Sandy_Grove_Clarendon_County_South_Carolina.jpg

Sandy Grove, Clarendon County, South Carolina

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Date: [unknown] [unknown]
Location: Clarendon County, South Carolinamap
This page has been accessed 1,962 times.
This profile is part of the Sandy Grove Place Study One Place Study.

Contents

Introduction

Sandy Grove was a small township that first appeared in the 1860 Census of Clarendon County. It was in the northeastern part of the county near the Williamsburg County line.

It appears that the town was a part of Williamsburg County when it first appeared. The first postmaster that I was able to find was William H McElveen on June 22 1858. [1]At this time it is listed in the Williamsburg post offices but has a note that says some lots were now in the Sumter District. The next post master is John E McElveen on June 10 1859 and the next to it it says "in Clarendon District". The post office remains in Clarendon County until July 1898 when it appears to have been combined into the Mouzon post office in Williamsburg County.

The town of Sandy Grove appears in the United States Census from 1860 until 1940. As more census information is made available, I will be able to see if it remained after that. In all census records it is listed in Clarendon County. On the enumeration maps, Sandy Grove appears as the northeastern most point on the map of Clarendon County.

Currently the area that was Sandy Grove is called Hebron Crossroads.

History

The first mention of Sandy Grove in a newspaper that I have been able to find was in the Edgefield Advertiser on Jan 19, 1859. It describes a proposal for mail routes. It reads " 5607 From Lynchburgh, by Shiloh, Bethlehem, and New Zion, to Sandy Grove, 23 miles and back, once a week. Leave Lynchburgh Saturday at 6am; Arrive at Sandy Grove by 12pm; Leave Sandy Grove Saturday at 1pm; Arrive at Lynchburgh by 7pm."

The further I get into studying the place, the more apparent it becomes that it changed districts and counties over the year. This probably because of its location near the borders of several counties. An example of this comes from the obituary of Thomas E Burgess in the Florence Morning News who died in Sept of 1932. His obituary states that he lived on the family's homestead his entire life but that it was at various times considered part of the Sumter District, then was part of Clarendon County, and finally part of Williamsburg County. He appears in several censuses under Sandy Grove.

Cemeteries

The following are Cemeteries that residents of Sandy Grove were laid to rest in. Some of them may be outside the area that was known as Sandy Grove.

McElveen Cemetery

McElveen Cemetery

Family cemetery located off Burnt Branch Rd. Entrance to cemetery has two brick posts on either side of the entrance.

McFadden Cemetery

McFadden Cemetery

African American cemetery located off St James Road near the intersection of Burnt Branch Rd. It does not have a sign but death certificates of those buried there indicate it is called McFadden Cemetery.

New Hope Christian Church Graveyard

New Hope Christian Church

Located on Salem Road, this Graveyard was originally attached to the Old Mother Church.

New Town Baptist Church Graveyard

New Town Baptist Church Graveyard

Located off New Town Rd.

St. James Baptist Church Cemetery

St. James Baptist Church Cemetery

Located on the corner of St James Road and Burnt Branch Road.


Sandy Grove in the News

I am looking for any news articles related to the area or people who lived in the area.

1850s

It was reported that the Postmaster General had added 38 post offices throughout the country including the Sandy Grove post office in SC. The post office was in the Sumter District and William McElveen was appointed postmaster. [2]

This is an article about disruptions in mail service throughout the Sumter District including Sandy Grove.[3]

1880s

On Aug. 4, 1886, it was reported in The Manning Times that the County Convention had been called to order the following Saturday and that W D McFadden and R E Smith were seated as delegates for Sandy Grove. Also, W D McFaddin was named as a member of the Executive Committee.[4]

On Aug. 25, 1886, the Manning Times reported on the meeting of the Democratic Executive Meeting at which R E Smith, R E Burgess, and W H Thigpen were appointed managers of the Sandy Grove Club. [5]

The County auditor reported delinquent taxes for each town on Feb, 9, 1887. Sandy Grove had reported: 200 Acres, $265; personal $205 and 7 polls. [6]

From the Manning Times: "We had the pleasure of meeting last Friday, R E Smith, of Sandy Grove. He is a man of meritorious parts, is closely connected with Rev. A Coke Smith, of the Methodist Conference, and is an honor to his community."[7]

In May of 1988, the Democratic Committee met and T E Shannon and W D Mcfadden were listed as delegates who were present. T E Shannon was elected onto the Executive Committee. [8]

Official results of the Clarendon County second primary elections were reported. Sandy Grove gave 16 votes to J E Davis and 16 votes to J C Ingraham for Clerk of Court. 26 votes for L Appelt and 5 votes for S W Kirton for Pr. Judge. 12 votes for PC Cochran and 19 votes for J L Rowe for Coroner. 5 votes for E C Horton and 16 votes for T A Wat for County Commissioner. [9]

Daniel Driggers is reported as petit juror for Sandy Grove for the May term of court 1889.[10]

Auditor Bradham published an abstract of Real Property in Clarendon County. Sandy Grove has 14,628 acres of land valued at $20,850 with 142 Buildings valued at $2,345. The total value of Sandy Grove Real Property was $23,195. [11]

R E Smith was pulled for petit jury for the Oct Term 1889.[12]

"Another alliance was organized last week at Sandy Grove. D I Burgess, president, W T Kennedy, Vice president; and W D Mcfadden, secretary".[13]

Notice is given that 37 acres and 2 buildings belonging to J G Gowdy will be sold at auction for delinquent taxes.[14]

1890

In an article about membership of the Clarendon County Farmer's Alliance, D I Burgess is named as president and W D McFadden as secretary of the Sandy Grove Sub-Alliance. [15]

J E Kennedy was drawn as a Grand Jury member for Sandy Grove. [16]

Transfers of Real Estate were reported for the county. In Sandy Grove, W D McFadden sold to Daniel Driggers 372 acres for $1,200. L G Suggs sold 50 acres to E S Driggers for $300.[17]

Real Estate transfers reported for Sandy Grove: D R Cook,et al. to J E Lee 25 acres for $45. J A & A Barfield to B W Moore unknown acres for $10. D Driggers to S P Brockinton 200 acres for $800. S P Brockinton to W M Brockinton 240 acres. [18]

"Sandy Grove-May 9. News is very scarce down here among us Pudding Swampers. Tillman and the coming campaign is the general topic now. We think two-thirds of the voters will vote for Tillman.
Farmers are about all through planting. The corn crop looks tolerably well. Cotton is getting up fast since the rains commenced. The oat crop is very light in this section, the cause being attributed to the Hessian fly. We are having fine seasons just now, which makes the farmers' hearts glad.
A little negro child on Mr J J McFaddin's plantation was burned to death on the 3rd inst. The child was an infant not quite a year old, and was left alone in the house. It is supposed that it crawled into the fire.
The good people of Hebron Church organized their Sunday school last Sunday, the 4th inst., with upwards of fifty members, which speaks well for that place.
We had a fine picnic and a sentimental drenching last Saturday at Mouzon's Bridge. A heavy ran came up during the day, and the ladies were compelled to take shelter under wagons, buggies, and such like until the rain was over.
Mr J E Johnson's infant child about 5 months old died this week. He has another very sick child. Mr J C Baker has a sick child also.The trouble seems to be diarrhea, which is quite prevalent. A little child of Mr W A J Moore, of Moore's X Roads, about two years old, swallowed a silver quarter. There is no hope of the child's life being saved, as there is no relief to be had. With these exceptions, the health of the community is good. TOM TATTLER" [19]

S H Burgess named to Petit Jury for Sandy Grove.[20]

"Sandy Grove, May 31-Crops are looking well throughout our neighborhood, more especially cotton. Mr Myers Coker has the finest field of corn the writer has seen this season. We fear the finny tribe of the swamp will injure the crops nearby a little as there seems to be a good many of them in the swamp, we hope not seriously however.
Times are pretty hard down here, and we Alliance men are trying to exercise all the economy possible so as to be able to do a cash business through the state exchange another year.
Mr Tillman is still gaining ground in our section. we would like to have him come down and let us see him and hear him talk.
Mr John J Bradwell died of consumption the 24th. He had been suffering from that terrible disease for a long time.
Mr David Welch has been quite ill, but is mending.
Mr Joseph Barrow has been very ill, but is also improving.
Mr W A J Moore's child, that accidentally swallowed the silver quarter, is still living and thought to be improving. We hope it may recover.
The times is a welcome visitor among us. I was pleased to get mine earlier the last time than usual. All papers addressed to Sandy Grove should be sent by way of Kingstree, as we can get them three days sooner.
The different Democratic Clubs of Williamsburg have been holding their meetings, and sending resolutions to the County Record for publication. We would like to hear from some of our clubs in Clarendon. SAM TATTLER" [21]

In an article discussing political views in Clarendon county, the writer remarks that a "prominent gentleman" from Sandy Grove believed that 9/10s of his neighbors were for Tillman now[22]

"Sandy Grove, July 14- A meeting was called for the purpose of reorganizing the old Sandy Grove Democratic club, but after the call was made we learned of the action of the County Executive Committee, and decided not to organize until the 19th. The sentiment of the meeting was solid for the farmers' movement and Tillman.
We are needing rain very much down here on the swamp, more especially the corn crop.
The health of the community is tolerably good. Items scarce. SAM TATTLER" [23]

A reporting by a writer who signed himself as "One I" writes of attending a picnic at the home of Mr J J McFaddin. He stated that there were different political factions there and it was made clear that he found those who were not voting for Tillman did not know their history. [24]

"New Town democratic club met at Reidsville School House July 19, 1890 and was called to order by President W T Kennedy who explained the objects of the meeting in a most appropriate and telling speech. The following officers were elected to serve for the next two years: J W Kennedy, president; D H Welch and W L Barrineau, vice presidents; F N Thomas, secretary; member of the executive committee, F N Thomas; committee on good of the order, A J Hicks, W L Barrineau, W H Curry. A Committee composed of J W Kennedy, G T Worsham, D H Welch, W L Barrineau and W H Curry was appointed to draft resolutions, which were offered and accepted and ordered to be published in the Manning Times:
Resolved The we endorse the action of the March convention in adopting a platform so well suited to all important wants of our people; we do nearby endorse the nomination of Capt. B R Tillman for governor, and pledge ourselves to support him as long as honesty is the watchword of Tillman and reform.
After adoption of resolutions President J W Kennedy gave an enthusiastic simon-pure Democratic speech on the duty of voters, urging them to exercise their rights as men and not as henchmen. Adjourned to meet Aug. 2nd." [25]

"Mr D L Burgess, of Sandy Grove, says: I was a Bratton man until the Democratic party made their nominations and the party put forward a Democratic ticket. Since then I feel bound to support Tillman and his whole ticket. Every democrat should turn out to the polls and support the regular Democratic nominees." [26]

A notice of Delinquent Tax Sales: S R Marshall, 95 acres land; R S Thigpen, 125 acres land; Weston N Coker, 120 acres of land. [27]

"Sandy Grove, Nov.8- The cotton crop is far better in our section than the farmers thought it would be when picking first began. Even P Y's honey bee cotton is making an honorable turn out.
The election passed off smoothly at our poll. The Democrats in our section are rejoiced over their success, having elected Tillman.
The health of the community is good, with exception of colds, which seem to be general. SAM TATTLER" [28]

1891

"Sandy Grove, Jan.17- News is as scarce as hen's teeth down here. The farmers are busy preparing for another crop. We Sandy Grove fellows are going to try to bring up our honey bee cotton to that of P Y's pig pen.
Messrs. James E Kennedy and Sam'l N Johnson are in Charleston this week.
Some of the people don't see to be very well pleased with the work of our legislature. We think that if they had repealed the lien and homestead laws that the people would have been better pleased.
Mr S F Curry has been quite ill for some time but is improving slowly. The general health of the community is tolerable good, with the exception of colds, which are prevalent.
The Times is always a welcome visitor. SAM TATTLER" [29]

Sandy Grove residents called for Petit Jury were W J Hodge and T E Burgess. [30]

In a letter written by P Y from Midway he says, "I think the honey-bee cotton in Sandy Grove will do well this year if the finny tribe don't rise, which will give the cotton the rust. It will have to do fine if it gets up with pig pens cotton." [31]

R E Burgess attended the county board of equalization meeting. [32]

"Sandy Grove, Mar. 12- We are having some very wet weather now, most too wet to plow or burn logs. The roads are very bad. The county commissioners of Williamsburg are having the worst places worked.
I visited the little city by the lake a few days ago. Business was very slow, except the guano trade. I was informed that there had been more guano sold at that place this season than they ever knew before. They must be going to manure higher. I hear a great many of them say that they are not going to plant as much cotton as last year. If we would make a plenty of corn, and then as much cotton as we could, we would certainly be better off, for the price of cotton is down, and the price of corn is up. A great many of the farmers in our section are still holding some their last year's cotton.
We would be glad to hear from Mr J M Knight again on teaching, and would like for him to express his opinion in regard to abandoning the use of the rod in our country schools.
The finny tribe will be apt to rise well if high water is any sign, but I don't fear the cotton in Sandy Grove being injured if P Y finds the lakes in time.
The grip seems to be subsiding and the general health tolerable good. SAM TATTLER" [33]

"Sandy Grove, Mar. 30- We are still having more heavy rains, so much so that plowing and planting has almost stopped. The water courses are all very full. The oat crop so far bids fair to be a fine one. Mr A J Moore has the finest prospect the writer has seen. A good many of the farmers are through planting corn.
Mrs Mary Evans died March 27 at the home of her son, Mr S H D Evans, at the good old age of 78. She leaves many relatives and friends to mourn her loss.
The general health is tolerable good with a few exceptions. We are going to plant a patch of watermelons. Come round, Mr Editor in Watermelon time. SAM TATTLER"[34]

"Sandy Grove, Apr.27- We are having some as dry weather now as we had wet one a month ago. The farmer fear the stand of cotton will be very poor.
I agree with your humorous and instructive correspondent Tom in denouncing the lien and homestead laws. I look upon them as the worst evil the laboring class has to contend with. It is a reflection upon a farmer's dignity and honesty to acquire a lien or bill of sale of him. The merchants seriously doubt his honesty when they ask it; but they say they must treat all alike. Why not repeal the obnoxious laws, and let his word be his lien, his property his security? I am no in favor of repealing one without the other, for we have some dishonest men. A short time ago I asked a member of the General Assembly why they did not repeal those laws. He asked me if I favored their repeal. I told him I did. He said the reason was there were more that did not favor it than did. My simple opinion is that the majority of farmers favor it if the majority of the members do not. Brother farmers, what plan can we fall upon to get this curse removed? I would like to have Tom, as he has shown us the evil so clearly, to show us how to get rid of it.
Mr S N Johnson and Mr Daniel Mims, of Sandy Grove, are said to have the finest corn in Salem.
Mr and Mrs S F Curry are visiting relatives in Florence County.
The health of the community is very good. SAM TATTLER"[35]

Sandy Grove residents called for Petit Jury were Daniel Mims and W H Thigpen. [36]

"Sandy Grove, May 13- We are having a long looked for and a much needed rain this evening, which we hope will bring the cotton up. Some of the farmers who planted early have been planting over.
I will endeavor to give you what I think is the greatest cause of the farmers' present depression. I claim that the farmers alone are to blame for their condition. When the war closed cotton was bringing a good price which was an inducement to plant it. The farmers turned most of their attention to the cultivation of it, which soon reduced its value. By this time they had learned well to cultivate it, and as the price decreased the more they tried to make. So the large crops that are made now bring about the same money. Does it not seem now that if we would plant more grain and raise more stock and make less cotton that we would receive the same for our cotton?
Just about the time the farmers were turning their attention to cotton the Radicals were in power and passed the obnoxious Homestead Act, and the farmers began buying their meat and bread and you might say all the necessaries of life. Most of them were no able to pay cash for everything and had to buy on time. We had some dishonest men, and this Homestead Act gave the farmer a decided advantage over the merchant. To amend this trouble instead of repealing the Homestead Law made by the Radicals the Democrats passed this farmers' ruin, the lien law. As soon as this Act was passed it seemed as if the people thought that pay day would never come, but when it did it was to their sorrow. Some bought more than they could pay for; misfortune befell some; and so it went. They strove to pay out with cotton and got further in, so it is those that plant the most cotton are the deepest in debt and will be until we make our meat and bread at home.
When we get our barns and smokehouses well filled we shall have all the warehouses we need. I have heard it often said, "Have plenty of corn and you will have plenty of everything else." Give us more corn and Christians and time will be better.
Mr James E Kennedy, who lost his horse some time ago, has bought a fine mule. Mr Kennedy has been quite sick but we are glad to say he is improving.
Mrs J E Johnson is quite ill.
Messrs. S C Williams and E S Ervin, of Manning, passed through our section a few days ago. They tarried under the shade of the grove and took refreshments. They were jovial and quite pleasant. If they are a genuine type of the Manning people, we would like to have more of them call on us. SAM TATTLER" [37]

In an article describing changes in population from 1880 to 1890 in Clarendon County it is stated that the population grew by 4,970. Sandy Grove went from a population of 402 in 1880 to a population of 518 in 1890. [38]

"Sandy Grove, July 20- We are all about through laying by crops but are suffering considerably from want of rain in this immediate section. We hope, however, to get it soon as rains are passing about. The swamps are very low and quantities of fish are being caught. Picnics and fish dinners are frequent.
We will have a quarterly meeting at the new Free Will Baptist church recently organized near Johnson's Crossing on the third Saturday and Sunday in August.
Mr W H Curry, of Sandy Grove, will open a private school near St Johns Church in Florence County, the 20th inst.
We are informed that the Salem Railroad is progressing slowly on account of the want of hands. Only four miles have been built. We learn that Mr W D McFaddin has applied for the contract of cutting the road way to the Pudding Swamp Road.
I am sorry to say out mail from Manning is becoming more irregular. Mr Editor, what can be done to remedy this trouble, and whose fault is it?
It is disgusting to think our Governor can scarcely make an appointment or a removal without criticism or probably taken through the courts, but it will not hurt them so much when they get used to it.
We have had a good deal of sickness. SAM TATTLER"[39]

N R McKenzie was chosen for Petit Jury from Sandy Grove. [40]

1892

"Sandy Grove, Jan. 10- Low cotton, no money and hard times no news, but it is the general topic of the day in this section. Times will be better in '96 when Ben Tillman is President.
Miss Kate Kennedy has just returned from a two weeks visit among relatives and friends on Black River.
The writer took as visit to the city and county of Georgetown last week, and we have no reason to complain of the storm compared with the losses there. Mrs McElveen, wife of Mr W H McElveen, is dead and the remains were interred at the family graveyard, near Hon. J W Kennedy's, yesterday. We learn her death resulted from cancer. Mrs McElveen was well-known and popular, and a large congregation attended her burial.
Mrs W D McFaddin has been quite sick with grip but is improving.
Mrs J F McFaddin is teaching the Oak Grove School.
We learn that some of our farmers are going to try a tobacco crop instead of cotton this year. We wish them success.
The health tolerably good. SAM TATTLER "[41]

A Directory was published of the National Farmers Alliance and Industrial Union. J W Kennedy of Sandy Grove is named as Doorkeeper. [42]

"One day last week two negroes, who were getting out shingles in Pudding Swamp, near Johnson's Crossing, met a peddler and pretended to buy some of his wares. The peddler opened his pack and began showing his goods, when one of the negroes slipped a razor and concealed it in his clothing. The Peddler seeing him demanded the razor or pay for it. The negroes became indignant and cursed and threatened violence to the peddler. The peddler finding himself in danger of bodily harm blew a whistle and two other peddlers who were near by responded to the alarm. As soon as his fellow peddlers came up he informs them of the difficulty and where the razor is. One of them stepped up to the darkey that had the razor and snatched the razor from him. This enraged the darker and he picked up a stick. One of the peddlers drew a pistol and at the sight of this the negroes broke and run. A little later one of the drakes procured a shot gun and followed the peddlers about a mile, but the peddlers went on without being over taken.
Hon J W Kennedy has been quite sick and has been so ever since the adjournment of the Legislature. SAM TATTLER"[43]

D H Welch was drawn as a petit juror for Sandy Grove.[44]

1894

"Robert Johnson, a colored man from the Sandy Grove section, was brought to Manning on Friday of last week to be examined for lunacy. The doctor pronounced him insane and he was turned over to the sheriff, who carried him to Columbia yesterday." [45]

Notice of members of the Board of Equalization states that W T Kennedy, R E Burgess, and W L Barrineau represent Sandy Grove. [46]

A notice that the Reform faction of Clarendon County are calling for a convention. J E Kennedy of Sandy Grove is listed as a delegate. [47]

"Sandy Grove, S.C., March 9, 1894.- Mr Editor: I would like to amend your suggestion for a convention for considering whether it would be best to call a State convention and to elect a delegate to represent us in Columbia. My amendment is: A committee of one from each club or township be selected to wait on, to confer, and bring out suitable men to represent us in the next Legislature. Let the office seek the man, not the man the office. I do not think that any true honest man that has the interests and wishes of the people at heart could object to the plan. This is a most important office, therefore we should exercise more discretion in the selection. we would like to hear from other portions of the county on the subject, and get their views.
We learn that a branch office of the Atlanta building and loan association has been organized at Lake City, which, if we understand the plan right, will be a blessing to that country. The directors are H H Singletary, J B Husbands, J M Matthews, J W Kennedy, G M Hicks, Elijah Nettles. They are soliciting all that will take stock.
The farmers of this section generally are behind with their farm work.
The health of the community is very good. SAM TATTLER" [48]

Sandy Grove citizen W H Thigpen was selected for Petit Jury. [49]

A list of forfeited property in Clarendon County was published which lists name, township, number of acres and the year it was forfeited. For Sandy Grove: Mrs. C Floyd, 150 acres, 1875; S J McKenzie, 82, 1875; Daniel Morris, 75 acres, 1884; S J McKenzie, 100 acres, 1884.[50]

Article discusses the county Democratic convention. W D Gamble is named as the Sandy Grove as member of the executive committee. [51]

1895

Called for Petit Jury from Sandy Grove were Daniel Mims and W. Nelson Coker. [52]

A notice of sale of land for delinquent taxes has the following listed for Sandy Grove: J D B Floyd, 120 acres; S M Floyd, 73 acres; M C Barfield, 32 acres. [53]

Primary Election managers for the Democratic primaries for Sandy Grove included S E McFaddin, L P Hardy, J P Gibbons, J C Baker.[54]

S M McKenzie was selected as Petit Juror for Sandy Grove. [55]

"Married last Wednesday at the residence of the bride's mother in Williamsburg, Mr Dozier Burgess, of Sandy Grove, and Miss Mattie Epps. The Rev. S E Bishop performed the ceremony." [56]


1896

W L Barrineau and S N Johnson were drawn to serve on the Grand Jury for Sandy Grove. Petit Jury members from the area were J E Kennedy, J M Mims, and S H Adams. [57]

"We learned the other day that a little son of Mr W N Coker, of the Sandy Grove section, was shot from ambush after dark, the shot taking effect in the leg. No reason was given for the shooting." " Rehoboth Sparks", The Manning Times, Feb 19, 1896, p. 3 </ref>

"Sandy Grove, March 6.-It is pretty hard to make something out of nothing, and that is what I am trying to do just now. I think editors must have a very hard time when news is scarce.
Has it or when will the Legislature adjourn, and what have they done or what are they doing for the benefit of we poor farmers? Why do they not repeal the lien law, which is virtually dead? Some our largest businessmen say that they would not turn on their heel for a lien without other security.
Why do not the General Assembly pass an act compelling professional drummers to pay a license as they do other agents who are selling by sample, for instance the book agent, or else set them all free. They should not discriminate.
We learn that there will be five candidates for sheriff in Williamsburg this year and seven candidates for the same office in Sumter County. It must be a very desirable position.
Mr J Muldrow Kennedy, of this section, is quite ill and has been for some time. Dr Woods is attending him. We hope he will soon recover.
We understand Hardee Brothers, near New Zion, are going to plant thirty acres of tobacco this year. There will be a good more tobacco planted in Salem this year than last.
Messrs. Alex Tilton and Capers Eaddy, two prominent farmers of Williamsburg, spent last night with us on their way home from Manning, where they had been to purchase stock.
The general health of the community is good. SAM TATTLER" [58]


A list of all the Civil War Class C pensioners was published. From Sandy Grove, listed as a veteran is T G Roberson and listed as a widow is M M Johnson.[59]


"We regret to learn that Mr John J McFaddin, of Sandy Grove, is getting very feeble. The old gentleman has a host of friends on his side who will ever remember his genial and open-hearted hospitality." The Manning Times, Jul 15, 1896, p. 3 </ref>


"Seloc, July 10.-The time for curing tobacco has come. We are now at our barns. Mr J C Burton of Ridegville, N C, the gentleman that cured for some of us last yea, came in the first day of July to cure for us again this year. He proved faithful last year and we made him ruler again this year.
We have fine seasons. Crops are looking fine.
There was a big time at Bethel Presbyterian Church in Sandy Grove the 4th instant. Pretty girls, fine rations, and lemonade was the order of the day. Candidates were plentiful but the most of them were for matrimony. I would like to go there again. [60]


"Sandy Grove, July 10, 1896.-We are having nice rains. Crops are looking well. Curing tobacco is the order of the day in Salem.
Mrs Maggie Buckles, of Williamsburg, aged seventy-two years, was laid to rest the johnson burial ground last Sunday.
The candidates are moving around among us within the last few days and they all seem hopeful. We wish them success, but all of them cannot win that is certain. Wonder who the candidate we saw last , but then we might be tattling too much, as we infer we have already done judging from the reference to a paragraph in our last. If there was anything objectionable in that paragraph we beg pardon. Well, we compelled to say that there is more back-stabbing, mud-slinging, and dirty insinuations being used this year than ever before, and we do not charge it all to candidates either; we hope the people of Clarendon will not give ear or countenance to such tactics to catch votes. Hurrah for Bryan and Sewall
SAM TATTLER" [61]


"Editor Times:-We have but little news except sickness and deaths. We regret to pen the death of Mrs Wheeler from paralysis, wife of Mr Robert Wheeler, of Sardinia. Mrs Wheeler was a highly respected lady and leaves many friends to mourn her loss.
Miss Ella DuBose, daughter of Mr & Mrs B L DuBose, of New Zion, after a long and sever illness of typhoid malarial fever, died last Friday. Miss DuBose was consigned to her last resting place at Shiloh Cemetery. The funeral services were conducted by the Rev J W Kenney.
Mr Daniel Driggers, a venerable old gentleman of this section, has suffered for some time from heart trouble. He passed away on last Saturday morning. Mr Driggers was a man noted for his honesty and industry, and liked generally, judging from the number in attendance at his interment, it was estimated that a hundred and fifty persons were present. He leaves a host of relatives and friends to mourn his loss.
Mr William Gary, of the Hebron section, is quite ill with typhoid malarial fever, but is thought to be improving a little.
Mr & Mrs S F Curry are visiting relatives and friends in Florence County.
Farmers are busy gathering cotton, nice weather for it.
SAM TATTLER. Sandy Grove, SC, Sept 16, 1896." [62]

T R Roberson and W N Roberson were drawn to serve on the Petit Jury for Sandy Grove. [63]

W T Kennedy, R R McFaddin and W H Curry were appointed Managers of Election for State and County Officers at Barrineaus.
W H Thigpen, E G Barrineau, and D H Welch were appointed to manage the elctions at Barrineaus. [64]

"Died at his home, in Sandy Grove, last Saturday, Mr John J McFaddin, aged about eighty-five years. The deceased was a very prominent man, well known throughout this county, and under his roof, every man who entered public life was entertained. He was kind, open-hearted and generous, and always a gentleman of the old school." [65]


1897

"Sandy Grove, Januery 28:-I thought I would again try to gather a few items for your paper. They should not find their way to the waste basket. The news of the day in Sandy Grove is sickness and deaths; in the last few weeks there have been five deaths in the small territory of Sandy Grove. The dead are : Mr W J Floyd and son. Mrs M D Floyd and son. And Mrs T P Odom. The eldest daughter of the late W J Floyd is very ill. Mr Rush McKenzie is quite sick. Capt. W D McFaddin and three other members of his family are very ill. Mrs Margaret Johnson is also quite ill. Mrs W W Kennedy and little son are slowly improving. With but few exceptions the trouble has been grippe or pneumonia.
We have just had the coldest wave of the winter, Our thermometer registered as low as 15 in the open air.
Gov Ellerbe's inauguaral address has the right ring and proves him to be a man of marked ability. It seems that the legislature is trying to legislate the very hammer off of the pistols.
Mr Editor, please tell us when the legislature adjourns, how many new counties are there being formed so fast. We hardly can keep up with them-Cherokee, Saluda, Bamberg, Dorchester and the Lord knows how many by the close of the session.
Well, we saw all the newly elected county officers have at last, succeeded in giving bond.
We would have been more than glad to have attended the Teacher's Association today, hadit been so that we could, but on account of sickness we cannot be there. We wish it much success and will try and attend next time.
SAM TATTLER" [66]


W T Kennedy was selected to serve on the Petit Jury for Sandy Grove. [67]


"Sergeant David H Welsh (Welch) of Company E, First Regiment of SC Artillery during the late war was in town a day or two since and has entrusted the custody of this flag which was presented to him just after the surrender by the officers of his regiment "For conspicuous Bravery"- to Mr T E Richardson to take down to Charleston and turn it over to the city authorities for safe keeping alongside of "The Silk Regimental Flag" and "Beauregard's Sword".
Sergeant Welsh is now sixty-three years of age, and as full of vim and fire as he was when the battle of Bentonville took place in March 1865. He lives near Sandy Grove P.O., in Clarendon County, and has raised three sons and eleven daughters.
The flag in question is a Confederate flag of 1864, type." [68]

W T Kennedy, J M Mims, and T E Burgess were selected by the Governor to serve as Township Commissioners for Sandy Grove. [69]


"We still have plenty of rain. Almost every tobacco planter has good stands this year in this section. Farmers are still behind with their crops. Some have planted no corn, some few are through planting corn.
The young men have organized a debating society at the school house near Mr A J Morris's with Mr J L Barrow as president and secretary, and Mr A J Morris chaplain. The querry for the next meeting is, "Resolved, that the Public Highways be worked by Taxation." The introductory speakers are: Affirmative, E W H Baker; Negative, W H Curry.
We hear that a Salem man says that if each lie would sink an inch of ground, there had been enough lies told him within the last three months to sink ten acres of land. Somebody must be in full practice.
We learn that Mr Rush McKenzie, who was operated on some time ago by his physicians, is improving and able to walk about.
Mr Editor, we would like to ask why the 1895 delinquent tax-payers go scot free, and no executions last year, what is wrong?
We have heard but very little said about the vacancy in the Senate and know not what the sentiment over here is. As for ourself, we would like to be represented in the Senate, but don't want to pay to dear for the whistle. Why not elect him in convention as we did Senator Ragin to fill Senator DesChamps's unexpired term and save so much expense.
SAM TATTLER" [70]

J R McKenzie was selected to serve jury duty for Sandy Grove. [71]

The following delinquent tax sales were announced: S M Godwin, 9 acres, '95-96; S C Johnson, 210 acres, '95-96. [72]


Militia Enrollments of 1869

18 to 30 Years of Age

William Barrino, 25, farmer, w
E Barrino, 23, farmer, w
Edwin Barrino, 24, farmer, w

T E Burgess, 21, farmer, w
R E Burgess, 18, farmer, w

P I J Coker, 28, farmer, w

M D Floyd, 21, farmer, w

J D Gowdy, 18, farmer, w

W T Kennedy, 22, farmer, w
J D Kennedy, 21, farmer, w

Wash McFadden, 25, farmer, c
W D McFadden, 25, farmer, c

N R McKenzie, 20, farmer, c

Henry Middleton, 18, farmer, c

P W Mims, 25, farmer, w

Isham Montgomery, 25, farmer, c

F D Robinson, 26, farmer, w
H E Robinson, 25, farmer, w

Lawrence Rose, 21, farmer, c

W H Thigpen, 26, farmer, w
S C Thigpen, 19, farmer, w

Hosea Weaver, 18, farmer,w
W D Weaver, 22, farmer, w


30 to 45 Years of Age

Henry Barrino, 35, farmer, w

Robert Burgess, 35, farmer, w
James Burgess, 35, farmer, c

C S Land, 35, farmer, w

Hyman McElveen, 40, farmer, c
J E McElveen, 32, farmer, w

P McFadden, 39, farmer, c
Anzi McFadden, 30, farmer, c
John McFadden, 40, mechanic, c

Bob Rose, 38, farmer, c
Hacker Rose, 30, farmer, c

J T Weaver, 32, farmer, w
J M Weaver, 33, clergy, w


Families in Census Records

1860 Census

During the 1860 Census, all of Clarendon County was counted on one sheet. Though the instructions for that year say to separate townships by a few blank lines, the census takers did not apparently do this. I am using the 1870 where there is a clear distinction for Sandy Grove to try to determine which families were in Sandy in 1860. While the census taker did write Sandy Grove as the township on 5 pages they were interspersed throughout.

Click here to see all families in this census


1860 Slave Holders

Burgess

According to the 1860 Census slave schedules, Jno A Burgess had 51 slaves and 9 slave houses. They are listed as such:
Male, 60 years old
Male, 30 years old
Male, 28 years old
Female, 26 years old
Male, 35 years old
Female, 10 years old
Female, 8 years old
Female, 4 years old
Male, 15 years old
Male, 13 years old
Female, 11 years old
Female, 1 years old
Female, 45 years old
Female, 22 years old
Male, 15 years old
Male, 28 years old
Male, 15 years old
Male, 13 years old
Female, 11 years old
Female, 30 years old
Male, 11 years old
Female, 30 years old
Female, 10 years old
Female, 9 years old
Female, 9 years old
Male, 9 years old
Female, 8 years old
Male, 7 years old
Female, 7 years old
Male, 7 years old
Female, 4 years old
Male, 4 years old
Female, 4 years old
Male, 1 years old
Female, 4 years old
Female, 28 years old
Female, 24 years old
Female, 11 years old
Male, 7 years old
Female, 40 years old
Male, 12 years old
Male, 7 years old
Male, 5 years old
Female, 10 years old
Male, 3 years old
Female, 60 years old
Female, 45 years old
Female, 89 years old
Female, 56 years old
Male, 27 years old
Female, 19 years old

S A Burgess is recorded as having 63 slave and 8 slave houses. They are listed as such:
Male, 90 years old
Male, 59 years old
Male, 57 years old
Male, 40 years old
Male, 35 years old
Male, 37 years old
Female, 80 years old
Female, 30 years old
Male, 21 years old
Female, 18 years old
Female, 13 years old
Female, 13 years old
Female, 60 years old
Male, 30 years old
Male, 39 years old
Male, 30 years old
Female, 32 years old
Male, 26 years old
Male, 19 years old
Female, 13 years old
Female, 60 years old
Male, 20 years old
Female, 19 years old
Female, 40 years old
Male, 28 years old
Female, 26 years old
Female, 13 years old
Male, 12 years old
Female, 50 years old
Female, 27 years old
Male, 25 years old
Female, 20 years old
Female, 18 years old
Female, 15 years old
Female, 14 years old
Female, 10 years old
Male, 10 years old
Female, 10 years old
Female, 9 years old
Female, 9 years old
Male, 9 years old
Female, 9 years old
Female, 9 years old
Female, 9 years old
Female, 9 years old
Female, 9 years old
Female, 8 years old
Female, 8 years old
Male, 8 years old
Male, 7 years old
Male, 7 years old
Female, 7 years old
Male, 7 years old
Female, 6 years old
Male, 6 years old
Male, 5 years old
Female, 5 years old
Male, 4 years old
Male, 2 years old
Male, 1 years old
Male, 1 years old
Male, 6/12 years old
Female, 60 years old
Female, 3 years old

Floyd

Jessee Floyd is listed as employing 2 slaves owned by Jno Smith. They are a 19 year old female and a 2 year old male who is listed as M under color.

Johnson

According to the 1860 Census slave schedules, Blarny(?) Johnson had 16 slaves and 3 slave houses. They are listed as such:
Male, 70 years old
Female, 28 years old
Female, 27 years old
Female, 26 years old
Female, 16 years old
Female, 3 years old
Male, 20 years old
Male, 18 years old
Male, 16 years old
Female, 7 years old
Female, 6 years old
Female, 4 years old
Male, 1 years old
Male, 7 years old
Male, 5 years old
Male, 2 years old

According to the 1860 Census slave schedules, Jno H Johnson & two others had 15 slaves and 2 slave houses. They are listed as such:
Male, 60 years old
Male, 32 years old
Female, 30 years old
Female, 24 years old
Male, 15 years old
Female, 13 years old
Male, 10 years old
Female, 9 years old
Female, 7 years old
Female, 6 years old
Male, 5 years old
Female, 4 years old
Female, 3 years old
Male, 2 years old
Female, 4/12 years old

According to the 1860 Census slave schedules, Jno H Johnson for six others had 2 slaves and 1 slave houses. They are listed as such:
Male, 28 years old
Female, 14 years old

McElveen

According to the 1860 Census slave schedules, J E McElveen had 7 slaves and 3 slave houses. They are listed as such:
Female, 50 years old
Male, 35 years old
Female, 23 years old
Male,6 years old
Female, 5 years old
Male, 3 years old
Male, 1 years old

Also listed are the following slaves. Next to them it says Martha Epps, Owner and J E McElveen employer: Female, 50 years old
Female, 15 years old
Male, 11 years old
Male, 9 years old
Female, 5 years old
Male, 4 years old
Male, 2 years old

McFadden

According to the 1860 Census slave schedules, Jno J McFadden had 54 slaves and 13 slave houses. They are listed as such:
Male, 70 years old
Female, 55 years old
Female, 20 years old
Female, 18 years old
Male, 15 years old
Male, 12 years old
Male, 2 years old
Female, 35 years old
Male, 33 years old
Male, 18 years old
Female, 16 years old
Female, 14 years old (color listed as M)
Female, 13 years old
Male, 11 years old
Male, 9 years old
Male, 7 years old
Male, 5 years old
Male, 3 years old
Female, 3/12 years old
Male, 29 years old
Female, 26 years old
Male, 12 years old
Male, 8 years old
Male, 6 years old
Female, 4 years old
Male, 2 years old
Male, 4/12 years old
Female, 45 years old
Male, 29 years old
Female, 25 years old
Female, 5 years old
Female, 2 years old
Male, 65 years old
Female, 38 years old
Male, 26 years old
Female, 45 years old
Male, 25 years old
Male, 33 years old
Female, 28 years old
Male, 55 years old
Female, 33 years old
Male, 40 years old
Female, 30 years old
Female, 20 years old (Color listed as M)
Male, 16 years old
Female, 13 years old
Male, 13 years old
Male, 11 years old(Color listed as M)
Male, 7 years old
Female, 7 years old
Male, 5 years old
Male, 3 years old
Male, 1 years old
Male, 28 years old

McIntosh

According to the 1860 Census slave schedules, H L McIntosh had 6 slaves and 3 slave houses. They are listed as such:
Male, 55 years old
Male, 28 years old
2 Female, 18 years old
Female, 16 years old
Male, 6/12 years old

McKensie

M McKensie is listed as employing a slave that is owned by D Epps. The slave is a 17 year old female.

Samuel McKensie is listed as having one slave and one slave house. The slave is a 55 year old male.

According to the 1860 Census slave schedules, Elizabeth McKensie had 28 slaves and 1 slave house. They are listed as such:
Female, 37 years old
Female, 16 years old
Female, 14 years old
Male, 11 years old (Color listed as M)
Female, 7 years old
Female, 5 years old
Male, 3 years old
Female, 2/12 years old

Rose

According to the 1860 Census slave schedules, S F Rose had 28 slaves and 8 slave houses. They are listed as such:
Male, 40 years old
Female, 40 years old
Male, 18 years old
Male, 17 years old
Female, 16 years old
Male, 15 years old
Male, 14 years old
Male, 13 years old
Male, 12 years old
Female, 11 years old
Male, 8 years old
Female, 1 years old
Male, 1 years old
Female, 26 years old
Male, 3 years old
Female, 39 years old
Male, 18 years old
Female, 21 years old
Female, 4 years old
Male, 3 years old
Male, 3/12 years old
Female, 40 years old
Female, 12 years old
Male, 11 years old
Female, 30 years old
Male, 27 years old
Female, 8 years old
Male, 26 years old
Male, 3 years old

Also listed as employed by S F Rose, Owned by W T Rose: Female, 20 years old
Male, 6/12 years old

Thigpen

According to the 1860 Census slave schedules, Hugh Thigpen had 9 slaves and 2 slave houses. They are listed as such:
Female, 30 years old
Female, 20 years old
Female, 16 years old
Male, 15 years old
Female, 13 years old
Male, 13 years old
Female, 4 years old
Female, 2 years old
Male, 7/12 years old

1870 Census

This census was very hard to read the handwriting. I have done my best, but if you see family that you know is not correct, please correct it. Also, I think the census taker may have not followed the directions. Its possible he marked people who could read and write as not being able to. The reason I question this is that he marked a physician as unable to read and write which seems unlikely.

Click here to see families in the 1870 Census


1880 Census

Click here to see families from the 1880 Census

1900 Census

Click here to see families from the 1900 Census

Sources

  1. Record of Appointment of Postmasters, 1832-1971. NARA Microfilm Publication, M841, 145 rolls. Records of the Post Office Department, Record Group Number 28. Washington, D.C.: National Archives.
  2. "Post Office Operations", The Charleston Courier, May 10, 1852, p. 2
  3. "Mail Facilities", The Charleston Courier, Jul 17, 1858, p. 1
  4. "The County Convention", The Manning Times, Aug. 4, 1886, p. 2
  5. "Proceedings of County Executive Committee", The Manning Times, Aug. 25, 1886, p. 3
  6. "County Affairs", The Manning Times, Feb. 9, 1887, p. 3
  7. The Manning Times, Apr. 6, 1887, p. 3
  8. "Democratic County Convention", The Manning Times, May 16, 1888, p. 2
  9. The Manning Times, Sep 12, 1888, p. 3
  10. "Petit Jury- May Term", The Manning Times, May 8, 1889, p. 2
  11. "Abstract of Real Property of Clarendon County", The Manning Times, Jun 5, 1889, p. 3
  12. "Petit Jury- October Term", The Manning Times, Oct 9, 1889, p. 2
  13. The Manning Times, Oct 16, 1889, p. 5
  14. "Delinquent Tax Sales", The Manning Times, Oct 16, 1889, p. 3
  15. "Clarendon County Farmer's Alliance Directory", The Manning Times, Jan 22, 1890, p. 2
  16. "The Jury", The Manning Times, Feb 5, 1890, p. 2
  17. "Transfers of Real Estate", The Manning Times, Feb 12, 1890, p. 2
  18. "Transfers of Real Estate", The Manning Times, Apr 16, 1890, p. 2
  19. "News from Pudding Swamp", The Manning Times, May 14, 1890, p. 2
  20. "Petit Jury", The Manning Times, May 14, 1890, p. 2
  21. "News from Pudding Swamp", The Manning Times, Jun 4, 1890, p. 3
  22. "Clarendon Politics", The Manning Times, Jun 4, 1890, p. 2
  23. "Pudding Swamp is for Tillman", The Manning Times, Jul 16, 1890, p. 3
  24. "Picnic and Politics in Salem", The Manning Times, Jul 23, 1890, p. 3
  25. Thomas, F N, "Tillman Clubs. Sandy Grove", The Manning Times, Jul 23, 1890, p. 2
  26. "Haskellism in Clarendon", The Manning Times, Oct 15, 1890, p. 2
  27. "Delinquent Land Sales", The Manning Times, Oct 29, 1890, p. 3
  28. "Dots from Sandy Grove", The Manning Times, Nov 12, 1890, p. 3
  29. "Items from Sandy Grove", The Manning Times, Jan 21, 1891, p. 3
  30. "The Jury", The Manning Times, Feb 4, 1891, p. 3
  31. "Letter from Midway", The Manning Times, Feb 25, 1891, p. 3
  32. "County Board of Equalization", The Manning Times, Mar 11, 1891, p. 2
  33. "Sandy Grove Items", The Manning Times, Mar 18, 1891, p. 4
  34. "News from Sandy Grove", The Manning Times, Apr 1, 1891, p. 4
  35. "News from Sandy Grove", The Manning Times, May 6, 1891, p. 3
  36. "Petit Jury", The Manning Times, May 13, 1891, p. 3
  37. "Sayings from Sandy Grove", The Manning Times, May 20, 1891, p. 3
  38. "Our Population", The Manning Times, Jun 24, 1891, p. 2
  39. "Grains from Sandy Grove", The Manning Times, Jul 29, 1891, p. 3
  40. "Petit Jury for October Court", The Manning Times, Sep 30, 1891, p.7
  41. "Salem News", The Manning Times, Jan 10, 1892, p. 3
  42. "Official Directory of the National Farmers' Alliance and Industrial Union", The Keowee Courier, Jan 14, 1892, p. 4
  43. "Sandy Grove News", The Manning Times, Jan 24, 1892, p. 3
  44. "Court", The Manning Times, Feb 7, 1892, p. 2
  45. "Your Name in Print", The Manning Times, Feb 14, 1894, p. 3
  46. "Board of Equalization", The Manning Times, Mar 7, 1894, p. 2
  47. "Call for Convention", The Manning Times, Mar 14, 1894, p. 2
  48. "Sandy Grove News", The Manning Times, Mar 14, 1894, p. 3
  49. "Petit Jury", The Manning Times, Mar 16, 1894, p. 3
  50. "Forfeited Lands in Clarendon County", The Manning Times, Jul 4, 1894, p. 3
  51. "County Convention", The Manning Times, Aug 8, 1894, p. 3
  52. "Petit Jury", The Manning Times, May 22, 1895, p. 3
  53. "Notice of Sale of Delinquent Land for Taxes", The Manning Times, Jul 17, 1895, p. 2
  54. "Primary Election Managers", The Manning Times, Jul 24, 1895, p. 2
  55. "Petit Jury", The Manning Times, Spe 25, 1895, p. 2
  56. "Your Name in Print", The Manning Times, Dec 18, 1895, p. 3
  57. " Jury List", The Manning Times, Feb 5, 1896, p. 3
  58. "Sandy Grove Siftings", The Manning Times, Mar 11, 1896, p. 2
  59. "Warriors and Widows.A Patriotic List of the Class "C" State Pensioners", The State, Jul 7, 1896, p. 6
  60. "Seloc Selections", The Manning Times, Jul 15, 1896, p. 3
  61. "Sandy Grove Siftings", The Manning Times, Jul 29, 1896, p. 3
  62. "Sandy Grove Siftings", The Manning Times, Sep 16, 1896, p. 2
  63. " Petit Jurors", The Manning Times, Oct 7, 1896, p. 4
  64. " Notice of Election", The Manning Times, Oct 14, 1896, p. 2
  65. The Manning Times, Nov 25, 1896, p. 4
  66. "Sandy Grove Siftings", The Manning Times, Feb 3, 1897, p. 2
  67. " Petit Jury", The Manning Times, Feb 10, 1897, p. 2
  68. The Watchman & Southron, Feb 17 16, 1897, p. 5
  69. " Township Commissioners", The Manning Times, Mar 17, 1897, p. 3
  70. "Dots from Sandy Grove", The Manning Times, Apr 7, 1897, p. 2
  71. " Court", The Manning Times, May 19, 1897, p. 3
  72. "Delinquent Tax Sale", The Manning Times, May 26, 1897, p. 3
  • Year: 1860; Census Place: Clarendon, Clarendon, South Carolina; Roll: M653_1217; Page: 190; Family History Library Film: 805217
  • Ancestry.com. 1860 U.S. Federal Census - Slave Schedules [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010.
  • Year: 1870; Census Place: Sandy Grove, Clarendon, South Carolina; Roll: M593_1491; Page: 517A; Image: 21287; Family History Library Film: 552990
  • Edgefield Advertiser, Edgefield, South Carolina, Wednesday, January 19, 1859
  • Record of Appointment of Postmasters, 1832-1971. NARA Microfilm Publication, M841, 145 rolls. Records of the Post Office Department, Record Group Number 28. Washington, D.C.: National Archives.
  • Thomas E Burgess Obituary, Florence Morning News, 22 Sep 1932, Thu, Page 2
  • Militia Enrollments of Men Between the Ages of 18 and 30 for Clarendon County, Sandy Grove, 1869. Accessed on the South Carolina Archives Online Database.
  • Militia Enrollments of Men Between the Ages of 30 and 45 for Clarendon County, Sandy Grove, 1869. Accessed on the South Carolina Archives Online Database.




Images: 8
Sandy Grove, Clarendon County, South Carolina Image 1
Sandy Grove, Clarendon County, South Carolina Image 1

Clarendon County Enumeration Map from 1900
Clarendon County Enumeration Map from 1900

1940 Clarendon County Enumeration Map
1940 Clarendon County Enumeration Map

McElveen Cemetery
McElveen Cemetery

McFadden Cemetery
McFadden Cemetery

view all


Collaboration