no image

Royal Ancestry

Privacy Level: Public (Green)
Date: [unknown] [unknown]
Location: [unknown]
This page has been accessed 794 times.


Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families

click here for the source page for Magna Carta Ancestry

Royal Ancestry has five volumes (I, II, III, IV, V) and is divided into chapters (family name or lordship) with numbered entries. In the examples, the Beauchamp chapter in volume I spans pages 277 through 302; entry number 11 in the chapter is on page 293. The volume, page(s), chapter, and entry information in the examples will probably not be appropriate for the profile you are working on, so you will need to replace the details (volume, page, chapter, entry) to be correct for the information you are citing.

Bibliography:

Richardson, Douglas. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. Salt Lake City: the author, 2013. See also WikiTree's source page for Royal Ancestry.

Note:

Douglas Richardson. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols, ed. Kimball G. Everingham (Salt Lake City: the author, 2013), volume I, pages 277-302 BEAUCHAMP.

Short Note:

Richardson, Royal Ancestry, I:293 BEAUCHAMP 11.

The sections below provide details and copy/paste-able versions, as well as the recommended use for profiles managed by the Magna Carta Project.

Contents

First Inline Citation

The style is based on the Notes style of Evidence Explained. It should be a named ref (RA). Use it the first time you reference Royal Ancestry (see below for recommended use for project profiles).

<ref name="RA">Douglas Richardson. ''Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families,'' 5 vols, ed. Kimball G. Everingham (Salt Lake City: the author, 2013), volume I, pages 277-302 BEAUCHAMP.</ref>

results in:[1]
Note: Don't forget to change the specific volume, page, chapter, and number from the example to reflect what you are citing.
subsequent references:

<ref name="RA" />

results in:[1]

Second Inline Citation

The style is based on the Short Notes style of Evidence Explained. It should be a named ref[2] and link to the Google Books' snippit view of the specific page being referenced (or the first page, if more than one). Include the specific entry number of the chapter where the information can be found (see below for recommended use for project profiles).

<ref name="raI293">Richardson, ''Royal Ancestry,'' I:293 BEAUCHAMP 11.</ref>

results in:[3]
Note: Don't forget to change the specific volume, page, chapter, and number from the example to reflect what you are citing.
subsequent references:

<ref name="raI293" />

results in:[3]

Bibliography

The style is based on the Bibliography style of Evidence Explained, with the added note linking to this WikiTree source page:

* Richardson, Douglas. ''Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families,'' 5 vols, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. Salt Lake City: the author, 2013. See also WikiTree's source page for ''[[Space:Royal Ancestry|Royal Ancestry]].''

results in:
  • Richardson, Douglas. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. Salt Lake City: the author, 2013. See also WikiTree's source page for Royal Ancestry.

Reliability

Royal Ancestry is the latest published work (2013) of Douglas Richardson and includes updates from his Magna Carta Ancestry (2011).
Richardson's "Royal Ancestry series", which includes Royal Ancestry (five volumes) and the second editions of Magna Carta Ancestry and Plantagenet Ancestry published in 2011 (four volumes and three volumes, respectively), were published by the author with Kimball G. Everingham as editor.
Richardson's works are considered reliable.[4]

Magna Carta Project's Recommended Use

Background: Magna Carta Ancestry (2011) and Royal Ancestry (2013) are the foundational references used by the Magna Carta Project to develop profiles in trails between the Gateway Ancestors documented in these works to a Magna Carta Surety Baron.[5] The Magna Carta Project recommends checking for updates to Magna Carta Ancestry in Royal Ancestry when possible. The project does not recommend Plantagenet Ancestry as a source for Magna Carta Project profiles because its focus was not on descendants of the Magna Carta Surety Barons.[6] See additional information about Magna Carta-related sources on the Magna Carta Project Reliable Sources page.

When developing a Magna Carta Project profile, the Magna Carta Project recommends using all three forms when citing Royal Ancestry, even if you are not using multiple Richardson references. This way, a reference to the relevant chapter(s) can be easily found, the specific facts being cited to Richardson have specific references, and the profile will have a link back to this page, which has additional information. The project recommends including a Richardson citation to genealogical information (birth, death, marriage, and parent/child relationships), even after a primary source has been identified and added to the profile (although there are exceptions, which would be discussed with project members as they arise).

Specifics:

The first inline citation - the first time you cite Royal Ancestry - should include the volume and pages for the relevant chapter (family name or lordship) or chapters. Frequently, parents or children will be covered in a different chapter, so more than one chapter may be relevant to the person whose profile you're working on and should be cited.
This first inline citation should be used following the first use of the name of the person represented by the profile. For project profiles, this seems to work best when the person's name in bold is on a line by itself just below the == Biography == heading, either with or without additional information. For example:
== Biography ==
'''Thomas de Beauchamp''', K.G., 11th Earl of Warwick[1]
The second inline citation is specific to a chapter's entry. If all of the information in a sentence or paragraph is from the specific entry, the citation can go at the end of the sentence or paragraph. If information from another source is included in the sentence or paragraph, then citations should be used as needed to show what information came from what source. Following is an example from Elizabeth (Butler) Claiborne's profile:
Elizabeth Butler, of Little Birch, Essex, England,[7] was born before 1612.[8][9][10]
The bibliography style entry should be included in the bulleted list of sources.

Even if using all three styles in a profile seems redundant (which they will, if the profile is sourced to only one Richardson entry) , please add them anyway, as it is to be hoped that additional details and sources will be added in the future.

Links

Information about Royal Ancestry available online:
ISBN 1482784513 [11]
Bibliography
What Links to This Page

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Douglas Richardson. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols, ed. Kimball G. Everingham (Salt Lake City: the author, 2013), volume I, pages 277-302 BEAUCHAMP.
  2. lowercase ra with the volume (Roman numeral) and page number (Arabic numeral); e.g., "raI293" or "raV32"
  3. 3.0 3.1 Richardson, Royal Ancestry, I:293 BEAUCHAMP 11.
  4. For other "Reliable Sources" for pre-1700 profiles, see links under this category.
  5. If you are working on Magna Carta Project profiles, please see this section of the project's Reliable Sources page.
  6. Also, descendants' entries in Magna Carta Ancestry have updates not included in Plantagenet Ancestry, even though the 2nd editions of both were published the same year. Do not use the first edition of either for project profiles. The WikiTree source pages for Magna Carta Ancestry and Plantagenet Ancestry include citations for both first and second editions of those works.
  7. Marlyn Lewis. Elizabeth Butler, entry in "Our Royal, Titled, Noble, and Commoner Ancestors and Cousins" database (2 Feb. 2019).
  8. Richardson, Royal Ancestry, I:385-387 BLETSOE 18.i.
  9. Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, I:220 BLETSOE 13.i.a.(3).
  10. "born ca 1610 in Roxwell, Essex, England" per Sanders (http://oursoutherncousins.com/Claiborne.html).
  11. Library of Congress (LOC) Catalogue Card Number 2013905440
    International Standard Book Number (ISBN) 1482784513






Collaboration

On 4 Feb 2019 at 01:11 GMT Liz (Noland) Shifflett wrote:

Both this page and the Space:Magna Carta Ancestry source page were redone to make it easier to implement the recommendation of how to cite these Richardson works. Previous comments mostly no longer apply.

As posted there... "Trying to implement what was (with spotty success) led to a revamp"

New version, in a nutshell:

  • 1st ref (note citation/full inline citation, named ref), citing entire chapter(s)
  • 2nd ref (short note citation, named ref with vol/page[s]), citing chapter & entry
  • bibliography entry with link to this page

On 28 Jan 2019 at 16:35 GMT Liz (Noland) Shifflett wrote:

P.S. If you do have several different named references to the same work, using Short Notes with a Bibliography entry (#Short Note Style and #Bibliography Style) might be the better option. Please keep in mind that which style to use is more a question of aesthetics and personal preference than a "rule", although the Magna Carta Project would prefer that you use one of the styles suggested here (with or without a link back to this page), to afford a certain level of consistency among project-managed profiles.

Thanks!

On 28 Jan 2019 at 16:22 GMT Liz (Noland) Shifflett wrote:

Please note: It was pointed out that WikiTree recommends that named references be within quotation marks - for example, ref name="RA" (see this section of the Sources help page). I've changed the examples to reflect this, although both work (with or without quotation marks).

Please note that if your named citation uses quotation marks, the subsequent references need to also use quotation marks, and vice versa. The names need to match exactly, to include capitalization.

If you have more than one entry that you're referring to, you'll need different names for them. One suggested naming scheme is to use the volume number and page number with ra - for example, name="raI293"

Cheers, Liz

Categories: Source | Magna Carta Project