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Vincent Family and the Sandemanian Church

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Date: [unknown] [unknown]
Location: London, Englandmap
Surnames/tags: Vincent Sandemanian nonconformist
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Contents

Introduction

Robert Sandeman
The Sandemanian church is a non-conformist protestant movement which began in Scotland in 1730’s and spread into England and to the USA. The church was founded by John Glas but much of the teaching was developed and promoted by his son-in-law Robert Sandeman, who founded churches in England and in North America.

An introduction to the Sandemanian Church includes an overview but also details of the categories used for the various families
has more details.

History of the Vincent family

Thomas Vincent (abt.1721-1800) was born in Sherbourne, Dorset but moved to London in about 1756. He was a member of the Three Cranes Meeting in Upper Thames Street, where Samuel Pike (abt.1717-bef.1773) was the minister. Samuel Pike gradually introduced Sandemanian ideas into the church, which resulted by 1759 a split in the church (see Thomas Vincent (abt.1721-1800) profile for details). Thomas remained at Three Cranes, with Samuel Pike, but did not move with him to join the Sandemanian's, when Pike left in 1765. He remained at Three Cranes and became the minister where he served for many years.

His children would have attended Three Cranes meeting house.

Iphedeiah Vincent (abt.1751-1808) was about 14 years old when Pike left, but when he grew up he also joined the Sandemanians. He was a member of the London Sandemanian Church that met in St Paul's Alley, Barbican. The London Congregation had been meeting for about 30 years by that point. He had 14 children who would have attended the Sandemanian meeting house as children. A number died young and were buried in Bunhill Fields, a nonconformist burial ground. Only two married as far as is known and both married within the church.He was buried at Bunhill Fields, a nonconformist burial ground.
Thomas Iphediah Vincent was born in 1783 in London and married Ann Leighton (1787-1821) in 1807. Ann's father was George Leighton a church member. Thomas's children included
Thomas Vincent (1810-1883) who was church member,
Benjamin Vincent born 1812 who became a Sandemanian and married Janet Young Nichol and Ellen Barnard, both from Sandemanian families.
William Randell Vincent born 1798 was also a church member as was his wife Mary Jane Vine.


Zelophehad Wyeth Vincent (1755-1840) grew up and joined the London Scotch Wall Church, where his children were baptised. He then retired to Streatham were he was a founding member of the Streatham Congregational Church. He is buried in their graveyard.

Addresses where the family lived or worked

Islington, Iphedeiah Vincent, Barber 1796[1]
Little Thomas Apostle, Thomas Vincent, Barber, 1796
No 5 Little Thomas Apostle Zelophehad Wyeth Vincent, Barber 1796


List of the Livery of London 1796, City of London [2]
Bow Lane, Thomas Vincent, Barber 1796
Bow lane Barber Iphedeiah Vincent 1796
Little St Thomas Apostle Barber Zelophehad Vincent 1796

1802 Holden Directory[3].
71 White Lion Street, Pentonville, Iphedeiah Vincent


Business Interests

Electoral Poll 1796[4]
Barber, Islington Iphedeiah Vincent, 1796
Barber, Little Thomas Apostle, Thomas Vincent, 1796
Barber No 5 Little Thomas Apostle, Zelophehad Wyeth Vincent 1796


List of the Livery of London 1796, City of London [5] Barber, Thomas Vincent, Bow Lane
Barber Iphedeiah Vincent Bow lane
Barber Zelophehad Vincent Little St Thomas Apostle


Links with other Sandemanian Families

Many of the members of the London Church came from a small number of families, perhaps between 10-12 families. It is not easy to be clear who were members, because the church records have not been published, although some documents are available.

Within the key Sandemanian families, some became church members, others attended the church without formally declaring their faith and so were not members. Many people married within the church, and this continued for up to 5 generations.

The links with other families are detailed below.

Barnard Family

Annie Leighton Vincent married Vernor Barnard in 1853

Benjamin Vincent married Ellen Barnard in 1864

Theodore Baxter Vincent married Annie Miles Barnard in 1900

Leighton Family

Thomas Vincent married Ann Leighton in 1807

Sandeman Family

Maria Vincent married Edward Sandeman in 1863


Whitelaw Family

Stephen Vincent married Selina Whitelaw in 1899

Research into the Sandemanian's in London

Introduction and Research Questions

An introduction to the Sandemanian Church includes an overview but also details of the categories used for the various families
Research into the London Sandemanian Church and the questions I am seeking to answer
The arrival of Sandemanianism in London with details of the people involved and the impact on the nonconformist community

Histories of other Sandemanian Families

Barnard Family and the Sandemanian Church
Baynes Family and the Sandemanian Church
Boosey Family and the Sandemanian Church
Chater Family and the Sandemanian Church
Deacon Family and the Sandemanian Church
Leighton Family and the Sandemanian Church
Peat Family and the Sandemanian Church
Rutt Family, London Nonconformists
Vincent Family and the Sandemanian Church
Young Family and the Sandemanian Church


Other pages with details of Sandemanians

Sandemanian Church London membership list 1762 - 1868 providing the most complete details of the London Sandemanian's with over 650 names included. Links added to Wikitree profiles as discovered.
Sandemanian Church London membership list as researched by Prof Geoffrey Cantor covering men and some of their wives from 1821-1867. Most have links to Wikitree profiles.
Sandemanian Church London membership list 1885 provides a one off snap shot of existing members in 1885. Most have links to Wikitree profiles.
London Sandemanian marriages and other links between families It was common in the Sandeman church in London for marriages to take place within the church, so this is a list of marriages and other links between church families.
Sandemanians and the bookbinding, paper and publishing trades There were 14 families in the London Sandemanian with links to the bookbinding, paper and publishing trades.
Grosvenor Family Stationers business Details of business addresses used by the company.
Reid and Sons Silversmiths a Sandemanian family from Newcastle, some of whom married into the London Church.
London Nonconformist Glass Cutters, the Leathley, Chater and Hayward Families The families were linked by marriage and in business, with some becoming Sandemanians.
Sandemanian Church, Old Buckenham, Norfolk and links with the church in London.
The letter from the London Sandemanian Church to the Edinburgh Church in 1855, including signatories to the letter.
Rev John Collett Ryland's Scholars

Text template for individual profiles using this category

This template has been added to individual profiles with links to the church.

==Links to the Glasite/Sandemanian Church==

The Vincent family were one of the key families in the Glasite or Sandemanian Church in London. The category "Vincent Family and the Sandemanian Church" has been added to this profile to help identify relevant people.

The aim is to collect the names of the family members of the Vincent family who were associated with the church. Not all will have become formal church members but are within 1-2 generations of a known member.

See the VIncent Family category for individual profiles.


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