The_Murdochs.jpg

Newspaper Article - The Murdochs

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Surname/tag: Murdoch
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13:21: Hugh Smith edited the Text on The Murdochs. (Categorization. -adding Murdoch ONS) [Thank Hugh for this]
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Contents

Introduction

The following article was written by the late Mr. Matthew McTurk (1813-1899) of Auchinleck. He was the Auchinleck correspondent to the Ayr Observer and earlier to the Kilmarnock Journal. Matthew was the son of William McTurk and Janet Reid. One of his occupations was a School Board Officer. The article was published in the Kilmarnock Journal on the 22nd April 1882. It is believed that this transcription was transcribed in this form by David L. Murdoch.
(Source of this transcription: – it was received by Hugh Smith from Stuart Wilson in February 2018) Smith-127977 09:36, 29 July 2021 (UTC)

NOTE: - I have received in Feb 2022 a similar newspaper article and transcription (1882 and 1866 articles possibly written by the same author, as written in similar style) published in the newspaper, "Ardrossan and Saltcoats Herald" on April 7, 1866 on page 5. It consists a series of articles about various Auchinleck families including the Murdoch family. Any differences between the articles will be shown as indented paragraphs. This will be a work in Progress Smith-127977 05:40, 10 February 2022 (UTC)

The Original Transcription of the 1882 Newspaper Article

THE MURDOCHS

The Murdochs have been resident in the parish from a very early date, and to several of them we are indebted for many of the improvements which had taken place during the end of the last century, as well as in the present. It appears that they have nearly all sprung from the same branch of Murdochs, as their burial places are nearly all contiguous to each other. Many of their gravestones are very old, but there are no names on them with the exception of the initials and date, such as “A.M.” “M.C.” , 1681 J.M. , J.F. 1748” and several others. About forty years ago, one of the Murdochs of Commondyke was the originator of Murdoch & Aitken, the engineers in Hill Street, Glasgow, who have turned out so many engines to every quarter of the globe as to bring that firm into repute. None of that family now survive, but several nephews and nieces are still in the place. “Old Commondyke”, the father of Murdoch the engineer, died nearly 50 years ago at a great age. At one time he commenced a colliery on the farm of Glenshamrock, his son supplying him with an engine; but it turned out a failure, although it is now a prosperous work with the Gilmilnscroft Coal Co. There was a James Murdoch in Raw (now Blackston), who also died about 50 years ago, his ancestors having been in that farm for several generations. Several of his grandchildren and great grandchildren are still in the neighbourhood, and some of them have carried on the building trade in Cumnock for some time past. There was also another branch of the family in High Park – Robert Murdoch, carrier, a brother to “Raw” , who died aged 86 years. We believe none of his descendants are now in the parish. High Park stood where the railway bridge crosses the Birnieknowe Road. There were also Murdochs in Pighall or North Auchengibbert, several of whose descendants are still in the place. There was also a David Murdoch in Highhouse, who also kept an Alehouse in his time. As the Highhouse stands in a line with the churchyard, many of those attending church from the country brought their dinner of “mashlam scones” and such other food as was common in those days, and went into the Highhouse, during the interval between sermons, and got a bicker or stoup of stout yill for a penny. Old “Lord Auchinleck” was a regular attender at both diets of worship, and he also often went there during the interval, but David is now long gone the way of all the earth. The inscription on his tombstone says “Here lyes the body of David Murdoch, in Highhouse of Auchinleck, who died January 10th, 1789, aged 64 years.

There was also a David Murdoch who was Schoolmaster and Session Clerk at the time when the Rev. Mr Dun was settled minister here in 1652. There were also the Murdochs who were long in Common, and who were cousins to the Author of the Protestant“ (William McGavin), a number of whose descendants are still in the parish. One of them was long gardener to the Marquis of Bute, at Dumfries House, but who is dead some years since. Several of the sons are in America. One of the daughters was married to William Alexander of Rogerton, after being a widow for a number of years. She died a few years ago, leaving a large family of sons and daughters, the most of whom are farmers in the district.

There were also the Murdochs in Dalsalloch; old David Murdoch was long farmer and a horse-dealer here; about fifty or sixty years since he drove a large trade, principally in Irish horses – he going over to Ireland and bringing large numbers of horses with him. He was succeeded by one of his sons, Robert Murdoch, who afterwards removed from here to the farm of Goatfoot, Galston, and who died some years since. One of his daughters is still living in the village (Mrs. Terras) and many of their descendants are in Australia and New Zealand. One of the sons – William, died a few years ago in Glasgow, where he had long been resident, and another – David, emigrated some years since to New Zealand, where his family was, he being accidentally drowned while crossing some creek there.

[1866 Article: - Then there were the Murdochs in Dalsalloch. Old David Murdoch was long farmer and horse dealer. About fifty years ago he drove a large trade, principally in Irish horses. He was succeeded by one of his sons, who afterwards removed to the farm of Goatfoot, Galston, and died some years since. Several sons and daughters are still in the place, while many of their descendants are now in Australia and New Zealand. There was a brother, Wm. Murdoch, who was long a mason in the place. We believe only one of his sons is alive, Mr Jas. Murdoch, who has long carried on an extensive trade as agent for hand-sewing. ]

There was also a Murdoch in Cottar-tacks – a house which has long since disappeared. He had a son, John Murdoch – who was a customer weaver in the village, and who, through some dispute, became very eccentric in his habits and manners. He left the Church at Auchinleck and attended the Secession Church in Cumnock. His wife also was most regular in her attendance at church, but in going or coming she had always to keep a respectful distance behind him; and if she happened to approach too near, he would turn about and tell her to keep her distance. As his house was near the parish school, seldom a day passed but some of the boys and he were in contact. He used to play on the violin or fiddle, and when a wedding or ball took place John was generally called into requisition. He generally had one tune, and at the same time he made as much noise with his mouth, - bum bumming away – as with the fiddle.
Page -2-
Many stories and anecdotes are related of him. He went generally by the nickname of “Pin” which name was given him, as the “Scottish Haggis” says, in the following manner: - Being unwell, he was attended by a Dr Wilson, from Cumnock who ordered an injection. The next time the doctor called he told him “he had eaten the skin, and drank the brae, but the pin he could not manage”, which gave rise to the name he afterwards retained; but both john and his wife Annie are long gone the way of all the earth. All his family are now gone, but he has several grandchildren, and great-grandchildren living. One of his daughters died about sixteen years ago, considerably above fourscore. There was also Robert Murdoch in Orchard, who was brother to old Bello Mill. He carried on the wright and joiner trade. He left two sons, who were both master joiners here for many a day. William and George Murdoch, the sons of George Murdoch, about fifty years ago established and carried on a new and very extensive trading at making snuff boxes. It appeared once to be both flourishing and lucrative, nearly one hundred hands being engaged with them; but their trade soon got into disorder, and the box making declined so that it is now only carried on here by Mr. William Johnstone, who still employs a few hands at it. Their families are now all out of the place. The son of William Murdoch, Robert carried on the joiner trade. He was a mechanic as well and invented several implements for box making; and died about fourteen year since, leaving three sons, all joiners – the eldest of whom is now dead. We now come to the Murdochs of Bello Mill, whose names have put a halo of lustre around our native parish. Bello Mill is situated at the junction of the Bellowater and the Lugar, and quite contiguous to the Lugar Iron Works. How long they were in the mill we have no means of knowing. In 1745 one of them left a staff to be always kept by the eldest Murdoch in the parish, and it appears that he was the oldest Murdoch at that time. The inscription is as follows: - “This stave I leave in legacy to the oldest Murdoch after me in Auchinleck. 1743.” The staff at present is in the possession of Agnes Murdoch, a daughter of the late David Murdoch, Dalsalloch, and widow of the late David Terras. The following have had possession of the staff in our day :- We believe the first was James Murdoch, Commondyke, next Hugh Murdoch, Common; next Robert Murdoch, High Park; next James Murdoch, Raw; next John Murdoch, weaver; next John Murdoch, Raw; next Jean Murdoch, daughter of John Murdoch, weaver; next Ann Murdoch, widow of Wm. Rankin, Lugar, a niece of Bello Mill; next David Murdoch, gardener, Dumfries House, and now Agnes Murdoch or Terras, the whole of these, with one exception, lived from eighty to ninety years of age. Old Bello Mill was a millwright. He had several sons. He also carried on the mill.

February 1907
(Jean Murdoch, wife of John Girvan also had the stave. She died in 1897 aged 93. John Girvan, a great-grandson of Jean Girvan handed the stave to Kelvin Grove Galleries, Glasgow for safe keeping.)

Project: Extracting Likely Family Groups From the above Article

This project is a Work in Progress ----

Methodology:
Nine likely Murdoch Family Groups were extracted from the above transcription (viz: Family 1 to Family 9).

These potential family groups are then researched and as supporting records are found for these likely family groups either:

  1. if individual profile exists on wikitree then the profile will be linked from here.
  2. If there is no existing profile on wikitree, then a new wikitree profile will be created and then linked

All these profiles (existing or new) will also be linked back to:

General Introduction

THE MURDOCHS – article- Extracting Family Groupings
The Murdochs have been resident in the parish from a very early date. It appears that they have nearly all sprung from the same branch of Murdochs, as their burial places are nearly all contiguous to each other. Many of their gravestones are very old, but there are no names on them with the exception of the initials and date, such as 'A.M.' 'M.C.', 1681 J.M., J.F. 1748 and several others.

Comments:

See Also - Auchinleck_Kirk_Graveyard_Transcriptions

Family 1. Old 'Commondyke' Murdochs

About forty years ago (c1840’s), one of the Murdochs of Commondyke was the originator of Murdoch & Aitken, the engineers in Hill Street, Glasgow, who have turned out so many engines to every quarter of the globe as to bring that firm into repute. None of that family now survive, but several nephews and nieces are still in the place. 'Old Commondyke', the father of Murdoch the engineer, died nearly 50 years ago (c1830’s) at a great age. At one time he commenced a colliery on the farm of Glenshamrock, his son supplying him with an engine; but it turned out a failure, although it is now a prosperous work with the Gilmilnscroft Coal Co.

Old 'Commondyke' Murdoch Family
Old Commondyke (cYYYY-c1830’s) (aged – a great age) – Commondyke (farm Glenshamrock – later covered by Gilmilnscroft Coal Co).

  • son Murdoch - (of Murdoch & Aitken, engineers - c1840’s (=1882-40) situated in Hill St, Glasgow.

Note: Family not survived, but do have several nieces & nephews near

Comments:

  • Son above is Robert Murdoch (????-1833) engineer (master) married to an Agnes Aitken (1793-1873) in 1814 at Glasgow.
  • the firm Murdoch & Aitken is located in Hill Street, Calton, Glasgow
  • Old 'Commondyke' is likely James Murdoch who married a Janet Osborn(e) - not verified.

Family 2. James Murdoch in Raw (now Blackston)

There was a James Murdoch in Raw (now Blackston), who also died about 50 years ago (c1830’s) , his ancestors having been in that farm for several generations. Several of his grandchildren and great grandchildren are still in the neighbourhood, and some of them have carried on the building trade in Cumnock for some time past. There was also another branch of the family in High Park – Robert Murdoch, carrier, a brother to 'Raw', who died aged 86 years. We believe none of his descendants are now in the parish. (High Park stood where the railway bridge crosses the Birnieknowe Road).

James Murdoch (cxxxx-c1830’s) of Raw (now Blackston)
(ancestors on same farm)

  • Child
    • Grand child
      • Great Grandchild

Descendants (grandchildren & great children) – still in neighbourhood – some are builders in Cumnock.

Brother to Raw Robert Murdoch ( d aged 86 )
– a carrier of High Park (High Park is approx. where the railway bridge crosses the Birnieknowe Road)
- none of his descendants are now in the parish

Comments:

Family 3. Murdochs in Pighall or North Auchengibbert

There were also Murdochs in Pighall or North Auchengibbert, several of whose descendants are still in the place.

----- Murdoch (of Pighall or North Auchengibbert)

  •  ????

Comments:

Family 4. David Murdoch in Highhouse

There was also a David Murdoch in Highhouse, who also kept an Alehouse in his time. As the Highhouse stands in a line with the churchyard, many of those attending church from the country brought their dinner of 'mashlam scones' and such other food as was common in those days, and went into the Highhouse, during the interval between sermons, and got a bicker or stoup of stout yill for a penny. Old 'Lord Auchinleck' was a regular attender at both diets of worship, and he also often went there during the interval, but David is now long gone the way of all the earth. The inscription on his tombstone says 'Here lyes the body of David Murdoch, in Highhouse of Auchinleck, who died January 10th, 1789, aged 64 years.'

David Murdoch (c1725 – d1789)
(aged 64 yrs)) from Highhouse (stands in a line with the churchyard)

Comments:

Family 5. David Murdoch who was Schoolmaster and Session Clerk

There was also a David Murdoch who was Schoolmaster and Session Clerk at the time when the Rev. Mr Dun was settled minister here in 1652.

David Murdoch

  •  ??

Comments:

Family 6. Murdochs who were long in Common

There were also the Murdochs who were long in Common, and who were cousins to the Author of the Protestant (William McGavin), a number of whose descendants are still in the parish. One of them was long gardener to the Marquis of Bute, at Dumfries House, but who is dead some years since. Several of the sons are in America. One of the daughters was married to William Alexander of Rogerton, after being a widow for a number of years.. She died a few years ago (c1870-1880’s), leaving a large family of sons and daughters, the most of whom are farmers in the district.

Unknown Murdochs (from Common)
(cousins to William McGavin) Murdochs descendants

  • some are still in the parish (one a gardener to Dumfries House) – died some time ago
  • Several of the sons are in America
  • One of the daughters was married to William Alexander of Rogerton, after being a widow for a number of years. She died a few years ago (c1870-1880’s), leaving a large family of sons and daughters, the most of whom are farmers in the district

Comments:

Family 7. Murdochs in Dalsalloch

There were also the Murdochs in Dalsalloch; old David Murdoch was long farmer and a horse-dealer here; about fifty or sixty years since he drove a large trade, principally in Irish horses – he going over to Ireland and bringing large numbers of horses with him. He was succeeded by one of his sons, Robert Murdoch, who afterwards removed from here to the farm of Goatfoot, Galston, and who died some years since. One of his daughters is still living in the village (Mrs. Terras) and many of their descendants are in Australia and New Zealand. One of the sons – William, died a few years ago in Glasgow, where he had long been resident, and another – David, emigrated some years since to New Zealand, where his family was, he being accidentally drowned while crossing some creek there.

[1866 Article: - Then there were the Murdochs in Dalsalloch. Old David Murdoch was long farmer and horse dealer. About fifty years ago he drove a large trade, principally in Irish horses. He was succeeded by one of his sons, who afterwards removed to the farm of Goatfoot, Galston, and died some years since. Several sons and daughters are still in the place, while many of their descendants are now in Australia and New Zealand. There was a brother, Wm. Murdoch, who was long a mason in the place. We believe only one of his sons is alive, Mr Jas. Murdoch, who has long carried on an extensive trade as agent for hand-sewing. ]



Old David Murdoch (in Dalsalloch)
was long farmer and a horse-dealer (50-60 yrs ago Irish horses)

  • Son Robert M - succeeded David (from here to the farm of Goatfoot, Galston, and who died some years since)
  • Daughter - One of his daughters is still living in the village (Mrs. Terras)

many of their descendants are in Australia and New Zealand

  • One of the sons – William, died a few years ago in Glasgow, where he had long been resident.
  • David, emigrated some years since to New Zealand, where his family was, he being accidentally drowned while crossing some creek there

(note: Not clear on the generations – could be children of children)

Comments:

  1. Daughter (Mrs Terras) - Agnes Murdoch
  2. Son William - died in 1878, Glasgow (married to Agnes Murdoch in 1850)
  1. Wife Agnes died Bothwell in 1892
  2. had daughter Janet/Jessie Murdoch - married 1875 Andrew Smith
  1. Old David Murdoch's brother William, married Agnes Campbell
  1. their son James married Janet Smith
  2. son James died in 1867

Family 8. Murdoch in Cottar-tacks

There was also a Murdoch in Cottar-tacks – a house which has long since disappeared. He had a son, John Murdoch – who was a customer weaver in the village, and who, through some dispute, became very eccentric in his habits and manners. He left the Church at Auchinleck, and attended the Secession Church in Cumnock. His wife also was most regular in her attendance at church, but in going or coming she had always to keep a respectful distance behind him; and if she happened to approach too near, he would turn about and tell her to keep her distance. As his house was near the parish school, seldom a day passed but some of the boys and he were in contact. He used to play on the violin or fiddle, and when a wedding or ball took place John was generally called into requisition. He generally had one tune, and at the same time he made as much noise with his mouth, - bum bumming away – as with the fiddle. Many stories and anecdotes are related of him. He went generally by the nickname of Pin which name was given him, as the Scottish Haggis says, in the following manner: - Being unwell, he was attended by a Dr Wilson, from Cumnock who ordered an injection. The next time the doctor called he told him 'he had eaten the skin, and drank the brae, but the pin he could not manage', which gave rise to the name he afterwards retained; but both john and his wife Annie are long gone the way of all the earth. All his family are now gone, but he has several grandchildren, and great-grand children living. One of his daughters died about sixteen years ago, considerably above fourscore.

Unknown Murdoch in Cottar-tacks
– a house which has long since disappeared.

  • a son, John Murdoch – who was a customer weaver in the village. his house was near the parish school. went generally by the nickname of “Pin” - his wife Annie. Both john and Annie are long gone the way of all the earth.
    • All his family are now gone,
      • but he has several grandchildren, and
        • great-grand children living.
    • One of his daughters died about sixteen years ago, considerably above fourscore.

Comments:

Family 9. Robert Murdoch in Orchard

There was also Robert Murdoch in Orchard, who was brother to old Bello Mill. He carried on the wright and joiner trade. He left two sons, who were both master joiners here for many a day. William and George Murdoch, the sons of George Murdoch, about fifty years ago established and carried on a new and very extensive trading at making snuff boxes. It appeared once to be both flourishing and lucrative, nearly one hundred hands being engaged with them; but their trade soon got into disorder, and the box making declined so that it is now only carried on here by Mr. William Johnstone, who still employs a few hands at it. Their families are now all out of the place. The son of William Murdoch, Robert carried on the joiner trade. He was a mechanic as well and invented several implements for box making; and died about fourteen year since, leaving three sons, all joiners – the eldest of whom is now dead.

Robert Murdoch [c1730?]- of Orchard
(brother John Murdoch (Old Bello Mill) of Bello Mill)- wright & Joiner

  • Son 1 – William - master joiner
    • Robert Murdoch – joiner (died about 14 yrs ago)
      • Son 1 – joiner (eldest now dead)
      • Son 2 - joiner
      • Son 3 - joiner
  • Son 2 – George - master joiner
    • William Murdoch - snuff boxes (c1830’s)
    • George Murdoch – snuff boxes (c1830’s?)

Their families are now all out of the place

Comment:
Robert Murdoch [c1730?]- of Orchard
(brother John Murdoch (Old Bello Mill) of Bello Mill)- wright & Joiner

  • Son 1 – William Murdoch [c1755?] - master joiner
    • Robert Murdoch [c1825’s?] – joiner (died about 14 yrs ago)
      • Son 1 – Murdoch - joiner (eldest now dead)
      • Son 2 - Murdoch - joiner
      • Son 3 - Murdoch - joiner
  • Son 2 – George Murdoch [c1760?] - master joiner
    • William Murdoch [c1790s?] - manufacturing snuff boxes (c1830’s)
    • George Murdoch [c1790’s?] – manufacturing snuff boxes (c1830’s?)

their families are now all out of the place

Family 10. Murdochs of Bello Mill and the Murdoch Stave

We now come to the Murdochs of Bello Mill, whose names have put a halo of lustre around our native parish. Bello Mill is situated at the junction of the Bellowater and the Lugar, and quite contiguous to the Lugar Iron Works. How long they were in the mill we have no means of knowing. In 1743 (or 5) one of them left a staff (stave) to be always kept by the oldest Murdoch in the parish, and it appears that he was the oldest Murdoch at that time. The inscription is as follows: - 'This stave I leave in legacy to the oldest Murdoch after me in Auchinleck. 1743 [or 5].' ....... Old Bello Mill was a millwright. He had several sons. He also carried on the mill.

Comments:

  • "Old Bello Mill" is likely to be William Murdoch's (1754-1839, inventor) grandfather (possibly John Murdoch - but not verified) who likely died about 1745.
  • Likely transcription of the words as positioned on the collar of the stave. Reading each of the 5 lines - each line starting from the right hand side of collar (Note: The above photo - image 1 - is of the left hand side) and going round to the left side. It reads something like this.(Difficult to read some letters)
Line 1: THIS STAVE I LEAVE
Line 2: IN LEGACY TO : THE
Line 3: OLDEST MURDOCH
Line 4: AFTER ME
Line 5: IN : AUCHINLECK : 1743

The History of the Murdoch staff

The staff at present is in the possession of Agnes Murdoch, a daughter of the late David Murdoch, Dalsalloch, and widow of the late David Terras. The following have had possession of the staff in our day:- We believe the first was James Murdoch, Commondyke, next Hugh Murdoch, Common; next Robert Murdoch, High Park; next James Murdoch, Raw; next John Murdoch, weaver; next John Murdoch, Raw; next Jean Murdoch, daughter of John Murdoch, weaver; next Ann Murdoch, widow of Wm. Rankin, Lugar, a niece of Bello Mill; next David Murdoch, gardener, Dumfries House; and now Agnes Murdoch (or Terras), the whole of these, with one exception, lived from eighty to ninety years of age........

A listing of the above 'oldest Murdochs' who have had possession of the staff up to Agnes:-

  1. James Murdoch, Commondyke, (first receiver);
  2. next Hugh Murdoch, Common;
  3. next Robert Murdoch, High Park;
  4. next James Murdoch, Raw;
  5. next John Murdoch, weaver;
  6. next John Murdoch, Raw;
  7. next Jean Murdoch, daughter of John Murdoch, weaver;
  8. next Ann Murdoch, widow of Wm. Rankin, Lugar, a niece of Bello Mill;
  9. next David Murdoch, gardener, Dumfries House,
  10. next Agnes Murdoch (or Terras),

Note (a): the whole of these, with one exception, lived from eighty to ninety years of age.

Comment:

  • At the time that this newspaper article was published in April 1882, the staff was in the possession of Agnes Murdoch (the oldest Murdoch living in Auchinleck at the time),
  • Agnes (Murdoch) Terras was the daughter of David Murdoch, of Dalsalloch, and the widow of the late David Terras.
  • The Oldest Murdoch listed above is referred back to their family group if determined.
  • Hoping to obtain the death years for each of the above.
  1. James Murdoch, Commondyke, (first receiver); - See Family 1
  2. Hugh Murdoch, Common; - See Family 6
  3. Robert Murdoch, High Park; - See Family 2
  4. James Murdoch, Raw; - See Family
  5. John Murdoch, weaver; - See Family
  6. John Murdoch, Raw; - See Family
  7. Jean Murdoch, daughter of John Murdoch, weaver; - See Family
  8. Ann Murdoch, widow of Wm. Rankin, Lugar, a niece of Bello Mill; -
  9. David Murdoch, gardener, Dumfries House, - See Family
  10. Agnes Murdoch (or Terras), - See Family

Transcriber's Notes

The above was written by the late Mr. Matthew McTurk of Auchinleck. It was published in the local paper 22nd April 1882. It is now republished in this form by DAVID L. MURDOCH

February 1907
(Jean Murdoch, wife of John Girvan also had the stave. She died in 1897 aged 93. John Girvan, great-grandson of Jean Murdoch handed the stave to Kelvin Grove Galleries, Glasgow, for safe keeping.)

Comment:

  • Author was Matthew McTurk (1813-1899) of Auchinleck.
  1. He was the Auchinleck correspondent to the "Ayr Observer" and earlier to the Kilmarnock Journal.
  2. Matthew was the son of William McTurk and Janet Reid.
  3. One of his occupations was a School Board Officer.
  • The article was published in Auchinleck's local paper Kilmarnock Journal issued on the 22nd April 1882.
  • republished in this transcribed form by DAVID L. MURDOCH
  • Signifigance of this date "Feb 1907" -
  1. was it the date the newspaper was transcribed by David L Murdoch? or
  2. was it the date that Jean's g-grandson John Girvan handed the stave over to the Kelvin Grove Galleries? or
  3. was it someting else?
Jean Murdoch (c1804-1897) & John Girvan
  • Son
  • Grandson
  • (great-grandson) - John Girvan


End of Document

Sources

  1. https://www.glasgowlife.org.uk/museums/venues/kelvingrove-art-gallery-and-museum




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I have recently received a copy of a very similar newspaper article (and its transcription) written about 16 years earlier. "Auchinleck Churchyard in 1866 - This is a transcript from the newspaper Ardrossan and Saltcoats Herald, published on April 7, 1866 on page 5

It consists a series of articles about various Auchinleck families. As a result I will be editing the above to include any parts that are either (1) additional information or (2) different.....Hugh

posted by Hugh Smith