists New South Wales and Norfolk Island 1800-1802. Australian Biographical & Genealogical Record and Society of Australian Genealogists. Sydney, 1988.
  • Baxter, Carol. Musters of New South Wales and Norfolk Island 1805-1806. Australian Biographical & Genealogical Record and Society of Australian Genealogists. Sydney, 1989.
  • Bruen, Gweneth. Thank You Mother England: Paul Lutherburrow and Families. Self-published. Epping, 1986.
  • Evans, Kenneth. Paddle to Australia: The Story of George Patfield. Self-published. Beaudesert, 2001.
  • Flynn, Michael. The Second Fleet: Britain’s Grim Armada of 1790. Library of Australian History. Sydney, 1993.
  • Gillen, Mollie. The Search for John Small First Fleeter. Library of Australian History. Sydney, 1988.
  • Martin, Megan. Settlers and Convicts of the Bellona 1793: a Biographical Dictionary. Bellona Muster Committee 1793-1993. North Ryde, 1992.
  • Ryan, R J. Land grants 1788-1809. Australian Documents Library. Sydney, 1981.
  • Sainty, Malcolm R & Johnson, Keith A. Census of New South Wales, November 1828. Library of Australian History. Sydney, 1985.
  • Sweeney, Christopher. Transported: In Place of Death. Macmillan Company of Australia. South Melbourne, 1981.




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Hi Ken, Awesome FSP. Excellent work.
posted by David Urquhart