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Research and Notes for Scots-Irish Migration

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Discussion on the Scots-Irish or Ulster Irish project can be read here: https://www.wikitree.com/g2g/866802/lets-talk-about-the-scots-irish-and-ulster-scots-project?show=868205#c868205

Contents

Research and Notes

We are focusing research efforts on the Scots-Irish or Ulster Scots who immigrated from Ireland to New England from 1714 to 1720, but especially from 1718 to 1720.

The migration of 1718 was so thoroughly a deliberate undertaking, clearly conceived and organized, that an agent was sent out to prepare the way. Ships were chartered for the voyage and their holds were filled with the household goods of the Bann Valley emigrants. It was this initiative in 1718 which led to an active but short-lived passenger trade between Irish ports and Boston.[1]
The Scots-Irish largely came to colonial America in family groups, often such that members of an extended family settled near one another in America, whether they immigrated together or separately. Some Scots-Irish immigrants came to America as part of larger group or congregational migrations, meaning that an entire group or congregation of Presbyterians together moved from one locality in Ireland to one locality in America. It is thus very important to trace persons that immigrated with a Scots-Irish ancestor or were associated with the ancestor in America.[2]
In some cases, the immigrating group was led by a minister. In such instances, the minister may be traced back to the church he served in Ireland. Most of the immigrants who accompanied him would be from the same area. However, a group or congregational migration may have drawn from a larger area than just one town or parish in Ireland.[2]

Ireland: Presbyteries List

Below is a list of the Presbyterian synods that were active at the time of our period of the migration.[3]

  • Down
  • Belfast
  • Antrim
  • Tyrone
  • Armagh
  • Coleraine
  • Derry
  • Convoy
  • Monaghan

Currently working on identifying the congregations within each of the synods.

New England: Ship List

Susan: Finished spreadsheet for Massachusetts arrivals. Source: Bolton, Scotch Irish Pioneers in Ulster and America], Pages 317 ff. The historical society in Connecticut has indicated there are no similar ship lists for their ports. Continuing to update ship list with information from additional sources.

The list of ships to New England are here.

New England: Immigrant List

  • Organizers:
    • Rev. William Homes
    • Rev. Thomas Craighead
    • Rev. William Boyd (agent for the emigrants from Bann Valley, County Londonderry)[4]
    • Rev. Cotton Mather

Susan: Continuing with Bolton, looking for the names of the immigrants and any details about them.

Source Lists

General

  • Betit, Kyle J. "American History Colonial Scots-Irish Immigrants: The Irish Records." Colonial Scots-Irish Immigrants: The Irish Records. Accessed July 12, 2019. Note: This article was originally published in The Irish At Home and Abroad journal of Irish genealogy and heritage (volume 2, No. 1, 1994/1995). Published four times yearly.
  • Bolton, Charles Knowles, Scotch Irish Pioneers in Ulster and America, with Maps and Illustrations Drawn by Ethel Stanwood Bolton, Boston, MA: Bacon and Brown, 1910. Also available as a reprint: Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1989.
  • Bolton, Esther Stanwood, compiler, Immigrants to New England, 1700-1775, Reprinted from the Historical Collections of the Essex Institute, Volumes LXIII, LXIV, LXV, LXVI, and LXVII, Salem, Massachusetts: Newcomb & Gauss, Printers, 1931.
    • Bolton, Esther Stanwood, compiler, "Immigrants to New England, 1700-1775," The Essex Institute Historical Collections, Volume LXIII (1927), Pages 117-192, 269-284 and 365-380.
    • Bolton, Esther Stanwood, compiler, "Immigrants to New England, 1700-1775," The Essex Institute Historical Collections, Volume LXIV (1928), Pages 25-32, and 257-272.
    • Bolton, Esther Stanwood, compiler, "Immigrants to New England, 1700-1775," The Essex Institute Historical Collections, Volume LXV (1929), Pages 57-72, 113-128 and 531-546.
    • Bolton, Esther Stanwood, compiler, "Immigrants to New England, 1700-1775," The Essex Institute Historical Collections, Volume LXVI (1930), Pages 411-426, and 521-536.
    • Bolton, Esther Stanwood, compiler, "Immigrants to New England, 1700-1775," The Essex Institute Historical Collections, Volume LXVII (1931), Pages 89-112, 201-224 and 305-328 [Note: Includes corrections and addenda].
  • Dickson, R. J., Ulster Immigration to Colonia America, 1718-1775, Ulster-Scot Historical Series, No. 1, New York: Humanities Press, 1966; 4th reprint, with a new introduction by G. E. Kirkham, Ulster Historical Foundation, Belfast: ColourBooks, Ltd., 2001.
Burns, Robert E., “Review: R. J. Dickson, Ulster Immigration to Colonia America, 1718-1775,” American Historical Review (AHR), 73:5 (Jun 1968), pp. 1619-20.
  • Homes, William, Diary of the Reverend William Homes, pastor of the church in Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard 1688 to 1746, ed. Henry A. Homes, 1866; corr. Richard L. Pease, 1886, manuscript copy in the library of the New England Histocical and Genealogical Society, Cal No. Mss A 1996. Note: original diary in the holdings of the Maine Historical Society.
  • Griffin, Patrick, The People with No Name: Ireland’s Ulster Scots, America’s Scots Irish, and the Creation of a British Atlantic World, 1689-1764, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001.
Akenson, Donald Harman, “Review: Patrick Griffin, The People with No Name: Ireland’s Ulster Scots, America’s Scots Irish, and the Creation of a British Atlantic World, 1689-1764,” American Historical Review (AHR), 107:4 (Oct 2002), pp. 1190-1.
  • McConnell, James, “The Promise of the New World,’’ The Scots-Irish Journey to the New World: The 1718 Migration, website created by: Ulster-Scots Agency; Ulster Historical Foundation; Centre for Migration Studies; Institute of Ulster-Scots Studies.

Ireland

  • Gillespie, Raymond, Seventeenth Century Ireland: Making Ireland Modern, New Gill History of Ireland, Volume 3, Dublin: M. H. Gill & Co., 2006.
  • McBride, Ian, Eighteenth Century Ireland: The Isle of Slaves, New Gill History of Ireland, Volume 4, Dublin: Gill & Macmillan Ltd, 2009.
  • Robinson, Philip S., The Plantation of Ulster: British Settlement in an Irish Landscape, 1600-1670, St. Martin's Press, 1984, 2nd ed., Ulster Historical Foundation, Belfast: ColourBooks Ltd, 1994, repr. 2000.
  • The Ulster Scots Society of America, “About the Ulster Scots.”

Maps

American Colonies

  • Oliver, Charles, "The Fighting Scots-Irish: They shaped America, but did they make it more free?” Reason, July 2005. Review of James Webb, ‘’Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America’’, New York: Broadway Books, [2005?]

Connecticut

  • Connecticut: Vital Records (The Barbour Collection), 1630-1870 (Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2011.) From original typescripts, Lucius Barnes Barbour Collection, 1928. (subscription required)
  • Stiles, Henry Reed, The History and Genealogies of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut, including East Windsor, South Windsor, Bloomfield, Windsor Locks, and Ellington, v. 2: Genealogies and Biographies, Hartford, CT: Press of Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company, 1892.

Maine

Massachusetts

  • Temple, Josiah Howard, History of the Town of Palmer, Massachusetts, Early Known as the Elbow Tract: Including Records of the Plantation, District and Town, 1716-1889. With a Genealogical Register, Published by the Town of Palmer, Springfield, Massachusetts: Clark W. Bryan & Co., Printers and Binders, 1889; also available at Google Books.

New Hampshire

  • Annis, Daniel Gage, and Browne, George Waldo, compilers, Vital Records of Londonderry, New Hampshire: A Full and Accurate Transcript of the Births, Marriage Intentions, Marriages and Deaths in This Town from the Earliest Date to 1910, Manchester, NH: The Granite State Publishing Company, 1914. Also available online and indexed at AmericanAncestors.org (subscription required).
  • Morrison, Leonard A., The History of Windham, In New Hampshire (Rockingham County), 1719-1883, A Scotch Settlement (Commonly Called Scotch-Irish), Embracing Nearly One Third of the Ancient Settlement and Historic Township of Londonderry, N.H., with the History and Genealogy of Its First Settlers and Their Descendants, and Most of the Families of Its Past, and All of Its Present Permanent Inhabitants, Comprising More Than Two Hundred Different Family Names. With Map, and Sixty Pages of Engravings, together with Twenty Autographs and Cuts, Boston, MA: Cupples, Upham & Co., 1883.
  • Morrison, Leonard A., Supplement to The History of Windham, In New Hampshire. A Scotch Settlement. Giving the History of the Presbyterian Religious Society, and a List of Its Officers from 1827 to 1892; Proceedings on the 50th Anniversary of the Dedication of the Church, Jan. 14, 1885; History of Canobie Lake, and Origin of the Name; List of Town Officers from 1882 to 1892, and Record of Marriages, Births, and Deaths from 1882 to 1892; the Flora of Windham; Proceedings of Columbus Day Celebrarion, Oct. 21, 1892; together with Genealogical Records Gathered in Londonderry, Ireland; with Historical Gleanings in Dublin, Ireland; Giving a List of References to Grants to Some of the Cromwellian Scotch Officers of 1649, Boston, MA: Damrell & Upham, 1892.

Footnotes

  1. Bolton, Scotch Irish Pioneers in Ulster and America, Page 58.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Betit, Kyle J. "American History Colonial Scots-Irish Immigrants: The Irish Records." Colonial Scots-Irish Immigrants: The Irish Records. Accessed July 12, 2019. https://electricscotland.com/history/america/scots_irish.htm. Note: this article was originally published in The Irish At Home and Abroad journal of Irish genealogy and heritage (volume 2 #1, 1994/1995). Published four times yearly.
  3. "Scotch Irish Pioneers in Ulster and America : Bolton, Charles Knowles, 1867-1950 : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming." Internet Archive. January 01, 1970. Accessed July 12, 2019. https://archive.org/details/scotchirish00boltrich/page/92.
  4. Bolton, Scotch Irish Pioneers in Ulster and America, Page 91.




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Comments: 9

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I'm having second thoughts about extending the timeframe back to 1714, since the coherent, minister-led effort didn't begin until 1718. Also, do we include Scots-Irish who came as indentured servants, without family or minister attached? Beginning in 1718, how would we differentiate them from the families? Revs. Homes and Craighead, two of the principal organizers of the New England effort, and their families would be part of the pre-1718 group.
posted by Susan Anderson
I liked what you did in adding your quote and list of presbyteries, so I just followed along.
posted by Susan Anderson
Nice job on the page organization Susan. Looks great!
posted by Caryl (Short) Ruckert
I added some structure for the sources (and the sources I've found, so far) and notes regarding the Ship and Immigrant Lists to come from Bolton.
posted by Susan Anderson
I added the passage and a couple of sources. I have an initial list of the Presbyteries.
posted by Caryl (Short) Ruckert
I like that focus. Let's start small and expand once we are ready. I think this makes it manageable to get things going.
posted by Caryl (Short) Ruckert
Do we want to expand the years we cover to include 1714-1720? Bolton included arrivals in New England between those dates in his "1718" migration. (See pp. 17 f.) Also, the ship list he provided for New England arrivals covered those dates - how thoroughly is a different question. (See Appendix I, pp. 317 ff.)
posted by Susan Anderson
The first thing that occurs to me is that we may need to divide this into three parts: Ireland, migration, American Colonies. The sources we've found seem to cover either the Plantations or America, not both. Figuring out who traveled when on what ship seems crucial but separate from origin and destination. On the American side, would it work divide the sources according to final location? Thus, some of your finds would go in a New Hampshire category, mine in a Connecticut category. Then there's Maine and Massachusetts. Bolton, bless him, would go in a general category. Links to maps of the Plantations in the Ireland category? Is that too cumbersome? Any ideas for dealing with working notes?
posted by Susan Anderson
Susan what are your thoughts on organizing our research? I am open to any ideas or suggestions. Please add anything you like to the page.
posted by Caryl (Short) Ruckert