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Taking and concealing a beehive

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Date: 18 Jun 1783 to 15 Oct 1783
Location: Pasquotank County, North Carolina, United Statesmap
Surname/tag: Trueblood
This page has been accessed 87 times.

On the 18th of June, 1783, a complaint concerning a beehive was made to the monthly meeting in Pasquotank County, North Carolina. John, Benjamin and Caleb Trueblood were accused of taking and concealing the beehive. The immediate question is who are the three Truebloods involved. The Truebloods are a very large family that settled in Pasquotank County late in the 17th century (1680's). The founder of the family was John Trueblood. He had two sons, John Trueblood and Amos Trueblood. Neither were alive at the time of the taking of the beehive. Members of both the third and fourth generation were alive at the time of the taking and concealing of the beehive.

Examining the Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy,[1] we find six candidates, Benjamin Trueblood, son of Abel, son of Amos, John Trueblood, son of Josiah, son of Amos, John Trueblood, son of Daniel, son of John, Caleb Trueblood, son of Josiah, son of Amos, Caleb Trueblood, son of Abel, son of Amos, and Caleb Trueblood, son of Amos.

  • As there is a single candidate for Benjamin, he will be used as an anchor. With respect to Benjamin, John, son of Josiah is a first cousin, John, son of Daniel is a second cousin, Caleb, son Josiah, is a first cousin, Caleb, son of Abel, is a brother and finally, Caleb, son of Amos, is an uncle.
  • With regard to the two candidates for John, the minutes of the monthly meeting were this misconduct was first reported (18 Jun 1783) it is noted that John Trueblood had recently been appointed overseer (previous monthly meeting) and that he was "displaced" from that position. John Trueblood appeared at the meeting with a written statement acknowledging and condemning his misconduct, which was not accepted. The first candidate, Benjamin's first cousin, John Trueblood, son of Josiah, is 19 1/2 years old and unmarried. Both of these facts disqualifies him from an overseer's position. On the other hand Benjamin's second cousin. John Trueblood, son of Daniel, son of John, is 25 years old, has been married for five years, he already has two children with another on the way and is an ideal candidate for the position. It is concluded that the John in question is Benjamin's second cousin, John Trueblood, son of Daniel, son of John.
  • Of the three candidates for Caleb, Benjamin's uncle Caleb Trueblood, son of Amos is the least likely. He is fifty one years of age, twice the age of the other two culprits. If he had been involved he would have been seen as the instigator and this is not consistent with the action of the meeting, which continually postponed action with regard to his case until the October monthly meeting. In addition, the minutes refer to Caleb as junior and this Caleb is senior to the other two candidates. Benjamin and his first cousin, Caleb Trueblood, son of Josiah, son of Amos, are approximately the same age and would appear to have the same level of culpability, and thus, one would expect them to be dealt with simultaneously. On the other hand if the third culprit was Benjamin's brother, Caleb Trueblood, son of Abel, son of Amos, who is six years younger at the age of nineteen, one might expect more leniency from the meeting. This is seen in that the meeting postpones Caleb's case despite his not being present. It should be noted that case of Caleb was not dealt with until after Benjamin's case was concluded. From this it is concluded that the Caleb of this adventure is in fact Benjamin's younger brother Caleb, son of Abel. Furthermore, at the age of nineteen it is unlikely that Caleb had ever attended a monthly meeting.

Thus, it is concluded that John Trueblood, son of Daniel, son of John, Benjamin Trueblood, son of Abel, son of Amos, and Caleb Trueblood, son of Abel, son of Amos were the culprits in this ill-advised adventure. This identification are certain for Benjamin and John Trueblood. Additional evidence for the participation of Caleb son of Abel would be nice.


Transcripts of the relevant minutes

Meeting # 930[2] 18 Jun 1783

  • "There was a complaint brought against John Trueblood, for assisting in taking and concealing a bee hive, He being lately appointed overseer, this meeting agrees to displace him from that station. He appeared and offer a paper of acknowledgement and condemnation, but friends not being satisfied therein with, his case is referred to the next monthly meeting. Also complaints (were) brought against Benjamin Trueblood and Caleb Trueblood, junior, for assisting in taking and concealing a bee hive, thus their case is referred to the next monthly meeting."

Meeting # 931[3] 16 Jul 1783

  • "The case of John Trueblood coming under consideration, but Friends not being satisfied with his condemnation, it is refereed to the next monthly meeting. The case of Benjamin and Caleb Trueblood is referred to the next monthly meeting."

Meeting # 932[4] 20 Aug 1783

  • "The case of John Trueblood coming under consideration, he appeared and acknowledged and condemned his misconduct to the satisfaction of the meeting. The case of Benjamin Trueblood coming under consideration, it appearing that the matter is not yet settled, therefore it is referred to the next monthly meeting. Caleb Trueblood, junior, not being present, his case is referred to the next monthly meeting."

Meeting # 933[5] 17 Sep 1783

  • "The case of Benjamin Trueblood coming under consideration, he appeared, acknowledged and condemned his misconduct to the satisfaction of the meeting. Caleb Trueblood, junior, not being present, his case is referred to the next monthly meeting. Benjamin Morris and Nathan Symons are appointed to discourse with him and to report to the next monthly meeting."

Meeting # 934[6] 15 Oct 1783

  • "Friends appointed to discourse with Caleb Trueblood, junior, report that they have done so, he appeared, acknowledged and condemned his misconduct to the satisfaction of the meeting."


Research Note For those of you who have not moved a beehive, it is not that difficult (if you know what you are doing). I have done it once with a friend who has worked bees for over 50 years. We arrive early in the morning, at dawn, the bees had not emerged from hive. We sealed the hive, and then the two of us lifted it into the back of a pickup, and off we went. Having moved the hive to its new location, we unsealed it and the bees went about their business in the new location.

Bee swarms are even easier. When the bees leave their hive to swarm they fill their gut with honey, so much honey that they are unable to sting you. I have watched my friend walk up to a swarm pick it up and put it in a box; the trick being to get the queen in the box and then the rest of the bees will follow her in and you can close the box and transport the swarm to a new location. (If the swarm is "old," having left the hive a long time ago, then the bees will have consumed some of the honey and they will be able to sting you and the problem is more difficult).

Sources

  1. Hinshaw, William Wade, et al., compilers. Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy. 6 vols. 1936–1950. Reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1991–1994. Hinshaw, William Wade. Marshall, Thomas Worth, comp. Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy. Supplement to Volume 1. Washington, D.C.: n.p. 1948.
  2. Religious Society of Friends, Pasquotank Monthly Meeting (Pasquotank, County, North Carolina), "Men's Minutes, 1699 - 1785," meeting 930, page 751, 18 Jun 1783, John Trueblood, Benjamin Trueblood, Caleb Trueblood, Guilford College, Greensboro, North Carolina; "U.S., Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935," digital images, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : 3 Dec 2019), North Carolina> Pasquotank> Symons Creek Monthly Meeting> Minutes, 1699-1786, image 384 of 411.
  3. Religious Society of Friends, Pasquotank Monthly Meeting (Pasquotank, County, North Carolina), "Men's Minutes, 1699 - 1785," meeting 931, page 752, 16 Jul 1783, John Trueblood, Benjamin Trueblood, Caleb Trueblood, Guilford College, Greensboro, North Carolina; "U.S., Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935," digital images, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : 3 Dec 2019), North Carolina> Pasquotank> Symons Creek Monthly Meeting> Minutes, 1699-1786, image 385 of 411.
  4. Religious Society of Friends, Pasquotank Monthly Meeting (Pasquotank, County, North Carolina), "Men's Minutes, 1699 - 1785," meeting 932, page 754, 18 Jun 1783, John Trueblood, Benjamin Trueblood, Caleb Trueblood, Guilford College, Greensboro, North Carolina; "U.S., Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935," digital images, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : 3 Dec 2019), North Carolina> Pasquotank> Symons Creek Monthly Meeting> Minutes, 1699-1786, image 386 of 411.
  5. Religious Society of Friends, Pasquotank Monthly Meeting (Pasquotank, County, North Carolina), "Men's Minutes, 1699 - 1785," meeting 933, page 758, 17 Sep 1783, Benjamin Trueblood, Caleb Trueblood, Guilford College, Greensboro, North Carolina; "U.S., Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935," digital images, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : 3 Dec 2019), North Carolina> Pasquotank> Symons Creek Monthly Meeting> Minutes, 1699-1786, image 388 of 411.
  6. Religious Society of Friends, Pasquotank Monthly Meeting (Pasquotank, County, North Carolina), "Men's Minutes, 1699 - 1785," meeting 934, page 760, 15 Oct 1783, Caleb Trueblood, Guilford College, Greensboro, North Carolina; "U.S., Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935," digital images, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : 3 Dec 2019), North Carolina> Pasquotank> Symons Creek Monthly Meeting> Minutes, 1699-1786, image 389 of 411.

Also see:

  • Hinshaw, William Wade, et al., compilers. Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy. 6 vols. 1936–1950. Reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1991–1994. Hinshaw, William Wade. Marshall, Thomas Worth, comp. Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy. Supplement to Volume 1. Washington, D.C.: n.p. 1948.
  • Religious Society of Friends, Pasquotank Monthly Meeting (Pasquotank, County, North Carolina), "Men's Minutes, 1699 - 1785," Guilford College, Greensboro, North Carolina.




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