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Research Notes on James Hedges and Allied Families

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  • Misc. Notes The Draper Papers (James Hedges #20) by Layman C. Draper

The first one is by James Hedges, the son of Joseph Hedges and Sarah Biggs. His brothers include: John Hedges, who also wrote a Biography for the Draper report, Charles Hedges and Joseph Hedges Jr., from whom we descended. When this biography was written, James was living in Sharpsburg Kentucky, in Bath County. He is an Older man at the time of this writing, although, the time that he describes, starting in 179I, he was a boy of eight years old. He tells about the family's move from Fredrick County Maryland to Bourbon County Kentucky, and their early days in Paris.

"Fort Pitt." that is spoken of is Pittsburgh Pennslyvinia. Braddock's defeat, was in 1755 at Fort Dequesne, which is the present city of Pittsburgh. They came down the Monogahila, this is a river in Pennslyvinia, which is one of the rivers that make up the Ohio.

St. Clair was a General in the French and Indian wars, who became Governor of the Northwest Territory, and gave Cincinnati its present name. He led the fight against the Indians untill November 4. 179I, when he was defeated by the Miami Indians, in what amounted to a massacre, by the Maumee river, which is near the Ohio-Indiana border. St. Clair himself survived, but he had to resign his Generalship to Mad Anthony Wayne.

Maysville, at that time, was the only logical place for a man with a family to get off the river. The next town down-river that was safe was Louisville, and that was over One-Hundred miles.

According to the book, "Genealogies of Kentucky Families". John Hedges, son of Joseph Hedges and Sarah Biggs. married Catherine Troutman who died in 1793--then he married Rebecca Troutman. Both were daughters of Peter Troutman, whom we find is with them on the trip from Maryland.

This report was copied from micro-film and was written by hand, therefore, it was necessary to type this, otherwise it is original.

NOTE- Joseph died in 1805 and Sarah in 1822. They are burried in the "Hedges Burrying Ground" Stone Farm (fomerly, Alfred Clay farm). At the corner of Stoney Point Road and State route 627, in Burbon County, near Paris. This land was once owned by Peter Hedges.

  • HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS BATH COUNTY 1840

No. 20 James Hedges (Brother of John Hedges, No. 47 Burbon County)

Came to Kentucky in the fall of 179I. We stayed at Reinhart's farm on the Monougahila two weeks. This is said to be where Braddock's defeat was. (Ten miles above Fort Pitt.) We were 18 days on the river. St. Clair's battle was fought while we were on the river. Came down on two boats; one a family and one a horse boat. Old Peter Troutman, and Peter Troutman, and a son-in-law of Old Peter's were along.

Maysville was called "The Point". A good many wagons were waiting at Maysville "The Point" when we got there. Lots more Immigrants in 1793, the waters were low, seemed as if the place was full of wagons, as I was down and stayed a little.

As we were coming to Kentucky, John Troutman overtook us this side of Maysville, at Ready-Money Jack's (Ready-Money Jack is an Irishman). Ready-Money Jack had a dubble cabin, it was where Holyday was for a great while after that. John Troutman, Ralph Morgan, and a good many others had gotten there before us, that same night that we stayed there. They had been out to bury the dead at St. Clair's defeat, and were just returning. They had gotten everything ready when we got there, and we had a great frolic there that night.

Emigration to Kentucky for two or three years, at this time was very great.

We spent the first winter in Paris. The winter of 1791-92. Old-man Kelly was the first Merchant in Paris, afterwards, he was in pardnership with Brent. Kelly was a sort of Contractor for the Iron-Works. This small store did a good deal of trafficking. Kelly married an old man's daughter that lived close to us in a cabin. The old man's wife was Sarah, I forgot his name.

I think there was no other frame house there (in Paris), except a little frame house that they held court in, in the winter of 1791-92. That year, however, Old-Man Harris, a Potter, that came the same winter that we did, who had some money for improving, built a frame house in 1792.

Old-Man Jackson, who kept the first Court House, moved the frame Court House off and kept the Post Office in it. The next year, the summer of 1792, Thomas West built a brick Court House. Smedly made the bricks. Tom West had the cantract; I don't know who put it up for him. I don't know that West completed it, it wasn't finished then, I think that West had to quit, some difficulties in his privet affairs made him.

A man by the name of Linsey, living where Cotton Town is now, an old Widower, plenty of cane, his was the only house on that side of Stoner Creek, and some other man, built a flat to ferry Stoner with. The flat was launched about the middle of the day. Sycamore trees hung far over the banks on both sides, and their branches touched the water. Part of a family was coming from above, moving somewhere to that side, and waited at our house all night, waiting to get to Paris, till the boat should be launched. A little boy had been detained up about Georgetown, going to school or something; the rest of the family had gone on before.

When the boat was launched, this little boy, Webb and James Hughes (Who afterwards became Sherrif) got in the craft. The boat struck a Sycamore in the water that was turned down. The Sycamore capsized the boat. Webb and Hughes hung to the trees; the little boy was drowned.

My brother, Charles found the little boy after two or three days when the water fell. Lindsey swam across, he and the other man were the proprietors, (I don't know the other man's name that was with him now) As soon as the people of town heard it they came to see, and laughed at Webb and Hughes hanging from the trees. One of them, a very large fleshy man, had a canoe in which they took Hughes and Webb to the shore.

The road from this side, leading into the creek was very bad back then, ground very soft, they would sink in deep. The next fall they built rock piers and made a wooden bridge.

We moved out the last week in March on to Stoner. We put in a crop in 1792. Jimmy Baitt was the only one who had put any in before us. He had been there three years. He put in his third crop that year.

Jimmy Baitt was gone, a prisoner amoung the Indians for three years and six months. Baitt lived on Stoner, right where the spring branch coming down from John Hedges, empties into Stoner, between where Peter Hedges and Algan Smith now live. I heard Baitt say myself, that the crop of 1792 was his third crop at the mouth of the Spring Branch.

Springs are better now than they were then. We dug a good many wells that first fall, after we moved out, untill finally the country became settled and was trodden and cleared.

Maintained a good many old settlers around. Old-Man Baitt gave half of his off to his Son-in law Swinary. Swinary sold lots to which he could give no title. The place became dilapidated, owners of houses took away the buildings, hauled them away. Crawford happened on Smith at Mt. Stirling and got a hundred acres of land for one year's work.

Ralph Morgan married the widow of Dovylaps, who was killed in the battle of Blue-Licks. She was the sister of Jimmy Baitt's wife. When we came, Winchester wasn't even laid out yet. Troutman had a tan-yard over in the bottom, at Paris, on Houstow, where it comes into Stoner to the right of Paris. He went out that first winter, and we got his cabin. He went up somewhere between Morgan Station and the old forge and made a tan-yard there. John Troutman, son of Michael Troutman, yet lives in Maryland.

Judge Allen, the Judge of the court in Paris, is Grand-father of Lawford Allen of Sharpsburg, (Bath Co.) Michael Troutman, a Tanner in Maryland, near where we lived, heard my brother Charles say, "He helped to lay out the road which they cut for Old Troutman to move upon". It went from Paris to Jimmy Baitt's and so on. They followed the trails leading from one neighbors to another, those times, in making roads.

(Then, how did they move into Troutmans house if Charles Hedges helped to lay out the road to move on?) Layman C Draper James Hedges No. 20

  • Misc. Notes

The Filson Club Historical Quarterly, Vol. 14, Louisville, Ky., July, 1940, No. 3, pp. 176-181

(p. 176)

JOHN D. SHANE'S INTERVIEW WITH PIONEER JOHN HEDGE, BOURBON COUNTY

TRANSCRIBED FOR PUBLICATION By OTTO A. ROTHERT Louisville, Kentucky

INTRODUCTION: Every year during the past thirteen years, with one or two exceptions, THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY has published one of Reverend John D. Shane's interviews. Shane was born in 1812 and died in 1864. He spent much of his time interviewing Kentucky pioneers and sons and daughters of pioneers. His notes on his several hundred interviews are preserved: some in the Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison, and some in the Presbyterian Historical Society, Philadelphia. Photostat copies of all the notes on Shane's interviews now in the Wisconsin Society are in the archives of The Filson Club. A sixteen-page biography, "Shane the Western Collector," by Otto A. Rothert, appears in the January, 1930, number of the HISTORY QUARTERLY.

The Shane interview with pioneer John Hedge is of interest, although in places it is somewhat trivial. It covers so much ground that it requires a little more explanation than given in the notes here inserted in Shane's text. Therefore some additional facts are presented in this Introduction:

Many descendants of pioneer Hedge still survive in Bourbon, Clark and Montgomery counties. Hedge's Station is, even to this day, a well-known point in eastern Clark County.

The McClelland's Station referred to is clearly not the station of the same name which grew into Georgetown. The cabins mentioned as being built "that winter" in Winchester were doubtless the cabins known as Crossthwaites' Station. They stood about a half-mile east of the present Winchester, and were erected before 1791, which is the only suggested date for "that winter." There were no houses built until 1793 in what became Winchester. See "John D. Shane's Interview with Benjamin Allen of Clark County" (11CC67-79), by Lucien Beckner, in THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY, April, 1931.

The story of Smith's Station, the settlement of Mt. Sterling and the sack of Morgan's Station, based entirely on Shane interviews, were given by Lucien Beckner before The Filson Club,

(p. 177)

November 2, 1937, in a scholarly address entitled "John D. Shane and What He Has Done for Kentucky."

Details regarding John Constant's Station, Major Andrew Hood's Station, and the Indian captivity of James Beath are presented in John D. Shane's Interview with Pioneer William Clinkenbeard (11CC54-66), transcribed by Lucien Beckner and printed in the HISTORY QUARTERLY, April, 1928.

The Shane interview here published was selected somewhat at random. In A Calendar of The Kentucky Papers of the Draper Collection of Manuscripts it is designated 11CC19-23. Shane does not give the time of this interview; it probably occurred before 1850. In the following transcription no changes were made other than spelling out abbreviated words and inserting, in brackets, some attempted elucidations; the headings, here in italics, are Shane's.

SHANE'S INTERVIEW WITH HEDGE

John Hedges. John Hedges lives at the crossing of the Paris and Winchester, and Iron Works, or Clintonville and Middletown roads. - Diagonally across from Stony Point meeting-house.

Settling Lands. It was for some time a prevalent custom for persons to take a lease on lands in the more central parts, free from probable incursions of the Indians, till they could either go out to lands of their own in safety, or have opportunity and the means of getting land of their own. The lease was to secure their privileges, and the lessor thus got his lands cleared. But all did not take these precautions to secure themselves, or to do justice to others. Many squatted down on lands, not knowing or caring whose they were. And some who had leased, enchanted with the abundance of the cane and the ease of raising cattle, fell too readily from their original purpose of settling themselves, and by attempting to follow up the range, which thus soon ran out, reduced themselves to poverty, and some of them thus lost some of the finest lands in the country. Improvidence, once scaxcely to be practiced, when the face of things changed, was then the ruin of thousands.

Currency. The currency of the country then was cows and calves, and horses. More current than our bank notes now. Have heard a horse cried off in Paris at so many cows and calves.

Settlers. Irish mostly from Pennsylvania country and South Carolina. Were called Cohies. Mostly Presbyterians.

(p. 178)

Virginians were called Tuckahoes. You could tell where a man was from, on first seeing him.

John Hedge, was here in 1791, November 3d, Monday. Morgan's Station was taken in 1793. (Monday, November 3d?) [April 1, 1793] On Slate, near the Iron Works.

Mayslick. Mayslick [settled in 1784] was then a station [when we came to Kentucky in 17891. There was no settlement from there to Blue Licks.

Ready-Money Jack. About 5 or 6 miles from there, one Ready--Money Jack (an Irishman] had some cabins. Five or six miles this side of the Blue Licks, where one Holyday since kept a tavern, within a few hundred yards. Ready-Money Jack was from Monongahela country. Was less afraid of Indians. The people in that country were more accustomed to them. He kept a kind of tavern there [five or six miles from Blue Licks] and gave himself that name. People were afraid to encamp out of the settlements, after leaving Mayslick.

Irish Station. Higher up, about two miles of Millersburgh, was the Irish Station.

McClelland's Station. Had been a station what was [earlier] called McClelland's Station. But the people were just settling out. Pretty much dispersed at that time. Between Paris and Millersburgh was settled pretty thickly.

Wilmot's Station. Wilmot's Station was on the heads of Huston, nine or ten miles from Paris, between Paris and Lexington. But at that time (they) were settled out pretty much in (a) little neighborhood. The neighborhood still retaining the name Wilmot's Station. You might see a dozen little cabins, say, at a time.

Hood's Station. [Andrew] Hood's Station was up by Winchester (three miles north] and Stroud's. That winter [1791] they were beginning to build some cabins at Winchester [at Crossthwaite's Station, one-half mile east of the present town].

Constant's Station. [John] Constant's Station was opened two or three miles [only one-half mile] this side of Stroud's, on a road that had been opened to Maysville from Boonsborough, and intercepting that one from Lexington, about this Ready-Money Jack's. This road was cut for Stroud to move up on, and for others to get salt, &c. (John] Stroud moved -up about two years after he first came out here at all. That was the only road at all through heie then. They went on from Paxis on the road that was about that time made to Hornbach's Mill [about four miles

(p. 179)

north of Strode's] till it intersected the one leading to Stroud's. They went up it to Stroud's, and then on by Hood's, and soon the old trace on the ridge to go to Mount Sterling.

Seven or eight years before some mischief had been done at this Constant's. His was the first Station built out of Strode's. Hood and Constant were both in existence when I came [in 1789] to the country.

Stroud's Station. Stroud's Station was the most prominent point in all that section. Was on the head of Stroud's Fork of Stoner. [Strode's was less than a mile from Constant's. Shane spells pioneer John Strode's name both "Stroud" and "Strode." The correct spelling always has been Strode. The Strode family is still prominent in Clark and neighboring counties.]

Shull's Station. Shull's Station was on Stoner, near the head. [Joseph Schull was a son-in-law of Daniel Boone. This place, in Clarke County, is now Schollsville, but locally the name is pronounced Shellsville.]

Buffaloe. When I first came here, the buffaloe bones covered all the grounds. Said that men used to come down from Stroud's (and) the interior, when the buffaloe were poor, and kill them for sport, and leave them lie. The trace that passed on to the upper and lower Blue Licks led through here, and they would- kill them on it. It went from Strode's Station. There was very little cane through here. Mostly covered with wild-rye and pea-vines.

Salt Spring Trace. The trace that was a buffaloe trace from Strode's Trace to Harrod's Lick, on Stoner, was called the Salt Spring Trace. And the trace made by Stroud avoided crossing Stoner so often. The buffaloe took a strait course.

Stoner's Trace. [Michael] Stoner's Deposition in the case of Payne versus Strode, &c. at Paris. In 1778 Stoner was out to kill and hunt, under the Virginia government, and was passing from Boonsborough to Blue Licks in 1776 and lost his horses, and marked his way back so as to find his baggage, and it was from that called Stoner's Trace for some time.

Moses Thomas, Enoch Smith, Testimonies.

Settling Lands. Would take a lease for five years, clear as much as they pleased, and enjoy the range till it was gone, and then move. Most of the people when I came were on leased lands, till times became more safe.

Mrs. Young. Morgan's Station. 1793. A Mrs. Young, at Morgan's Station, was taken with her child. Her child was killed on the Ohio River, and she exchanged at Wayne's treaty.

(p. 180)

A young woman, that was scalped on the road, and was left, got well again, and came in. Young, that husband, escaped from that station.

A man took off his wife and two children. Was pursued by two Indians. She waded Slate [Creek]. It was pretty deep. After they crossed, her clothes were in her way, and he took out his knife and trimmed them off. She led along the little boy, and he took the child and his gun in his arms, treeing whenever the Indians came too near, thus keeping them at bay, and brought off the only woman and children that escaped. Harry Martin?

Smith's Station. [Enoch] Smith's Station was not far from Mount Sterling. It was Mount Sterling that was settled that spring of 1792. Winchester wasn't thought of then. Some of the people I was moving that winter, 1791-2, and one or two of the company, went aside to a father-in-law's, at Smith's Station, about one and one-half miles from the road. Troutman and his wife we were moving. A Tanner, going up on to the peeled-oak fork of Slate to live. Spurgen was going on with a cabin at that time, and there were one or two others going on. Mount Sterling was on the trace that led from Lexington and Stroud's Station to the Slate Iron works [in Bath County]. Moved Troutman there, fall 1791. Some Negroes were killed afterwards from his same neighborhood.

Coming Out. Fare. Wind was a great-deal against us, and we had turkey-pot-pie till I got so tired I never wanted to eat any more as long as I lived. At this Ready-Money Jack's we got some hot corn cake and milk, which ate admirable. Our pot-pie had been made of flour ground on horse mills, in Monongahela country. That winter we got hog and hominy, good and abundance of it. I travelled a great deal that winter, and off from the public roads the people were ready to thank me for my company.

Wolves. Wolves beset me when I stopped all night near Mount Sterling.

Salt Licks. Fall of 1792, I went to Bullitt's Licks, by Lexington, Danville, Bairdstown, &c. Fall of 1793 I went to Mann's Lick twice. [Both licks are a few miles south of Louisville.] Same rout. Only road. Crossed Kentucky [River] at the mouth of Hickman. After peace was made, they got to make salt upon Sandy, Salt-Lick, on the Ohio, about the same time. Blue Lick had been used. But was not used but for making a

(p. 181)

very little salt, the year after I came. The year of Wayne's army, salt was as high as $4 per bushel, and pork got up to the same price.

Wolves. August, 1793, at Mann's Lick, wolves came around the wagons again. They were mighty bad in them days in Kentucky, on young cattle, horses, and calves.

James Beath Captured. James Beath helped to settle Stroud's Station in 1779. Went to Grassy Lick with two others (Swearingen, one, I think he got clear.) They were watching the Lick. Beath was shot through the shoulder. He and the other were taken. His wounds were not dressed till he got in, and the flies blowed him [swelled due to infection by flies]. Packed him several days, and this the month of August! Was taken to Detroit and kept about three years. Sold there, and released at the close of the British War. Had a wife and five children. Mrs. Beath had a sister, Mrs. Douglass, whose husband had been killed [in the Blue Licks campaign] and left her with three children. She [Mrs. Douglass] afterwards married Raph. Morgan [at Strode's Station]. Another sister married a weaver, Irishman, named Howard, and during this time he had the charge of all three of the families. Beath was a very interesting, conversible man. After all his scuffles, and got back to his family, and he had settled down on a part of this land and made considerable improvements, he was likely to lose his land through conflicting claims, and got chagrined, and sold out, and moved over to Ohio, and died in less than twelve months.

Strode's Station. He [Beath] and old Tom Kennedy, Jesse Kennedy's father, within three miles of Paris, were with the first settlers of Strode's Station.

James Beath's treatment by Indians. Somewhere where Chillicothe now stands, they had been a day or two without any thing to eat, and killing an old dog, divided it equally with him. He tasted a piece, but it was so unpleasant, he threw it down, and couldn't eat it. One morning the flies had blown him so, and he felt so sore, and tired, the Indians, when they got ready to start, said ho! as usual, and hod! to the pack, meaning for him to take it. He felt so indignant, and was so angry, he thought he would rather just die, than carry it any farther. He went on, they taking it after some pow-wowing. When he had run the gauntlet, an old Indian took him and dressed his wound, and he was afterwards sold to a British officer.

  • BB-247

James Hedges House; 1780 Levy Road

Constructed at an early date, this one-and-a-half-story weatherboarded log house has two pens with a large stone chimney placed unusually on the inner end of one of them. Near the house is a one-story log outbuilding.

This early log dwelling was built by Joseph Hedges, who emigrated to Bourbon County from Maryland in 1782. The farmstead was inherited by his son, James, indicated here on the 1861 and 1877 maps.

Whitley; Perrin, pp. 471, 529.

  • E-mail from Ken Hedges, January, 1999:

The James Hedges in Deed Bk. L pg.61 is the son of Joseph Hedges and Sarah Biggs. He was born Jan. 7 1783 in Fredrick Co. Md. and moved to Bourbon Co. with his family in the fall of 1791. He married Amy Foreman on June 23, 1803 in Bourbon Co. Ky. He lived in the Rockbridge Cr. area and moved to Bath Co. about 1830. He died Oct. 10, 1868 in Bath Co. Ky.

The land was so cheap because it was an overlapping survey and the owner was questionable. It was supposed to go to court, I haven't checked to see if it did. James paid taxes on this land from 1815 - 1830. The house mentioned was built by Joseph Hedges Jr. brother of James Hedges. He also lived on Rockbridge Cr., he built the house about 1814 and it is still in the family's posession. The James Hedges mentioned as being on the atlas is the son of Joseph Hedges Jr. and the inheritor of the homestead.--Ken Hedges Misc. Notes The Filson Club Historical Quarterly, Vol. 14, Louisville, Ky., July, 1940, No. 3, pp. 176-181

(p. 176)

JOHN D. SHANE'S INTERVIEW WITH PIONEER JOHN HEDGE, BOURBON COUNTY

TRANSCRIBED FOR PUBLICATION By OTTO A. ROTHERT Louisville, Kentucky

INTRODUCTION: Every year during the past thirteen years, with one or two exceptions, THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY has published one of Reverend John D. Shane's interviews. Shane was born in 1812 and died in 1864. He spent much of his time interviewing Kentucky pioneers and sons and daughters of pioneers. His notes on his several hundred interviews are preserved: some in the Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison, and some in the Presbyterian Historical Society, Philadelphia. Photostat copies of all the notes on Shane's interviews now in the Wisconsin Society are in the archives of The Filson Club. A sixteen-page biography, "Shane the Western Collector," by Otto A. Rothert, appears in the January, 1930, number of the HISTORY QUARTERLY.

The Shane interview with pioneer John Hedge is of interest, although in places it is somewhat trivial. It covers so much ground that it requires a little more explanation than given in the notes here inserted in Shane's text. Therefore some additional facts are presented in this Introduction:

Many descendants of pioneer Hedge still survive in Bourbon, Clark and Montgomery counties. Hedge's Station is, even to this day, a well-known point in eastern Clark County.

The McClelland's Station referred to is clearly not the station of the same name which grew into Georgetown. The cabins mentioned as being built "that winter" in Winchester were doubtless the cabins known as Crossthwaites' Station. They stood about a half-mile east of the present Winchester, and were erected before 1791, which is the only suggested date for "that winter." There were no houses built until 1793 in what became Winchester. See "John D. Shane's Interview with Benjamin Allen of Clark County" (11CC67-79), by Lucien Beckner, in THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY, April, 1931.

The story of Smith's Station, the settlement of Mt. Sterling and the sack of Morgan's Station, based entirely on Shane interviews, were given by Lucien Beckner before The Filson Club,

(p. 177)

November 2, 1937, in a scholarly address entitled "John D. Shane and What He Has Done for Kentucky."

Details regarding John Constant's Station, Major Andrew Hood's Station, and the Indian captivity of James Beath are presented in John D. Shane's Interview with Pioneer William Clinkenbeard (11CC54-66), transcribed by Lucien Beckner and printed in the HISTORY QUARTERLY, April, 1928.

The Shane interview here published was selected somewhat at random. In A Calendar of The Kentucky Papers of the Draper Collection of Manuscripts it is designated 11CC19-23. Shane does not give the time of this interview; it probably occurred before 1850. In the following transcription no changes were made other than spelling out abbreviated words and inserting, in brackets, some attempted elucidations; the headings, here in italics, are Shane's.

SHANE'S INTERVIEW WITH HEDGE

John Hedges. John Hedges lives at the crossing of the Paris and Winchester, and Iron Works, or Clintonville and Middletown roads. - Diagonally across from Stony Point meeting-house.

Settling Lands. It was for some time a prevalent custom for persons to take a lease on lands in the more central parts, free from probable incursions of the Indians, till they could either go out to lands of their own in safety, or have opportunity and the means of getting land of their own. The lease was to secure their privileges, and the lessor thus got his lands cleared. But all did not take these precautions to secure themselves, or to do justice to others. Many squatted down on lands, not knowing or caring whose they were. And some who had leased, enchanted with the abundance of the cane and the ease of raising cattle, fell too readily from their original purpose of settling themselves, and by attempting to follow up the range, which thus soon ran out, reduced themselves to poverty, and some of them thus lost some of the finest lands in the country. Improvidence, once scaxcely to be practiced, when the face of things changed, was then the ruin of thousands.

Currency. The currency of the country then was cows and calves, and horses. More current than our bank notes now. Have heard a horse cried off in Paris at so many cows and calves.

Settlers. Irish mostly from Pennsylvania country and South Carolina. Were called Cohies. Mostly Presbyterians.

(p. 178)

Virginians were called Tuckahoes. You could tell where a man was from, on first seeing him.

John Hedge, was here in 1791, November 3d, Monday. Morgan's Station was taken in 1793. (Monday, November 3d?) [April 1, 1793] On Slate, near the Iron Works.

Mayslick. Mayslick [settled in 1784] was then a station [when we came to Kentucky in 17891. There was no settlement from there to Blue Licks.

Ready-Money Jack. About 5 or 6 miles from there, one Ready--Money Jack (an Irishman] had some cabins. Five or six miles this side of the Blue Licks, where one Holyday since kept a tavern, within a few hundred yards. Ready-Money Jack was from Monongahela country. Was less afraid of Indians. The people in that country were more accustomed to them. He kept a kind of tavern there [five or six miles from Blue Licks] and gave himself that name. People were afraid to encamp out of the settlements, after leaving Mayslick.

Irish Station. Higher up, about two miles of Millersburgh, was the Irish Station.

McClelland's Station. Had been a station what was [earlier] called McClelland's Station. But the people were just settling out. Pretty much dispersed at that time. Between Paris and Millersburgh was settled pretty thickly.

Wilmot's Station. Wilmot's Station was on the heads of Huston, nine or ten miles from Paris, between Paris and Lexington. But at that time (they) were settled out pretty much in (a) little neighborhood. The neighborhood still retaining the name Wilmot's Station. You might see a dozen little cabins, say, at a time.

Hood's Station. [Andrew] Hood's Station was up by Winchester (three miles north] and Stroud's. That winter [1791] they were beginning to build some cabins at Winchester [at Crossthwaite's Station, one-half mile east of the present town].

Constant's Station. [John] Constant's Station was opened two or three miles [only one-half mile] this side of Stroud's, on a road that had been opened to Maysville from Boonsborough, and intercepting that one from Lexington, about this Ready-Money Jack's. This road was cut for Stroud to move up on, and for others to get salt, &c. (John] Stroud moved -up about two years after he first came out here at all. That was the only road at all through heie then. They went on from Paxis on the road that was about that time made to Hornbach's Mill [about four miles

(p. 179)

north of Strode's] till it intersected the one leading to Stroud's. They went up it to Stroud's, and then on by Hood's, and soon the old trace on the ridge to go to Mount Sterling.

Seven or eight years before some mischief had been done at this Constant's. His was the first Station built out of Strode's. Hood and Constant were both in existence when I came [in 1789] to the country.

Stroud's Station. Stroud's Station was the most prominent point in all that section. Was on the head of Stroud's Fork of Stoner. [Strode's was less than a mile from Constant's. Shane spells pioneer John Strode's name both "Stroud" and "Strode." The correct spelling always has been Strode. The Strode family is still prominent in Clark and neighboring counties.]

Shull's Station. Shull's Station was on Stoner, near the head. [Joseph Schull was a son-in-law of Daniel Boone. This place, in Clarke County, is now Schollsville, but locally the name is pronounced Shellsville.]

Buffaloe. When I first came here, the buffaloe bones covered all the grounds. Said that men used to come down from Stroud's (and) the interior, when the buffaloe were poor, and kill them for sport, and leave them lie. The trace that passed on to the upper and lower Blue Licks led through here, and they would- kill them on it. It went from Strode's Station. There was very little cane through here. Mostly covered with wild-rye and pea-vines.

Salt Spring Trace. The trace that was a buffaloe trace from Strode's Trace to Harrod's Lick, on Stoner, was called the Salt Spring Trace. And the trace made by Stroud avoided crossing Stoner so often. The buffaloe took a strait course.

Stoner's Trace. [Michael] Stoner's Deposition in the case of Payne versus Strode, &c. at Paris. In 1778 Stoner was out to kill and hunt, under the Virginia government, and was passing from Boonsborough to Blue Licks in 1776 and lost his horses, and marked his way back so as to find his baggage, and it was from that called Stoner's Trace for some time.

Moses Thomas, Enoch Smith, Testimonies.

Settling Lands. Would take a lease for five years, clear as much as they pleased, and enjoy the range till it was gone, and then move. Most of the people when I came were on leased lands, till times became more safe.

Mrs. Young. Morgan's Station. 1793. A Mrs. Young, at Morgan's Station, was taken with her child. Her child was killed on the Ohio River, and she exchanged at Wayne's treaty.

(p. 180)

A young woman, that was scalped on the road, and was left, got well again, and came in. Young, that husband, escaped from that station.

A man took off his wife and two children. Was pursued by two Indians. She waded Slate [Creek]. It was pretty deep. After they crossed, her clothes were in her way, and he took out his knife and trimmed them off. She led along the little boy, and he took the child and his gun in his arms, treeing whenever the Indians came too near, thus keeping them at bay, and brought off the only woman and children that escaped. Harry Martin?

Smith's Station. [Enoch] Smith's Station was not far from Mount Sterling. It was Mount Sterling that was settled that spring of 1792. Winchester wasn't thought of then. Some of the people I was moving that winter, 1791-2, and one or two of the company, went aside to a father-in-law's, at Smith's Station, about one and one-half miles from the road. Troutman and his wife we were moving. A Tanner, going up on to the peeled-oak fork of Slate to live. Spurgen was going on with a cabin at that time, and there were one or two others going on. Mount Sterling was on the trace that led from Lexington and Stroud's Station to the Slate Iron works [in Bath County]. Moved Troutman there, fall 1791. Some Negroes were killed afterwards from his same neighborhood.

Coming Out. Fare. Wind was a great-deal against us, and we had turkey-pot-pie till I got so tired I never wanted to eat any more as long as I lived. At this Ready-Money Jack's we got some hot corn cake and milk, which ate admirable. Our pot-pie had been made of flour ground on horse mills, in Monongahela country. That winter we got hog and hominy, good and abundance of it. I travelled a great deal that winter, and off from the public roads the people were ready to thank me for my company.

Wolves. Wolves beset me when I stopped all night near Mount Sterling.

Salt Licks. Fall of 1792, I went to Bullitt's Licks, by Lexington, Danville, Bairdstown, &c. Fall of 1793 I went to Mann's Lick twice. [Both licks are a few miles south of Louisville.] Same rout. Only road. Crossed Kentucky [River] at the mouth of Hickman. After peace was made, they got to make salt upon Sandy, Salt-Lick, on the Ohio, about the same time. Blue Lick had been used. But was not used but for making a

(p. 181)

very little salt, the year after I came. The year of Wayne's army, salt was as high as $4 per bushel, and pork got up to the same price.

Wolves. August, 1793, at Mann's Lick, wolves came around the wagons again. They were mighty bad in them days in Kentucky, on young cattle, horses, and calves.

James Beath Captured. James Beath helped to settle Stroud's Station in 1779. Went to Grassy Lick with two others (Swearingen, one, I think he got clear.) They were watching the Lick. Beath was shot through the shoulder. He and the other were taken. His wounds were not dressed till he got in, and the flies blowed him [swelled due to infection by flies]. Packed him several days, and this the month of August! Was taken to Detroit and kept about three years. Sold there, and released at the close of the British War. Had a wife and five children. Mrs. Beath had a sister, Mrs. Douglass, whose husband had been killed [in the Blue Licks campaign] and left her with three children. She [Mrs. Douglass] afterwards married Raph. Morgan [at Strode's Station]. Another sister married a weaver, Irishman, named Howard, and during this time he had the charge of all three of the families. Beath was a very interesting, conversible man. After all his scuffles, and got back to his family, and he had settled down on a part of this land and made considerable improvements, he was likely to lose his land through conflicting claims, and got chagrined, and sold out, and moved over to Ohio, and died in less than twelve months.

Strode's Station. He [Beath] and old Tom Kennedy, Jesse Kennedy's father, within three miles of Paris, were with the first settlers of Strode's Station.



Spouses –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 1: Catherine “Kate” TROUTMAN Birth: 1773 Death: 1833 Age: 60 Father: Peter TROUTMAN (1741-1813) Mother: Anna Maria MILLER (1740-1819) Marriage: January 15, 1798 Bourbon County, Kentucky Children: Silas (1803-1880) Peter (1797-1865) James Nancy (1799-) Fannie (1805-1867) Lucinda Mary Ann (1816-1849) Sythia Sallie

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 2: Rebecca TROUTMAN Birth: September 13, 1781 Frederick Co., Maryland Death: August 24, 1835 Bourbon County, Kentucky Age: 53 Burial: after August 24, 1835 Hedges Family Cemetery, Winchester-Paris Road, Stoney Point, Bourbon County, Kentucky Father: Peter TROUTMAN (1741-1813) Mother: Anna Maria MILLER (1740-1819) (3) Name: Joseph HEDGES –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Birth: 1750 Death: 1805 Age: 55 Father: Charles HEDGES (1712-1796) Mother: Mary STILLE (1714-)

Misc. Notes HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS, E. Polk Johnson, three volumes, Lewis Publishing Co., New York & Chicago, 1912. Common version, Vol. III, pp. 1360-1361. [Bourbon County]

JOSEPH HEDGES.-The Hedges are of ancient and honorable English lineage, their landed estates and manorial privileges being situated in Wilts, Berks and Gloucester, with London the seat of the younger sons of enterprise. Sir Philip Hedges, of Gloucester and London, born during the reign of the last Lancastrian king, appears to have been the earliest known ancestor. He was knighted for bravery on the field of battle and died in 1487. His descendant, William Hedges, of Youghal, Ireland, and Gloucester and London, England, was at Wilmington in 1675 and owned property there under the Duke of York's rule, through Governor Fenwick's administration of South Jersey.

His son, Joseph Hedges, of Gloucester and London, born in 1670, and died in 1732, on Monocacy Manor, Prince George's county, Maryland, was twice married. On January 1, 17o8, he married Mary Fettleplace, -of Kingswood, Wilts; Issue, Solomon and Charles, born in England. He married second, September 8, 17Q, Katharine Tingey, of London; Issue, Joshua, Jonas, Joseph, Samuel, Catherine, Ruth and Dorcas, born in America.

Joseph Hedges first located land in what was known as the Marlborough district of Delaware, which was settled by Gloucester people from Marlborough, Bristol and Kingswood. His sons gained a splendid foothold in the American colonies: Solomon won distinction; Charles (father of the subject of sketch), aided in driving Indian hordes from Maryland and amassed a fortune; Joshua patented over one thousand acres of land in Virginia in 1743, and Jonas founded Hedges Villa (Hedgesville, West Virginia), in 1746. Among the men who peopled the frontier, contributed to the development of the middle west, furnished its social background was Joseph Hedges, of Bourbon county, Kentucky, farmer, Revolutionary soldier and pioneer. He was born in 1743 in Frederick county, Maryland, and was the son of Charles Hedges, Sr., and Mary Stille. In 177o he married Sarah Biggs, of the same county, and engaged in farming at "Standing Stone" in Maryland, on a tract of four hundred and thirty-four acres owned jointly with his brother Absalom. During the steady progression from discontent of a colony to the freedom and independence of a nation, with splendid patriotism he renounced' his allegiance to George III. and served his country from September, 1777, to December, 1780, in the companies of Captains Ward and Comb, Regiment of Foot, Continental Troops, commanded by Colonel Oliver Spencer. After the Revolutionary war, in common with many of the settlers on the Atlantic coast, he determined to emigrate to the wilderness of Kentucky, obtaining patents September 1, 1791, for Hedges' Silence, Hedges' Range, Shintaler Gut and resurveys on Fleming's Purchase and Pilgrim's Harbour, for the purpose of conveying these farms to the purchasers. Early in 1792 he started on the long journey, accompanied by his family and slaves, his brother Shadrach and sister, also several Maryland families,-the Troutmans and others, all traveling in Conestoga wagons. About twelve miles above Wheeling they visited Mr. Hedges' brother Charles, who settled at Beech Bottom Fort in Ohio county, Virginia, in 1776. While sojourning here they constructed flat boats to complete their journey down the Ohio river, taking their wagons apart to carry them. Upon reaching Wheeling, Shadrach Hedges having been wounded by an Indian, abandoned the trip and his sister returned to Maryland with him. They drifted down to Limestone, now Maysville, Kentucky, three hundred and nine miles from Wheeling, with no especial incident to mark their transit other than the falling overboard of Mr. Hedges' little daughter Jemima and her rescue by her small brother James, who caught her by her floating skirts and pulled her into the boat. Disembarking at Limestone, they coupled their wagons, hitched their horses and followed the Buffalo trail, afterward the State road, to where Paris is now located. Here they pitched their tents for two weeks during very inclement weather, while Mr. Hedges negotiated with Ralph and Mary Morgarn for the purchase of land in the vicinity of Stony Point, near Strode’s creek. On March 25, 1792, the sale was consummated, and he started soon afterward the erection of a substantial and comfortable log house of a story and a half, of roomy dimensions, and assisted by the slaves planted his first crop on Kentucky soil; but his farming venture the first year was not encouraging, nor for succeeding years. The energy expended in clearing a new country and adapting himself to unusual conditions at his age undermined his constitution, and his health gradually failed until the end came in 1804.

He has left a name of prominence in the early annals of Bourbon and the heritage of an honored memory to numerous descendants. His wife survived until 1822, and nine children have perpetuated the race: John, born in 1771, of fine business ability, accumulated a large estate; Charles born in 1773, spent his life at Clintonville; Rebecca, born in 1775, married Mr. McCray, of Middletown; Joseph, born in 1778; James, born in 1783, of Sharpsburg; Jonas, born in 1785, a farmer of Bourbon and Clark counties; Jemima, born in 1790, married Mr. Reid; Samuel, born in 1792, in Kentucky; and Mary, born in 1795, married Dr. Carney, of Ohio.

History

Bailey Fulton Davis was my father's cousin. He was a Baptist preacher and was very involved in genealogy. Most of my genealogical data on my father's mother's ancestors comes from him. The Davis family lived in Clark County, at least my grandmother did when she married my grandfather.

I am attaching Bailey's notes on several of my family lines. Not all of them are Bourbon County lines, but, if not, they are from neighboring counties. These notes are compiled from several letters Bailey wrote to various family members.

If you find any notes in square brackets "[ ]", they are my additions to the text.

Bill McCray

Contents

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HEDGES FAMILY OF BOURBON COUNTY, KENTUCKY Data compiled by Bailey Fulton Davis, A.B.;Th.M.

This is one of my father's lines. We are faced with a great many contradictory traditions when we get back of the Bourbon pioneer, Joseph Hedges. There are several who have done research on the family and they are in disagreement as to their findings and interpretations. We are putting down the facts that are known to us and then will set forth the various arguments and theories. We are beginning with the family in Bourbon and then will examine other data.

JOSEPH HEDGES

This ancestor came into Bourbon and settled at Stoney Point. I have correspondence received from Mr. J.L. Hay whose address in November, 1938, was 645 Merrick Avenue, Apt.#36, Detroit, Michigan. He spoke of his forthcoming book on the Hedges family, but I have never seen any references to it since then. It is probable that he died before publishing it. Mr. Hay said that JOSEPH was the son of CHARLES HEDGES who was the son of JOSEPH HEDGES. The Hedges family was an early Maryland family and the Bourbon pioneer was born in Maryland in 1750. He married SARAH BIGGS of Maryland in 1770 and she was the daughter of JOHN BIGGS. There is a long article about Sarah Biggs Hedges in Johnson's History of Kentucky, 1912, Vol. 3, p. 136 Off. Some of the data therein disagrees with the above, but essentially it gives the true story of the Kentucky branch. It states that both Joseph and his wife came from Frederick County, Maryland. As a Baptist minister, I was interested in the fact that Sarah Biggs Hedges was a devout and active Baptist. On page 1361 of Johnson is this sketch: "Mrs. Sarah Hedges, nee Biggs, was a characteristic type of the noble pioneer mothers. Of gentle birth and unaccustomed to the ruder conditions of life, and of a handsome and striking appearance, she numbered among her accomplishments that of being a thorough horsewoman and an excellent judge of the qualities constituting fine horses. She was remarkable for her industry, piety, and Christian influence, and took an active interest in the Baptist Church, with which she had long been associated and to which she was a pillar of strength, prior to leaving her native state, as evidenced by the records of Frederick, Md.: 'July 10, 1790, Sarah Hedges appears among the number of persons who entered into an agreement for the re-organization of a Baptist congregation.' After the death of her husband in 1804 Mrs. Hedges continued to live at the old home place with John (her son, B.D.) until 1822, when she entered the higher service. Both are buried in a locust grove within sight of their home."

I cannot vouch for the authenticity of this statement, but I have been told that more Bourbon D.A.R.'s have joined on Joseph Hedges' service than on any other pioneer's line. Joseph Hedges renounced his allegiance to King George III and served in the Revolutionary war. He was Ensign in Michael Troutman's Company, Middle District of Frederick County, Md., Militia. He was a signer of the Association Test in Frederick County, Md., in 1775. In 1778 he hired Luke Horsfield as a substitute for the duration of the war, passed by Lt. of Frederick County, May 20, 1778; service being in Col. Price's Regiment. I have a copy of the S.A.R. application of William Calvin Gillespie on the basis of Joseph Hedges' service and he cites National numbers of previous successful applicants: 14529, 14534, and 111330.

The article in Johnson's history is at variance as to the above regimental service. I shall omit it here and deal with other data: "Joseph Hedges engaged in farming at Standing Stone in Maryland on a 434-acre tract which he owned jointly with his brother, Absalom.--After the War, in common with many of the settlers on the Atlantic coast, he determined to emigrate to the wilderness of Kentucky, obtaining patents on Sept. 1, 1791, for Hedges' Silence, Hedges' Range, Shintaler Gut, and resurveys on Fleming's Purchase and Pilgrim's Harbor, for the purpose of conveying these farms to the purchasers. Early in 1792 (2) he started on the long journey, accompanied by his family and slaves, his brother Shadrach, his sister, also several Maryland families--The Troutmans and others (It will be noted that he served under Michael Troutman B.D.), all traveling in Conestoga wagons. About twelve miles above Wheeling they visited Mr. Hedges' brother, Charles, who settled at Beech Bottom Fort in Ohio County, Virginia, in 1776. While sojourning here they constructed flat boats to complete their journey down the Ohio river, taking their wagons apart to carry them. Upon reaching Wheeling, Shadrach Hedges, having been wounded by an Indian, abandoned the trip and his sister returned to Maryland with him. The party drifted down to Limestone, now Maysville, Ky., 309 miles from Wheeling, with no special incident to mark their transit other than the falling overboard of Mr. Hedges' little daughter, Jemima, and her rescue by her brother, James, who caught her by her floating skirts and pulled her into the boat. Disembarking at Limestone, they coupled their wagons, hitched their horses, and followed the buffalo trail, afterward the State road, to where Paris is now located. Here they pitched their tents for two weeks during very inclement weather, while Mr. Hedges negotiated with Ralph and Mary Morgan for the purchase of a choice body of land in the vicinity of Stoney Point, near Strode's Creek. On March 25, 1792, the deal was closed and he started soon afterward the erection of a substantial and comfortable log house of a story and a half, of roomy dimensions, and, assisted by the slaves, planted his first crop on Kentucky soil. His farming ventures were not successful for several years. The energy expended in clearing the new country and adapting himself to unusual conditions at his age undermined his constitution and his health gradually failed until the end came in 1804.

Joseph Hedges and his wife, Sarah Biggs Hedges, had nine children. This list is taken from the Johnson article. The children were as follows:

John, born in 1771, "of fine business ability and accumulated a large estate";

Charles, born in 1773--"spend his life at Clinton-ville";

Rebecca, born in 1775, "married Mr. McCray of Middle-town" (Note: North Middletown in Bourbon is what was meant. My father, John Fulton Davis, had a sister named Bertie Davis and she married Tom McCray, so my aunt's children have two Hedges lines. B.F.D.);

Joseph, born in 1778;

JAMES HEDGES--my line--born in 1783--"lives at Sharps-burg";

Jonas--born in 1785, "a farmer of Bourbon and Clark Counties";

Jemima, born in 1790, "married Mr. Reid";

Samuel, "born in 1792, in Kentucky" (Note: there is a sketch of this line in Johnson, B.F.D.);

Mary, "born in 1795 and married Dr. Carney of Ohio".

I might state here that the Johnson Article was prepared by some of the Ewalt family. Joseph Hedges Ewalt has long been one of Kentucky Masonry's leading men. I recall the unique way in which I met him. I had seen his name in the Masonic Journal and had written to him, but he had never replied. One day my wife and I were driving out in Bourbon County looking for old stone homes built by another of my ancestors, Thomas "Stonehammer" Metcalfe, 10th Governor of Kentucky. We found a beautiful old stone house and I drove back to a crossroad to question an old man whom I had seen sitting out in the yard. I went over and introduced myself and found that it was Joseph Hedges Ewalt. They call that locality "Hedges Cross Roads", if memory serves me correctly. He found out that I was a minister and said, "I got a letter from a Sky Pilot about the Hedges family, but I never have answered it." I told him that I was the writer of the query and we had a nice visit.

It is also well to tell of the way in which the older members of the family were confused in their thinking about the Hedges family. Perrin's History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison, and Nicholas Counties has a sketch on page 471 which records this legend that caused so much confusion. It is the article on Silas Hedges, deceased, and starts out like this: "The Hedges family trace their ancestry to Sir Charles Hedges, an English politician, who graduated at Oxford in 1675 and died in 1714. he had four daughters and one son, whose name was Joseph, who emigrated to America at an early day and located in Prince William County, Maryland." The person who gave in the information then listed the children of Joseph. The tradition was that Sir Charles was infuriated at his son for leaving home and having married without his consent and had left a will whereby his vast estate was tied up for the descendants. The Hedges family in America organized and set about to get this supposedly fabulous estate that was due them. I have a number of old papers that belonged to my grandmother, Pauline Campbell Davis, and she had preserved them from the effects of her mother, Margaret Lucinda Banta Campbell. She, in turn, had kept them from the papers of her mother, Dorcas Hedges Banta.

These old papers are quite interesting and show the extent of the movement whereby the so-called heirs of Sir Charles Hedges tried to get possession of his estate. The movement seems to have begun in 1881 and faded newspaper clipping tells of the meeting on April 8, 1881, in Frederick City, Maryland, and states that the minutes of the Hedges' heirs, held in Paris, Kentucky, on April 5th, were read. Another clipping tells of the Paris meeting which was held in the Council Chamber in this city last Monday. There was a "reasonable attendance" despite the inclement weather. John Hedges of Sharpsburg presided and E.B. Hedges, Paris, was secretary. Dr. Hedges of Cynthiana presented the data relative to what was being done by heirs in various places. The meeting adjourned with reference to further action to be taken at the meeting of "all the heirs in the United States" shortly to be held in Cincinnati.

I also have a copy of the minutes of the Cincinnati meeting which was held May 18, 1881. It is stated therein that 500 copies were ordered to be printed. It contains 13 pages and has a good bit of genealogical data in it. Mr. Hay, of Detroit, insisted that there was no will for Sir Charles Hedges, but on page 9f. of the minutes is a letter from John R. Mayo, barrister in London, England, in which he states that he found the will after much search.

There is a receipt printed on green paper and it bears date of April 11, 1881, Frederick City, Maryland: "Received of Mrs. Dorcas Banta - $2.00 - to be used in the prosecution of the claim of the Hedges Heirs, now recorded in the Bank of England, as certified in the Books of Gun's Agency (or Index). See Numbers on record. J.P. Creager, per Joyns". There is also an old post card which bears date of April 13, 1881, on which Creager requested that Mrs. Dorcas Banta send genealogical data so as to be recognized at the Cincinnati convention. I also have a letter which T.I. Davis copied. It is a history of the Hedges family and bears this notation: "Written by George S. Hedges on the 5 day of November, 1874, at the request of the owner of this book, E. Clendenen". T.I. Davis was my grandfather.

I infer that all was not sweetness and light as far as my great-grandmother was concerned. Her mother, Mrs. Dorcas Hedges Banta, had joined, but her daughter (my great-grandmother, Margaret Lucinda Banta Campbell) evidently did not like the way things were handled at Cincinnati. She had sent a letter to her uncle, John H. Hedges, Sharpsburg, and he replied in kind: "Sharpsburg, Ky. June the 18th, 1881 (I am copying it just exactly as written and spelled. B.F.D.) Dear Niece, I receive (sic) yours of the 16inst contents noted. You seem to criticise our proceedings at Cincin-nati Oh. The first item I notice is that you find L.M. Campbell's name appears on the list of legal heirs of the Hedges estate in England. Now my dear neice where does it so appear? See first page. On motion all heirs or representatives (underscored) attending the meeting were admitted as deligates (sic) and were as followes (sic). Now the very first name on the list from Oh. is Geo. W. Patter of Paleldin is no heir. But he was a deligate (sic). Now turn to the 5th page and you will find the name of D.A. Roach of Crawfordville he is no heir But a delegate his mother in law is and (sic) heir (Sister Polly Gillespie). The same as L.M. Campbell he married my niece my sister Dorcas Banta's daughter. Your mother was not there neither was Polly Gillespie there. But each had a Son in law as a deligate so you can see a very great differance (sic) in the statement and the one you give. Lon M. Campbell is no heir neither are you an heir at law while your mother lives. She is an heir. We have a family organization at Paris, Kentucky, for Kentucky alone and if you want your Mother's name enrolled as an heir you can do so by sending to Ed. B. Hedges of Paris who is our secretary for Ky. $1.00. He will enter her name in a book for that purpose as an heir. My name is entered and my dollar paid. So is Warren's. We want to get all in Ky. on our book so it can be presented at our next National meeting. So their names may appear as heirs we have brought the family history of our fore parents down to my and your mother's grandfather, Joseph. He is the Son of Charles who left 14 children and he a Son of Joseph the Emigrant who made a will on the 6 day of September, 1732. Now I hope the explantion will be satisfactory. If your husband had spent some ten dollars and attended the convention his name would have been enrolled as a delegate. Now for the 2nd item you also seem to think we committed an error. Here is what we say in relation of Sir Charles Hedges: It appears from the information brought before the convention of the Hedges heirs--that Sir Charles Hedges was an English politician, who graduated at Oxford in 1675--died in 1714. Your history commences with Sir Charles Hedges in 1700 and ends in 1707. Ours in 1675 and ends in 1714. Now which history is correct? If yours is correct you can see at onst (sic) we lost considerably by your or your husband not being at the convention to give us the information. Your information was not before the convention. We don't say our history is correct But give it as it appeared from History--all we could gather from several persons. You lose sight of Sir Charles in 1701, we trace him to 1714. If we have made an error in the History of the Hedges we can correct all errors that may be presented and pointed out to us at our next national meeting and have it all made in a book containing all heirs at law and sell it to help pay expencies (sic). Those of course who will not take the pains to give there (sic) family history will be left out. I remain Your uncle, John H. Hedges." Marginal notes state: "Our next State meeting will be in Paris the first Monday in September" and "We are well and send our respects to you all". The old fellow's letter is given as it was written. His superficial knowledge of grammar was not helped by his wrath at his sister's daughter because she had dared to disagree with him.

This estate talk was common about that time and seems to have been promoted by a group of promoters who were eager to collect funds from gullible victims. I could point out a great many other such stories, too, from my study of genealogy. Just how long the hoax was continued is to me, but modern researchers state there was not basis in fact for belief in the existence of any connection between Sir Charles Hedges and all of these American Hedges. My last evidence at hand consists of two pamphlets which were printed in 1882 and one states that a lawyer is ready to sail for England as soon as the ready cash is at hand. $700 and 140 new members stood between them and $250,000,000 (with interest, mind you) in 1882. Those 140 folk must have decided that wild-cat oil stock brought more hope than an investment in Hedges stock.

JAMES HEDGES

He was one of the sons of Joseph Hedges, Bourbon pioneer, and James is our ancestor. I have not tried to trace all of the children of Joseph, but for the information of my McCray cousins I did find out that James' sister, Rebecca Hedges, married Samuel McCray on Aug. 15, 1796. They were married by another of our ancestors, Rev. William Forman, who was to become the father-in-law of James Hedges. William Forman was a pioneer Methodist minister in Central Kentucky.

We are fortunate in that we know a good bit about James and his early movements in Kentucky. Many years ago a Presbyterian minister by the name of Shane lived in Bourbon County, Kentucky. He loved history and took great delight in interviewing pioneers and jotting down their memoirs. The original papers are now in the library of the Historical Society of Wisconsin. They have been photostated and copies are now in two libraries in Kentucky: Filson Club and the Historical Library at Frankfort. One has to go to both places in order to get a complete study. John and James Hedges were both interviewed by Shane. I have not seen the papers on John. They bear reference number 11CC19. Those pertaining to our ancestor, James Hedges, bear number 12CC117. I give them just as Shane jotted them down: "James Hedge (Brother of John Hedge, No. 9, p47, Bourbon) lives to the left of the road, leading from Sharpsburg to Mount Sterling-near, on the banks of Hinkston. Came to Kentucky in the Fall of 1791. We staid (coming out) at Reinhart's farm on Monongahela (said to be where Braddock's defeat was) two weeks. 10 mi. above Ft. Pitt. Were 18 days on the river. St. Clair's battle was fought while we were on the river. Came down on two boats. One a family and one a horse boat. Old Peter Troutman and Peter Troutman, a son of Michael Troutman, and a son-in-law of old Peter were along."

"Maysville was called 'The Point'. A good many wagons waiting at Maysville, the point for loading when we got there. Loading of immigrants. In 1793 the waters were low, seemed as if the place was full of wagons--but little gotten. I was down and got a little.

As we were coming to Kentucky John Troutman overtook us this side of Maysville; at Ready Money Jack's (Ready Money Jack, an Irish-man). Ready Money Jack had a double cabin. It was here that Holyday was for a great while after. John Troutman, Ralph Morgan, and a good many others had gotten there before us that same night we staid there, had been out to bury the dead at St. Clair's defeat--and were just returning; they had gotten everything ready when we go there and had a great frolic that night.

Migration to Kentucky about this time--for 2 or 3 years was very great.

We spent the first winter in Paris. The winter of 1791-92. Old man Kelly, first merchant in Paris. Afterwards in partnership with Brent. Kelly was a sort of contractor for the Iron-works. Kept a small store-did a great deal of trafficking. Kelly married an old Man's daughter that lived opposite us (in a cabin), the old man's wife was dead. I forgot his name. I think there was no other frame house then in Paris except a little frame house they held court in that winter of 1791-'2. That year, however, old man Harris, a potter (came that same winter we did) who had some money, turned in to improving; built a frame house, 1792.

Old man Jackson kept the first Court house. Moved the frame Courthouse off, and kept the Post-office in it. Next year, 1792-that summer, Thomas West built a brick Court House. Smedley made the brick. Tom West had the contract. Don't know who put it up for him. Don't know that West completed it. It wasn't finished then, I think. West had to quit. Some difficulty in his affairs made him. A man by the name of Lindsay living where Cotton Town now is, an old widower. Plenty of cane where Cotton Town now is. Linsay's the only house on the side of Stoner.

Lindsay and another man built a flat to ferry Stoner with. The flat was launched about the middle of the day. Sycamore trees leaned far over the banks on each side, and their branches reached over the water. Part of a family was coming from above, moving somewhere on this side, and waited all night at our house--our house was the next one to the bank--in Paris, till the boat should be launched. Little boy had been detained up about Georgetown, going to school or something; the family had gone on before. When the boat was launched, this little boy, Dr. Webb, and James (or Thomas) Hughes, afterwards sheriff, got in to cross. The boat struck a sycamore and the water capsized the boat (was turned down and carried it against the sycamore). Webb and Hughes clung to the trees. The little boy was drowned. My brother, Charles, found the boy, after 2 or 3 days, after the water fell. Lindsay swam across. He and the other man were the proprietors. Don't know the name of the other man that was with him now. As soon as the people of the town heard of it, they came to see and laughed at Hughes and Webb. One of them a large fleshy man. Had a canoe, in which they took Hughes and Webb to the shore. The road from this side leading in to the creek was very bad, there, ground soft. They would sink in deep. Next fall, they built rock-pins and made a wooden bridge.

We moved out the last week in March, on to Stoner. We put in a crop, in 1792. Jimmy Baits was the only one who had put in any before. He had been there 3 years. Put in the 3rd crop this year. Jimmy Baits was gone a prisoner among the Indians 3 years and 6 months. Swearinger in the same company. Baits lived on Stoner, right where the Spring branch, coming down from John Hedges, empties into Stoner, between where Peter Hedges and Algan Smith now live. I heard him say myself, the crop of 1792 was his third crop. At the mouth of a spring branch.

Springs are better now than they were then. Dug a good many wells that fall, we moved out (after) until the country became settled. Was trodden and cleared.

Mentioned a good many old settlers around Bath. Gave an account of Huff and his son-in-law, Swinner. Swinner sold lots to which he could give no title. Place became dissipated. Owners of houses took away the buildings. Hauled them off.

Crawford happened on Smith at Mt. Sterling and got a hundred acres of land for one year's work.

Ralph Morgan married the widow of Douglass who was killed in the battle of Blue Licks. She was a sister of Jimmie Baits' wife.

When we came Winchester wasn't laid out yet. Troutman had a tanyard over in the bottom at Paris, on Houston, where it comes into Stoner, to the right of Paris. He went out and we got his cabin that first winter. He went up somewhere about Morgan's station and the old forge and made a tanyard there. John Troutman, son of Michael Troutman, who yet lived in Maryland. Judge Allen, then judge of the court, grandfather of Sanford Allen of Sharps-burg, then in Paris. Michael Troutman, a tanner in Maryland, near Frederick Town, near where we had lived. Heard my brother, Charles, say he helped lay out that road which they cut out for Troutman to move upon. It went from Paris to Jimmy Baits' and so on. They followed the traces leading from one neighbor to another, those times in making roads."

This is the interesting data which our ancestor gave and which sheds light upon pioneer customs and personalities. James Hedges married Amy Forman in Bourbon County, Kentucky. The famous preacher, Barton W. Stone, performed the ceremony. The return is in Marriage Book #2, page 13. Amy Forman was the daughter of one of Methodism's early ministers in Central Kentucky. His name was William Forman and I have a good bit on this family and that of his wife, Betsy Allen. In Will Book E, Bourbon wills, page 384, Feb. 6, 1815, James Hedges is named as one of the administrators of William Forman's estate along with Joseph and Aaron Forman, Charles Lander, and Robert Scott. In Order Book F, p. 129, James Hedges is listed as an heir of William Forman's. Betsy Forman was granted her dower in Order Book F, page 140. I am including all of this Forman data here for when I first found the marriage the old writing seemingly appeared to be "Amy Farmer", but I knew that my informa-tion said that she was a Forman and these other documents substan-tiate tradition.

James Hedges left a will that was probated in Bath County, Kentucky. It is in Bath Wills, Book F, page 176. It was written on July 15, 1868, and probated on October 12, 1868. In it he names his children as follows: William Hedges, Forman Hedges, Joseph F. Hedges (deceased) and James Warner (called James Warren elsewhere and we know that this is correct from the mention of him in the cited letter of John H. Hedges) Hedges, son of Joseph F. Hedges.

I have never seen this will, but Mrs. W.F. Reiner of Portland, Oregon, has done a good bit of Hedges research and sent me a copy. Letter from Miss Elizabeth Grimes, now dead, Paris, Ky., gives June 17, 1784, as the birthdate of Amy Forman and her death date as Nov. 14, 1867. This latter date is also given in the S.A.R. papers of William C. Gillespie. Oct. 10, 1868, is given by both of these as the death date of James Hedges. Mr. Hay of Detroit lists eleven children in his data;

William Hedges--born 1804; died 1876;

Jonas--born 1806, died 1841. He had this query by Jonas' name--"Was he a twin of Dorcas?" It is quite probable for it will be noted that Dorcas' birth date is for the same year and she had twins herself.

Sythia--born 1808, died 1870;

Elizabeth--born 1811, died 1890; John Harrison--born 1813, died 1860. Mr. Hay notes that he had secured complete data on this line from Mrs. J.A. Cooper of Springwood Farm, about seven miles north of Dayton, Ohio.

Sarah, born 1815;

Mary--born 1817;

Lucinda--born 1819;

James. F.--born 1822, died in 1896; Mr. Hay states that he has all--or practically all--of this line.

Dorcas Hedges--born 1806, July 28th. It will be noted that I capital-ized her name in the will and gave the spelling as it was sent to me--"DARCUS BANTY". The correct spelling is Dorcas Banta and I shall have more to say about her in the next section for she was my great-great grandmoth-er and I have a picture of her and of her husband, Abram Banta. I suspect that I have more data on the Banta family than any other line, but it is too voluminous to even attempt to give too much of it in this sketch.

[I have checked several times and can find only ten children listed.]

For the benefit of the descendants of Jemima Hedges, daughter of Joseph and Sarah Biggs Hedges, this information is inserted here: See sketch of Capt. Greenberry Reid, Perrin's History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison, and Nicholas Counties, Kentucky, page 488f. There is one mistake there, though, for it is asserted that Joseph Hedges was in the War of 1812. On page 529 of the same book is the sketch of James Hedges who was a son of Joseph and Margaret (Goulden) Hedges.

I am not asserting that the following references are all that pertain to Hedges descendants in the Perrin volume cited, but I have found treatment of them on the following pages; 450; 462; 470; 471; 476; 480; 483; 488; 522; 527; 529; 539; 542; 558; 663; 684; 693; and 757.

DORCAS HEDGES

Dorcas was one of the children named in the will of her father, James Hedges. As stated, her mother was Amy Forman. On page 732 of the Perrin book is a sketch of the husband of Dorcas Hedges, Abram Banta. In this article it is stated that they were married in 1828. However, I am inclined to believe that another date is correct. I fail to recall whether I have looked up the court record on this. In the early 1880's a genealogy of the Banta family was published which was called "A Frisian Family". Theodore Melvin Banta was the editor and it is considered to be one of the finest works of its kind that ever came from the press. I was able to borrow one from one of the Bourbon clan and had everything that pertained to the Kentucky branch copied. He included all data on our line from 1659 down to my great-grandmother, Margaret Lucinda Banta Campbell. In his data on Abram Banta and Dorcas Hedges he gave their marriage date as September 4, 1824.

MARGARET LUCINDA BANTA

Margaret was the daughter of Abram Banta and Dorcas Hedges Banta. She was born May 28, 1833, and married Thomas Metcalfe Campbell on December 22, 1853. Thomas Metcalfe Campbell was the son of John Preston Campbell and Jane Lee Metcalfe and was born on January 2, 1832. He died on March 24, 1884, and Margaret Lucinda Banta Campbell died on August 1, 1918. I recall her for she lived until I was eleven years old. I visited her home once in Carlisle and then we were at her bedside just one day before she died in 1918. We had been up to Maysville to visit my mother's father, Dr. Bernard Bascom Bailey, who was pastor of the Baptist church there.

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BANTA Family

HENRY BANTA, born Jan 22nd 1762 in Pennsylvania, married Sally Shook (or Shuck), born Oct. 27, 1761 in Pennsylvania

Henry Banta came into Kentucky from Pennsylvania in 177[?] (one of Kentucky's hardest winters) and by his own statement (Vet. Admin. pension application) came to what is now Jefferson and the fort where he settled is there. He came to Dutch Station "about six or seven miles from the Falls of the Ohio" and enlisted during the Revolution as a spy and ranger at the Station. A monument for the Old Dutch Station (according to the Filson Club map) is between St. Matthews and Taylorsville Road on Beargrass Creek. He was wounded near there in the shoulder by an Indian and went from there to the Indian campaign with General George Rogers Clark in Ohio and returned to the fort. He left there in 1783 and re-enlisted in Fort Harrod and served there as a "spy and ranger" - also doing guard duty. That makes the replica of Old Fort Harrod more interesting to us. After the War he came to Shelby County and was a charter member and owner of the Lord Dutch Colony.

Later they moved to the fort at Bryant's Station and then to the Flat Rock precinct in Bourbon Co. and built, with the help of his sons, a substantial brick residence. This was later the home of Peter Banta, his son. All the furniture in the house was made to order, among the pieces was a handsome "grand father's" clock which is now the property of a Mrs. Fisher in Carlisle, granddaughter of Peter Banta. There were ten children in Henry Banta's Family, six daughters and four sons - Viz. - Polly, who married Mr. Develley, Henry, who married Miss Jennie Fulton, Margaret, who married Gen. Sam Fulton, Andrew, who married Betsy Hayden, Peter, who married Judith Zachery, Rachel, who married James Bryan, Sally, who married Wm. Boardman, Betsy, who married Peter Vanice, Anna, who married Reason Brace, and Abram Banta, who married Dorcas Hedges in 1828.

ABRAM BANTA: On page 732 of the Perrin book is a sketch of Abram Banta. The sketch goes thus:

"Abram Banta, farmer, P.O. Carlisle; youngest son of Henry Banta (see Peter Banta's history). He was born April 18, 1805, and attended school about three months, during which time he received his theoretical education. He remained with his parents until in the year 1839, when he came to the farm upon which he now resides. He was married in 1828 to Miss Dorcas Hedges, born July 28, 1806, to James and Annie (an error, her name was Amy. B.D.) (Forman) Hedges, who were heirs in the famous "Hedges Estate". The Bantas and Hedges were among the early settlers in the "Region" and noted for their longevity. Mr. Banta is the father of eight children, all of whom grew to maturity. They were:

Scythia A., born Dec. 24, 1829, was wife of Samuel Fulton;

James H., born Aug. 14, 1831, both of whom (he means, of course, Scythia and her brother, James H.) are residing at Ridge Farm, Vermillion County, Illinois;

MARGARET L., born May 28, 1833, and wife of Thomas Campbell, residing in Headquarters Precinct;

Andrew J., died a prisoner at Camp Morton, Aug. 20, 1864, aged twenty-nine years (I have a letter written by a nephew of Abram, Miles Gillespie, telling of the death of this Confed-erate soldier and enclosing a lock of his beard and hair. B.D.)

Sarah F., born April 4, 1839, died March 19, 1877, leaving one child, Nannie;

The next item is confusing and I merely give it as recorded--

J.M., the father, Edwin Colling(s), engaged in business at Carlisle (The Banta Genealogy states that this was Sarah Francis and her husband was Edmund Collins, but I do not get the J.M. connection unless the printer made an error for with J.M. there are nine children listed as stated. however, the Banta book only lists eight children and there is no J.M. among them. B.D.)

William F., born May 28, 1841, farming in Edgar County, Illinois;

Elizabeth, a twin sister to William F., wife of Lon Campbell (Note: Lon or Leonidas Campbell was named for Leonidas Metcalfe, his uncle, and was a brother to my great-grandfa-ther, Thomas Metcalfe Campbell who married Margaret Lucinda Banta. B.F.D.) of Carlisle;

Amie Maria, born Aug. 9, 1847, wife of Henry Bogart of Vermil-lion County, Ind. (Note: I think that they meant Illinois instead of Indiana for I have some old letters from this branch out in Illinois. B.D.)

The parents are vigorous old people, highly esteemed citizens of the community in which they live, and with their family belong to the Christian Church."

Abram Banta was born April 18, 1805, and died February 12, 1883. Dorcas Hedges Banta was born July 28, 1806, and died February 6, 1888. The original pictures of this old couple are in the possession of Thomas Worthington Campbell in Lexington, Kentucky. T.W. Campbell is the son of Abram Banta Campbell who was the brother of my grandmother, Pauline Campbell Davis.

I stated that I had a great deal of data on the Banta family. I might say here that Abram Banta was the son of Henry Banta and Sally Shuck. I have this family line clear on back into Holland. The first one came to New Amsterdam in 1659. The first of the family came into Kentucky in 1779-80 and I have the history of the various migrations. It is fascinating history and very interest-ing. A distant cousin is bringing the Banta family up to date and she has the data on our line and is including it even though most lines are considered completed when the female marries and only male Bantas are sketched.


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DAVIS Family

John Davis - Perrin's History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison, and Nicholas has a sketch (page 538) on Abram Henson Davis in which it says that Abram Henson was the grandson of John Davis of Virginia. John Davis was a Rev. soldier from Virginia and raised a family of ten children--2 sons and 8 daughters. He moved to Ohio and later to Missouri where he died. He was drawing a pension for Rev. services at the time of his death. That was my clue so I wrote to the Veteran's Administration in Washington, D.C., and gave them my data. There is only one John Davis who fits that description so I am positive that I have the right man. Here is what information they have on him: John Davis was born Aug. 19, 1757 or 58--place or parents not stated on his pension application. Enlisted in Rev. while resident of Prince William County, Va., in Spring of 1775, served three months under Capt. Heath as in his company, Col. Levin Powell's Va. Regiment. Immediately re-enlisted and served as and wagoner under Wagonmaster John Morris. 15 months entire length of service. While on visit to relatives in North Carolina, he enlisted in Rowan County (I have not had chance to investigate this county but Jefferson Davis' people came from this section) sometime in March, 1780, and served in Capt. Lowman's Co., Col. Lytle's North Carolina regiment. He was taken prisoner at Charleston, S.C., and was released on parole at end of 8 days. In a short time he re-enlisted and served one month in Capt. Hedrick's Co. to guard Char-leston from the Tories. He applied for a pension on August 10, 1832, at which time he was living in Perry Township, Pickaway County, Ohio. In the fall of 1843 he moved to Buchanan Co., Missouri, and died May 31, 1844. His administrator was John Deverss whose address was St. Joseph, Missouri, in 1847. The papers of John Davis (S. 2155) contain no mention of wife or children.

James Davis was the son of John Davis (Perrin - p. 538). He was born ____________. He married Margaret Moore of Bourbon County, Sept. 8, 1808, at home of John Moore (her brother, I believe) in Bourbon by a M.E. preacher. James enlisted in War of 1812 in Adams Co., Ohio, and served from July 29, 1813 till Sept. 9, 1813 as in Capt. Caleb Haskings Co. of Ohio militia. Discharged at Upper Sandusky, Ohio. James was thrown from a young horse in Houston Creek near Paris, Ky., and drowned on January 20, 1823. His widow was left with several children - Perrin says 7 but grandfather said 4 - [he then lists only three] Abram Henson; John Isaac; and a daughter (name?) who married Lyde Ater of Four Corners, Ohio. Margaret Moore Davis applied for bounty land due of war services, Dec. 20, 1850. She then lived in Pickaway Co. Ohio (you'll note that John Davis lived here and she evidently went to live with her in-laws after James' death - thus confirming that Perrin was correct about John Davis.

[The right edge of this page didn't copy, so I will be missing some text or will infer it from the context.] She was allowed 40 acres on warrant #88365-40-50 under Act of Sept. 28, 1850. She applied July 10, 1855, for additional land under Act of Mch. 3, 1855. She was granted 120 acres on warrant 74160-1___-55. In 1855 she gave her age as 69 years but did not give parents nor place (I believe that her father was Thomas Moore who came from Ireland to Va. in 1770 to escape being Roman Catholic priest, but Mr. John V. Moore and I can't straighten out a date. We know that the Fulton in our name comes from Fulton Moore his descendent and grandfather assured me that we are kin). Sept. 5, 1874, she applied for a pension but James hadn't served long enough. In 1874, she was living at Pleasant hill, Cass County, Missouri. In December, 1852, one E.S. Davis (was he James' brother?) witnessed an affidavit made by her in Pickaway. In 1851 John Moore and Elisha Stewart stated before magistrate that they were present at her marriage in Franklin Co., Ohio, relation not stated. In 1874 Andrew Mers of Jackson Co., Missouri, and John Wilson, Pleasant Gap, Bate[?] County, Missouri, stated that they had been well acquainted with her for 47 and 50 years respectively. When she died I've not been able to learn.

Abram Henson Davis, son of James and Margaret Moore Davis, was born January 24, 1817. He married Catherine Laughlin on September 15, 1839. The minister was the famous "Raccoon" John Smith. In Frankfort at the State Historical Library this marriage is listed as "Hinson" Davis and "Cathrin" Laughlin with explanation that it and about ten oth-ers were found in an attic in Montgomery Co., among papers of this old preacher and spelling is his own. Perrin says, "Abram Henson Davis inherited by his wife 100 acres in Bourbon where he settled and by industry and economy he has added to it from time to time until he now owns 576 acres three miles East of North Middletown. Notwithstanding he has had his residence twice destroyed by fire during his married life and each time caught him without any insurance. His not a man that forfeits much of his valuable time on account of politics, yet he always votes the Democratic ticket" - p. 538. Abram Henson died ______-____ 1892. Catherine Laughlin was born ___________ 1818 and died Nov. 2, 190[?, possibly a "2"]

Thomas Isaac Davis - born April 15, 1856; died June 2, 1937. He married Pauline Campbell, Sept. 4, 1877, at home of Abram Banta by Rev. Reynolds of Christian Church in Nicholas Co. Pauline Campbell was born Oct. 12. 1860, and died Feb. 9, 1928.

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CAMPBELL Family

You can readily see that there is more material on grandmother's people. Let's start into that even though I may get writer's cramps before I finish it! First - Campbell family. Uncle Abe tells me that Harry Campbell came over here from Scotland. He knows nothing about where he settled or who his wife was. His son was William and that's all he knows about him. There are numerous William Campbells' marriage records in M[?, Montgomery maybe, since it's adjacent to Bourbon] and Bourbon but I'll have to trace him through his will. He had several sons - John Preston (our ancestor), William, Harry, Albert, James, and daughter Nannie, who married Dr. Kenny. John Preston Campbell married Jane Lee Metcalfe (can't find date). I don't know their birth or marriage dates but she died January 10, 1839. The following year he married her sister, Mary Ann Metcalfe. We are descended from the first marriage. He died August 19, 1855. There is a Lucile Campbell in Frankfort who is descended from the second marriage and her grandmother (daughter-in-law of John Preston) is still living. I've sent a list of questions for the old lady to answer but so far haven't got an answer. She may know what William's wife was named. I'll guarantee that they were in the Revolution if they could find a stick or a gun! John Preston and Jane Lee had several children and their son, Thomas Metcalfe Campbell was our great-grandfather. He was born January 2, 1832, and died March 24, 1884. On December 22, 1853, he married Margaret Lucinda Banta. She was born May 28, 1833, and died Aug. 1, [?]. On October 22, 1861, he went to Prestonburg, Ky., and became a member of John Hunt Morgan's cavalry. He was First Lt. - Battalion Mounted Riflemen, Company D.

I have never been able to unravel the Campbell family line beyond John Preston Campbell. We know that he and Thomas "Stonehammer" Metcalfe were business partners for I have an old annual settlement of the store at Forest Retreat for 1839 (I am not positive of the date, but I have it in my papers at the house. B.D.). John Preston Campbell married first the daughter of Thomas Metcalfe who was named Jane Lee Metcalfe. Jane Lee was the mother of Thomas Metcalfe Campbell. After her death he later married her sister, Mary Ann Metcalfe. In the Sesquicentenial magazine issued by Kentucky there are pictures of the governor's wives. There is a picture of a woman and under it is the name, Mary Ann Metcalfe. This is evidently an error for Thomas Metcalfe was the tenth governor of Ky. and his wife was named Nancy Mason Metcalfe. At any rate, this picture resembles my aunt, Bertie Davis McCray, so much that it is odd.

Thomas Metcalfe Campbell attended school at Blue Licks and was taught by James G. Blaine. He served in the Mexican War and then became a Confederate captain. I have his old Confederate army blanket with the regimental numbers on it. I also have an old letter written to him by his brother, John Campbell, who was a major in the Union Army. John had arranged for Thomas' release from Federal prison for Thomas had been captured while serving under the cavalry general, John Hunt Morgan. I have a great many letters written by John and also his picture in uniform.

PAULINE CAMPBELL

She was the daughter of Thomas Metcalfe Campbell and Margaret Lucinda Banta Campbell. Pauline Campbell was born on October 12, 1860, and died on Feb. 9, 1928. Thomas Isaac Davis was born on April 15, 1855, and died on June 2, 1937. They were my grandpar-ents and I have spent many happy hours in their home at Winchester. Both of them are buried there. My grandfather Davis was a horseman and I have pictures of several horses that he trained. I can still recall his indignation when the family decreed that he must ride no more horses after one stumbled and fell with him. He was then in his seventies and felt that he was still active and alert enough to ride.

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METCALFE Family

JOHN METCALFE was a graduate of Cambridge who emigrated to Virginia about 1650 and was a teacher and principal of schools in that colony. [His wife's name runs off the page. The first four letters of her first and last names are "Dian" and "Bank", Diane or Diana Banks, perhaps, but I'm just guessing.] John Metcalfe, their child, became the Reverend Captain John Metcalfe.

REV. CAPT. JOHN METCALFE was born in Faquier County, Virginia in 1724. His third wife was Sarah Dent Chinn. He was well educated for his time and possessed a library of standard English works of his day. He was wounded by a shot from a British gun during the Revolutionary War. He took his family to Kentucky in 1784 locating in Fayette Co, but several years later he purchased land in Nicholas County where he died in 1799. He died in Robertson County, Kentucky in 1799.

THOMAS METCALFE, tenth Gov. of Kentucky (1828-32) was born in Fauquier County, Virginia - March 20, 1780. He was the son of Capt. John Metcalfe and his 3rd wife, Sarah Dent Chinn Metcalfe.

Thomas was educated at a country school and at the age of sixteen was apprenticed as a stone mason to an older brother. The death of his father devolving on him the care of the family, he left the slaves to work the farm and sought contracts for stone work in the country about him. He devoted his leisure hours to study and applying himself.

He especially liked history and soon developed remarkable intellec-tual abilities, at the age of 27 he began to take part in political discussions and at once became a conspicuous figure and popular leader in the public affairs of Kentucky. He served in the war of 1812 fought under Boswell in 1813, distinguished himself for gallantry at _________ _______ [looks like Hart Hneigs] for which he was complimented by Gen. Harrison. He was elected to the Kentucky Legislature _______ [looks like "heuring", probably "during", but it don't look like "during"] his absence in the field, in 1819 he was sent as representative to Congress where he sat until his election to the [the line goes off the bottom of the page. I can see "torial cha", so I'd guess "gubernatorial chair"] of Kentucky in Aug 1828 and filled the latter office for four years.

During his tearm [that's what it says] a common school law was enacted and as _____ [maybe "her"] measures passed for the promotion of education in the state. He was a state senator 1834-36, was president of the board of internal improvement in 1840 and in 1848 was appointed U.S. Senator to fill the unexpired term of John J. Crittenden, holding that post from June 23, 1843 to March 3rd, 1849 when he retired to his farm, "Forest Retreat".

Gov. Metcalfe was possessed of uncommon intelligence and force of character and was one of the most naturally eloquent man of his day. He made the speech nominating Gen. William Henry Harrison for the Presidency at the convention held in Harrisburg, Pa in 1840 and on the latter's election was offered by him the position of Secretary of War, which however he declined on account of failing health. He was proud of his early struggles and labors as a "stone mason" and delighted in being called "the Old Stone Hammer". He was married about 1806 to Nancy, daughter of Burgess and Jane (Lee) Mason. He died at his home in Nicholas County, Ky - Aug 18th 1855.


[Another note on Thomas Metcalfe:]

Thomas Metcalfe was born in Fauquier Co., Virginia on the 20th of March 1780, son of Captain John Metcalfe by his third and last wife. He served in the war of 1812 - was elected to Legislature from Nicholas Co. Ky. in 1813. Returned from the War of 1812 a general - Elected as governor of Ky. in 1828. Also served in both houses of U.S. Congress. He married in 1805 Nancy Mason, daughter of Burgess Mason of Virginia. Burgess Mason married Jennie Lee, sister of General Henry Lee of Mason Co. Ky. (Picture given in Collin's History of Ky.) Jennie Lee was the daughter of Stephen Lee and Ann Murphy Lee of Virginia. Stephen Lee was the son of Richard Lee, son of Hancock Lee, son of Thomas Lee, the progenitory of all the Lee family, who came to Virginia in 1649.


[And a third piece]

Thomas Metcalfe - He was a distinguished Kentuckian--native of Fauquier County, Virginia,--and was the son of a Revolutionary soldier, John Metcalfe. His mother's name was Rhoda Dent, but we know nothing of her people. As stated, Thomas Metcalfe was the tenth governor of Ky. (1828-1832). He was also a Congressman and U.S. Senator. His wife was Nancy Mason and she was the daughter of an early Mason County pioneer and he was descended from the famous Lee family of Virginia. I have had my papers accepted on this line and belong to the Society of Lees of Virginia.


And a fourth one, from A History of Nicholas County, page 445:

Thomas Metcalfe was born in Fauquier County, Va. on Mar. 20, 1780. In 1785, he came with his family to Fayette County, Ky. and in a few years moved with them to Nicholas County. He received only the basics of an eduction, but was quite interested in learning.

At 16, Metcalfe became an apprentice stone mason under his elder brother. He was to become an expert in this trade. Some of his notable accomplishments were the old governor's mansion in Frankfort, courthouses at West Union, Ohio, at Greensburg, Ky., and others. He laid the foundations for the courthouse in Paris, Ky. and for the first Nicholas County courthouse is Carlisle. He also built his home, Forest Retreat, here in Nicholas County, in 1826, on land which he bought in 1816 for $16.00 an acre. He earned the nickname "Old Stone Hammer" from his masonry and fierce oratory skills.

Metcalfe served as a captain in the War of 1812. He represented Nicholas County in the lower branch of the Kentucky legislature in 1812-1817. In 1818, he was elected to Congress and re-elected four times. He served his county as Sheriff from Jan. 25, 1819 to Feb. 15, 1819. In 1828, he resigned from Congress to run for governor and was elected. He served from 1829-1833, the tenth governor of Kentucky. Metcalfe served four years in the state senate from Nicholas and Bracken counties, 1834-38. In 1848-49 he filled by appointment the unexpired term of John j. Crittenden in the U.S. Senate.

Metcalfe entertained many notable Americans at Forest Retreat including Andrew Jackson on his way to his inauguration in 1829 and Gen. William Henry Harrison in 1840, while he was campaigning for President. Henry Clay often visited and it was he who coined the name Forest Retreat. John J. Crittenden, Santa Anna and many others were entertained at Metcalfe's home. After his wife's death, Metcalfe sold Forest Retreat and lived with his daughter and son-in-law at the old stage coach inn across the road from his home. He died here of Cholera on Aug. 18, 1855 at the age of 75.

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LAUGHLIN Family

As to the Laughlin family - I can find nothing back of John Laughlin but I still have hopes. I've found an early Laughlin will in Fayette, but I haven't connected them with our line. I think that they are Irish; sometimes spelled O'Laughlin. [During my high-school days, the minister of our church was Robert Laughlin, who had come to Frankfort from Ireland. He pronounced the name "Lock lin".] John Laughlin married Patsey Luckey (y or ie) on June 2, 1810. She is called Catherine Laughlin in her father's will and John Laughlin is named as an executor. "Mack" told me to write to Mildred Laughlin and she and her father have been quite kind in aiding me; making a trip back to our Davis family graveyard for me. Her father assures me that Patsey and Catherine are the same person. Her tombstone is in old Cane Ridge graveyard and she is called "Caty Laughlin consort of John Laughlin" and records that she was 25 when she died - born 1794, died 1819. John Laughlin later married [?] Trimble.

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LUCKEY Family

Now the Luckey family; it is spelled Luckey (Veterans' Administra-tion records), Lucky, and Luckie. We begin with John Luckey of North Carolina. He was a Revolutionary soldier from North Carolina - record in N.C. Auditor's Report, Salisbury District - Western Military #8955 -12-9-4; also N.C. Archives, Vol. 22, page 1014 (or 1814 - I got this from Miss Elizabeth Grimes of Paris and her writing is a bit "wavy" in spots). He came to Bourbon after the Revolution and his will, dated Dec. 28, 1793, is in Bourbon Will book G179-180; probated Feb. 1824. He named his sons, Robert, Joseph, and daughters Jenny, Keeza, Margaret, Elizabeth, Esther, and Sally.

His son, Robert, is our ancestor. He, too, was a Revolutionary soldier. He was born in N.C. on Feb. 6, 1760. He enlisted in N.C. and served as from Sept. 1778 six months in Capt. Wm. Johnston's Co.. From May 1779 - 3 months in Capt. Armstrong's Co.. In 1780 - 3 months in Capt. Armstrong's Co. and was in battle of Ramsour's Mill. In 1780 - 3 months in Capt. Cowan's Co. and was in battle of Charlotte. From sometime late in 1780, three months in Capt. Cowan's Co.. In 1781, six months in Capt. Dickson's Co. and was in the battle of Guilford Court House. Vet. Admin. Records - Robt. Luckey, #38157. He was allowed pension on application as of Nov. 30, 1833, while resident of Bourbon. Robert was twice married. 1. To Polly Thorn. 2. To Catherine Foster (our line). They were married April 9, 1793, in Bourbon and in bond her father's name is given as John Foster. I believe that he is a Rev. soldier, too, as Mrs. Ardery names a John Foster as a Rev. soldier who died in Bourbon. I haven't been able to confirm it as yet.


Book: "Forebears of the Four Dunbars" By Carl & Lorene Dunbar

Note: This is the book where I found this story but the information is noted in another book called "History of Kentucky and Kentuckians" by E. Polk Johnson.

Sarah (Biggs) Hedges -- Mrs. Sarah Hedges, nee Biggs, was a characteristic type of the noble pioneer mothers. Of gentle birth and unaccustomed to the ruder conditions of life and to handsome and striking appearance she numbered among her personal accomplishments that of being a thorough horsewoman and an excellent judge of the qualities constituting fine horses. She was remarkable for her industry, piety and Christian influence and took an active interest in the Baptist church with which she had long been associated and to which she was a pillar of strength prior to leaving her native state, as evidence by the records of Frederick Maryland "July 10, 1750, Sarah Hedges appears among the number of persons who entered into an agreement for the re-organization of a Baptist congregation."

Mr. and Mrs. Hedges had evidently been lured from their desirable Maryland home by glowing representations made by friends who had preceded them to the backwoodsman's paradise in whose primeval solitude they were destined to rear an interesting family and inculcate those high principles of domestic virtue and exalted conceptions of duty which have exerted a powerful influence over the descendants to the present, thus verifying what had often been claimed-that many generations preside at the birth of every individual.

To Mrs. Hedges is due our highest tribute of praise for the noble and active and humanizing part she took in reclaiming the wilderness from savagery and converting it into a civilized habitation for man. Her mental strength was indelibly impressed upon her children. Upon her youngest son, Samuel she especially exerted an influence for uprightness and worth and the veneration he bore his mother was an uplifting force throughout life. Not one of the children of her heart and home proved unfaithful to the influence brought to bear by her moral worth, all becoming worthy citizens who left their impress for good upon the community in which they lived. After the death of her husband in 1804, Mrs. Hedges continued to live at the old home with John until 1822, when she entered the higher service. Both are buried in a locust grove within sight of their home..


Spouses –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 1: Sarah BIGGS Birth: 1750 Frederick County, Maryland Death: 1822 Bourbon County, Kentucky Age: 72 Father: John BIGGS (-1760) Mother: Mary (<1721-1784) Marriage: 1770 Children: John (1771-1857) Charles (1773-) Rebecca (1775-) Joseph (1778-1829) James (1783-1868) Jonas (1785-) Jemima (1790-) Samuel (1792-1874) Mary (1795-) (4) Name: Joseph HEDGES –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Birth: 1690 England Death: 1732 Prince George County, Maryland Age: 42 Father: Samuel HEDGES Mother: Ann FENWICK (-1703)

Misc. Notes THE EARLY HEDGES, THEIR LAND AND HOMES By Don C. Wood

John Vanmeter and his family moved to the present Berkeley, Jefferson Co. area in 1734. At this time Berkeley Co. was a part of Orange Co., Va. John Vanmeter was granted two large land grants 1,786 acres on the 12th of June 1734 which was located on Joshiah Jones mill run, now called Rocky Marsh. Route 45 from Martinsburg to Shepherdstown pass through this grant in the area of the Berkeley-Jefferson Co. line. The other land granted on the same day, 885 acres on the east side of the Opecquon Creek. The old stone bridge at Vanmeter's Ford is located on this land grant. John Vanmeter's children all moved to this area with him. His daughter Sarah married James Davis; Daughter Rebecca married Solomon Hedges Esq.; his son Abraham Vanmeter married Ruth Hedges Frederick Co., Va. WBI, p. 52 & Shepherd, Duke, Vanmeter History by Gordon Smythe and DAR Book). Abraham Vanmeter born 1721, died 1783, married 1742 to Ruth Hedges born-1722, died 1761. Abraham Vanmeter owned several larger tracts of land along the Opecquon Creek and the area of Newton D. Baker Hospital. Abraham, who served in the Revolution (DAR Book) and Ruth Hedges Vanmeter had 10 children: Jacob Vanmeter (who served in the Revolutionary War (DAR Records); Isaac, Abraham Jr.; Joseph; Rebecca; Mary; Ruth; Hannah; Daniel and John (WB1, p.348, BC). I am a descendant of this family as are many other hundreds of present Berkeley Countians. All of the Vanmeter-Hite land was east of the Opecquon Creek. In 1735 Alexander Ross and Morgan Bryan received orders from the Governor of Virginia for 1,000 acres of land for each family they could settle up to 70,000 acres. On November 12, 1735, Morgan Bryan was granted 1,020 acres lying and being on Tully's Branch. On the same day Edward Davis was granted an adjoining tract of 875 acres on Tully's Branch, a branch of the Hungoluta River. Richmond, Va. Land grant records which are also on microfilm in Berkeley County Courthouse) Tully's Branch is the stream that lies at the foot of the mountain east of present Hedgesville. On the 10th day of April 1738 James Davis of Orange Co., Va. divided his land grant into three tracts. He sold 300 acres to Richard Morgan, 300 acres to Peter Hedges and 275 acres to Solomon Hedges (DB2, p. 475, 488, 481,Orange Co., Va. on microfilm Berkeley-County Courthouse). In the same year, 1738, Frederick County, Virginia, was formed from Orange County but the Court did not meet until 1743. Morgan Bryan and his wife, Martha, of Frederick Co., Va. sold on II January 1743 their 1,020 acre tract of land on Tully's Branch to Joshua Hedges for 46 pounds current money (DBI, p. 27, Frederick Co., Va.). Joshua Hedges did not keep the southern most part of this tract long. He sold 220 acres I September 1747 to Robert Paul. Joshua Hedges received a land grant of 391 acres 7 November 1754 from Lord Fairfax. This land is located where the James Rumsey School is today and joined on the west the land he had purchased from Morgan Bryan and the land that Peter Hedges had purchased on the south. Jonas Hedges received a land grant of 261 acres on 7 November 1754 from Lord Fairfax. This tract of land lies on the south side of Joshua Hedges's grant (Land grant records, Richmond, Va. & Land grant plat map by Galtjo Gertseema).

In the year 1754 we have five Hedges families living in what is present day Berkeley County, W. Va. Joshua Hedges born April 14, 1717, died February 16, 1790. Married Elizabeth Chapline. Jonas Hedges married Agnes Powelston; Peter Hedges married Elizabeth Seeds; Ruth Hedges who was married to Abraham Vanmeter, and Solomon Hedges who married Rebecca Vanmeter. These were all children of Joseph Hedges who emigrated to America in 1710 and died at Monocacy, Maryland, 1732. There were also five children in this family which did not come to this area: Charles; Joseph; Catherine; Dorcas and Samuel (Will of Joseph Hedges in The Christine Bergen papers Berkeley County Courthouse). Joseph Hedges was the son of Charles Hedges who died in England in 1720. His father was Sir Charles Hedges who died in 1714.

On 14 September 1752, Charles Goff received a warrant from Lord Fairfax to survey a parcel of waste and ungranted land at the Gap of the North Mountain in Frederick Co. This was a survey run for 150 acres, which Charles Goff assigned to William Chapline. The survey plat on November 24, 1752 shows the land was joined on the east by Jonas and-Joshua Hedges land; on the north by Capt. Morgan and the Meetinghouse. For some reason the land was not granted until after Lord Fairfax died. On the 23rd of February 1789, for fifteen shillings Sterling Governor Berkley Randolph of Virginia granted the land to William Chaplin. This is part of the land where Hedgesville was founded. Apparently the William Chapline who received the land grant was the son of William who purchased the survey from Charles Goff. On the 6th of August 1768, when Richard Riggs ran a survey on the land, which later became part of Hedgesville, the line ran along William Chaptine heirs. This survey was for Gaspard Bonner for 334 3/16 acres. This survey, or land grant, does not mention the Chapel but does show the Warm Spring Road, which led from Rawling's on Back Creek to the Warm Springs. John and Reuben Bonner were the chain carriers. This tract of land was not granted for several years after the survey. Richard Riggs died before the land was granted and a Mr. John McCool attested to his signature in March 1788. The land was granted for I pound 15 shillings Sterling to Gasper Bonner (spelled Banner on grant) on the 24th of July 1789. Samuel Hedges II received a land grant for 50 acres 27 November 1795. This land is located on top of North Mountain near High Knob, which was on the Chapline grant. Richard Riggs who did surveying for Lord Fairfax obtained a warrant for a survey of Cannon Hill in 1768. Richard Rigg died in 1785 leaving the survey to his nephew Richard Wood of Cumberland Co., England. The land was granted to Richard Wood 4 December 1788. This is how my Wood family came to the Hedgesville area. I am a descendant of Richard Rigg's sister Elizabeth who was married to John Wood and lived in Cumberland Co. England (Richard Rigg will Frederick Co., Va.).

We will start at the southernmost part of the Hedges 1,020-acre tract. There is a lovely old brick house here, which is owned by Miss Virginia Wilson. Miss Wilson is a descendant of Hezekiah Hedges. Hezekiah's daughter married Harrison S. Seibert. The property then went to his son, Luther Seibert, who married Nora Riner. They had one son which was killed by a train at Flaggs Crossing. When Luther Seibert died the property went to his only sister, Mary Emma Wilson's children, Lewis, Henry and Hall Wilson. Miss Virginia Wilson inherited the property from her father, Lewis Wilson. On down Mountain Road we next come to a very old log house owned by Mr. & Mrs. Fredie Blair which is located on the other part of the Paul land. This house was in the Paul family for many years and later went to the Robinsons. Next we "come to the lovely old stone house of Samuel Hedges, owned by H. P. Thorn heirs. Picture 1. On 16 June 1772-Joshua Hedges, Sr. deeded for-5 shillings 200 acres to his son Samuel Hedges. (DB 1,p. 74) Shortly after, Samuel Hedges built the lovely front stone part of the present house. Samuel Hedges served in the Revolutionary War (Court Minute Book 3, p. 401).

Samuel Hedges left his lovely dwelling house with 230 acres to der of Hedgesville), born December 16, 1772, died September 4, 1849, married October 21, 1800 Catharine Morgan, born July 20, 1773, died March 29, 1855, daughter of Rev. Morgan Morgan 11, son of Morgan Morgan. Both buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery, Hedgesville. 2. Hezekiah Hedges born August 21, 1796, died April 25, 1847, married November 20, 1824 Elizabeth Snodgrass. Both buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery, Hedgesville. 3. Joshua Hedges married June 11, 1804 Ruth Southwood, daughter of Edward Southwood (WB 7, p. 352). 4. Ruth Hedges, born 1787, died September 10, 1845, married September 28, 1814 James H. Robinson. Both buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery, Hedgesville. Rebeccah Hedges who married March 27, 1793 Abraham Robinson. 6 Phebe Hedges who married January 17, 1825 Robert Vincent. 7. Elizabeth Hedges who married a Morgan. 8. Samuel Hedges III who married March 30, 1807 Charity Shields, daughter of William Shields. Samuel Hedges III acquired much land on the west side of Back Creek and paid taxes in 1816 on 1,175 acres listed as Rawlings Mill Race. (Land Book 1816).

Samuel Hedges left his lively dwelling house with 230 acres to his wife Rebeccah for her life and then to his son Hezekiah (WB 7, p. 207)' In 1843 Hezekiah Hedges and wife Elizabeth gave a deed of trust on all land they owned in Berkeley and Morgan Counties and the town of Hedgesville and the 220 acres Hedges Mansion Farm (DB 47, p. 226). The trustees were Henry Seibert and John W. Hedges who sold 211 acres to Thomas Vanmeter for $5,796.75 1/2 Cents (DB 49, p. 218). On 31 March 1860 Thomas Vanmeter and Mary, his wife, traded the Hedges Farm to his son, Philip Carmine Vanmeter, for his interest in land Philip had inherited from his uncle, Philip Carmine (DB 61, p. 41). Philip Vanmeter born July 25, 1823, died January 15, 1871 married Susan Mead Hedges born February 3, 1839, died March 21, 1913, daughter of Josiah Hedges son of Solomon. The back section of the house was built by the Vanmeters. Philip Vanmeter and his wife Susan Mead Hedges Vanmeter had three children: J. Thomas Vanmeter died 12 January 1864 aged I year; Sarah E. Vanmeter died March 1, 1871 aged 7 months and Mary S. Vanmeter. Both are buried Greenhill Cemetery. Philip Vanmeter left the home place to his wife and young children. Philip's wife Susan married a second time to Adam S. Wolfe (WB 22, p. 141). The farm and orchard then went to Philip Vanmeter's only surviving child, Mary S. Vanmeter Faulkner, who left it by her will dated 11 March 1931 to her son, Philip 0. Faulkner. In 1941 Philip 0. Faulkner sold the old Hedges home with 211 acres to H. P. Thorn. It is now owned by his heirs. Mr. Philip 0.Faulkner who is 93 is one of Berkeley County's oldest Hedges descendants. (DB 169, p. 124 & 156).

We will now move on down Tulleses Branch to the next Hedges Farm. Joshua Hedges divided the 1,020 tract into five tracts of 200 to 220 acres each. In 1772 Joshua Hedges, Sr. sold this 200 acre tract to his son Joshua Hedges, Jr. (DB 1, p 67). In 1804 Joshua Hedges, Jr. and his wife, Mary, sold this tract to Jacob Seibert of Washington Co., Md. (DB 1, p. 95). In 1881 Jacob M. Seibert, sole heir of Michael Seibert, sold the tract to Moses C. Nadenbousch (DB 77, p. 417). The land is now owned by the Pet Milk Company and the present house was built by Moses C. Nadenbousch in 1885. We are now down to the Warm Spring Road. Part of this tract is now owned by Norman Dillon and wife. The present house is known as the John W. Hedges house. The lovely plastered brick house was built in 1879 by John W. Hedges. Picture No. 2. Joshua Hedges Sr. sold this 200 acres to his brother Jonas. This was Jonas's home plantation and named Tulusses. Jonas Hedges eldest son Benjamin born 1738, died Jan. 16, 1805; Joseph and Samuel Hedges. Jonas deeded 130 acres, part of his land grant which joined his home plantation on the east side, to his son Joseph (DB 1, p. 44), and 130 acres the same day to his son Benjamin Hedges. Jonas left his home plantation to his son Samuel II. Both Benjamin and Samuel had large families. Benjamin Hedges had Jonas, Mary Ann, James, Philip, Sarah who married Sept. 6, 1810, to William Reed, Jr.; Mary who married Jan. 18, 1810 to David Shewhan; Joseph, Solomen, John, Elijah and Elenor who married March 11, 1790 George Hood (Complete Record Book, p. 99). Samuel Hedges II married Mary Tabb June 26, 1783, and after she died he married widow Nancy Harris Sept. 22, 1807. She was the daughter of David Wolgmot (DB 27, p.307). Samuel Hedges begat Joseph, Robert, Jonas, Samuel, Seaton, Baily, William, Elizabeth, Mary, Anna, Isabella, Harriet, Sally who married Levi M. Backus 2 June 1835, Isabel who married Absolom Thatcher Feb. 24, 1828, Enoch G., and John W. Hedges. Samuel II left his home plantation to his second wife Nancy. Enoch Hedges lived on the plantation during the Civil War and was a Quartermaster for the Southern Army. After the Civil War, area residents brought a court suit against Enoch and collected $2,000.00 for supplies he had taken from them. Enoch, as administrator of Samuel's estate, sold the farm to his brother, John W. Hedges, who built the lovely present plastered brick house in 1879 (DB 61, p. 65). It was sold in 1889 to H. H. Boyd who sold it the following year to James Dillon (DB 86, p. 486, DB 87, p. 151). It went to his son, James L. Dillon, and then to the present owner, Norman Dillon (DB 141, p. 9, DB 193, p. 253). We will now travel on down the most northern section of Ridge Road to the next 220-acre tract of the original tract. This was Joshua Hedges, Sr.'s home plantation. It is believed that Joshua erected an Indian fort on this property. There is a large limestone house here. Picture No. 3. The older section of the house was built in the mid to late 1700s by Joshua who Furnished supplies during the Revolutionary War. On August 5, 1769, George Washington with Mrs. Washington and Patsy, lodged with Joshua Hedges while on a trip to the Warm Spring (George Washington Diaries 1748-1799, Vol. 1, p. 340): August 5, 1769 "Prosecuted our Journey to ye Spring (by Jacob Hites') Bated at Opeckon and lodged at Joshua Hedges". Page 344: September 9, 1769 "9 Set out on my return home about 8 oclock but broke the Chariot and made it 11 before we got a mile Reached Joshua Hedges". Mrs. Washington and Patsy accompanied him on the trip. Joshua Hedges left his home plantation of 220 acres by his will dated 21 December 1789 proved 16 February 1790, to his widow and son, Jesse. One third of the home plantation, the house and three slaves to his wife, Elizabeth Hedges. He devised the remaining two thirds of the tract of land to his son Jesse Hedges with Jesse to receive the house and other one third at the decease of Mrs. Hedges. (WB 2, p. 51). On 7 April 1801 Jesse Hedges and wife, Rachel, sold for 4,980 pounds currency of Pennsylvania, to John E. Moore the 220 acres (DB 16, p. 568). Mr. Moore kept it only a short time and sold to Samuel Hedges (DB 24, p. 377). Joshua Hedges sold 100 acres of the land to his father-in-law, Edward Southwood (DB 7, p. 352). Edward Southwood in his will of 13 November 1824, proved 13 December 1824, left the 100 acres in trust to Joshua Hedges to keep possession until his two grandsons Chapline Swearingen Hedges and Southwood Carter Hedges, became of age (WB 7, 352). Joshua Hedges in his will of 4 March 1832, proved 9 April 1832, left everything he owned to his sons Chaplin and Southwood Hedges (WB 10, p. 302). Before his death Joshua Hedges had given a deed of trust on his land to Josiah Hedges and others. On the 23rd of August 1836, Chaplin S. Hedges brought a suit against Josiah Hedges claiming the debt had been paid and his brother, Southwood Hedges, had died. During the trial it was stated that Southwood Hedges had become an Episcopal minister and died in Illinois; however, some one else stated Southwood Hedges was fond of drinking and gambling an died of cholera in New Orleans. They all agreed he was dead (Chancery Case 313). The Court decided that the debt had been paid and the land belonged to Chaplin Hedges (DBR 1, p. 196). 16 June 1837 Rev. Chapline S. Hedges sold the 220-acre plantation to Thomas Newton Lemen (DB 50, p. 56). During the Civil War Thomas N. Lemen was shot and killed in front of his corncrib (from Mrs. Eliza McLurkin). Mr. Lemen was survived by his widow the former Margaret Bfllmyer who died November 3, 1869, a daughter Sarah E. Lemen who married Joseph Bosler, and two sons Joseph N. Lemen and William M. Lemen. Joseph Lemen died unmarried October 20, 1867. This left only William Lemen and Sarah Lemen Bosler as heirs of Thomas and Margaret Lemen. Thomas Newton Lemen built the south side of the present house in the 1840s (Diary of Thomas N. Lemen owned by John K. Eckert). They divided the house and William M. Lemen received 1/2 of the house with 150 acres 3 roods and 13 square poles of the homestead farm; also 1/2 of 117 acres of wood land lying at the eastern base of Third Hill Mountain; also 1/2 of 1/3 of the farm in Jefferson County known as the Reynolds farm which they had inherited from their mother who had inherited it from her brother Solomon Billmyer, and it was agreed that Sarah E. Bosler should have 1/2 of the Mansion house and 71 acres of the homestead, 55 acres 3 roods and 31 square poles of the Wandling land and also the reversionary right in 14 acres assigned to Mrs. Wandling as dower; 1 1/2 acres bought from Mrs. Kisinger and 14 acres of wood land west of Hedgesville and 1/2 of 117 acres wood land and 1/2 of 1/3 in the Jefferson County farm. Joseph Bosler and wife, Sarah E. Bosler, purchased William Lemen's interest in the homestead farm 29 January 1881 (DB 77, p. 391) and 8 June 1891 (DB 88, p. 410) Joseph and Sarah E. Bosler lived in Cumberland Co. Pa. Joseph devised his interest in the homestead farm to his wife Sarah Bosler by will 23 May 1891. Will probated in Cumberland Co. and recorded in WB 25, p. 139, Berkeley Co. Sarah E. Bosler devised by the seventh clause of her will 21 January 1915 (WB 25, p. 278; recorded and probated Cumberland Co., Pa.) the right for Mary Bosler and Susan L. Bosler to purchase the homestead farm of 222 acres located in Berkeley County, W. Va. for $16,000.00 on the 13 July 1917 Joseph Bosler, Jr. deeded the property to Mary and Susan L. Bosler (DB 134, p. 443). On 20 October 1921 Mary Bosler unmarried and Susan L. Bosler unmarried, sold the old homestead with 208.6 acres to W. E. Branham. The old Joshua Hedges house then went to Mr. Branham's daughter, Eliza B. Branham who had married Charles McLurkin. The Joshua Hedges house remained in the Lemen family from 1837 to 1945. Thomas Newton Lemen, son of William Martin Lemen, graduated from the University of Maryland and became a well-known Hedgesville doctor. After his brother Joseph died he moved back to his father's home with his wife, his daughter Margaret Lemen who married W. E. Branham (from Mrs. Eliza B. McLurkin). On the 6th of February 1945 Eliza B. McLurkin and Charles McLurkin, her husband, sold the Hedges-Lemen farm to Dr. T. K. Oates (DB 175, p. 462). Dr. T. K. Oates left it to his wife, Altha S. Oates, who was very fond of the then called "Fort Hill" and used it as a summer home (WB 30, p. 278). Mrs. Oates left it by will to her son, Max 0. Oates, the present owner. (WB 30, p. 348). The Thomas Newton Lemen cemetery is located on the property and was reserved with the wall that encloses the cemetery in DB 134, p. 443. List of stones in the cemetery (Picture No. 4) are:


Thomas Newton Lemen Margaret (Billmyers) consort of Wife of Margaret Lemen Thos. N. Lemen Born Born Jan 15, 1807 April 24, 1803 Died Nov. 3, 1869 Died aged 62 years 9 mos 19 days July 16, 1863

John N. Henry Clay son Born Feb. 23, 1830 Died July 1840 Died Jan. 9, 1849 aged 22 days aged 18 years 10 mos 17 days


Margaret Ann Susan Mary dau Dau Born May 6, 1837 Born Sept. 21, 1835 Died June 12, 1857 Died April 2, 1862


Joseph N Son of Thos. & Margaret Lemen Born June 11, 1842 Died Oct. 20, 1867 aged 25 years 4 mos 9 days


Joshua's home farm was joined on the east by his 391 acre land grant. Joshua willed 291 acres to his son Solomon Hedges. There are two very old log houses standing today on his farm. It would appear both were built in the late 1700s. Solomon Hedges married July 28, 1769, to Sarah Vinsonheller. They had Joshua who did not marry, died May 10, 1825; buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery. Hiram Hedges who did not marry, died March 23, 1880; buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery. Mary Hedges who married August 22, 1826 John Lingamfelter. Mary Hedges Lingamfelter died January 23, 1868 and is buried at Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery. Angelina Hedges who married May 29, 1833 George H. Cunningham. Phebe who married December 21, 1820 William Lemon. Elizabeth Hedges who married April 14, 1807 David Curtis. John Hedges died May 24, 1852 aged 58 years 5 months 24 days buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery and did not marry. Josiah Hedges born January 28, 1801, died March 2, 1866 buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery married November 28, 1801 Susan Robinson born June 6, 1800, died August 26, 1867, buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery. She was the daughter of George Robinson (WB 22, p. 76). Solomon Hedges left his plantation to be divided after the decease of his wife to his four sons (WB 8, p. 295). Joshua Hedges died soon after his father and willed his share of his father's estate to his three brothers. Solomon's land ran just a little ways on the south side of the Warm Spring Road; 98 acres here went to Josiah Hedges. (WB 8, p. 298) (DB 46, p. 190) The log house here, the home of Josiah Hedges, was built in the late 1700s. Picture No. 5. Only the large front part is log, the back kitchen part was built by the Riners in the 1700s and the whole house was stuccoed over. Josiah Hedges and wife, Susan Robinson, had sons John D. Hedges buried Greenhill Cemetery on lot with his sister Susan; George T. Hedges; daughters Sarah R. Hedges who married James P. Hedges. They were living in Jackson Co., Missouri in 1872 and Susan Mead Hedges who first married Philip C. Vanmetre; after he died to Adam Wolfe. On 1 April 1872 the heirs of Josiah Hedges sold to Thomas J. Harley (DB 69, p. 48). Thomas J. Harley was a well-known doctor of Hedgesville. In his will, dated 16 November 1881, proved 16 July 1885, he mentions his five daughters Laura B. Harley, Emma G. Harley, Mary E. Ellis, Anna C. Henson and Ida V. Speck. He also mentions his office on Lot 10 in Hedgesville and adjoining lot plus another farm beside the Hedges farm (WB 23, p. 217). In 1887 the executors of his will sold the Hedges farm to George P. Riner (DB 83, p. 521). On 24 August 1896 George P. Riner and Mary, his wife, sold to John H. Riner. A blacksmith's shop was located on the north side of the old Warm Spring Road. The place then became known as Riner's Shop (DB 94, p. 182). In 1949 the executor of John H. Riner's will sold to E. M. Luttrell (DB 185, p. 638) who sold a few days later to James L. Dillon. It then went to his son Norman Dillon and then to his children Dorothea P. Coblentz and James R. Dillon who sold the old Solomon Hedges house to the Board of Education (DB 186, p. 54, WB 32, p. 414, DB 253, p. 16, DB 255, p. 554, DB 265, p. 641, DB 236, p. 536). The James Rumsey Vocational Technical Center is located on this property.

The other log house located on the Solomon Hedges farm is known as the Hiram Hedges house. The land here has never been out of the Hedges family since it was granted to Joshua Hedges 7 November 1754. Picture No. 6. In the division of Solomon Hedges's land, Lot I went to Hiram Hedges and Lot 2 to John Hedges. When John Hedges died in 1852 he left his 104 acres to his brother, Hiram Hedges (WB 17, p. 129). The log section of the house (the west side) was the home of Hiram Hedges. The east end was built by the Lingamfelters. When Hiram died in 1880 he left his land to his nephew Walter H. Lingamfelter son of his sister Mary Lingamfelter and his niece Sallie E. Myers, wife of Cromwell Myers.

In 1889 Sarah E. Myers of Jefferson County and Walter H. Lingamfelter divided Hiram's land; 101 acres went to Walter Lingamfelter (DB 86, p. 449). The land which Sallie Myers received later became the Eversole place. In 1839 Solomon Hedges's widow, Sarah, and three sons sold the land to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad which was located on the back part of the tract that went to Sallie Myers (DB 44, p. 415). On 28 January 1891 Walter H. Lingamfelter and Mary M. Lingamfelter, his wife, gave the Hedges farm to their son Walter B. Lingamfelter who had married Katie Myers Kilmer who was a granddaughter of Josiah Hedges, founder of Hedgesville. Walter B. Lingamfelter in his will of 1932 left the home farm to his wife Katie with his son Robert L. Lingamfelter to have the right to buy the home farm. He named son Paul Lingamfelter as executor (WB 28, p. 107). In 1952, after the death of Robert, Mrs. Katie Lingamfelter transferred the home place to her two daughters, Mary Hilda and Georgeanna K. Seibert who still reside in the lovely old house.

Both the Joshua Hedges house and the Hiram Hedges house are located on the last part of the old Ridge Road on the south side of the old Warm Spring Road. As we move on down the road we come to the site of the old mill - the Hedges Grist Mill. In 1817 James Hedges and Elizabeth his wife, sold the mill to Samuel Hedges IV (DB 29, p. 232). We next come to the Peter Hedges house. Solomon Hedges who had purchased part of the land in this area, sold his land to Thomas Hilyard and Allen Cox in 1765 and moved to Hampshire County (DB 10, p. 485 & 487, Frederick Co., Va.). The old log section of the Peter Hedges house was built in the mid-1700s. It has an unusually large chimney as may be seen in Picture No. 7. Deed Book 15, page 525, states that Peter Hedges devised his Berkeley County land to be divided equally between his two sons Peter and William Hedges. Peter Hedges's will has not been found in either the Berkeley Co., W. Va. or Frederick Co., Va. records. The late Mrs. Bergen stated in a letter that perhaps Peter Hedges served in the Revolutionary War and received land in Kentucky and may have moved there (Mrs. Bergen's Historical Books, Berkeley County Courthouse). On 23 September 1799 William Hedges and Sarah, his wife, of Berkeley Co. gave Peter Hedges a deed for 1/2 of the land devised to William and Peter Hedges' by Peter Hedges deceased. On the next day, 24 September 1799, Peter Hedges and Elizabeth, his wife, of Berkeley County, sold for 1,305 pounds current money of Pennsylvania, to Alexander Robertson. The 1/2 of the 300 acres surveyed out at this time to contain 187 acres (DB 15, p. 523). Alexander Robertson also acquired another 420 acres part of which is now the Dr. Clifford Sperow farm. Alexander Robinson born 1749, died April 1811, married 24 March 1785, Ann Hedges, born 1765, died April 1817. Both buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery. They had children John, Samuel, James, Alexander, Joshua, Elizabeth, Anne and Polly (Mary) Robinson (DB 373, p. 23). When Alexander Robinson's land was divided on 9 March 1812, widow Anne Robinson received the home place on Tulise Branch. In 1820 Alexander Robinson 11 borrowed money from Philip C. Pendleton on the following land: 5 undivided 1/8 parts of 187 acres, 1/8 as one of the heirs (Alexander) 1/8 purchased from Jonas and Elizabeth Hedges, 1/8 each from James, Joshua and John Robinson (DB 31, p. 331). In 1822 Alexander Robinson, Polly Robinson and Ann Robinson sold 130 acres to Peter Riner for $2,757.06 (DB 33, p. 49). On 31 March 1834 Peter Riner sold for $5,000.00 the 130 acres Peter Hedges farm to Teter Myers, Jr. who also purchased in 1838 140 acres from Joseph Evans Snodgrass and Hannah M., his wife of Washington County, Maryland. (RRDB 1, p. 479). In 1845 Teter Myers and Catherine, his wife, sold for $8,000.00 to Aaron Myers (their son) 215 acres which included all of the Snodgrass land and part of the Robinson land. Aaron Myers was living here when his father deeded the place to him. Aaron Myers had married May 19, 1822 Mary Hedges, daughter of Josiah Hedges the founder of Hedgesville. Aaron's grandfather Teter Myers, Sr. and John Myers, Teter's brother, had fought in the Revolutionary War (Court Minute Book). Aaron Myers was a large landowner and owned much land in the area of his home place. His heirs paid taxes on 754 acres in 1873 (Land Book 1873). The buildings on the home place were valued at $1,500.00 at this time. In 1875 Cromwell Myers and Aaron H. Myers, executors of Aaron Myers sold for $13,008.63, 213 acres to John H. Miler and William Kilmer. In 1907 the heirs of John Harley Miller, who were J. William Miller, C. A. Miller, Eugene P. Miller, Robert S. Miller, Mrs. Addie Richard and Frank Richard, her husband and George W. Appleby, Jr., Laura Virginia Appleby children of Laura Miller Appleby, deceased-brought suit asking for a division of the land (Chancery Case No. 1699). The Court assigned 87 acres to W. H. Kilmer and 119 acres to the heirs of J. H. Miller. Both tracts were then sold to William L. Ellis (DB 118, p. 59, DB 119, p. 312). On 12 October 1929 Mrs. W. L. Ellis, Ellis Ellis and Carrie, his wife, Boyd Ellis and Mary, his wife and Helen M. Ellis, sold the property to William K. Ellis and his wife, Margaret K. Robbins Ellis, all being heirs of William L. Ellis, deceased (DB 158, p. 414). Margaret K. Robbins Ellis died 12 June 1962. William K. Ellis sold the property in 1968 to Mrs. Ruth Dirting Dehaven who recently deeded it to her son, Douglas Dirting.

We will now travel back up the road we just came down to the old Warm Spring Road (Route 9). We are now going west toward the town of Hedgesville. After we pass through the old Lemen woods - originally part of Joshua Hedges's home plantation - we come to Josiah Hedges's land. Right in front of us we see the lovely, old brick home of Josiah Hedges, founder of Hedgesville, just southwest of the home lie's the quaint little town of HedgesVille. We do want to call to mind that all of the Hedges homes and land we have just visited east of the town of Hedgesville joined each other making a total of over 2,000 acres owned by the early Hedges. The Josiah Hedges home (Picture No. 8) was built at three different times. The log back section in the late 1700s by Samuel Hedges; the middle brick section in the 1820s and the front brick section most likely around 1860 by Daniel Lefever. Samuel Hedges and wife, Elizabeth, sold the 150 acres which he had acquired from the Chaplines to his son Josiah Hedges (DB 27, p. 17). Josiah Hedges born December 16, 1772, died September 4, 1849, married October 21, 1800 Catharine Morgan born July 20, 1773, died March 29, 1855, daughter of Rev. Morgan Morgan II. Both are buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery. They had the following children:

1. Morgan Morgan Hedges b. 1809, d. July 7, 1854, married Dec. 8, 1831 Lucinda Snodgrass b. 1811, d. Nov. 24, 1853. They had four children: a. Norma Allen Hedges b. Catharine M. Hedges c. Josiah Morgan Hedges d. Plummer 1. W. Hedges (RRDB 2, p. 276) 2. Harvey A. Hedges 3. Rebecca Hedges b. April 2, 1807, d. Feb. 24, 1881, married twice. 1st Dec. 2, 1823 Elijah Alexander. 2nd Jan. 27, 1840 Samuel Robinson b. 1795, d. July 8, 1853. Both buried Mt. Zion Cemetery. (DB 58, p. 124). 4. Mary Morgan Hedges b. 1802, d. June 14, 1853, married Aaron Myers b. 1802, d. Sept. 27, 1871, both buried Mt. Zion Cemetery (DB 58, p. 124). 5. Catharine Hedges married a Robbins.

  • Misc. Notes

The Filson Club Historical Quarterly, Vol. 14, Louisville, Ky., July, 1940, No. 3, pp. 176-181

(p. 176)

JOHN D. SHANE'S INTERVIEW WITH PIONEER JOHN HEDGE, BOURBON COUNTY

TRANSCRIBED FOR PUBLICATION By OTTO A. ROTHERT Louisville, Kentucky

INTRODUCTION: Every year during the past thirteen years, with one or two exceptions, THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY has published one of Reverend John D. Shane's interviews. Shane was born in 1812 and died in 1864. He spent much of his time interviewing Kentucky pioneers and sons and daughters of pioneers. His notes on his several hundred interviews are preserved: some in the Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison, and some in the Presbyterian Historical Society, Philadelphia. Photostat copies of all the notes on Shane's interviews now in the Wisconsin Society are in the archives of The Filson Club. A sixteen-page biography, "Shane the Western Collector," by Otto A. Rothert, appears in the January, 1930, number of the HISTORY QUARTERLY.

The Shane interview with pioneer John Hedge is of interest, although in places it is somewhat trivial. It covers so much ground that it requires a little more explanation than given in the notes here inserted in Shane's text. Therefore some additional facts are presented in this Introduction:

Many descendants of pioneer Hedge still survive in Bourbon, Clark and Montgomery counties. Hedge's Station is, even to this day, a well-known point in eastern Clark County.

The McClelland's Station referred to is clearly not the station of the same name which grew into Georgetown. The cabins mentioned as being built "that winter" in Winchester were doubtless the cabins known as Crossthwaites' Station. They stood about a half-mile east of the present Winchester, and were erected before 1791, which is the only suggested date for "that winter." There were no houses built until 1793 in what became Winchester. See "John D. Shane's Interview with Benjamin Allen of Clark County" (11CC67-79), by Lucien Beckner, in THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY, April, 1931.

The story of Smith's Station, the settlement of Mt. Sterling and the sack of Morgan's Station, based entirely on Shane interviews, were given by Lucien Beckner before The Filson Club, (p. 177)

November 2, 1937, in a scholarly address entitled "John D. Shane and What He Has Done for Kentucky."

Details regarding John Constant's Station, Major Andrew Hood's Station, and the Indian captivity of James Beath are presented in John D. Shane's Interview with Pioneer William Clinkenbeard (11CC54-66), transcribed by Lucien Beckner and printed in the HISTORY QUARTERLY, April, 1928.

The Shane interview here published was selected somewhat at random. In A Calendar of The Kentucky Papers of the Draper Collection of Manuscripts it is designated 11CC19-23. Shane does not give the time of this interview; it probably occurred before 1850. In the following transcription no changes were made other than spelling out abbreviated words and inserting, in brackets, some attempted elucidations; the headings, here in italics, are Shane's.

SHANE'S INTERVIEW WITH HEDGE

John Hedges. John Hedges lives at the crossing of the Paris and Winchester, and Iron Works, or Clintonville and Middletown roads. - Diagonally across from Stony Point meeting-house.

Settling Lands. It was for some time a prevalent custom for persons to take a lease on lands in the more central parts, free from probable incursions of the Indians, till they could either go out to lands of their own in safety, or have opportunity and the means of getting land of their own. The lease was to secure their privileges, and the lessor thus got his lands cleared. But all did not take these precautions to secure themselves, or to do justice to others. Many squatted down on lands, not knowing or caring whose they were. And some who had leased, enchanted with the abundance of the cane and the ease of raising cattle, fell too readily from their original purpose of settling themselves, and by attempting to follow up the range, which thus soon ran out, reduced themselves to poverty, and some of them thus lost some of the finest lands in the country. Improvidence, once scaxcely to be practiced, when the face of things changed, was then the ruin of thousands.

Currency. The currency of the country then was cows and calves, and horses. More current than our bank notes now. Have heard a horse cried off in Paris at so many cows and calves.

Settlers. Irish mostly from Pennsylvania country and South Carolina. Were called Cohies. Mostly Presbyterians.

(p. 178)

Virginians were called Tuckahoes. You could tell where a man was from, on first seeing him.

John Hedge, was here in 1791, November 3d, Monday. Morgan's Station was taken in 1793. (Monday, November 3d?) [April 1, 1793] On Slate, near the Iron Works.

Mayslick. Mayslick [settled in 1784] was then a station [when we came to Kentucky in 17891. There was no settlement from there to Blue Licks.

Ready-Money Jack. About 5 or 6 miles from there, one Ready--Money Jack (an Irishman] had some cabins. Five or six miles this side of the Blue Licks, where one Holyday since kept a tavern, within a few hundred yards. Ready-Money Jack was from Monongahela country. Was less afraid of Indians. The people in that country were more accustomed to them. He kept a kind of tavern there [five or six miles from Blue Licks] and gave himself that name. People were afraid to encamp out of the settlements, after leaving Mayslick.

Irish Station. Higher up, about two miles of Millersburgh, was the Irish Station.

McClelland's Station. Had been a station what was [earlier] called McClelland's Station. But the people were just settling out. Pretty much dispersed at that time. Between Paris and Millersburgh was settled pretty thickly.

Wilmot's Station. Wilmot's Station was on the heads of Huston, nine or ten miles from Paris, between Paris and Lexington. But at that time (they) were settled out pretty much in (a) little neighborhood. The neighborhood still retaining the name Wilmot's Station. You might see a dozen little cabins, say, at a time.

Hood's Station. [Andrew] Hood's Station was up by Winchester (three miles north] and Stroud's. That winter [1791] they were beginning to build some cabins at Winchester [at Crossthwaite's Station, one-half mile east of the present town].

Constant's Station. [John] Constant's Station was opened two or three miles [only one-half mile] this side of Stroud's, on a road that had been opened to Maysville from Boonsborough, and intercepting that one from Lexington, about this Ready-Money Jack's. This road was cut for Stroud to move up on, and for others to get salt, &c. (John] Stroud moved -up about two years after he first came out here at all. That was the only road at all through heie then. They went on from Paxis on the road that was about that time made to Hornbach's Mill [about four miles

(p. 179)

north of Strode's] till it intersected the one leading to Stroud's. They went up it to Stroud's, and then on by Hood's, and soon the old trace on the ridge to go to Mount Sterling.

Seven or eight years before some mischief had been done at this Constant's. His was the first Station built out of Strode's. Hood and Constant were both in existence when I came [in 1789] to the country.

Stroud's Station. Stroud's Station was the most prominent point in all that section. Was on the head of Stroud's Fork of Stoner. [Strode's was less than a mile from Constant's. Shane spells pioneer John Strode's name both "Stroud" and "Strode." The correct spelling always has been Strode. The Strode family is still prominent in Clark and neighboring counties.]

Shull's Station. Shull's Station was on Stoner, near the head. [Joseph Schull was a son-in-law of Daniel Boone. This place, in Clarke County, is now Schollsville, but locally the name is pronounced Shellsville.]

Buffaloe. When I first came here, the buffaloe bones covered all the grounds. Said that men used to come down from Stroud's (and) the interior, when the buffaloe were poor, and kill them for sport, and leave them lie. The trace that passed on to the upper and lower Blue Licks led through here, and they would- kill them on it. It went from Strode's Station. There was very little cane through here. Mostly covered with wild-rye and pea-vines.

Salt Spring Trace. The trace that was a buffaloe trace from Strode's Trace to Harrod's Lick, on Stoner, was called the Salt Spring Trace. And the trace made by Stroud avoided crossing Stoner so often. The buffaloe took a strait course.

Stoner's Trace. [Michael] Stoner's Deposition in the case of Payne versus Strode, &c. at Paris. In 1778 Stoner was out to kill and hunt, under the Virginia government, and was passing from Boonsborough to Blue Licks in 1776 and lost his horses, and marked his way back so as to find his baggage, and it was from that called Stoner's Trace for some time.

Moses Thomas, Enoch Smith, Testimonies.

Settling Lands. Would take a lease for five years, clear as much as they pleased, and enjoy the range till it was gone, and then move. Most of the people when I came were on leased lands, till times became more safe.

Mrs. Young. Morgan's Station. 1793. A Mrs. Young, at Morgan's Station, was taken with her child. Her child was killed on the Ohio River, and she exchanged at Wayne's treaty.

(p. 180)

A young woman, that was scalped on the road, and was left, got well again, and came in. Young, that husband, escaped from that station.

A man took off his wife and two children. Was pursued by two Indians. She waded Slate [Creek]. It was pretty deep. After they crossed, her clothes were in her way, and he took out his knife and trimmed them off. She led along the little boy, and he took the child and his gun in his arms, treeing whenever the Indians came too near, thus keeping them at bay, and brought off the only woman and children that escaped. Harry Martin?

Smith's Station. [Enoch] Smith's Station was not far from Mount Sterling. It was Mount Sterling that was settled that spring of 1792. Winchester wasn't thought of then. Some of the people I was moving that winter, 1791-2, and one or two of the company, went aside to a father-in-law's, at Smith's Station, about one and one-half miles from the road. Troutman and his wife we were moving. A Tanner, going up on to the peeled-oak fork of Slate to live. Spurgen was going on with a cabin at that time, and there were one or two others going on. Mount Sterling was on the trace that led from Lexington and Stroud's Station to the Slate Iron works [in Bath County]. Moved Troutman there, fall 1791. Some Negroes were killed afterwards from his same neighborhood.

Coming Out. Fare. Wind was a great-deal against us, and we had turkey-pot-pie till I got so tired I never wanted to eat any more as long as I lived. At this Ready-Money Jack's we got some hot corn cake and milk, which ate admirable. Our pot-pie had been made of flour ground on horse mills, in Monongahela country. That winter we got hog and hominy, good and abundance of it. I travelled a great deal that winter, and off from the public roads the people were ready to thank me for my company.

Wolves. Wolves beset me when I stopped all night near Mount Sterling.

Salt Licks. Fall of 1792, I went to Bullitt's Licks, by Lexington, Danville, Bairdstown, &c. Fall of 1793 I went to Mann's Lick twice. [Both licks are a few miles south of Louisville.] Same rout. Only road. Crossed Kentucky [River] at the mouth of Hickman. After peace was made, they got to make salt upon Sandy, Salt-Lick, on the Ohio, about the same time. Blue Lick had been used. But was not used but for making a

(p. 181)

very little salt, the year after I came. The year of Wayne's army, salt was as high as $4 per bushel, and pork got up to the same price.

Wolves. August, 1793, at Mann's Lick, wolves came around the wagons again. They were mighty bad in them days in Kentucky, on young cattle, horses, and calves.

James Beath Captured. James Beath helped to settle Stroud's Station in 1779. Went to Grassy Lick with two others (Swearingen, one, I think he got clear.) They were watching the Lick. Beath was shot through the shoulder. He and the other were taken. His wounds were not dressed till he got in, and the flies blowed him [swelled due to infection by flies]. Packed him several days, and this the month of August! Was taken to Detroit and kept about three years. Sold there, and released at the close of the British War. Had a wife and five children. Mrs. Beath had a sister, Mrs. Douglass, whose husband had been killed [in the Blue Licks campaign] and left her with three children. She [Mrs. Douglass] afterwards married Raph. Morgan [at Strode's Station]. Another sister married a weaver, Irishman, named Howard, and during this time he had the charge of all three of the families. Beath was a very interesting, conversible man. After all his scuffles, and got back to his family, and he had settled down on a part of this land and made considerable improvements, he was likely to lose his land through conflicting claims, and got chagrined, and sold out, and moved over to Ohio, and died in less than twelve months.

Strode's Station. He [Beath] and old Tom Kennedy, Jesse Kennedy's father, within three miles of Paris, were with the first settlers of Strode's Station.



Spouses –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 1: Catherine “Kate” TROUTMAN Birth: 1773 Death: 1833 Age: 60 Father: Peter TROUTMAN (1741-1813) Mother: Anna Maria MILLER (1740-1819) Marriage: January 15, 1798 Bourbon County, Kentucky Children: Silas (1803-1880) Peter (1797-1865) James Nancy (1799-) Fannie (1805-1867) Lucinda Mary Ann (1816-1849) Sythia Sallie

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 2: Rebecca TROUTMAN Birth: September 13, 1781 Frederick Co., Maryland Death: August 24, 1835 Bourbon County, Kentucky Age: 53 Burial: after August 24, 1835 Hedges Family Cemetery, Winchester-Paris Road, Stoney Point, Bourbon County, Kentucky Father: Peter TROUTMAN (1741-1813) Mother: Anna Maria MILLER (1740-1819) (3) Name: Joseph HEDGES –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Birth: 1750 Death: 1805 Age: 55 Father: Charles HEDGES (1712-1796) Mother: Mary STILLE (1714-)

  • Misc. Notes

HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS, E. Polk Johnson, three volumes, Lewis Publishing Co., New York & Chicago, 1912. Common version, Vol. III, pp. 1360-1361. [Bourbon County]

JOSEPH HEDGES.-The Hedges are of ancient and honorable English lineage, their landed estates and manorial privileges being situated in Wilts, Berks and Gloucester, with London the seat of the younger sons of enterprise. Sir Philip Hedges, of Gloucester and London, born during the reign of the last Lancastrian king, appears to have been the earliest known ancestor. He was knighted for bravery on the field of battle and died in 1487. His descendant, William Hedges, of Youghal, Ireland, and Gloucester and London, England, was at Wilmington in 1675 and owned property there under the Duke of York's rule, through Governor Fenwick's administration of South Jersey.

His son, Joseph Hedges, of Gloucester and London, born in 1670, and died in 1732, on Monocacy Manor, Prince George's county, Maryland, was twice married. On January 1, 17o8, he married Mary Fettleplace, -of Kingswood, Wilts; Issue, Solomon and Charles, born in England. He married second, September 8, 17Q, Katharine Tingey, of London; Issue, Joshua, Jonas, Joseph, Samuel, Catherine, Ruth and Dorcas, born in America.

Joseph Hedges first located land in what was known as the Marlborough district of Delaware, which was settled by Gloucester people from Marlborough, Bristol and Kingswood. His sons gained a splendid foothold in the American colonies: Solomon won distinction; Charles (father of the subject of sketch), aided in driving Indian hordes from Maryland and amassed a fortune; Joshua patented over one thousand acres of land in Virginia in 1743, and Jonas founded Hedges Villa (Hedgesville, West Virginia), in 1746. Among the men who peopled the frontier, contributed to the development of the middle west, furnished its social background was Joseph Hedges, of Bourbon county, Kentucky, farmer, Revolutionary soldier and pioneer. He was born in 1743 in Frederick county, Maryland, and was the son of Charles Hedges, Sr., and Mary Stille. In 177o he married Sarah Biggs, of the same county, and engaged in farming at "Standing Stone" in Maryland, on a tract of four hundred and thirty-four acres owned jointly with his brother Absalom. During the steady progression from discontent of a colony to the freedom and independence of a nation, with splendid patriotism he renounced' his allegiance to George III. and served his country from September, 1777, to December, 1780, in the companies of Captains Ward and Comb, Regiment of Foot, Continental Troops, commanded by Colonel Oliver Spencer. After the Revolutionary war, in common with many of the settlers on the Atlantic coast, he determined to emigrate to the wilderness of Kentucky, obtaining patents September 1, 1791, for Hedges' Silence, Hedges' Range, Shintaler Gut and resurveys on Fleming's Purchase and Pilgrim's Harbour, for the purpose of conveying these farms to the purchasers. Early in 1792 he started on the long journey, accompanied by his family and slaves, his brother Shadrach and sister, also several Maryland families,-the Troutmans and others, all traveling in Conestoga wagons. About twelve miles above Wheeling they visited Mr. Hedges' brother Charles, who settled at Beech Bottom Fort in Ohio county, Virginia, in 1776. While sojourning here they constructed flat boats to complete their journey down the Ohio river, taking their wagons apart to carry them. Upon reaching Wheeling, Shadrach Hedges having been wounded by an Indian, abandoned the trip and his sister returned to Maryland with him. They drifted down to Limestone, now Maysville, Kentucky, three hundred and nine miles from Wheeling, with no especial incident to mark their transit other than the falling overboard of Mr. Hedges' little daughter Jemima and her rescue by her small brother James, who caught her by her floating skirts and pulled her into the boat. Disembarking at Limestone, they coupled their wagons, hitched their horses and followed the Buffalo trail, afterward the State road, to where Paris is now located. Here they pitched their tents for two weeks during very inclement weather, while Mr. Hedges negotiated with Ralph and Mary Morgarn for the purchase of land in the vicinity of Stony Point, near Strode’s creek. On March 25, 1792, the sale was consummated, and he started soon afterward the erection of a substantial and comfortable log house of a story and a half, of roomy dimensions, and assisted by the slaves planted his first crop on Kentucky soil; but his farming venture the first year was not encouraging, nor for succeeding years. The energy expended in clearing a new country and adapting himself to unusual conditions at his age undermined his constitution, and his health gradually failed until the end came in 1804.

He has left a name of prominence in the early annals of Bourbon and the heritage of an honored memory to numerous descendants. His wife survived until 1822, and nine children have perpetuated the race: John, born in 1771, of fine business ability, accumulated a large estate; Charles born in 1773, spent his life at Clintonville; Rebecca, born in 1775, married Mr. McCray, of Middletown; Joseph, born in 1778; James, born in 1783, of Sharpsburg; Jonas, born in 1785, a farmer of Bourbon and Clark counties; Jemima, born in 1790, married Mr. Reid; Samuel, born in 1792, in Kentucky; and Mary, born in 1795, married Dr. Carney, of Ohio.

History

Bailey Fulton Davis was my father's cousin. He was a Baptist preacher and was very involved in genealogy. Most of my genealogical data on my father's mother's ancestors comes from him. The Davis family lived in Clark County, at least my grandmother did when she married my grandfather.

I am attaching Bailey's notes on several of my family lines. Not all of them are Bourbon County lines, but, if not, they are from neighboring counties. These notes are compiled from several letters Bailey wrote to various family members.

If you find any notes in square brackets "[ ]", they are my additions to the text. Bill McCray

  • HEDGES FAMILY OF BOURBON COUNTY, KENTUCKY

Data compiled by Bailey Fulton Davis, A.B.;Th.M.

This is one of my father's lines. We are faced with a great many contradictory traditions when we get back of the Bourbon pioneer, Joseph Hedges. There are several who have done research on the family and they are in disagreement as to their findings and interpretations. We are putting down the facts that are known to us and then will set forth the various arguments and theories. We are beginning with the family in Bourbon and then will examine other data.

JOSEPH HEDGES

This ancestor came into Bourbon and settled at Stoney Point. I have correspondence received from Mr. J.L. Hay whose address in November, 1938, was 645 Merrick Avenue, Apt.#36, Detroit, Michigan. He spoke of his forthcoming book on the Hedges family, but I have never seen any references to it since then. It is probable that he died before publishing it. Mr. Hay said that JOSEPH was the son of CHARLES HEDGES who was the son of JOSEPH HEDGES. The Hedges family was an early Maryland family and the Bourbon pioneer was born in Maryland in 1750. He married SARAH BIGGS of Maryland in 1770 and she was the daughter of JOHN BIGGS. There is a long article about Sarah Biggs Hedges in Johnson's History of Kentucky, 1912, Vol. 3, p. 136 Off. Some of the data therein disagrees with the above, but essentially it gives the true story of the Kentucky branch. It states that both Joseph and his wife came from Frederick County, Maryland. As a Baptist minister, I was interested in the fact that Sarah Biggs Hedges was a devout and active Baptist. On page 1361 of Johnson is this sketch: "Mrs. Sarah Hedges, nee Biggs, was a characteristic type of the noble pioneer mothers. Of gentle birth and unaccustomed to the ruder conditions of life, and of a handsome and striking appearance, she numbered among her accomplishments that of being a thorough horsewoman and an excellent judge of the qualities constituting fine horses. She was remarkable for her industry, piety, and Christian influence, and took an active interest in the Baptist Church, with which she had long been associated and to which she was a pillar of strength, prior to leaving her native state, as evidenced by the records of Frederick, Md.: 'July 10, 1790, Sarah Hedges appears among the number of persons who entered into an agreement for the re-organization of a Baptist congregation.' After the death of her husband in 1804 Mrs. Hedges continued to live at the old home place with John (her son, B.D.) until 1822, when she entered the higher service. Both are buried in a locust grove within sight of their home."

I cannot vouch for the authenticity of this statement, but I have been told that more Bourbon D.A.R.'s have joined on Joseph Hedges' service than on any other pioneer's line. Joseph Hedges renounced his allegiance to King George III and served in the Revolutionary war. He was Ensign in Michael Troutman's Company, Middle District of Frederick County, Md., Militia. He was a signer of the Association Test in Frederick County, Md., in 1775. In 1778 he hired Luke Horsfield as a substitute for the duration of the war, passed by Lt. of Frederick County, May 20, 1778; service being in Col. Price's Regiment. I have a copy of the S.A.R. application of William Calvin Gillespie on the basis of Joseph Hedges' service and he cites National numbers of previous successful applicants: 14529, 14534, and 111330.

The article in Johnson's history is at variance as to the above regimental service. I shall omit it here and deal with other data: "Joseph Hedges engaged in farming at Standing Stone in Maryland on a 434-acre tract which he owned jointly with his brother, Absalom.--After the War, in common with many of the settlers on the Atlantic coast, he determined to emigrate to the wilderness of Kentucky, obtaining patents on Sept. 1, 1791, for Hedges' Silence, Hedges' Range, Shintaler Gut, and resurveys on Fleming's Purchase and Pilgrim's Harbor, for the purpose of conveying these farms to the purchasers. Early in 1792 (2) he started on the long journey, accompanied by his family and slaves, his brother Shadrach, his sister, also several Maryland families--The Troutmans and others (It will be noted that he served under Michael Troutman B.D.), all traveling in Conestoga wagons. About twelve miles above Wheeling they visited Mr. Hedges' brother, Charles, who settled at Beech Bottom Fort in Ohio County, Virginia, in 1776. While sojourning here they constructed flat boats to complete their journey down the Ohio river, taking their wagons apart to carry them. Upon reaching Wheeling, Shadrach Hedges, having been wounded by an Indian, abandoned the trip and his sister returned to Maryland with him. The party drifted down to Limestone, now Maysville, Ky., 309 miles from Wheeling, with no special incident to mark their transit other than the falling overboard of Mr. Hedges' little daughter, Jemima, and her rescue by her brother, James, who caught her by her floating skirts and pulled her into the boat. Disembarking at Limestone, they coupled their wagons, hitched their horses, and followed the buffalo trail, afterward the State road, to where Paris is now located. Here they pitched their tents for two weeks during very inclement weather, while Mr. Hedges negotiated with Ralph and Mary Morgan for the purchase of a choice body of land in the vicinity of Stoney Point, near Strode's Creek. On March 25, 1792, the deal was closed and he started soon afterward the erection of a substantial and comfortable log house of a story and a half, of roomy dimensions, and, assisted by the slaves, planted his first crop on Kentucky soil. His farming ventures were not successful for several years. The energy expended in clearing the new country and adapting himself to unusual conditions at his age undermined his constitution and his health gradually failed until the end came in 1804.

Joseph Hedges and his wife, Sarah Biggs Hedges, had nine children. This list is taken from the Johnson article. The children were as follows:

John, born in 1771, "of fine business ability and accumulated a large estate";

Charles, born in 1773--"spend his life at Clinton-ville";

Rebecca, born in 1775, "married Mr. McCray of Middle-town" (Note: North Middletown in Bourbon is what was meant. My father, John Fulton Davis, had a sister named Bertie Davis and she married Tom McCray, so my aunt's children have two Hedges lines. B.F.D.);

Joseph, born in 1778;

JAMES HEDGES--my line--born in 1783--"lives at Sharps-burg";

Jonas--born in 1785, "a farmer of Bourbon and Clark Counties";

Jemima, born in 1790, "married Mr. Reid";

Samuel, "born in 1792, in Kentucky" (Note: there is a sketch of this line in Johnson, B.F.D.);

Mary, "born in 1795 and married Dr. Carney of Ohio".

I might state here that the Johnson Article was prepared by some of the Ewalt family. Joseph Hedges Ewalt has long been one of Kentucky Masonry's leading men. I recall the unique way in which I met him. I had seen his name in the Masonic Journal and had written to him, but he had never replied. One day my wife and I were driving out in Bourbon County looking for old stone homes built by another of my ancestors, Thomas "Stonehammer" Metcalfe, 10th Governor of Kentucky. We found a beautiful old stone house and I drove back to a crossroad to question an old man whom I had seen sitting out in the yard. I went over and introduced myself and found that it was Joseph Hedges Ewalt. They call that locality "Hedges Cross Roads", if memory serves me correctly. He found out that I was a minister and said, "I got a letter from a Sky Pilot about the Hedges family, but I never have answered it." I told him that I was the writer of the query and we had a nice visit.

It is also well to tell of the way in which the older members of the family were confused in their thinking about the Hedges family. Perrin's History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison, and Nicholas Counties has a sketch on page 471 which records this legend that caused so much confusion. It is the article on Silas Hedges, deceased, and starts out like this: "The Hedges family trace their ancestry to Sir Charles Hedges, an English politician, who graduated at Oxford in 1675 and died in 1714. he had four daughters and one son, whose name was Joseph, who emigrated to America at an early day and located in Prince William County, Maryland." The person who gave in the information then listed the children of Joseph. The tradition was that Sir Charles was infuriated at his son for leaving home and having married without his consent and had left a will whereby his vast estate was tied up for the descendants. The Hedges family in America organized and set about to get this supposedly fabulous estate that was due them. I have a number of old papers that belonged to my grandmother, Pauline Campbell Davis, and she had preserved them from the effects of her mother, Margaret Lucinda Banta Campbell. She, in turn, had kept them from the papers of her mother, Dorcas Hedges Banta.

These old papers are quite interesting and show the extent of the movement whereby the so-called heirs of Sir Charles Hedges tried to get possession of his estate. The movement seems to have begun in 1881 and faded newspaper clipping tells of the meeting on April 8, 1881, in Frederick City, Maryland, and states that the minutes of the Hedges' heirs, held in Paris, Kentucky, on April 5th, were read. Another clipping tells of the Paris meeting which was held in the Council Chamber in this city last Monday. There was a "reasonable attendance" despite the inclement weather. John Hedges of Sharpsburg presided and E.B. Hedges, Paris, was secretary. Dr. Hedges of Cynthiana presented the data relative to what was being done by heirs in various places. The meeting adjourned with reference to further action to be taken at the meeting of "all the heirs in the United States" shortly to be held in Cincinnati.

I also have a copy of the minutes of the Cincinnati meeting which was held May 18, 1881. It is stated therein that 500 copies were ordered to be printed. It contains 13 pages and has a good bit of genealogical data in it. Mr. Hay, of Detroit, insisted that there was no will for Sir Charles Hedges, but on page 9f. of the minutes is a letter from John R. Mayo, barrister in London, England, in which he states that he found the will after much search.

There is a receipt printed on green paper and it bears date of April 11, 1881, Frederick City, Maryland: "Received of Mrs. Dorcas Banta - $2.00 - to be used in the prosecution of the claim of the Hedges Heirs, now recorded in the Bank of England, as certified in the Books of Gun's Agency (or Index). See Numbers on record. J.P. Creager, per Joyns". There is also an old post card which bears date of April 13, 1881, on which Creager requested that Mrs. Dorcas Banta send genealogical data so as to be recognized at the Cincinnati convention. I also have a letter which T.I. Davis copied. It is a history of the Hedges family and bears this notation: "Written by George S. Hedges on the 5 day of November, 1874, at the request of the owner of this book, E. Clendenen". T.I. Davis was my grandfather.

I infer that all was not sweetness and light as far as my great-grandmother was concerned. Her mother, Mrs. Dorcas Hedges Banta, had joined, but her daughter (my great-grandmother, Margaret Lucinda Banta Campbell) evidently did not like the way things were handled at Cincinnati. She had sent a letter to her uncle, John H. Hedges, Sharpsburg, and he replied in kind: "Sharpsburg, Ky. June the 18th, 1881 (I am copying it just exactly as written and spelled. B.F.D.) Dear Niece, I receive (sic) yours of the 16inst contents noted. You seem to criticise our proceedings at Cincin-nati Oh. The first item I notice is that you find L.M. Campbell's name appears on the list of legal heirs of the Hedges estate in England. Now my dear neice where does it so appear? See first page. On motion all heirs or representatives (underscored) attending the meeting were admitted as deligates (sic) and were as followes (sic). Now the very first name on the list from Oh. is Geo. W. Patter of Paleldin is no heir. But he was a deligate (sic). Now turn to the 5th page and you will find the name of D.A. Roach of Crawfordville he is no heir But a delegate his mother in law is and (sic) heir (Sister Polly Gillespie). The same as L.M. Campbell he married my niece my sister Dorcas Banta's daughter. Your mother was not there neither was Polly Gillespie there. But each had a Son in law as a deligate so you can see a very great differance (sic) in the statement and the one you give. Lon M. Campbell is no heir neither are you an heir at law while your mother lives. She is an heir. We have a family organization at Paris, Kentucky, for Kentucky alone and if you want your Mother's name enrolled as an heir you can do so by sending to Ed. B. Hedges of Paris who is our secretary for Ky. $1.00. He will enter her name in a book for that purpose as an heir. My name is entered and my dollar paid. So is Warren's. We want to get all in Ky. on our book so it can be presented at our next National meeting. So their names may appear as heirs we have brought the family history of our fore parents down to my and your mother's grandfather, Joseph. He is the Son of Charles who left 14 children and he a Son of Joseph the Emigrant who made a will on the 6 day of September, 1732. Now I hope the explantion will be satisfactory. If your husband had spent some ten dollars and attended the convention his name would have been enrolled as a delegate. Now for the 2nd item you also seem to think we committed an error. Here is what we say in relation of Sir Charles Hedges: It appears from the information brought before the convention of the Hedges heirs--that Sir Charles Hedges was an English politician, who graduated at Oxford in 1675--died in 1714. Your history commences with Sir Charles Hedges in 1700 and ends in 1707. Ours in 1675 and ends in 1714. Now which history is correct? If yours is correct you can see at onst (sic) we lost considerably by your or your husband not being at the convention to give us the information. Your information was not before the convention. We don't say our history is correct But give it as it appeared from History--all we could gather from several persons. You lose sight of Sir Charles in 1701, we trace him to 1714. If we have made an error in the History of the Hedges we can correct all errors that may be presented and pointed out to us at our next national meeting and have it all made in a book containing all heirs at law and sell it to help pay expencies (sic). Those of course who will not take the pains to give there (sic) family history will be left out. I remain Your uncle, John H. Hedges." Marginal notes state: "Our next State meeting will be in Paris the first Monday in September" and "We are well and send our respects to you all". The old fellow's letter is given as it was written. His superficial knowledge of grammar was not helped by his wrath at his sister's daughter because she had dared to disagree with him.

This estate talk was common about that time and seems to have been promoted by a group of promoters who were eager to collect funds from gullible victims. I could point out a great many other such stories, too, from my study of genealogy. Just how long the hoax was continued is to me, but modern researchers state there was not basis in fact for belief in the existence of any connection between Sir Charles Hedges and all of these American Hedges. My last evidence at hand consists of two pamphlets which were printed in 1882 and one states that a lawyer is ready to sail for England as soon as the ready cash is at hand. $700 and 140 new members stood between them and $250,000,000 (with interest, mind you) in 1882. Those 140 folk must have decided that wild-cat oil stock brought more hope than an investment in Hedges stock.

JAMES HEDGES

He was one of the sons of Joseph Hedges, Bourbon pioneer, and James is our ancestor. I have not tried to trace all of the children of Joseph, but for the information of my McCray cousins I did find out that James' sister, Rebecca Hedges, married Samuel McCray on Aug. 15, 1796. They were married by another of our ancestors, Rev. William Forman, who was to become the father-in-law of James Hedges. William Forman was a pioneer Methodist minister in Central Kentucky.

We are fortunate in that we know a good bit about James and his early movements in Kentucky. Many years ago a Presbyterian minister by the name of Shane lived in Bourbon County, Kentucky. He loved history and took great delight in interviewing pioneers and jotting down their memoirs. The original papers are now in the library of the Historical Society of Wisconsin. They have been photostated and copies are now in two libraries in Kentucky: Filson Club and the Historical Library at Frankfort. One has to go to both places in order to get a complete study. John and James Hedges were both interviewed by Shane. I have not seen the papers on John. They bear reference number 11CC19. Those pertaining to our ancestor, James Hedges, bear number 12CC117. I give them just as Shane jotted them down: "James Hedge (Brother of John Hedge, No. 9, p47, Bourbon) lives to the left of the road, leading from Sharpsburg to Mount Sterling-near, on the banks of Hinkston. Came to Kentucky in the Fall of 1791. We staid (coming out) at Reinhart's farm on Monongahela (said to be where Braddock's defeat was) two weeks. 10 mi. above Ft. Pitt. Were 18 days on the river. St. Clair's battle was fought while we were on the river. Came down on two boats. One a family and one a horse boat. Old Peter Troutman and Peter Troutman, a son of Michael Troutman, and a son-in-law of old Peter were along."

"Maysville was called 'The Point'. A good many wagons waiting at Maysville, the point for loading when we got there. Loading of immigrants. In 1793 the waters were low, seemed as if the place was full of wagons--but little gotten. I was down and got a little.

As we were coming to Kentucky John Troutman overtook us this side of Maysville; at Ready Money Jack's (Ready Money Jack, an Irish-man). Ready Money Jack had a double cabin. It was here that Holyday was for a great while after. John Troutman, Ralph Morgan, and a good many others had gotten there before us that same night we staid there, had been out to bury the dead at St. Clair's defeat--and were just returning; they had gotten everything ready when we go there and had a great frolic that night.

Migration to Kentucky about this time--for 2 or 3 years was very great.

We spent the first winter in Paris. The winter of 1791-92. Old man Kelly, first merchant in Paris. Afterwards in partnership with Brent. Kelly was a sort of contractor for the Iron-works. Kept a small store-did a great deal of trafficking. Kelly married an old Man's daughter that lived opposite us (in a cabin), the old man's wife was dead. I forgot his name. I think there was no other frame house then in Paris except a little frame house they held court in that winter of 1791-'2. That year, however, old man Harris, a potter (came that same winter we did) who had some money, turned in to improving; built a frame house, 1792.

Old man Jackson kept the first Court house. Moved the frame Courthouse off, and kept the Post-office in it. Next year, 1792-that summer, Thomas West built a brick Court House. Smedley made the brick. Tom West had the contract. Don't know who put it up for him. Don't know that West completed it. It wasn't finished then, I think. West had to quit. Some difficulty in his affairs made him. A man by the name of Lindsay living where Cotton Town now is, an old widower. Plenty of cane where Cotton Town now is. Linsay's the only house on the side of Stoner.

Lindsay and another man built a flat to ferry Stoner with. The flat was launched about the middle of the day. Sycamore trees leaned far over the banks on each side, and their branches reached over the water. Part of a family was coming from above, moving somewhere on this side, and waited all night at our house--our house was the next one to the bank--in Paris, till the boat should be launched. Little boy had been detained up about Georgetown, going to school or something; the family had gone on before. When the boat was launched, this little boy, Dr. Webb, and James (or Thomas) Hughes, afterwards sheriff, got in to cross. The boat struck a sycamore and the water capsized the boat (was turned down and carried it against the sycamore). Webb and Hughes clung to the trees. The little boy was drowned. My brother, Charles, found the boy, after 2 or 3 days, after the water fell. Lindsay swam across. He and the other man were the proprietors. Don't know the name of the other man that was with him now. As soon as the people of the town heard of it, they came to see and laughed at Hughes and Webb. One of them a large fleshy man. Had a canoe, in which they took Hughes and Webb to the shore. The road from this side leading in to the creek was very bad, there, ground soft. They would sink in deep. Next fall, they built rock-pins and made a wooden bridge.

We moved out the last week in March, on to Stoner. We put in a crop, in 1792. Jimmy Baits was the only one who had put in any before. He had been there 3 years. Put in the 3rd crop this year. Jimmy Baits was gone a prisoner among the Indians 3 years and 6 months. Swearinger in the same company. Baits lived on Stoner, right where the Spring branch, coming down from John Hedges, empties into Stoner, between where Peter Hedges and Algan Smith now live. I heard him say myself, the crop of 1792 was his third crop. At the mouth of a spring branch.

Springs are better now than they were then. Dug a good many wells that fall, we moved out (after) until the country became settled. Was trodden and cleared.

Mentioned a good many old settlers around Bath. Gave an account of Huff and his son-in-law, Swinner. Swinner sold lots to which he could give no title. Place became dissipated. Owners of houses took away the buildings. Hauled them off.

Crawford happened on Smith at Mt. Sterling and got a hundred acres of land for one year's work.

Ralph Morgan married the widow of Douglass who was killed in the battle of Blue Licks. She was a sister of Jimmie Baits' wife.

When we came Winchester wasn't laid out yet. Troutman had a tanyard over in the bottom at Paris, on Houston, where it comes into Stoner, to the right of Paris. He went out and we got his cabin that first winter. He went up somewhere about Morgan's station and the old forge and made a tanyard there. John Troutman, son of Michael Troutman, who yet lived in Maryland. Judge Allen, then judge of the court, grandfather of Sanford Allen of Sharps-burg, then in Paris. Michael Troutman, a tanner in Maryland, near Frederick Town, near where we had lived. Heard my brother, Charles, say he helped lay out that road which they cut out for Troutman to move upon. It went from Paris to Jimmy Baits' and so on. They followed the traces leading from one neighbor to another, those times in making roads."

This is the interesting data which our ancestor gave and which sheds light upon pioneer customs and personalities. James Hedges married Amy Forman in Bourbon County, Kentucky. The famous preacher, Barton W. Stone, performed the ceremony. The return is in Marriage Book #2, page 13. Amy Forman was the daughter of one of Methodism's early ministers in Central Kentucky. His name was William Forman and I have a good bit on this family and that of his wife, Betsy Allen. In Will Book E, Bourbon wills, page 384, Feb. 6, 1815, James Hedges is named as one of the administrators of William Forman's estate along with Joseph and Aaron Forman, Charles Lander, and Robert Scott. In Order Book F, p. 129, James Hedges is listed as an heir of William Forman's. Betsy Forman was granted her dower in Order Book F, page 140. I am including all of this Forman data here for when I first found the marriage the old writing seemingly appeared to be "Amy Farmer", but I knew that my informa-tion said that she was a Forman and these other documents substan-tiate tradition.

James Hedges left a will that was probated in Bath County, Kentucky. It is in Bath Wills, Book F, page 176. It was written on July 15, 1868, and probated on October 12, 1868. In it he names his children as follows: William Hedges, Forman Hedges, Joseph F. Hedges (deceased) and James Warner (called James Warren elsewhere and we know that this is correct from the mention of him in the cited letter of John H. Hedges) Hedges, son of Joseph F. Hedges.

I have never seen this will, but Mrs. W.F. Reiner of Portland, Oregon, has done a good bit of Hedges research and sent me a copy. Letter from Miss Elizabeth Grimes, now dead, Paris, Ky., gives June 17, 1784, as the birthdate of Amy Forman and her death date as Nov. 14, 1867. This latter date is also given in the S.A.R. papers of William C. Gillespie. Oct. 10, 1868, is given by both of these as the death date of James Hedges. Mr. Hay of Detroit lists eleven children in his data;

    • William Hedges--born 1804; died 1876;

Jonas--born 1806, died 1841. He had this query by Jonas' name--"Was he a twin of Dorcas?" It is quite probable for it will be noted that Dorcas' birth date is for the same year and she had twins herself.

Sythia--born 1808, died 1870;

Elizabeth--born 1811, died 1890; John Harrison--born 1813, died 1860. Mr. Hay notes that he had secured complete data on this line from Mrs. J.A. Cooper of Springwood Farm, about seven miles north of Dayton, Ohio.

Sarah, born 1815;

Mary--born 1817;

Lucinda--born 1819;

James. F.--born 1822, died in 1896; Mr. Hay states that he has all--or practically all--of this line.

Dorcas Hedges--born 1806, July 28th. It will be noted that I capital-ized her name in the will and gave the spelling as it was sent to me--"DARCUS BANTY". The correct spelling is Dorcas Banta and I shall have more to say about her in the next section for she was my great-great grandmoth-er and I have a picture of her and of her husband, Abram Banta. I suspect that I have more data on the Banta family than any other line, but it is too voluminous to even attempt to give too much of it in this sketch.

[I have checked several times and can find only ten children listed.]

For the benefit of the descendants of Jemima Hedges, daughter of Joseph and Sarah Biggs Hedges, this information is inserted here: See sketch of Capt. Greenberry Reid, Perrin's History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison, and Nicholas Counties, Kentucky, page 488f. There is one mistake there, though, for it is asserted that Joseph Hedges was in the War of 1812. On page 529 of the same book is the sketch of James Hedges who was a son of Joseph and Margaret (Goulden) Hedges.

I am not asserting that the following references are all that pertain to Hedges descendants in the Perrin volume cited, but I have found treatment of them on the following pages; 450; 462; 470; 471; 476; 480; 483; 488; 522; 527; 529; 539; 542; 558; 663; 684; 693; and 757.

DORCAS HEDGES

Dorcas was one of the children named in the will of her father, James Hedges. As stated, her mother was Amy Forman. On page 732 of the Perrin book is a sketch of the husband of Dorcas Hedges, Abram Banta. In this article it is stated that they were married in 1828. However, I am inclined to believe that another date is correct. I fail to recall whether I have looked up the court record on this. In the early 1880's a genealogy of the Banta family was published which was called "A Frisian Family". Theodore Melvin Banta was the editor and it is considered to be one of the finest works of its kind that ever came from the press. I was able to borrow one from one of the Bourbon clan and had everything that pertained to the Kentucky branch copied. He included all data on our line from 1659 down to my great-grandmother, Margaret Lucinda Banta Campbell. In his data on Abram Banta and Dorcas Hedges he gave their marriage date as September 4, 1824.

MARGARET LUCINDA BANTA

Margaret was the daughter of Abram Banta and Dorcas Hedges Banta. She was born May 28, 1833, and married Thomas Metcalfe Campbell on December 22, 1853. Thomas Metcalfe Campbell was the son of John Preston Campbell and Jane Lee Metcalfe and was born on January 2, 1832. He died on March 24, 1884, and Margaret Lucinda Banta Campbell died on August 1, 1918. I recall her for she lived until I was eleven years old. I visited her home once in Carlisle and then we were at her bedside just one day before she died in 1918. We had been up to Maysville to visit my mother's father, Dr. Bernard Bascom Bailey, who was pastor of the Baptist church there. BANTA Family

HENRY BANTA, born Jan 22nd 1762 in Pennsylvania, married Sally Shook (or Shuck), born Oct. 27, 1761 in Pennsylvania

Henry Banta came into Kentucky from Pennsylvania in 177[?] (one of Kentucky's hardest winters) and by his own statement (Vet. Admin. pension application) came to what is now Jefferson and the fort where he settled is there. He came to Dutch Station "about six or seven miles from the Falls of the Ohio" and enlisted during the Revolution as a spy and ranger at the Station. A monument for the Old Dutch Station (according to the Filson Club map) is between St. Matthews and Taylorsville Road on Beargrass Creek. He was wounded near there in the shoulder by an Indian and went from there to the Indian campaign with General George Rogers Clark in Ohio and returned to the fort. He left there in 1783 and re-enlisted in Fort Harrod and served there as a "spy and ranger" - also doing guard duty. That makes the replica of Old Fort Harrod more interesting to us. After the War he came to Shelby County and was a charter member and owner of the Lord Dutch Colony.

Later they moved to the fort at Bryant's Station and then to the Flat Rock precinct in Bourbon Co. and built, with the help of his sons, a substantial brick residence. This was later the home of Peter Banta, his son. All the furniture in the house was made to order, among the pieces was a handsome "grand father's" clock which is now the property of a Mrs. Fisher in Carlisle, granddaughter of Peter Banta. There were ten children in Henry Banta's Family, six daughters and four sons - Viz. - Polly, who married Mr. Develley, Henry, who married Miss Jennie Fulton, Margaret, who married Gen. Sam Fulton, Andrew, who married Betsy Hayden, Peter, who married Judith Zachery, Rachel, who married James Bryan, Sally, who married Wm. Boardman, Betsy, who married Peter Vanice, Anna, who married Reason Brace, and Abram Banta, who married Dorcas Hedges in 1828.

ABRAM BANTA: On page 732 of the Perrin book is a sketch of Abram Banta. The sketch goes thus:

"Abram Banta, farmer, P.O. Carlisle; youngest son of Henry Banta (see Peter Banta's history). He was born April 18, 1805, and attended school about three months, during which time he received his theoretical education. He remained with his parents until in the year 1839, when he came to the farm upon which he now resides. He was married in 1828 to Miss Dorcas Hedges, born July 28, 1806, to James and Annie (an error, her name was Amy. B.D.) (Forman) Hedges, who were heirs in the famous "Hedges Estate". The Bantas and Hedges were among the early settlers in the "Region" and noted for their longevity. Mr. Banta is the father of eight children, all of whom grew to maturity. They were:

Scythia A., born Dec. 24, 1829, was wife of Samuel Fulton;

James H., born Aug. 14, 1831, both of whom (he means, of course, Scythia and her brother, James H.) are residing at Ridge Farm, Vermillion County, Illinois;

MARGARET L., born May 28, 1833, and wife of Thomas Campbell, residing in Headquarters Precinct;

Andrew J., died a prisoner at Camp Morton, Aug. 20, 1864, aged twenty-nine years (I have a letter written by a nephew of Abram, Miles Gillespie, telling of the death of this Confed-erate soldier and enclosing a lock of his beard and hair. B.D.)

Sarah F., born April 4, 1839, died March 19, 1877, leaving one child, Nannie;

The next item is confusing and I merely give it as recorded--

J.M., the father, Edwin Colling(s), engaged in business at Carlisle (The Banta Genealogy states that this was Sarah Francis and her husband was Edmund Collins, but I do not get the J.M. connection unless the printer made an error for with J.M. there are nine children listed as stated. however, the Banta book only lists eight children and there is no J.M. among them. B.D.)

William F., born May 28, 1841, farming in Edgar County, Illinois;

Elizabeth, a twin sister to William F., wife of Lon Campbell (Note: Lon or Leonidas Campbell was named for Leonidas Metcalfe, his uncle, and was a brother to my great-grandfa-ther, Thomas Metcalfe Campbell who married Margaret Lucinda Banta. B.F.D.) of Carlisle;

Amie Maria, born Aug. 9, 1847, wife of Henry Bogart of Vermil-lion County, Ind. (Note: I think that they meant Illinois instead of Indiana for I have some old letters from this branch out in Illinois. B.D.)

The parents are vigorous old people, highly esteemed citizens of the community in which they live, and with their family belong to the Christian Church."

Abram Banta was born April 18, 1805, and died February 12, 1883. Dorcas Hedges Banta was born July 28, 1806, and died February 6, 1888. The original pictures of this old couple are in the possession of Thomas Worthington Campbell in Lexington, Kentucky. T.W. Campbell is the son of Abram Banta Campbell who was the brother of my grandmother, Pauline Campbell Davis.

I stated that I had a great deal of data on the Banta family. I might say here that Abram Banta was the son of Henry Banta and Sally Shuck. I have this family line clear on back into Holland. The first one came to New Amsterdam in 1659. The first of the family came into Kentucky in 1779-80 and I have the history of the various migrations. It is fascinating history and very interest-ing. A distant cousin is bringing the Banta family up to date and she has the data on our line and is including it even though most lines are considered completed when the female marries and only male Bantas are sketched.

  • DAVIS Family

John Davis - Perrin's History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison, and Nicholas has a sketch (page 538) on Abram Henson Davis in which it says that Abram Henson was the grandson of John Davis of Virginia. John Davis was a Rev. soldier from Virginia and raised a family of ten children--2 sons and 8 daughters. He moved to Ohio and later to Missouri where he died. He was drawing a pension for Rev. services at the time of his death. That was my clue so I wrote to the Veteran's Administration in Washington, D.C., and gave them my data. There is only one John Davis who fits that description so I am positive that I have the right man. Here is what information they have on him: John Davis was born Aug. 19, 1757 or 58--place or parents not stated on his pension application. Enlisted in Rev. while resident of Prince William County, Va., in Spring of 1775, served three months under Capt. Heath as in his company, Col. Levin Powell's Va. Regiment. Immediately re-enlisted and served as and wagoner under Wagonmaster John Morris. 15 months entire length of service. While on visit to relatives in North Carolina, he enlisted in Rowan County (I have not had chance to investigate this county but Jefferson Davis' people came from this section) sometime in March, 1780, and served in Capt. Lowman's Co., Col. Lytle's North Carolina regiment. He was taken prisoner at Charleston, S.C., and was released on parole at end of 8 days. In a short time he re-enlisted and served one month in Capt. Hedrick's Co. to guard Char-leston from the Tories. He applied for a pension on August 10, 1832, at which time he was living in Perry Township, Pickaway County, Ohio. In the fall of 1843 he moved to Buchanan Co., Missouri, and died May 31, 1844. His administrator was John Deverss whose address was St. Joseph, Missouri, in 1847. The papers of John Davis (S. 2155) contain no mention of wife or children.

James Davis was the son of John Davis (Perrin - p. 538). He was born ____________. He married Margaret Moore of Bourbon County, Sept. 8, 1808, at home of John Moore (her brother, I believe) in Bourbon by a M.E. preacher. James enlisted in War of 1812 in Adams Co., Ohio, and served from July 29, 1813 till Sept. 9, 1813 as in Capt. Caleb Haskings Co. of Ohio militia. Discharged at Upper Sandusky, Ohio. James was thrown from a young horse in Houston Creek near Paris, Ky., and drowned on January 20, 1823. His widow was left with several children - Perrin says 7 but grandfather said 4 - [he then lists only three] Abram Henson; John Isaac; and a daughter (name?) who married Lyde Ater of Four Corners, Ohio. Margaret Moore Davis applied for bounty land due of war services, Dec. 20, 1850. She then lived in Pickaway Co. Ohio (you'll note that John Davis lived here and she evidently went to live with her in-laws after James' death - thus confirming that Perrin was correct about John Davis.

[The right edge of this page didn't copy, so I will be missing some text or will infer it from the context.] She was allowed 40 acres on warrant #88365-40-50 under Act of Sept. 28, 1850. She applied July 10, 1855, for additional land under Act of Mch. 3, 1855. She was granted 120 acres on warrant 74160-1___-55. In 1855 she gave her age as 69 years but did not give parents nor place (I believe that her father was Thomas Moore who came from Ireland to Va. in 1770 to escape being Roman Catholic priest, but Mr. John V. Moore and I can't straighten out a date. We know that the Fulton in our name comes from Fulton Moore his descendent and grandfather assured me that we are kin). Sept. 5, 1874, she applied for a pension but James hadn't served long enough. In 1874, she was living at Pleasant hill, Cass County, Missouri. In December, 1852, one E.S. Davis (was he James' brother?) witnessed an affidavit made by her in Pickaway. In 1851 John Moore and Elisha Stewart stated before magistrate that they were present at her marriage in Franklin Co., Ohio, relation not stated. In 1874 Andrew Mers of Jackson Co., Missouri, and John Wilson, Pleasant Gap, Bate[?] County, Missouri, stated that they had been well acquainted with her for 47 and 50 years respectively. When she died I've not been able to learn.

Abram Henson Davis, son of James and Margaret Moore Davis, was born January 24, 1817. He married Catherine Laughlin on September 15, 1839. The minister was the famous "Raccoon" John Smith. In Frankfort at the State Historical Library this marriage is listed as "Hinson" Davis and "Cathrin" Laughlin with explanation that it and about ten oth-ers were found in an attic in Montgomery Co., among papers of this old preacher and spelling is his own. Perrin says, "Abram Henson Davis inherited by his wife 100 acres in Bourbon where he settled and by industry and economy he has added to it from time to time until he now owns 576 acres three miles East of North Middletown. Notwithstanding he has had his residence twice destroyed by fire during his married life and each time caught him without any insurance. His not a man that forfeits much of his valuable time on account of politics, yet he always votes the Democratic ticket" - p. 538. Abram Henson died ______-____ 1892. Catherine Laughlin was born ___________ 1818 and died Nov. 2, 190[?, possibly a "2"]

Thomas Isaac Davis - born April 15, 1856; died June 2, 1937. He married Pauline Campbell, Sept. 4, 1877, at home of Abram Banta by Rev. Reynolds of Christian Church in Nicholas Co. Pauline Campbell was born Oct. 12. 1860, and died Feb. 9, 1928. CAMPBELL Family

You can readily see that there is more material on grandmother's people. Let's start into that even though I may get writer's cramps before I finish it! First - Campbell family. Uncle Abe tells me that Harry Campbell came over here from Scotland. He knows nothing about where he settled or who his wife was. His son was William and that's all he knows about him. There are numerous William Campbells' marriage records in M[?, Montgomery maybe, since it's adjacent to Bourbon] and Bourbon but I'll have to trace him through his will. He had several sons - John Preston (our ancestor), William, Harry, Albert, James, and daughter Nannie, who married Dr. Kenny. John Preston Campbell married Jane Lee Metcalfe (can't find date). I don't know their birth or marriage dates but she died January 10, 1839. The following year he married her sister, Mary Ann Metcalfe. We are descended from the first marriage. He died August 19, 1855. There is a Lucile Campbell in Frankfort who is descended from the second marriage and her grandmother (daughter-in-law of John Preston) is still living. I've sent a list of questions for the old lady to answer but so far haven't got an answer. She may know what William's wife was named. I'll guarantee that they were in the Revolution if they could find a stick or a gun! John Preston and Jane Lee had several children and their son, Thomas Metcalfe Campbell was our great-grandfather. He was born January 2, 1832, and died March 24, 1884. On December 22, 1853, he married Margaret Lucinda Banta. She was born May 28, 1833, and died Aug. 1, [?]. On October 22, 1861, he went to Prestonburg, Ky., and became a member of John Hunt Morgan's cavalry. He was First Lt. - Battalion Mounted Riflemen, Company D.

I have never been able to unravel the Campbell family line beyond John Preston Campbell. We know that he and Thomas "Stonehammer" Metcalfe were business partners for I have an old annual settlement of the store at Forest Retreat for 1839 (I am not positive of the date, but I have it in my papers at the house. B.D.). John Preston Campbell married first the daughter of Thomas Metcalfe who was named Jane Lee Metcalfe. Jane Lee was the mother of Thomas Metcalfe Campbell. After her death he later married her sister, Mary Ann Metcalfe. In the Sesquicentenial magazine issued by Kentucky there are pictures of the governor's wives. There is a picture of a woman and under it is the name, Mary Ann Metcalfe. This is evidently an error for Thomas Metcalfe was the tenth governor of Ky. and his wife was named Nancy Mason Metcalfe. At any rate, this picture resembles my aunt, Bertie Davis McCray, so much that it is odd.

Thomas Metcalfe Campbell attended school at Blue Licks and was taught by James G. Blaine. He served in the Mexican War and then became a Confederate captain. I have his old Confederate army blanket with the regimental numbers on it. I also have an old letter written to him by his brother, John Campbell, who was a major in the Union Army. John had arranged for Thomas' release from Federal prison for Thomas had been captured while serving under the cavalry general, John Hunt Morgan. I have a great many letters written by John and also his picture in uniform.

PAULINE CAMPBELL

She was the daughter of Thomas Metcalfe Campbell and Margaret Lucinda Banta Campbell. Pauline Campbell was born on October 12, 1860, and died on Feb. 9, 1928. Thomas Isaac Davis was born on April 15, 1855, and died on June 2, 1937. They were my grandpar-ents and I have spent many happy hours in their home at Winchester. Both of them are buried there. My grandfather Davis was a horseman and I have pictures of several horses that he trained. I can still recall his indignation when the family decreed that he must ride no more horses after one stumbled and fell with him. He was then in his seventies and felt that he was still active and alert enough to ride.


METCALFE Family

JOHN METCALFE was a graduate of Cambridge who emigrated to Virginia about 1650 and was a teacher and principal of schools in that colony. [His wife's name runs off the page. The first four letters of her first and last names are "Dian" and "Bank", Diane or Diana Banks, perhaps, but I'm just guessing.] John Metcalfe, their child, became the Reverend Captain John Metcalfe.

REV. CAPT. JOHN METCALFE was born in Faquier County, Virginia in 1724. His third wife was Sarah Dent Chinn. He was well educated for his time and possessed a library of standard English works of his day. He was wounded by a shot from a British gun during the Revolutionary War. He took his family to Kentucky in 1784 locating in Fayette Co, but several years later he purchased land in Nicholas County where he died in 1799. He died in Robertson County, Kentucky in 1799.

THOMAS METCALFE, tenth Gov. of Kentucky (1828-32) was born in Fauquier County, Virginia - March 20, 1780. He was the son of Capt. John Metcalfe and his 3rd wife, Sarah Dent Chinn Metcalfe.

Thomas was educated at a country school and at the age of sixteen was apprenticed as a stone mason to an older brother. The death of his father devolving on him the care of the family, he left the slaves to work the farm and sought contracts for stone work in the country about him. He devoted his leisure hours to study and applying himself.

He especially liked history and soon developed remarkable intellec-tual abilities, at the age of 27 he began to take part in political discussions and at once became a conspicuous figure and popular leader in the public affairs of Kentucky. He served in the war of 1812 fought under Boswell in 1813, distinguished himself for gallantry at _________ _______ [looks like Hart Hneigs] for which he was complimented by Gen. Harrison. He was elected to the Kentucky Legislature _______ [looks like "heuring", probably "during", but it don't look like "during"] his absence in the field, in 1819 he was sent as representative to Congress where he sat until his election to the [the line goes off the bottom of the page. I can see "torial cha", so I'd guess "gubernatorial chair"] of Kentucky in Aug 1828 and filled the latter office for four years.

During his tearm [that's what it says] a common school law was enacted and as _____ [maybe "her"] measures passed for the promotion of education in the state. He was a state senator 1834-36, was president of the board of internal improvement in 1840 and in 1848 was appointed U.S. Senator to fill the unexpired term of John J. Crittenden, holding that post from June 23, 1843 to March 3rd, 1849 when he retired to his farm, "Forest Retreat".

Gov. Metcalfe was possessed of uncommon intelligence and force of character and was one of the most naturally eloquent man of his day. He made the speech nominating Gen. William Henry Harrison for the Presidency at the convention held in Harrisburg, Pa in 1840 and on the latter's election was offered by him the position of Secretary of War, which however he declined on account of failing health. He was proud of his early struggles and labors as a "stone mason" and delighted in being called "the Old Stone Hammer". He was married about 1806 to Nancy, daughter of Burgess and Jane (Lee) Mason. He died at his home in Nicholas County, Ky - Aug 18th 1855.


[Another note on Thomas Metcalfe:]

Thomas Metcalfe was born in Fauquier Co., Virginia on the 20th of March 1780, son of Captain John Metcalfe by his third and last wife. He served in the war of 1812 - was elected to Legislature from Nicholas Co. Ky. in 1813. Returned from the War of 1812 a general - Elected as governor of Ky. in 1828. Also served in both houses of U.S. Congress. He married in 1805 Nancy Mason, daughter of Burgess Mason of Virginia. Burgess Mason married Jennie Lee, sister of General Henry Lee of Mason Co. Ky. (Picture given in Collin's History of Ky.) Jennie Lee was the daughter of Stephen Lee and Ann Murphy Lee of Virginia. Stephen Lee was the son of Richard Lee, son of Hancock Lee, son of Thomas Lee, the progenitory of all the Lee family, who came to Virginia in 1649.


[And a third piece]

Thomas Metcalfe - He was a distinguished Kentuckian--native of Fauquier County, Virginia,--and was the son of a Revolutionary soldier, John Metcalfe. His mother's name was Rhoda Dent, but we know nothing of her people. As stated, Thomas Metcalfe was the tenth governor of Ky. (1828-1832). He was also a Congressman and U.S. Senator. His wife was Nancy Mason and she was the daughter of an early Mason County pioneer and he was descended from the famous Lee family of Virginia. I have had my papers accepted on this line and belong to the Society of Lees of Virginia.


And a fourth one, from A History of Nicholas County, page 445:

Thomas Metcalfe was born in Fauquier County, Va. on Mar. 20, 1780. In 1785, he came with his family to Fayette County, Ky. and in a few years moved with them to Nicholas County. He received only the basics of an eduction, but was quite interested in learning.

At 16, Metcalfe became an apprentice stone mason under his elder brother. He was to become an expert in this trade. Some of his notable accomplishments were the old governor's mansion in Frankfort, courthouses at West Union, Ohio, at Greensburg, Ky., and others. He laid the foundations for the courthouse in Paris, Ky. and for the first Nicholas County courthouse is Carlisle. He also built his home, Forest Retreat, here in Nicholas County, in 1826, on land which he bought in 1816 for $16.00 an acre. He earned the nickname "Old Stone Hammer" from his masonry and fierce oratory skills.

Metcalfe served as a captain in the War of 1812. He represented Nicholas County in the lower branch of the Kentucky legislature in 1812-1817. In 1818, he was elected to Congress and re-elected four times. He served his county as Sheriff from Jan. 25, 1819 to Feb. 15, 1819. In 1828, he resigned from Congress to run for governor and was elected. He served from 1829-1833, the tenth governor of Kentucky. Metcalfe served four years in the state senate from Nicholas and Bracken counties, 1834-38. In 1848-49 he filled by appointment the unexpired term of John j. Crittenden in the U.S. Senate.

Metcalfe entertained many notable Americans at Forest Retreat including Andrew Jackson on his way to his inauguration in 1829 and Gen. William Henry Harrison in 1840, while he was campaigning for President. Henry Clay often visited and it was he who coined the name Forest Retreat. John J. Crittenden, Santa Anna and many others were entertained at Metcalfe's home. After his wife's death, Metcalfe sold Forest Retreat and lived with his daughter and son-in-law at the old stage coach inn across the road from his home. He died here of Cholera on Aug. 18, 1855 at the age of 75.

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LAUGHLIN Family

As to the Laughlin family - I can find nothing back of John Laughlin but I still have hopes. I've found an early Laughlin will in Fayette, but I haven't connected them with our line. I think that they are Irish; sometimes spelled O'Laughlin. [During my high-school days, the minister of our church was Robert Laughlin, who had come to Frankfort from Ireland. He pronounced the name "Lock lin".] John Laughlin married Patsey Luckey (y or ie) on June 2, 1810. She is called Catherine Laughlin in her father's will and John Laughlin is named as an executor. "Mack" told me to write to Mildred Laughlin and she and her father have been quite kind in aiding me; making a trip back to our Davis family graveyard for me. Her father assures me that Patsey and Catherine are the same person. Her tombstone is in old Cane Ridge graveyard and she is called "Caty Laughlin consort of John Laughlin" and records that she was 25 when she died - born 1794, died 1819. John Laughlin later married [?] Trimble.

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LUCKEY Family

Now the Luckey family; it is spelled Luckey (Veterans' Administra-tion records), Lucky, and Luckie. We begin with John Luckey of North Carolina. He was a Revolutionary soldier from North Carolina - record in N.C. Auditor's Report, Salisbury District - Western Military #8955 -12-9-4; also N.C. Archives, Vol. 22, page 1014 (or 1814 - I got this from Miss Elizabeth Grimes of Paris and her writing is a bit "wavy" in spots). He came to Bourbon after the Revolution and his will, dated Dec. 28, 1793, is in Bourbon Will book G179-180; probated Feb. 1824. He named his sons, Robert, Joseph, and daughters Jenny, Keeza, Margaret, Elizabeth, Esther, and Sally.

His son, Robert, is our ancestor. He, too, was a Revolutionary soldier. He was born in N.C. on Feb. 6, 1760. He enlisted in N.C. and served as from Sept. 1778 six months in Capt. Wm. Johnston's Co.. From May 1779 - 3 months in Capt. Armstrong's Co.. In 1780 - 3 months in Capt. Armstrong's Co. and was in battle of Ramsour's Mill. In 1780 - 3 months in Capt. Cowan's Co. and was in battle of Charlotte. From sometime late in 1780, three months in Capt. Cowan's Co.. In 1781, six months in Capt. Dickson's Co. and was in the battle of Guilford Court House. Vet. Admin. Records - Robt. Luckey, #38157. He was allowed pension on application as of Nov. 30, 1833, while resident of Bourbon. Robert was twice married. 1. To Polly Thorn. 2. To Catherine Foster (our line). They were married April 9, 1793, in Bourbon and in bond her father's name is given as John Foster. I believe that he is a Rev. soldier, too, as Mrs. Ardery names a John Foster as a Rev. soldier who died in Bourbon. I haven't been able to confirm it as yet.


Book: "Forebears of the Four Dunbars" By Carl & Lorene Dunbar

Note: This is the book where I found this story but the information is noted in another book called "History of Kentucky and Kentuckians" by E. Polk Johnson.

Sarah (Biggs) Hedges -- Mrs. Sarah Hedges, nee Biggs, was a characteristic type of the noble pioneer mothers. Of gentle birth and unaccustomed to the ruder conditions of life and to handsome and striking appearance she numbered among her personal accomplishments that of being a thorough horsewoman and an excellent judge of the qualities constituting fine horses. She was remarkable for her industry, piety and Christian influence and took an active interest in the Baptist church with which she had long been associated and to which she was a pillar of strength prior to leaving her native state, as evidence by the records of Frederick Maryland "July 10, 1750, Sarah Hedges appears among the number of persons who entered into an agreement for the re-organization of a Baptist congregation."

Mr. and Mrs. Hedges had evidently been lured from their desirable Maryland home by glowing representations made by friends who had preceded them to the backwoodsman's paradise in whose primeval solitude they were destined to rear an interesting family and inculcate those high principles of domestic virtue and exalted conceptions of duty which have exerted a powerful influence over the descendants to the present, thus verifying what had often been claimed-that many generations preside at the birth of every individual.

To Mrs. Hedges is due our highest tribute of praise for the noble and active and humanizing part she took in reclaiming the wilderness from savagery and converting it into a civilized habitation for man. Her mental strength was indelibly impressed upon her children. Upon her youngest son, Samuel she especially exerted an influence for uprightness and worth and the veneration he bore his mother was an uplifting force throughout life. Not one of the children of her heart and home proved unfaithful to the influence brought to bear by her moral worth, all becoming worthy citizens who left their impress for good upon the community in which they lived. After the death of her husband in 1804, Mrs. Hedges continued to live at the old home with John until 1822, when she entered the higher service. Both are buried in a locust grove within sight of their home..

  • Misc. Notes

THE EARLY HEDGES, THEIR LAND AND HOMES By Don C. Wood

John Vanmeter and his family moved to the present Berkeley, Jefferson Co. area in 1734. At this time Berkeley Co. was a part of Orange Co., Va. John Vanmeter was granted two large land grants 1,786 acres on the 12th of June 1734 which was located on Joshiah Jones mill run, now called Rocky Marsh. Route 45 from Martinsburg to Shepherdstown pass through this grant in the area of the Berkeley-Jefferson Co. line. The other land granted on the same day, 885 acres on the east side of the Opecquon Creek. The old stone bridge at Vanmeter's Ford is located on this land grant. John Vanmeter's children all moved to this area with him. His daughter Sarah married James Davis; Daughter Rebecca married Solomon Hedges Esq.; his son Abraham Vanmeter married Ruth Hedges Frederick Co., Va. WBI, p. 52 & Shepherd, Duke, Vanmeter History by Gordon Smythe and DAR Book). Abraham Vanmeter born 1721, died 1783, married 1742 to Ruth Hedges born-1722, died 1761. Abraham Vanmeter owned several larger tracts of land along the Opecquon Creek and the area of Newton D. Baker Hospital. Abraham, who served in the Revolution (DAR Book) and Ruth Hedges Vanmeter had 10 children: Jacob Vanmeter (who served in the Revolutionary War (DAR Records); Isaac, Abraham Jr.; Joseph; Rebecca; Mary; Ruth; Hannah; Daniel and John (WB1, p.348, BC). I am a descendant of this family as are many other hundreds of present Berkeley Countians. All of the Vanmeter-Hite land was east of the Opecquon Creek. In 1735 Alexander Ross and Morgan Bryan received orders from the Governor of Virginia for 1,000 acres of land for each family they could settle up to 70,000 acres. On November 12, 1735, Morgan Bryan was granted 1,020 acres lying and being on Tully's Branch. On the same day Edward Davis was granted an adjoining tract of 875 acres on Tully's Branch, a branch of the Hungoluta River. Richmond, Va. Land grant records which are also on microfilm in Berkeley County Courthouse) Tully's Branch is the stream that lies at the foot of the mountain east of present Hedgesville. On the 10th day of April 1738 James Davis of Orange Co., Va. divided his land grant into three tracts. He sold 300 acres to Richard Morgan, 300 acres to Peter Hedges and 275 acres to Solomon Hedges (DB2, p. 475, 488, 481,Orange Co., Va. on microfilm Berkeley-County Courthouse). In the same year, 1738, Frederick County, Virginia, was formed from Orange County but the Court did not meet until 1743. Morgan Bryan and his wife, Martha, of Frederick Co., Va. sold on II January 1743 their 1,020 acre tract of land on Tully's Branch to Joshua Hedges for 46 pounds current money (DBI, p. 27, Frederick Co., Va.). Joshua Hedges did not keep the southern most part of this tract long. He sold 220 acres I September 1747 to Robert Paul. Joshua Hedges received a land grant of 391 acres 7 November 1754 from Lord Fairfax. This land is located where the James Rumsey School is today and joined on the west the land he had purchased from Morgan Bryan and the land that Peter Hedges had purchased on the south. Jonas Hedges received a land grant of 261 acres on 7 November 1754 from Lord Fairfax. This tract of land lies on the south side of Joshua Hedges's grant (Land grant records, Richmond, Va. & Land grant plat map by Galtjo Gertseema).

In the year 1754 we have five Hedges families living in what is present day Berkeley County, W. Va. Joshua Hedges born April 14, 1717, died February 16, 1790. Married Elizabeth Chapline. Jonas Hedges married Agnes Powelston; Peter Hedges married Elizabeth Seeds; Ruth Hedges who was married to Abraham Vanmeter, and Solomon Hedges who married Rebecca Vanmeter. These were all children of Joseph Hedges who emigrated to America in 1710 and died at Monocacy, Maryland, 1732. There were also five children in this family which did not come to this area: Charles; Joseph; Catherine; Dorcas and Samuel (Will of Joseph Hedges in The Christine Bergen papers Berkeley County Courthouse). Joseph Hedges was the son of Charles Hedges who died in England in 1720. His father was Sir Charles Hedges who died in 1714.

On 14 September 1752, Charles Goff received a warrant from Lord Fairfax to survey a parcel of waste and ungranted land at the Gap of the North Mountain in Frederick Co. This was a survey run for 150 acres, which Charles Goff assigned to William Chapline. The survey plat on November 24, 1752 shows the land was joined on the east by Jonas and-Joshua Hedges land; on the north by Capt. Morgan and the Meetinghouse. For some reason the land was not granted until after Lord Fairfax died. On the 23rd of February 1789, for fifteen shillings Sterling Governor Berkley Randolph of Virginia granted the land to William Chaplin. This is part of the land where Hedgesville was founded. Apparently the William Chapline who received the land grant was the son of William who purchased the survey from Charles Goff. On the 6th of August 1768, when Richard Riggs ran a survey on the land, which later became part of Hedgesville, the line ran along William Chaptine heirs. This survey was for Gaspard Bonner for 334 3/16 acres. This survey, or land grant, does not mention the Chapel but does show the Warm Spring Road, which led from Rawling's on Back Creek to the Warm Springs. John and Reuben Bonner were the chain carriers. This tract of land was not granted for several years after the survey. Richard Riggs died before the land was granted and a Mr. John McCool attested to his signature in March 1788. The land was granted for I pound 15 shillings Sterling to Gasper Bonner (spelled Banner on grant) on the 24th of July 1789. Samuel Hedges II received a land grant for 50 acres 27 November 1795. This land is located on top of North Mountain near High Knob, which was on the Chapline grant. Richard Riggs who did surveying for Lord Fairfax obtained a warrant for a survey of Cannon Hill in 1768. Richard Rigg died in 1785 leaving the survey to his nephew Richard Wood of Cumberland Co., England. The land was granted to Richard Wood 4 December 1788. This is how my Wood family came to the Hedgesville area. I am a descendant of Richard Rigg's sister Elizabeth who was married to John Wood and lived in Cumberland Co. England (Richard Rigg will Frederick Co., Va.).

We will start at the southernmost part of the Hedges 1,020-acre tract. There is a lovely old brick house here, which is owned by Miss Virginia Wilson. Miss Wilson is a descendant of Hezekiah Hedges. Hezekiah's daughter married Harrison S. Seibert. The property then went to his son, Luther Seibert, who married Nora Riner. They had one son which was killed by a train at Flaggs Crossing. When Luther Seibert died the property went to his only sister, Mary Emma Wilson's children, Lewis, Henry and Hall Wilson. Miss Virginia Wilson inherited the property from her father, Lewis Wilson. On down Mountain Road we next come to a very old log house owned by Mr. & Mrs. Fredie Blair which is located on the other part of the Paul land. This house was in the Paul family for many years and later went to the Robinsons. Next we "come to the lovely old stone house of Samuel Hedges, owned by H. P. Thorn heirs. Picture 1. On 16 June 1772-Joshua Hedges, Sr. deeded for-5 shillings 200 acres to his son Samuel Hedges. (DB 1,p. 74) Shortly after, Samuel Hedges built the lovely front stone part of the present house. Samuel Hedges served in the Revolutionary War (Court Minute Book 3, p. 401).

Samuel Hedges left his lovely dwelling house with 230 acres to der of Hedgesville), born December 16, 1772, died September 4, 1849, married October 21, 1800 Catharine Morgan, born July 20, 1773, died March 29, 1855, daughter of Rev. Morgan Morgan 11, son of Morgan Morgan. Both buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery, Hedgesville. 2. Hezekiah Hedges born August 21, 1796, died April 25, 1847, married November 20, 1824 Elizabeth Snodgrass. Both buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery, Hedgesville. 3. Joshua Hedges married June 11, 1804 Ruth Southwood, daughter of Edward Southwood (WB 7, p. 352). 4. Ruth Hedges, born 1787, died September 10, 1845, married September 28, 1814 James H. Robinson. Both buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery, Hedgesville. Rebeccah Hedges who married March 27, 1793 Abraham Robinson. 6 Phebe Hedges who married January 17, 1825 Robert Vincent. 7. Elizabeth Hedges who married a Morgan. 8. Samuel Hedges III who married March 30, 1807 Charity Shields, daughter of William Shields. Samuel Hedges III acquired much land on the west side of Back Creek and paid taxes in 1816 on 1,175 acres listed as Rawlings Mill Race. (Land Book 1816).

Samuel Hedges left his lively dwelling house with 230 acres to his wife Rebeccah for her life and then to his son Hezekiah (WB 7, p. 207)' In 1843 Hezekiah Hedges and wife Elizabeth gave a deed of trust on all land they owned in Berkeley and Morgan Counties and the town of Hedgesville and the 220 acres Hedges Mansion Farm (DB 47, p. 226). The trustees were Henry Seibert and John W. Hedges who sold 211 acres to Thomas Vanmeter for $5,796.75 1/2 Cents (DB 49, p. 218). On 31 March 1860 Thomas Vanmeter and Mary, his wife, traded the Hedges Farm to his son, Philip Carmine Vanmeter, for his interest in land Philip had inherited from his uncle, Philip Carmine (DB 61, p. 41). Philip Vanmeter born July 25, 1823, died January 15, 1871 married Susan Mead Hedges born February 3, 1839, died March 21, 1913, daughter of Josiah Hedges son of Solomon. The back section of the house was built by the Vanmeters. Philip Vanmeter and his wife Susan Mead Hedges Vanmeter had three children: J. Thomas Vanmeter died 12 January 1864 aged I year; Sarah E. Vanmeter died March 1, 1871 aged 7 months and Mary S. Vanmeter. Both are buried Greenhill Cemetery. Philip Vanmeter left the home place to his wife and young children. Philip's wife Susan married a second time to Adam S. Wolfe (WB 22, p. 141). The farm and orchard then went to Philip Vanmeter's only surviving child, Mary S. Vanmeter Faulkner, who left it by her will dated 11 March 1931 to her son, Philip 0. Faulkner. In 1941 Philip 0. Faulkner sold the old Hedges home with 211 acres to H. P. Thorn. It is now owned by his heirs. Mr. Philip 0.Faulkner who is 93 is one of Berkeley County's oldest Hedges descendants. (DB 169, p. 124 & 156).

We will now move on down Tulleses Branch to the next Hedges Farm. Joshua Hedges divided the 1,020 tract into five tracts of 200 to 220 acres each. In 1772 Joshua Hedges, Sr. sold this 200 acre tract to his son Joshua Hedges, Jr. (DB 1, p 67). In 1804 Joshua Hedges, Jr. and his wife, Mary, sold this tract to Jacob Seibert of Washington Co., Md. (DB 1, p. 95). In 1881 Jacob M. Seibert, sole heir of Michael Seibert, sold the tract to Moses C. Nadenbousch (DB 77, p. 417). The land is now owned by the Pet Milk Company and the present house was built by Moses C. Nadenbousch in 1885. We are now down to the Warm Spring Road. Part of this tract is now owned by Norman Dillon and wife. The present house is known as the John W. Hedges house. The lovely plastered brick house was built in 1879 by John W. Hedges. Picture No. 2. Joshua Hedges Sr. sold this 200 acres to his brother Jonas. This was Jonas's home plantation and named Tulusses. Jonas Hedges eldest son Benjamin born 1738, died Jan. 16, 1805; Joseph and Samuel Hedges. Jonas deeded 130 acres, part of his land grant which joined his home plantation on the east side, to his son Joseph (DB 1, p. 44), and 130 acres the same day to his son Benjamin Hedges. Jonas left his home plantation to his son Samuel II. Both Benjamin and Samuel had large families. Benjamin Hedges had Jonas, Mary Ann, James, Philip, Sarah who married Sept. 6, 1810, to William Reed, Jr.; Mary who married Jan. 18, 1810 to David Shewhan; Joseph, Solomen, John, Elijah and Elenor who married March 11, 1790 George Hood (Complete Record Book, p. 99). Samuel Hedges II married Mary Tabb June 26, 1783, and after she died he married widow Nancy Harris Sept. 22, 1807. She was the daughter of David Wolgmot (DB 27, p.307). Samuel Hedges begat Joseph, Robert, Jonas, Samuel, Seaton, Baily, William, Elizabeth, Mary, Anna, Isabella, Harriet, Sally who married Levi M. Backus 2 June 1835, Isabel who married Absolom Thatcher Feb. 24, 1828, Enoch G., and John W. Hedges. Samuel II left his home plantation to his second wife Nancy. Enoch Hedges lived on the plantation during the Civil War and was a Quartermaster for the Southern Army. After the Civil War, area residents brought a court suit against Enoch and collected $2,000.00 for supplies he had taken from them. Enoch, as administrator of Samuel's estate, sold the farm to his brother, John W. Hedges, who built the lovely present plastered brick house in 1879 (DB 61, p. 65). It was sold in 1889 to H. H. Boyd who sold it the following year to James Dillon (DB 86, p. 486, DB 87, p. 151). It went to his son, James L. Dillon, and then to the present owner, Norman Dillon (DB 141, p. 9, DB 193, p. 253). We will now travel on down the most northern section of Ridge Road to the next 220-acre tract of the original tract. This was Joshua Hedges, Sr.'s home plantation. It is believed that Joshua erected an Indian fort on this property. There is a large limestone house here. Picture No. 3. The older section of the house was built in the mid to late 1700s by Joshua who Furnished supplies during the Revolutionary War. On August 5, 1769, George Washington with Mrs. Washington and Patsy, lodged with Joshua Hedges while on a trip to the Warm Spring (George Washington Diaries 1748-1799, Vol. 1, p. 340): August 5, 1769 "Prosecuted our Journey to ye Spring (by Jacob Hites') Bated at Opeckon and lodged at Joshua Hedges". Page 344: September 9, 1769 "9 Set out on my return home about 8 oclock but broke the Chariot and made it 11 before we got a mile Reached Joshua Hedges". Mrs. Washington and Patsy accompanied him on the trip. Joshua Hedges left his home plantation of 220 acres by his will dated 21 December 1789 proved 16 February 1790, to his widow and son, Jesse. One third of the home plantation, the house and three slaves to his wife, Elizabeth Hedges. He devised the remaining two thirds of the tract of land to his son Jesse Hedges with Jesse to receive the house and other one third at the decease of Mrs. Hedges. (WB 2, p. 51). On 7 April 1801 Jesse Hedges and wife, Rachel, sold for 4,980 pounds currency of Pennsylvania, to John E. Moore the 220 acres (DB 16, p. 568). Mr. Moore kept it only a short time and sold to Samuel Hedges (DB 24, p. 377). Joshua Hedges sold 100 acres of the land to his father-in-law, Edward Southwood (DB 7, p. 352). Edward Southwood in his will of 13 November 1824, proved 13 December 1824, left the 100 acres in trust to Joshua Hedges to keep possession until his two grandsons Chapline Swearingen Hedges and Southwood Carter Hedges, became of age (WB 7, 352). Joshua Hedges in his will of 4 March 1832, proved 9 April 1832, left everything he owned to his sons Chaplin and Southwood Hedges (WB 10, p. 302). Before his death Joshua Hedges had given a deed of trust on his land to Josiah Hedges and others. On the 23rd of August 1836, Chaplin S. Hedges brought a suit against Josiah Hedges claiming the debt had been paid and his brother, Southwood Hedges, had died. During the trial it was stated that Southwood Hedges had become an Episcopal minister and died in Illinois; however, some one else stated Southwood Hedges was fond of drinking and gambling an died of cholera in New Orleans. They all agreed he was dead (Chancery Case 313). The Court decided that the debt had been paid and the land belonged to Chaplin Hedges (DBR 1, p. 196). 16 June 1837 Rev. Chapline S. Hedges sold the 220-acre plantation to Thomas Newton Lemen (DB 50, p. 56). During the Civil War Thomas N. Lemen was shot and killed in front of his corncrib (from Mrs. Eliza McLurkin). Mr. Lemen was survived by his widow the former Margaret Bfllmyer who died November 3, 1869, a daughter Sarah E. Lemen who married Joseph Bosler, and two sons Joseph N. Lemen and William M. Lemen. Joseph Lemen died unmarried October 20, 1867. This left only William Lemen and Sarah Lemen Bosler as heirs of Thomas and Margaret Lemen. Thomas Newton Lemen built the south side of the present house in the 1840s (Diary of Thomas N. Lemen owned by John K. Eckert). They divided the house and William M. Lemen received 1/2 of the house with 150 acres 3 roods and 13 square poles of the homestead farm; also 1/2 of 117 acres of wood land lying at the eastern base of Third Hill Mountain; also 1/2 of 1/3 of the farm in Jefferson County known as the Reynolds farm which they had inherited from their mother who had inherited it from her brother Solomon Billmyer, and it was agreed that Sarah E. Bosler should have 1/2 of the Mansion house and 71 acres of the homestead, 55 acres 3 roods and 31 square poles of the Wandling land and also the reversionary right in 14 acres assigned to Mrs. Wandling as dower; 1 1/2 acres bought from Mrs. Kisinger and 14 acres of wood land west of Hedgesville and 1/2 of 117 acres wood land and 1/2 of 1/3 in the Jefferson County farm. Joseph Bosler and wife, Sarah E. Bosler, purchased William Lemen's interest in the homestead farm 29 January 1881 (DB 77, p. 391) and 8 June 1891 (DB 88, p. 410) Joseph and Sarah E. Bosler lived in Cumberland Co. Pa. Joseph devised his interest in the homestead farm to his wife Sarah Bosler by will 23 May 1891. Will probated in Cumberland Co. and recorded in WB 25, p. 139, Berkeley Co. Sarah E. Bosler devised by the seventh clause of her will 21 January 1915 (WB 25, p. 278; recorded and probated Cumberland Co., Pa.) the right for Mary Bosler and Susan L. Bosler to purchase the homestead farm of 222 acres located in Berkeley County, W. Va. for $16,000.00 on the 13 July 1917 Joseph Bosler, Jr. deeded the property to Mary and Susan L. Bosler (DB 134, p. 443). On 20 October 1921 Mary Bosler unmarried and Susan L. Bosler unmarried, sold the old homestead with 208.6 acres to W. E. Branham. The old Joshua Hedges house then went to Mr. Branham's daughter, Eliza B. Branham who had married Charles McLurkin. The Joshua Hedges house remained in the Lemen family from 1837 to 1945. Thomas Newton Lemen, son of William Martin Lemen, graduated from the University of Maryland and became a well-known Hedgesville doctor. After his brother Joseph died he moved back to his father's home with his wife, his daughter Margaret Lemen who married W. E. Branham (from Mrs. Eliza B. McLurkin). On the 6th of February 1945 Eliza B. McLurkin and Charles McLurkin, her husband, sold the Hedges-Lemen farm to Dr. T. K. Oates (DB 175, p. 462). Dr. T. K. Oates left it to his wife, Altha S. Oates, who was very fond of the then called "Fort Hill" and used it as a summer home (WB 30, p. 278). Mrs. Oates left it by will to her son, Max 0. Oates, the present owner. (WB 30, p. 348). The Thomas Newton Lemen cemetery is located on the property and was reserved with the wall that encloses the cemetery in DB 134, p. 443. List of stones in the cemetery (Picture No. 4) are: Thomas Newton Lemen Margaret (Billmyers) consort of Wife of Margaret Lemen Thos. N. Lemen Born Born Jan 15, 1807 April 24, 1803 Died Nov. 3, 1869 Died aged 62 years 9 mos 19 days July 16, 1863

John N. Henry Clay son Born Feb. 23, 1830 Died July 1840 Died Jan. 9, 1849 aged 22 days aged 18 years 10 mos 17 days


Margaret Ann Susan Mary dau Dau Born May 6, 1837 Born Sept. 21, 1835 Died June 12, 1857 Died April 2, 1862


Joseph N Son of Thos. & Margaret Lemen Born June 11, 1842 Died Oct. 20, 1867 aged 25 years 4 mos 9 days


Joshua's home farm was joined on the east by his 391 acre land grant. Joshua willed 291 acres to his son Solomon Hedges. There are two very old log houses standing today on his farm. It would appear both were built in the late 1700s. Solomon Hedges married July 28, 1769, to Sarah Vinsonheller. They had Joshua who did not marry, died May 10, 1825; buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery. Hiram Hedges who did not marry, died March 23, 1880; buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery. Mary Hedges who married August 22, 1826 John Lingamfelter. Mary Hedges Lingamfelter died January 23, 1868 and is buried at Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery. Angelina Hedges who married May 29, 1833 George H. Cunningham. Phebe who married December 21, 1820 William Lemon. Elizabeth Hedges who married April 14, 1807 David Curtis. John Hedges died May 24, 1852 aged 58 years 5 months 24 days buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery and did not marry. Josiah Hedges born January 28, 1801, died March 2, 1866 buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery married November 28, 1801 Susan Robinson born June 6, 1800, died August 26, 1867, buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery. She was the daughter of George Robinson (WB 22, p. 76). Solomon Hedges left his plantation to be divided after the decease of his wife to his four sons (WB 8, p. 295). Joshua Hedges died soon after his father and willed his share of his father's estate to his three brothers. Solomon's land ran just a little ways on the south side of the Warm Spring Road; 98 acres here went to Josiah Hedges. (WB 8, p. 298) (DB 46, p. 190) The log house here, the home of Josiah Hedges, was built in the late 1700s. Picture No. 5. Only the large front part is log, the back kitchen part was built by the Riners in the 1700s and the whole house was stuccoed over. Josiah Hedges and wife, Susan Robinson, had sons John D. Hedges buried Greenhill Cemetery on lot with his sister Susan; George T. Hedges; daughters Sarah R. Hedges who married James P. Hedges. They were living in Jackson Co., Missouri in 1872 and Susan Mead Hedges who first married Philip C. Vanmetre; after he died to Adam Wolfe. On 1 April 1872 the heirs of Josiah Hedges sold to Thomas J. Harley (DB 69, p. 48). Thomas J. Harley was a well-known doctor of Hedgesville. In his will, dated 16 November 1881, proved 16 July 1885, he mentions his five daughters Laura B. Harley, Emma G. Harley, Mary E. Ellis, Anna C. Henson and Ida V. Speck. He also mentions his office on Lot 10 in Hedgesville and adjoining lot plus another farm beside the Hedges farm (WB 23, p. 217). In 1887 the executors of his will sold the Hedges farm to George P. Riner (DB 83, p. 521). On 24 August 1896 George P. Riner and Mary, his wife, sold to John H. Riner. A blacksmith's shop was located on the north side of the old Warm Spring Road. The place then became known as Riner's Shop (DB 94, p. 182). In 1949 the executor of John H. Riner's will sold to E. M. Luttrell (DB 185, p. 638) who sold a few days later to James L. Dillon. It then went to his son Norman Dillon and then to his children Dorothea P. Coblentz and James R. Dillon who sold the old Solomon Hedges house to the Board of Education (DB 186, p. 54, WB 32, p. 414, DB 253, p. 16, DB 255, p. 554, DB 265, p. 641, DB 236, p. 536). The James Rumsey Vocational Technical Center is located on this property.

The other log house located on the Solomon Hedges farm is known as the Hiram Hedges house. The land here has never been out of the Hedges family since it was granted to Joshua Hedges 7 November 1754. Picture No. 6. In the division of Solomon Hedges's land, Lot I went to Hiram Hedges and Lot 2 to John Hedges. When John Hedges died in 1852 he left his 104 acres to his brother, Hiram Hedges (WB 17, p. 129). The log section of the house (the west side) was the home of Hiram Hedges. The east end was built by the Lingamfelters. When Hiram died in 1880 he left his land to his nephew Walter H. Lingamfelter son of his sister Mary Lingamfelter and his niece Sallie E. Myers, wife of Cromwell Myers.

In 1889 Sarah E. Myers of Jefferson County and Walter H. Lingamfelter divided Hiram's land; 101 acres went to Walter Lingamfelter (DB 86, p. 449). The land which Sallie Myers received later became the Eversole place. In 1839 Solomon Hedges's widow, Sarah, and three sons sold the land to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad which was located on the back part of the tract that went to Sallie Myers (DB 44, p. 415). On 28 January 1891 Walter H. Lingamfelter and Mary M. Lingamfelter, his wife, gave the Hedges farm to their son Walter B. Lingamfelter who had married Katie Myers Kilmer who was a granddaughter of Josiah Hedges, founder of Hedgesville. Walter B. Lingamfelter in his will of 1932 left the home farm to his wife Katie with his son Robert L. Lingamfelter to have the right to buy the home farm. He named son Paul Lingamfelter as executor (WB 28, p. 107). In 1952, after the death of Robert, Mrs. Katie Lingamfelter transferred the home place to her two daughters, Mary Hilda and Georgeanna K. Seibert who still reside in the lovely old house.

Both the Joshua Hedges house and the Hiram Hedges house are located on the last part of the old Ridge Road on the south side of the old Warm Spring Road. As we move on down the road we come to the site of the old mill - the Hedges Grist Mill. In 1817 James Hedges and Elizabeth his wife, sold the mill to Samuel Hedges IV (DB 29, p. 232). We next come to the Peter Hedges house. Solomon Hedges who had purchased part of the land in this area, sold his land to Thomas Hilyard and Allen Cox in 1765 and moved to Hampshire County (DB 10, p. 485 & 487, Frederick Co., Va.). The old log section of the Peter Hedges house was built in the mid-1700s. It has an unusually large chimney as may be seen in Picture No. 7. Deed Book 15, page 525, states that Peter Hedges devised his Berkeley County land to be divided equally between his two sons Peter and William Hedges. Peter Hedges's will has not been found in either the Berkeley Co., W. Va. or Frederick Co., Va. records. The late Mrs. Bergen stated in a letter that perhaps Peter Hedges served in the Revolutionary War and received land in Kentucky and may have moved there (Mrs. Bergen's Historical Books, Berkeley County Courthouse). On 23 September 1799 William Hedges and Sarah, his wife, of Berkeley Co. gave Peter Hedges a deed for 1/2 of the land devised to William and Peter Hedges' by Peter Hedges deceased. On the next day, 24 September 1799, Peter Hedges and Elizabeth, his wife, of Berkeley County, sold for 1,305 pounds current money of Pennsylvania, to Alexander Robertson. The 1/2 of the 300 acres surveyed out at this time to contain 187 acres (DB 15, p. 523). Alexander Robertson also acquired another 420 acres part of which is now the Dr. Clifford Sperow farm. Alexander Robinson born 1749, died April 1811, married 24 March 1785, Ann Hedges, born 1765, died April 1817. Both buried Mt. Zion Episcopal Cemetery. They had children John, Samuel, James, Alexander, Joshua, Elizabeth, Anne and Polly (Mary) Robinson (DB 373, p. 23). When Alexander Robinson's land was divided on 9 March 1812, widow Anne Robinson received the home place on Tulise Branch. In 1820 Alexander Robinson 11 borrowed money from Philip C. Pendleton on the following land: 5 undivided 1/8 parts of 187 acres, 1/8 as one of the heirs (Alexander) 1/8 purchased from Jonas and Elizabeth Hedges, 1/8 each from James, Joshua and John Robinson (DB 31, p. 331). In 1822 Alexander Robinson, Polly Robinson and Ann Robinson sold 130 acres to Peter Riner for $2,757.06 (DB 33, p. 49). On 31 March 1834 Peter Riner sold for $5,000.00 the 130 acres Peter Hedges farm to Teter Myers, Jr. who also purchased in 1838 140 acres from Joseph Evans Snodgrass and Hannah M., his wife of Washington County, Maryland. (RRDB 1, p. 479). In 1845 Teter Myers and Catherine, his wife, sold for $8,000.00 to Aaron Myers (their son) 215 acres which included all of the Snodgrass land and part of the Robinson land. Aaron Myers was living here when his father deeded the place to him. Aaron Myers had married May 19, 1822 Mary Hedges, daughter of Josiah Hedges the founder of Hedgesville. Aaron's grandfather Teter Myers, Sr. and John Myers, Teter's brother, had fought in the Revolutionary War (Court Minute Book). Aaron Myers was a large landowner and owned much land in the area of his home place. His heirs paid taxes on 754 acres in 1873 (Land Book 1873). The buildings on the home place were valued at $1,500.00 at this time. In 1875 Cromwell Myers and Aaron H. Myers, executors of Aaron Myers sold for $13,008.63, 213 acres to John H. Miler and William Kilmer. In 1907 the heirs of John Harley Miller, who were J. William Miller, C. A. Miller, Eugene P. Miller, Robert S. Miller, Mrs. Addie Richard and Frank Richard, her husband and George W. Appleby, Jr., Laura Virginia Appleby children of Laura Miller Appleby, deceased-brought suit asking for a division of the land (Chancery Case No. 1699). The Court assigned 87 acres to W. H. Kilmer and 119 acres to the heirs of J. H. Miller. Both tracts were then sold to William L. Ellis (DB 118, p. 59, DB 119, p. 312). On 12 October 1929 Mrs. W. L. Ellis, Ellis Ellis and Carrie, his wife, Boyd Ellis and Mary, his wife and Helen M. Ellis, sold the property to William K. Ellis and his wife, Margaret K. Robbins Ellis, all being heirs of William L. Ellis, deceased (DB 158, p. 414). Margaret K. Robbins Ellis died 12 June 1962. William K. Ellis sold the property in 1968 to Mrs. Ruth Dirting Dehaven who recently deeded it to her son, Douglas Dirting.

Josiah Hedges laid off lot in 1832. After his death his children laid off an additional set of lots.

After the death of Mrs. Hedges in 1855 the children of Josiah Hedges sold the mansion house on 31 May 1856 with 166 3/4 acres to Daniel Lefever for $29.97 1/2 per acre. Included in the sale to Daniel Lefever was lot No. I of the partition of Josiah Hedges's estate which was the town spring (DB 58, p. 124). Daniel Lefever further divided the mansion house tract and sold the mansion house with 59 acres to David Anderson on 24 April 1873 (DB 70, p. 201). In 1894 Mary E. Newkirk (nee Anderson) and George Newkirk, her husband, Eliza J. Ropp (nee Anderson) and J. Luther Ropp, her husband and Kate Warwick (nee Anderson) of Baltimore, Maryland, sold part interest in David Anderson, deceased, estate to Ann M. Anderson, Susan B. Anderson and Florence S. Anderson (DB 91, p. 235). On 23 October 1906 Ann M. Anderson, Florence S. Anderson, Mary E. Newkirk and George Newkirk, her husband, Eliza J. Ropp and J. Luther Ropp, her husband and Harry Warwick son of Kate Warwick, deceased sold the Josiah Hedges house with 77 acres to A. C. Stewart and Laura Stewart, his wife (DB 112, p. 362) who sold two years later to Benjamin Seibert Speck (DB 126, p. 119). On 17 December 1930 Benjamin Speck, Jr. conveyed the estate to Thomas H. Speck (DB 155, p. 435). In 1955 Ruth Speck Weir the sole heir of Thomas Speck, conveyed the estate to E. M. Luttrell and R. E. Lutz. On 20 January 1956 E. M. Luttrell and R. E. Lutz sold the Josiah Hedges house to the present owners, John K. Eckerd and Mary V. Eckerd, his wife.

Two other Hedges homes lay on the east side of the town of Hedgesville, which we have not visited. Joseph Hedges, brother to Benjamin and son of Jonas. Part of the information listed here on Joseph Hedges and his family comes from The Mahogany Tree and Other Stories and some Genealogical Data by Decatur H. (Hedges) Rodgers 1963, copy of which is in the Martinsburg Public Library. For more information about the family see same Captain Joseph Hedges lived on the land he had been given by his father Jonas until 1801 when he sold his 130 acre farm to Samuel Cunningham (DB 16, p. 472). He then moved to Frederick Co., Va., where he died in 1828 (WB 14, p. 489, Frederick Co., Va.) and had children; Agnes, wife of George Burns lived in Berkeley Co.; Elizabeth Hedges Davis; Joseph Hedges who went to Kentucky and John Hedges. Joseph Hedges was Captain in the Virginia Militia during the Revolution (Court Order Book 3, p. 401). He married Elizabeth Rawlings, daughter of Colonel Moses Rawlings. Joseph Hedges son, John Rawlings Hedges, became a well-known doctor. He first married Judith Churchill. Dr. John Hedges received two land grants on the west side of Back Creek - 237 acres 10 May 1802 and 80 acres 22 January 1802 (Galtjo L. Geertsema Geographical Land Grand Index). Dr. Hedges resided in Frederick Co., Va. until after he married his second wife, Elizabeth Turner November 29, 1821. She was the daughter of John Turner Esq. High Sheriff of Berkeley County in 1809. John Turner was also a land surveyor (DB 21, p. 317). Elizabeth Hedges inherited 80 acres from her father near Harlan Spring (RRDB 1, p. 19). By 1851 Dr. John Hedges acquired 187 acres in his home tract near Harlan Spring. The old log house, which burnt in later years, had two big rows of cedars and was called Cedar Grove. Dr. John R. Hedges born January 12, 1779, died December 6, 1852, by his first wife Judith Churchill, had two sons: 1. John Churchill Hedges born April 6, 1812, died October 11, 1854, buried Mt. Zion Cemetery, married in 1831 Abigail Ford. They had no children. 2. Owen Tudor Hedges born 1816, wounded on the 3rd and died on the 11th of July 1863 at Gettysburg, unmarried, buried Mt. Zion Cemetery. Dr. John Hedges and wife, Elizabeth Turner, had 3. Charles Maurice Tallyrand Hedges who married Lucy Rosalie they were living in Philadelphia, Pa. in 1864. 4. Matilda Hedges born 1830, died April 12, 1914, unmarried. 5. Decatur Hedges married twice. First wife Mary died May 14, 1869 aged 34 years, buried Mt. Zion Cemetery.

On 10 March 1853 the children of Dr. John R. Hedges divided the estate of their father among theirselves. Mrs. Elizabeth Hedges received no dower. Owen T. Hedges was appointed as a Committee for Mrs. Hedges. Each heir was to pay $200.00 per year to Owen T. Hedges for her care. If Mrs. Hedges regained her restoration to sanity the partition of the estate was to be annulled and everything to be returned to the estate as if there had been no partition. Assigned to Owen T. Hedges was the home place of Dr. John Hedges composed of three distinct parcels, the first on which the building stands of about 20 acres adjoining the lands of Daniel Ropp, the second of about 50 acres adjoining the land of Daniel Lemaster, Henry Riner and others and 30 acres adjoining the lands of Daniel Lemaster, Jacob Linginfelter and others, in all 100 acres. To C. M. T. Hedges the Fizer Farm of about 80 acres along Daniel Lemaster. To Decatur Hedges the Pendleton Farm of 260 acres and also the share of John C. Hedges to be held by him pursuant to the provision of a deed executed by the said John C. Hedges 13 December 1852. He had deeded his interest in Dr. John Hedges's estate to Decatur Hedges to pay all bills and apply rent and income for the support of the said John C. Hedges (DB 55, p. 24). Assigned to Decatur Hedges, as the share of John C. Hedges was the 275 acre Vinsonheller Farm, the Depot tract of land of about 29 acres, which was an undivided tract, and the Mountain Farm of 120 acres along John P. Hedges. Assigned to Matilda Hedges was a farm of 250 acres located in Frederick Co., Va. (DB 55, p. 95). After Mrs. Elizabeth Hedges and John Churchill Hedges died John's widow, Abigail Ford Shaecher, then the wife of John H. Shaecher, brought suit against the heirs of Dr. John R. Hedges, claiming she should have an interest in the home farm; that she had not signed the deed when John C. Hedges deeded his interest to Decatur Hedges (Chancery Case No. 816). Owen Tudor Hedges built the present lovely brick house in 1860 (Picture No. 9). Land books show the $200.00 value for the building raised to $700.00 in 1860 with new barn. The barn has a carved date of 1859. The land books show the value of the buildings raised to $1,900 in 1861. The brick for the building was burnt on the place by slave labor. The house was built on a three-story plan with the ground floor (basement) being used as the kitchen and dining room. Large fireplaces may be found in each room. The barn, slave house and icehouse still remain today. Owen Tudor Hedges entered service of Virginia 29 August 1861. His brother Decatur also enlisted but later returned to take care of his wife and family and the farms. Owen was shot early the morning of July 3, in the Battle of Gettysburg, and died in a nearby farm house 11 July. In his will of October 31, 1861 he left the farm he had purchased from Daniel B. Morrison (Tabbs Crossing) to his brother Decatur. He left the homestead farm, Cedar Grove, to his sister Matilda and his brother Tallyrand Hedges as long as they lived. At their death to his brother Decatur or if he was deceased to Decatur's children (WB 22, p. 8). Decatur spent the later part of his years at Cedar Grove. Matilda Hedges died in 1914. Decatur Hedges by his will of 21 October 1914 made provision that his son Dr. Gustavus Beall Hedges could buy Cedar Grove for $10,000.00. Cedar Grove then became the home of Dr. Gustavus Beall Hedges (WB 25, p. 245). Dr. G. B. Hedges married Caroline Burdette. They had no children but raised two nieces of Mrs. Hedges, Sarah Brown Burdette and Francis Hedges Burdette. Dr. G. B. Hedges by will dated 20 November 1916, probated May 2, 1928, left Cedar Grove (WB 27, p. 120) to his wife Caroline Burdette who left 1/4 interest to Sarah Brown Conkey and 3/4 to Sarah B. Burdette. Sarah Comkey sold her interest 25 July 1936 to her sister Caroline Burdette (DB 162, p. 47) who sold the 180 1/2 acre Cedar Grove (now called Fairstone) and an adjoining 20 acres to Felix J. Schneiderhan and Edwin Gould in 1937 (DB 163, p. 407). It is now the home of Mrs. Felix Schneiderhan. The farm is now a large apple orchard. On the Tabb Crossing farm is located a lovely brick house known as the Decatur Hedges house (Picture No. 10). The land books indicate the house was built in 1874, however, Decatur Hedges was living on the farm when his brother Owen Tudor Hedges wrote his will in 1861. When Owen died it went to Decatur Hedges. Owen T. Hedges purchased the farm, which contained 217 acres for $10,000.00 from Daniel B. Morrison and Jane V., his wife, 6 September 1858. It was then known as the George Porterfield farm (DB 60, p. 141). The executor of Decatur Hedges estate sold "the Tabbs Crossing Farm" of 217 acres to Charles James Faulkner for $20,750.00 on 29 March 1917 (DB 134, p. 207). In 1951 Charles J. Faulkner, Jr. sold the Decatur Hedges Farm to the present owner, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Gantt. Mr. Fred Gantt has spent most of his life in this house, it having been rented by his father for many years.

On the west side of Back Creek the Hedges also had large land holdings. The land grants to Dr. John R. Hedges have already been mentioned. Dr. John Hedges and his wife Judith Churchill sold 137 acres to Joseph Hedges 12 January 1808. In 1820 Joseph Hedges sold the land to Jonas Hedges, son of Benjamin Hedges (DB 55, p. 268). Jonas Hedges married April 9, 1799 Eve Plotner. Jonas also received a land grant of 63 acres 21 July 1836. In the 1850 Census we find Jonas Hedges, Sr. aged 75 wife Eve 73, his sister Mary who did not marry 77 and James Plotner 14. Mary Ann Hedges daughter of Benjamin and Susan Hedges died December 25, 1854 aged 81 years (Death records Berkeley County). Jonas Hedges and Eve, his wife, gave 137 acres they had purchased from Joseph Hedges to their son John P. Hedges in 1853 (DB 55, p. 268). Jonas died soon after in 1856. We find his son John P. Hedges, who had married October 20, 1825 Barbara Keesecker, daughter of George (Chancery Case No. 354) were living in Berkeley Co., Va.; son Samuel B. Hedges who married January 21, 1847 Elenor Catharine Manor living in Ogle Co., Illinois; son James R. Hedges and wife, Elizabeth, living in Green Co., Ohio; son Benjamin Hedges who married October 1, 1840 Margaret Ropp, living in Platte Co., Missouri; son William Hedges who married April 19, 1841 Eve Ann Weller, living in Ogle Co., Illinois; son Joseph Hedges who married August 15, 1831 Harriet Hedges living in Clark Co., Ohio and daughter Mary Hedges who married November 14, 1855 William Norrington living in Berkeley Co. (DB 58, p. 248). Two of the descendants of John P. Hedges are Mrs. Daisy Jordan Morrow and my nephew, Michael Wood.

On 15 March 1850 John Hedges sold to John P. Hedges, John Johnson, William Norrington, John Kerns, Joshua Norrington, Michael Kerns and Samuel Hedges, trustees, I acre for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church belonging to the United States of America and in perfect conformity to the uniform practices and regulation thereof; a building shall be erected which "shall forever afterwards be known and Styled by and with the name of Hedges Stony Lick Church in Berkeley County, Virginia for the use and benefit of the pious and Phylanthific denomination of the Methodist of the United States." A beautiful log structure was erected which is still standing (Picture No. 11) (DB 55, p. 198). Many of the Hedgeses are buried in the cemetery. There was also an early church located in this section called Ryner Chapel where many of the Hedges are buried.

All deeds, wills, Court cases, Minute Books from Berkeley County, W. Va. Courthouse unless otherwise stated; Galtjo Gertseema Land Grant Index and Plats and Guy L. Keesecker Marriage Records of Berkeley Co., Va. have been used in preparing this article. All research by Don C. Wood. All pictures, unless otherwise noted, are by Don C. Wood.

  • Spouses

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 1: Catherine STALCOP Birth: circa 1692 Death: 1792 Age: 100 Father: John STALCOP Mother: Catherine ERICKSON

Misc. Notes The Dream of Katherine Stalcop [1]

The Mahogany Tree by Decatur H. Rodgers

Katherine Stalcop Dream

There is a tradition that Katherine Stalcop dreamed that a young man had called at her father's home and asked for a night's lodging, and that his horse had been turned into the cow pasture for the night. In the morninig, when Katherine went to milk, she found a strange horse in the pasture. On going in to breakfast, shes met the young man of her dream. He proved to be Joseph Hedges. In due time, they were married and "lived happily ever after."

Dr. Draper, in his manuscripts (9 s. 122-139) records an interview with, Silas Hedges, a son of Col. Silas Hedges, son of Solomon, son or Joseph of Monocacy, in which this Silas said the Hedges were of Swedish descent. I suggest that statement had its origin in the fact that Joseph Hedges married Katherine Stalcop whose mother was a daughter of John Ericson of the Swedish settlement at Lucas Point on the Delaware.

Children: Charles (1712-1796) Solomon (1710-)

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 2: Katherine TINGEY

Sources 1. Copied with permission from the web site of Dennis Hedges.

(5) Name: Peter HEDGES –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Birth: April 23, 1797 Death: February 10, 1865 Age: 67 Father: John HEDGES (1771-1857) Mother: Catherine “Kate” TROUTMAN (1773-1833)

Misc. Notes Peter might be the same man who killed James Lamme with a knife on July 7, 1839 (Refer to biographical sketch of Leah LAMME, History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison and Nicholas Counties, Kentucky, ed. by William Henry Perrin, O. L. Baskin & County, Chicago, 1882, p. 543, for a description of this incident.).


Spouses –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 1: Susan Birth: September 24, 1806 Death: April 21, 1831 Age: 24 Children: Henry (1821-1878) (6) Name: Samuel HEDGES –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Birth: July 24, 1792 Cane Ridge, Bourbon County, Kentucky Death: July 3, 1874 Age: 81 Father: Joseph HEDGES (1750-1805) Mother: Sarah BIGGS (1750-1822)

  • Misc. Notes

HISTORY OF KENTUCKY AND KENTUCKIANS, E. Polk Johnson, three volumes, Lewis Publishing Co., New York & Chicago, 1912. Common version, Vol. III, pp. 1360-1361. [Bourbon County]

SAMUEL HEDGES, ESQUIRE, the youngest son of the pioneer, Joseph Hedges, was born June 24, 1792, several months after his parents reached Kentucky. Left fatherless at the age of twelve, the responsibility of developing the best qualities within him devolved upon his mother, who was equal to the obligation. On November 8, 1816, he married Mrs. Lucinda Scott, daughter of Reuben Sanford and Frances V. Webb, of Virginia, and granddaughter of Robert Sanford and William Crittenden Webb, both of Virginia. The children of this union were William G. Hedges, of Harrison county, Kentucky; Mrs. Matt Stone, Dr. T. W. Hedges, of Cynthiana, and Mrs. Sarah Victor, of Carlisle, Kentucky.

On March 11, 1838, he married Rebecca Barber Moran, born August 26, 1815, daughter of Edward B. Moran, of Virginia, and Letitia Clay, of Kentucky, and granddaughter paternally of William Moran, born in 1748, and Rebecca Barber, born in 1748, of an influential Virginia family, and maternally of Samuel Clay, born in 1761, in Virginia, died in 1810, in Kentucky, and Nancy Winn, of Fayette county, Kentucky. Samuel Clay was a brave Revolutionary soldier, when hardly sixteen years old. He was the second son of Dr. Henry Clay, a pioneer to Bourbon county, Kentucky, from Virginia. Samuel and Rebecca Hedges left four children: Mrs. Henrietta Ewalt, Lieutenant Joseph E. Hedges, Letitia Clay Hedges and Edward Barber Hedges, all of Bourbon county and the only surviving grandchildren of the pioneer in Kentucky.

Mr. Hedges engaged in agricultural pursuits all of his life, and to some extent in stockraising, being an excellent judge of live stock. He was for many years magistrate of Bourbon county, receiving his appointment in 1833 from Governor Breathitt. In politics he was a Whig. He lived through a period of events decisive in the history of the United States-the wars of 1812, 1840 and 1861; in the latter he felt for his beloved southland, in defence of which his son, Lieutenant Joseph E. Hedges, was fighting, although he always contended that "the North with its overwhelming numbers would be victorious."

During the war between the states he occupied the unique position of entertaining the "blue and the gray" the same night. The recipients of his hospitality were several Yankee officers heavily armed and hunting Rebels who stopped for shelter early in the night and were assigned an apartment upstairs, and a poor, half-starved and half-frozen wandering Rebel scout, who presented himself later, ate and then threw himself blanketed on the floor in the light of the cheerful hearth to spend a comfortable night. His host watched the entire night that he might sleep undisturbed, and aroused him at an early hour to breakfast and aided him to escape. Our subject's bravery in defending both commands our admiration. Not a thought had he of the dire consequences that may have ensued---of the imminent peril to himself or the conflagration that may have been made of his home. He was providing home comforts for "the stranger within his gates," and throwing around them such safeguards as his vigilance could conceive.

In appearance Air. Hedges was well formed, rather stout, broad-shouldered and erect. His broad, full forehead, surmounted by a shapely head well covered with snow-white hair, gave character to his thoughtful countenance, His bearing was unaffected and dignified and a pleasant candor of address inspired respect. His habits were strictly temperate. Was a fluent and original conversationalist and possessed a mind well-stored with useful and varied information, which made him a most agreeable companion. He was uncommonly shrewd and rarely erred in his discriminating and comprehensive judgment of men. Noted for his hospitality, with charitableness, his heart ever beat in unison-with the great master-chord of Christianity-the peace and good-will toward all. He left a busy, well-rounded life gradually having long passed the Psalmist's allotted span, dying July 3, 1874, at his residence on Cane Ridge, at the great age of eighty-two years.

Samuel Hedges, the subject of this sketch, is the maternal grandfather of Joseph Hedges Ewalt, whose sketch is on preceding pages.


Spouses –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 1: Rebecca Barbour MORAN Birth: August 25, 1815 Death: February 9, 1893 Age: 77 Father: Edward Barbour MORAN Mother: Letitia CLAY (1792-) Marriage: March 11, 1838 Children: Henrietta (1839-1917) Joseph Edward (1841-1931) Edward Barbour (1849-) Letitia Clay (7) Name: Samuel HEDGES ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Misc. Notes NOTE: There are several conflicting traditions concerning the ancestors of Joseph Hedges, the early Bourbon County, Kentucky, pioneer. Many of these are represented in articles on the Hedges family. It is not my purpose here to sort these out; but to simply present them.--REF


A HISTORY OF THE HEDGES FAMILY by John Thomas Hedges

King Charles 1st was a greedy and selfish King. He tried to rule without Parliament from 1629 to 1640. The Puritan people, along with Parliament, revolted, and England was plunged into Civil War (1643-1648).

When Lord Oliver Cromwell led the Parliamentary Army against the Monarchy, John Fenwick was a Major in his army. Eventually the Monarchy was over-thrown and a Parliament type of Government was set up with Lord Cromwell himself being the Protectorate. King Charles 1st was tried and convicted of treason, and was beheaded. At the beheading, John Fenwick was the Captain of the guard, and gave the order for the ax to fall.

When Lord Cromwell died (1659) his son, Richard became the Protectorate for a while, but he was a weak ruler and soon the people welcomed the return of the Monarchy (1660). When King Charles (II) took over as Monarch, John Fenwick was cast into prison for his part in the Revolution. It was about this time that John Fenwick was converted to Quakerism.

After his release in 1674, John Fenwick, acting for Lord Edwin Byllyage, purchased the Colony of West Jersey from Lord Berkley. At that time the Colony of New Jersey was divided into East and West Jersey. He received as his share, one tenth of the Colony, or the present Counties of Salem and Cumberland.

In 1675, John Fenwick received a Charter to take a shipload of Quaker Immigrants to this new Colony., in America.

At this time, two of the daughters of John Fenwick were married, and the other one, Ann, was in love with a young man named Samuel Hedges Jr., the son of Samuel Hedges and Elizabeth Weld. So when the ship sailed, young Samuel Hedges was aboard, along with Ann Fenwick and all her family.

The ship "The Griffin" was loaded and sailed from London on July 20., 1675, it landed October 5. 1675 in a little Dutch town at the mouth of the Delaware river called Fort Elfsbourg. From here the settlers moved three miles upstream and founded the first English-Speaking settlement on the Delaware, and the first Quaker settlement in America. They called It Salem West Jersey.

One year later, in November 1676, Samuel Hedges and Ann Fenwi6k were married. They had three sons, Samuel, being called Jr. the first Samuel being called "Samuel of England", Josiah, and Joseph; one daughter named Mary.

Samuel Hedges was the Surveyor General of Salem from 1678,, he was also the Clerk of Records until 1697, when lie became a member of the New Jersey Assemblies, a position that he held until 170I. He also became a receiptant of a large parcel of land called Hedgefield.

John Fenwick became the powerful leader of Salem, saying that he owed allegiance to no one, and until William Penn started the Colony of Pennsylvania, had things mostly his way. But Pennsylvania was also a Quaker Colony and eventually John Fenwick was brought under the direction, of this powerful Quaker from Pennsylvania, William Penn.

The two became close friends and at the death of John Fenwick,(1683) the executors of his will were: His good friend William Penn and his favorite Son-in-law, Samuel Hedges.

Samuel and Ann lived out their lives in Salem (Ann died in 1703); their children spread out. Samuel Jr. became the (III) in a line of six Samuel Hedges. Josiah Hedges became the founder of Hedgesville Virginia (now West Virginia). Mary married a man who’s last name was Adams, and moved to Pennsylvania.

Joseph Hedges married Catherine Stallcop in Maryland, and it is here that we find the next, three generations of Hedges.

Catherine Stallcop was the daughter of John Stallcop and Anake Erickson. She was the Grand-daughter of John Anderson Stallcop, a Swedish Immigrant who came to America in I643 to New Sweden. At that time New Sweden was a strip of land west of the Delaware river, (presently Delaware and part of Pennsylvania). New Netherlands lay east of the Delaware. (presently, New Jersey, including New York City.)

The book titled "Our Heritage" is the history and genealogy of the Stallcop family and their link with the Hedges family. It continues to follow the Hedges until after the Revolution and the family moved to Bourbon County Kentucky.

Joseph Hedges and Catherine Stallcop were the parents of ten children. All their names are listed in the Genealogy chart. Charles was their second child and was born in 17I2. Joseph Hedges was born in 1690 and died in 1732. Catherine died in 1795, near one-hundred years old.

Charles Hedges was born in Maryland in 1712. He is listed in the "Daughters of the American Revolution" as being a Revolutionary War veteran, "Patriotic Service" He married Mary Stille in 1736, and they were the parents of fourteen children. Every name was taken from the Bible. Joseph was their third child and was born in 1743- Charles died in 1795, the same year that his mother died.

Joseph Hedges Sr. was born in Fredrick County Maryland in 1743- He was the second child in a family of fourteen. He was a Revolutionary War Veteran. He served the Continental Troops as an Insignia in the "Regiment on Foot" from 1777 to 1780 in Maryland. He was married to Sarah Biggs in 1770 and they had nine children. Joseph Jr. being the third child was born in 1775- But Joseph Sr. with all the- family moved to Bourbon County Kentucky, and this makes quite a story.

After the Revolutionary War was over, Congress declared the "West" open for settlement. The "West" at that time, was Kentucky and the Ohio valley, or Northwest Territory. This started a wave of Immigrants west. For the next few years, hundreds and thousands of Immigrants, yearly, poured over the mountains and down the Ohio, to settle in the new lands. This western movement aroused the Indians to such rage that it became an all-out Indian war. The Ohio valley, especially around what is now Cincinnati, became known as "The Dark and Bloody Ground."

Amidst all this turmoil, to the wilderness of Kentucky, came the family of Joseph Hedges. They came in the fall of 1791; Kentucky did not become a State until June 1, 1792). They came down the Ohio as far as Maysville, then across country to Bourbon County, and became one of the Pioneer families of Paris.

The Draper reports are a series of Historical Documents. These include Biographies, letters and interviews collected by Layman C Draper in the mid 1800's from survivors of the Indian Wars, and the early pioneers who had lived through this migration to settle in the wilderness of this land. Several of these reports are of special interest to us as they are from members of the Hedges family. Therefore, I thought it appropriate to include them Here in this History.

During the early 1800s, the name of Hedges was very prominent in Bourbon County Kentucky, as the family of Joseph spread out and grew. The Joseph Hedges Estate was on Levy road, and the house, listed as a Historical site, still stands, although it is old and run-down.

John Hedges, the oldest son of Joseph, and Peter Hedges, a son of John, each held large parcels of land on Stoner creek, at Stony Point road. The land belonging to Peter became the site of a Historical find in 1848 of an ancient Indian civilization with customs very different than we know them to be. Artifacts from this excavation can be fond in the Museum of Anthropology In the University of Michigan. (See Buckner Component, back of this History.)

This land is also the site of "The Hedges Burying Ground". Presently, the Stone Farm. (A large Race-Horse farm). Joseph and Sarah are buried here, along with John and several other family members.

There is another place of burial on Levy road, called, "The Hedges Graveyard" containing family members.

At the Paris Cemetery, there is an old section containing about twenty graves of Hedges. At the center of this section stands a large grave-marker of Peter Hedges, It is shared with his son John. There are several other stones that are quite interesting for their uniqueness.

Joseph Hedges Jr. (from whom we descended) was the third child, in a family of nine. He was born in Fredrick County Maryland in 1775 and came to Bourbon County Kentucky, with his family at the age of 16. He is the only one of Joseph's children that is listed as a Veteran. He served in the war of 1812 as a Sargent in the Ohio Militia.

He eventually did not own any land, and it may be that he was away at the crucial time when land was available.

Joseph Hedges Jr. married Margaret Goulden on Oct. 16, 1804 in Bourbon County Ky. Margaret Goulden was born May 20, 1778, and she died Aug. 10, 1871. and is buried at the Hedges Graveyard, on Levy road.

Joseph and Margaret had three children, Jonas being the second was born in 1821.

Jonas Hedges was born in Bourbon County Kentucky in 1821. He was a tobacco Farmer, and he moved several times. He was married to Rebecca Jett on March 23, 1853, in Bracken County Kentucky.

Rebecca was born on Jan. 20, 1834. She was the daughter of Samuel Jett and Sarah Walker Jett. This was a pioneer family from Virginia. A book entitled "The Jett Family of Virginia" was written about this family and their early life in Virginia.

Jonas and Rebecca had seven children, Hiram being the fifth child was born June 14, 1860, in Bracken County. The descendants of Hiram Hedges is listed here in this History.


Spouses –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 1: Elizabeth WELD Children: Samuel (8) Name: Solomon HEDGES –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Birth: 1710 England Father: Joseph HEDGES (1690-1732) Mother: Catherine STALCOP (ca1692-1792)

Misc. Notes Solomon Hedges, who married Rebecca Van Meter, was the eldest son of Joseph Hedges and Catharine Stalcop who moved from New Jersey to Chester County, Pennsylvania, and then to Monocacy in Maryland, where Joseph died in 1732. Solomon Hedges, who was born in 1710, bought 275 acres of land in Frederick County from Edward Davis on 10 April 1738. Edward Davis obtained 875 acres on Tullis Run in what is now Berkeley County, West Virginia, on 12 November 1735, as one of the 70 patentees under Ross and Bryan . Identified as late of Orange County, Edward Davis disposed of this land on 10 April 1738 by three Orange County deeds of lease and release in which all three parcels were described as being "on the west side of Sherrendo, River and Opeckon Creek, on a branch of Hungoluta River called Tulises Branch, part of 875 acres granted to Edward Davis 12 November 1735." The first deed was to Richard Morgan who bought 300 acres for 30 pounds current money. The tract was adjacent to land of Solomon Hedges. The deed was witnessed by Joshua Hedges, Solomon Hedges and Peter (X) Hedges. The second deed for 275 acres at 18 pounds current money was to Solomon Hedges. The parcel was described additionally as being next to land of Peter Hedges and near the mountain. The deed was witnessed by Richard Morgan, Peter (X) Hedges and Joshua Hedges. The third parcel was deeded to Peter Hedges who paid 30 pounds current money for 300 acres adjoining land of James Davis and near the mountain. The deed was witnessed by Richard Morgan, Solomon Hedges and Joshua Hedges. All three deeds were proved on 24 August 1738. (Pioneers of Old Monocacy, Grace L. Tracey and John P. Dern, Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland, 1989.)


At first the family seems to have stayed put. In the year after his father died, Solomon Hedges had "Hedges Delight' surveyed - 192 acres near Tuscarora Creek some three miles southwest of "Hedge Hogg' and near the Monocacy road which was soon to carry the bulk of those settlers going to Virginia. In 1733 he was listed as a taxable in Monocacy Hundred, and in the June Court of 1734 Solomon declared that he had paid Robert Jones and John Tredane a debt of 15 pounds for Flower Swift, who had been a Constable for Monocacy Hundred with John van Metre in 1732. Also in 1734 Solomon’s name appeared on the list of those not burning their tobacco properly, and in 1735 he himself was named Constable for Monocacy Hundred. replacing Thomas Doudith, possibly a relative, who was incapable of duty. About this time Solomon married John van Metre's daughter Rebecca, and the connection with that family made it only a matter of time before they joined the move to Virginia. This occurred about 1738. They sold their farm animals, which they had purchased from Rebecca’s father, to John House and moved to Patterson Creek near present-day Keyser, West Virginia. This area was then a part of Orange County, Virginia, where the November 2, 1739 bill of sale for the livestock showed Solomon Hedges was then residing. George Washington in 1748 at the age of 16 "traveled up ye Creek to Solomon Hedges, Esq., one of his Majesty's Justices of the Peace for ye County of Frederick." The family was still there in 1753 when Hampshire County was formed, but by 1778 had moved on to Buffalo Creek in Ohio County in the [West] Virginia panhandle. There Solomon Hedges is alleged to have lived and died after the turn of the century at an age of over one hundred. [1]


Spouses –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 1: Rebecca VANMETER Birth: circa 1711 Somerset County, New Jersey Death: circa 1770 Age: 59 Father: John VANMETER (1683-1745) Mother: Margaret MOLLENAUER (ca1687->1745) Marriage: circa 1735 Children: Joseph

Sources

See also:

  • Pioneers of Old Monocacy, The Early Settlement of Frederick County, Maryland 1721-1743 by Grace L. Tracey and John P. Dern
  • Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V5Z4-WX2 : 17 May 2018), James Hedges and Amy Firmon, 20 Jun 1803; citing Marriage, Bourbon, Kentucky, United States, district clerk, court clerk, county clerk and register offices from various counties; FHL microfilm 183,078.
  • United States Census, 1850," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M65T-9P2 : 12 April 2016), James Hedges, Bath county, part of, Bath, Kentucky, United States; citing family 779, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • http://www.frontierfolk.net/ramsha_research/Notes/hedges.html
  • Type: Book Author: Bessie Burris Hunt Periodical: Ancestors & Descendants of Jonathan Burris Publication: Sun Printing

Acknowledgments

  • Thank you to Michael Gillespie for creating WikiTree profile Hedges-320 through the import of Gillespie Family 10.ged on Apr 25, 2013. Click to the Changes page for the details of edits by Michael and others.




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