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St Luke's Anglican Churchyard Free Space page

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Date: 1874
Location: 704 New North Road, Mt Albert, Auckland, New Zealandmap
Surnames/tags: Cemeteries New_Zealand
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St Luke's Churchyard

St Luke's has a small churchyard cemetery on its grounds, with most of the interments behind the church in a small lower section of the property. A list of the earliest interments can be accessed free of charge at Auckland War Memorial Museum (for information on this see Register of Burials at St Lukes Anglican 1874-1898). Original registers are held by the Archivist, Anglican Diocesan Office, Parnell, Auckland. "These entries include burials at Waikumete, Hillsborough, Avondale, Waikaraka, Purewa, Birkenhead, O'Neill's Point, Mangere, Symonds Street, Panmure, Otahuhu, Swanson and other country areas." Note: an appointment must be made to access the registers held by the Anglican Diocesan Office.

St Luke's Anglican Church is on the site legally described as Pt Allot 170 Parish of Waitemata,Pt Lot 85 DP 384. The church building was in 1872 by Pierre Finch Martineau Burrows. Burrows was born in Norwich, England, and arrived in New Zealand about 1863. He began working under W H Clayton in the Colonial Architect's Office in 1874 and became Chief Draughtsman in 1875. When Clayton died, Burrows took over his duties, but he did not receive a designation of Colonial Architect. When plans for an Anglican church for Mt Albert were first conceived in March 1872, the donor of the church land, Alan Kerr-Taylor (Alberton House), estimated there would be 25 families who would frequent it. The church building dedicated to St Luke on 29 September 1872, which now has a Heritage New Zealand ‘Historic Place Category 2’ listing, soon outgrew its capacity.

Mt Albert became a Parish separate from Holy Sepulchre in 1881, when The Rev'd John Haselden was instituted as St Luke’s first Vicar. The second Vicar, The Rev'd John King Davis, was grandson of John and Hannah King, two of the first six CMS missionaries to New Zealand in 1815. Davis served from 1886 to 1889, by which time regular Sunday attendance was 69 in the morning and 63 in the evening.

Extensions to the building were required. Edward Bartley, Architect to the Anglican Diocese of Auckland, designed the additions in 1883, and this more than doubled the capacity of the church from 60 to 150. The interior of the church also had a refit when the building was extended. The completed interior is said to be similar to the original Church of St Andrew Epsom building, which was designed by The Rev'd Dr John Kinder in 1867 with architectural assistance from Reader Wood.

On the slopes and in the hollow behind the church is the graveyard, consecrated in 1883, now closed to burials, but still open for ashes plots. Bishop Cowie consecrated the church and graveyard on 8 May 1883. He dedicated a new stone font on 14 September 1884. Buried here are past parishioners and clergy who served the parish over their lives. These include members of the Kerr-Taylor family, and St Luke’s first and second vicars, Haselden and Davis, and their wives, and also Davis’s mother and two infant children, who were laid to rest there during his time as Vicar.

The graveyard carpark is accessible from St Lukes Road and provides sealed parking at the rear of the church. There is street parking on New North Road, but this is subject to clearway times.

LOCATION
The carpark is at 3 Atawhai Lane, Mount Albert, Auckland, New Zealand, however the street address and main entrance for the church is 704 New North Road, Mt Albert, Auckland, New Zealand.

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