upload image

Walker E Snodgrass profile information

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Date: [unknown] [unknown]
Location: [unknown]
This page has been accessed 21 times.

The following information previously appears in the profile for Walker Earl Snodgrass

Sinking of U-515:http://uboat.net/allies/ships/uss_guadalcanal-4.htm“...On the morning of 8 April, Tenth Fleet sent a high priority message toGuadalcanal providing a "fix" on a submarine about 200 miles northwest of Madeira. The submarine was U-515, Kapitänleutnant Werner Henke in command. Guadalcanal changed course and headed for the position given by Tenth Fleet about 40 miles away. At sunset 4 Avengers were launched to conduct a sweep extending 60 miles in front of and 100 miles on each side of the carrier. During a flight recovery, the chevron seals on the #2 arresting gear hydraulic unit blew out disabling wires #2 and#4. These wires being in a critical part of the flight deck landing area, it was decided to scrub night operations until the arresting gear was repaired. However, this decision was soon reversed. (A timeline will beused to describe the events which followed):April 8:2115 - Flight of 4 Avengers is recovered. During pilot debriefing it is discovered one of the pilots had seen a U-boat which submerged before he could attack. His radio message reporting the sighting was never received by Guadalcanal. Captain Gallery decided to continue night operations despite the inoperative arresting gear unit but to await the launching of the next flight for an hour to give the U-boat an opportunity to surface.2215- 2 Avengers are launched. Several more are armed and spotted on the flight deck for immediate launch if they should be needed.2330 - U-515 is spotted on the surface silhouetted in the moonlight. An Avenger attacks, dropping two MK-47s which do no damage. U-515 puts up heavy anti-aircraft fire before submerging.April 9:0116 - Guadalcanal launches another Avenger to assist in the search.0200 - Guadalcanal picks up a radar contact about 5 miles ahead. (Op analysis later evaluated thiscontact to be either U-68 or U-214,both of which are in the area.)Chatelain and Pope are detached from the screen and sent to the contact areas.Pope established a contact and launches a hedgehog attack. At dawn one of the air patrols spots an oil slick in the vicinity of Pope's attack. Propeller noises are heard on sonobuoys.0630 - Pillsbury and Flaherty are detached from the screen to assist Pope and Chatelain. U-515 has been unable to charge batteries and is now in a desperate position.0640 - An Avenger finds U-515 surfaced and drops depth charges. Badly shaken but not broken, Henke submerges. But time is running out for U-515.Pillsbury and Flahertysearch the contact area, dropping hedgehogs. U-515 goes deeper and deeper attempting to evade the attackers. Chatelain and Pope join up on the contact.1030 -Pope gains a sound contact at 700 yds - loses it- and then regains it. From that point on continuous sound contact is held for the next 4 hours. The DE's continue their depth charge attacks.1250 - A large oil slick and air bubbles are spotted. U-515 is very deep and hurting bad; damage control is attempting to seal numerous leaks and the boat is down 30 degrees by the stern. The aft torpedo room is sealed off.1405 - Unable to control trim, Henke blows his tanks and comes up in a 45 degree bow-down position. U-515 broaches in a welter of spray and foam about 75 yards off Chatelains beam. The U-boat sailors come pouring out on deck and manage to get offa few rounds from the deck guns before Chatelain and Flaherty sweep their decks with return fire. An Avenger and two Wildcats are making strafing runs and firing rockets at the sub. The action is visible to the crew of Guadalcanal about 4 or 5 miles away.1413 - An explosion occurs within U-515, smoke comes pouring out of the conning tower, and the crew abandons ship.1417 - Stern high in the air, U-515 goes under."Report on the Interrogation of Survivors from U-515 Sunk9 April 1944 and U-68 10 April 1944 http://www.uboatarchive.net/U-515INT.htm "Chapter XIII. Sixth and Last Patrol of U-515"... ..."ACTION REPORT pp45-46 "At 0812 GCT 9 April 1944, U.S.S. CHATELAIN made contact. U.S.S. PILLSBURY AND FLAHERTY proceeded ahead of U.S.S. GUADALCANAL. At 0813 PILLSBURY fired hedgehog and 2 explosions were observed, bringing up debris. (O.N.I. Note: It is probably that this attack was made on a yet unidentified U-boat.) At 1133 U.S.S. POPE obtained sound contact and fired hedgehogs at 1157 and 1205. At 1214 POPE p46 dropped 11 depth-charges followed by 13 depth-charges at 1234 and by 13 depth-charges at 1307.At 1310 U.S.S. CHATELAIN obtained contact. At 1320 U.S.S. POPE dropped 13 depth-charges followed by series of 7 depth-charges at 1343, 1357 and 1411. Thereafter contact was lost. At about 1455, after several questionable contacts, CHATELAIN regained contact and fired 11 depth-charges in 2 groups just as the U-boatwas beginning to surface. At 1505, the U-boat surfaced within about 150 yards of CHATELAIN’S starboard quarter and CHATELAIN opened fire. At 1506 VT-25 made R.P. attack and VF-6 and VF-9 strafed the U-boat while the crew was abandoning her. At 1508 U.S.S. FLAHERTY opened fire. At 1509 CHATELAIN obtained a direct hit on the conning tower, starting a large fire. The U-boat sank bow first at 1512 GCT at 34.31 N.-19.29 W." [= northwest of Madeira in the North Atlantic] Photo caption: "U-515 burns after direct hits from U.S.S. Chatelain's 3"/50 guns" http://www.uboatarchive.net/U-515.htm "Sinking of the U-515: A First Person Account" by Frank P. DeNardo http://u505.dnsdata.com/u515.htmU-515: Source: http://uboat.net/boats/u515.htm“Kptlt. Werner Henke (Knights Cross) from 21 Feb, 1942 - 9 Apr, 1944  15 Jun, 1944: The former commander of the boat, Kptlt. Werner Henke, one of the top aces, sunk on 9 April, committed suicide by pretending to be escaping the POW camp on 15 June after falling victim for US mind games while in captivity.Career of U-515: 7 patrols21 Feb, 1942 - 31 Aug, 1942  4. Flottille (training)1 Sep, 1942 - 9 Apr, 1944  10. Flottille (front boat)Successes21 ships sunk for a total of 131.769 GRT2 auxiliary warships sunk for a total of 19.277 GRT1 ship damaged for a total of 6.034 GRT1 warship damaged for a total of 1.920 tons1 ship a total loss for a total of 4.668 GRT1 warship a total loss for a total of 1.350 tonsFate: Sunk at 1510 hrs on 9 April, 1944 in the mid-Atlantic north of Madeira, Portugal, in position 34.35N, 19.18W, by rockets from 4 Avenger and Wildcat aircraft (VC-58) of the US escort carrier USS Guadalcanal and depth charges from the US destroyer escorts USS Pope, USS Pillsbury, USS Chatelain and USS Flaherty. 16 dead and 44 survivors.”"Report on the Interrogation of Survivors from U-515 Sunk 9 April 1944 and U-68 10 April 1944 http://www.uboatarchive.net/U-515INT.htm pp58-59 Section V. "Sinking of U-68"/"Action Report" Sunk by aircraft fire.“Sunk 10 April 1944 north-west of Madeira (56 fatalities)”Source: Eberhard Moller and Werner Brack, _The Encyclopedia of U-Boats: From 1904 to the Present Day_, Motorbuch Verlag, 2002, p98(translated by Andrea Battson and Roger Chesneau, Greenhill Books/Stackpole Books, 2004)One survivor rescued:Source: Geoffrey Jones, _Defeat of the Wolf Pack_, Presidio Press, 1987, p108]Sank German Submarine U-68: [Karl Merten was commander in 1941:Geoffrey Jones, _Defeat of the Wolf Pack_, Presidio Press, 1987, p94   Albert Lauzemis was the commander from 30 Jul, 1943 - 10 Apr, 1944.Source: http://uboat.net/boats/u68.htm “Fate: Source: http://uboat.net/boats/u68.htmSunk 10 Apr 1944 north-west of Madeira, Portugal, in position 33.24N, 18.59W, by depth charges and rockets from Avenger andWildcat aircraft of the US escort carrier USS Guadalcanal (VC-58). 56 dead and 1 survivor.......The survivor, a lookout on the bridge, was rescued by the same US convoy escort group that had sunk Henke's U-515 the day before. The survivor was taken aboard the USS Guadalcanal and kept in isolation from the U-515 survivors already on board for the duration of the vessel's patrol to America. This was an American policy of not publishing U-boat sinkings....”Sank German submarine U-546: http://www.uboat.net/boats/u546.htm Commissioned: 2 Jun, 1943 Oblt. Paul JustCommanders: 2 Jun, 1943 - 24 Apr, 1945 Kptlt. Paul JustCareer: 3 patrols2 Jun, 1943 - 31 Dec, 1943  4. Flottille (training)1 Jan, 1944 - 9 Nov, 1944  10. Flottille (front boat)10 Nov, 1944 - 24 Apr, 1945  33. Flottille (front boat)Successes: 1 warship sunk for a total of 1.200 tonsFate: Sunk 24 April, 1945 north-west of the Azores, in position 43.53N, 40.07W, by depth charges from the US destroyer escorts USS Flaherty, USS Neunzer, USS Chatelain, USS Varian, USS Hubbard, USS Janssen, USS Pillsbury and USS Keith. 26 dead and 33survivors....”“Sunk 24 April 1945 north-west of the Azores (24 fatalities)”Source: Eberhard Moller and Werner Brack, _The Encyclopedia of U-Boats: From1904 to the Present Day_, Motorbuch Verlag, 2002, p101(translated by Andrea Battson and Roger Chesneau, Greenhill Books/Stackpole Books, 2004)Was gunnery officer in the group that captured and boarded German submarine U-505, 4 June 1944, 11 AM Source: Walker E. SnodgrassAttacking the U-505:Source: http://www.msichicago.org/whats-here/exhibits/u-505/story/capturing-the-u-505/on-the-attack/“On June 4, 1944 at 11:10am, the USS Chatelain reported a sonar contact and the Task Group jumped into action. The USS Guadalcanal could not attack without damaging itself, so Captain Gallery moved the ship quickly out of harms way. Supported by the Destroyer Escorts USS Pillsbury and USS Jenks, the USS Chatelain swiftly attacked.As the sonar crew maintained contact with the submerged U-505, the USS Chatelain attacked with a salvo of 24 hedgehogs that missed. While the USS Chatelain opened the range to turn and make another attack, two fighter planes from the USS Guadalcanal fired their guns into the water to help mark the location of the submerged U-505. The USS Chatelain then fired a pattern of 14 depth charges forcing U-505 to the surface.”U-505: Source: http://uboat.net/boats/u505.htm“Commanders:26 Aug, 1941- 5 Sep, 1942  KrvKpt. Axel-Olaf Loewe6 Sep, 1942 - 24 Oct, 1943   Kptlt. Peter Zschech24 Oct, 1943 - 7 Nov, 1943   Oblt. Paul Meyer (in deputize) -- acting 8 Nov, 1943 - 4 Jun, 1944   Oblt. Harald LangeCareer: 12 patrols26 Aug, 1941 - 31 Jan, 1942  4. Flottille (training)1 Feb, 1942 - 4 Jun, 1944   2. Flottille (front boat)Successes: 8 ships sunk for a total of 44.962 GRTFate: Captured at sea west of Africa on 4 June, 1944 by ships and Wildcat aircraft of the US Navy task force 22.3, escort carrier USS Guadalcanal, destroyer escorts USS Pillsbury, USS Chatelain, USS Flaherty, USS Jenks and USS Pope. 1 dead and 59 survivors.”COPY/PRINT: http://uboat.net/allies/ships/uss_guadalcanal-5.htmGuadalcanalhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Guadalcanal_%28CVE-60%29 "After shakedown training, Guadalcanal performed pilot qualifications out of San Diego, Calif., and then departed 15 November 1943, via the Panama Canal, for Norfolk, Va., arriving 3 December. There she became flagship of antisubmarine task group 21.12, and with her escort destroyers set out from Norfolk 5 January 1944 in search of enemy submarines in the North Atlantic. On 16 January aircraft from Guadalcanal sighted three submarines fueling on the surface and in a rocket and bombing attack succeeded in sinking German submarine U-544. Replenishing at Casablanca, the task group headed back for Norfolk and repairs, arriving 16 February. Departing again withher escorts 7 March, Guadalcanal sailed without incident to Casablanca and got underway from that port 30 March with a convoy bound for the United States. Scouring the waters around the convoy 8 April northwest of Madeira, the task group discovered German submarine U-515 and closed in for the kill. Guadalcanal aircraft and destroyers Chatelain, Flaherty, Pillsbury, and Pope made several well coordinated attacks on the intruder with rockets and depth charges throughout the night. Losing depth control on the afternoon of 9 April, the submarine was forced to surface amid the waiting ships, and was immediately devastated by point blank rocket and gunfire. As Wildcat fighters from Guadalcanal strafed the submarine, her captain, German ace Kapitanleutenant Werner Henke, ordered abandon ship and she went to the bottom.Again on the night of 10 April the task group caught German submarine U-68 on the surface in broad moonlight 300 miles south of the Azores and sank her with depth charges and rocket fire. The convoy arrived safely at Norfolk 26 April 1944.After voyage repairs at Norfolk, Guadalcanal and her escorts departed Hampton Roads for sea again 15 May 1944. Two weeks of cruising brought no contacts, and the task force decided to head for the coast of Africa to refuel. Ten minutes after reversing course, however, Chatelain detected a submarine, U-505.The destroyer loosed one depth charge attack and, guided in for a more accurate drop by circling Avenger aircraft from Guadalcanal, soon made a second. This pattern blasted a hole in the outer hull of the submarine and rolled the U-boat on its beam ends. Shouts of panic from the conning tower led her inexperienced captain to believe his boat wasdoomed, so he blew his tanks and surfaced, barely 700 yards from Chatelain. The destroyer fired a torpedo, which missed, and the surfaced submarine then came under the combined fire of the escorts and aircraft, forcing her crew to abandon ship.""U-505" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U-505 "Depth charge attack The task group sailed from Norfolk, Virginia, on 15 May 1944, for an anti-submarine patrol near the Canary Islands. For two weeks they searched unsuccessfully, steaming as far south as Freetown, Sierra Leone. On Sunday, 4 June 1944, with fuel running low, the warships reluctantly turned north and headed for Casablanca. Ten minutes later, at 1109, Chatelain (DE-149), Lieutenant Commander Dudley S. Knox, USNR, made sonar contact on an object just 800 yards away on her starboard bow. Guadalcanal immediately swung clear at top speed to avoid getting in the way, as Chatelain and the other escorts closed the position.In the minutes required to identify the contactdefinitely as a submarine, however, Chatalain closed too rapidly and could not attack - her depth charges would not sink fast enough to intercept the U-boat. The escort held her fire, opened range and set up an attack with her hedgehog battery. Regaining sonar contact after a momentary loss due to the short range, Chatelain passed beyond thesubmarine and swung around toward it to make a second attack with depth charges.As the ship heeled over in her tight turn, one of two FM-2 Wildcat fighter planes launched overhead by Guadalcanal, sighted the submerged U-boat and dived on it, firing into the water to mark the submarine's position. Chatelain steadied up on her sound bearing and moved in for the kill. A full pattern of depth charges set for a shallow target splashed into the water around the U-boat. As their detonations threw geysers of spray into the air, a large oil slick spread on the water; the fighter plane overhead radioed "You struck oil! Sub is surfacing!" Six and one-half minutes after Chatelain's first attack, U-505 broke the surface with its rudder jammed, lights and electrical machinery out, and water coming in.Surface action As the submarine broached only 700 yards from Chatelain, the escort opened fire with all automatic weapons that would bear and swept the U-boat's decks. Pillsbury, Lieutenant George W. Casselman, USNR, and Jenks, Lieutenant Commander Julius F. Way, USN, farther away, and the two "Wildcats" overhead all joined the shooting and added to the intense barrage. Wounded in the torrent of fire and believing that his submarine had been mortally damaged by Chatelain's depth charges, the commanding officer of U-505 quickly ordered his crew to abandon ship. So quickly was this command obeyed that scuttling measures were left incomplete and the submarine's engines continued to run.The jammed rudder caused the partially-submerged U 505 to circle to the right at a speed near seven knots. Seeing the U-boat turning toward him, the commanding officer of Chatelain ordered a single torpedo fired at the submarine in order to forestall what appeared to be a similar attack on himself. The torpedo passed ahead of U-505, which by now appeared to be completely abandoned. About two minutes later, the escort division commander ordered cease fire and called away Pillsbury's boarding party.Salvage operations While Chatelain and Jenks picked up survivors, Pillsbury sent its motor whaleboat to the circling submarine where Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Albert David led the eight-man party on board. Despite the probability of U-505 sinking or blowing up at any minute and not knowing what form of resistance they might meet below, David and his men clambered up the conning tower and then down the hatches into the boat itself. After a quick examination proved the U-boat was completely deserted (except for one dead man on deck - the only fatality of the action), the boarders set about bundling up charts, code books, and papers, disconnecting demolition charges, closing valves, and plugging leaks. By the time the flood of water had been stopped, the U-boat was low in the water and down by the stern.""Presidential Unit Citation" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Presidential_Unit_Citation "The United States Presidential Unit Citation is "awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and co-belligerent nations for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy occurring on or after 7 December 1941. The unit must display such gallantry, determination, and esprit de corps in accomplishing its mission under extremely difficult and hazardous conditions as to set it apart and above other units participating in the same campaign. The degree of heroism required is the same as that which would warrant award of a Distinguished Service Cross to an individual."Presidential Unit Citation: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U-505"The task group itself was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation. Admiral Royal E. Ingersoll, Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, cited the Task Group as follows:“For outstanding performance during anti-submarine operations in the eastern Atlantic on 4 June,1944, when the Task group attacked, boarded and captured the German submarine U 505.Setting out on an anti-submarine sweep with the stated purpose of capturing and bringing back to the United States a German submarine, all units of the Task Group worked incessantly throughout the cruise to prepare themselves for the accomplishment of this exceedingly difficult purpose. Locating a single U-boat after a long period of fruitless searches, the entire Task Group participated in intensive search and hold down operations which terminated in the sighting of the submerged submarine by an airplane. An extremely accurate initial depth charge attack by the USS Chatelain forced the U-boat to surface where it was subjected to the combined automatic weapons fire of three destroyer escorts and two aircraft. This anti-personnel attack completely achieved its pre-conceived objective in forcing the entire enemy crew to abandon ship while inflicting relatively minor material damage on the submarine.Completely unmindful of the dangers involved, all units of the Task Group then proceeded to carry out their assigned duties in accomplishing the actual capture. The USS Pillsbury, badly damaged in a series of attempts to go alongside the erratically maneuvering submarine in order to transfer a mass boarding and repair party, was forced to withdraw and to transfer necessary personnel by small boat. Undeterred by the apparent sinking condition of the U-boat, the danger of explosions of demolition and scuttling charges, and the probability of enemy gunfire, the small boarding party plunged through the conning tower hatch, did everything in its power to keep the submarine afloat and removed valuable papers and documents. Succeeding, and more fully equipped, salvage parties, faced with dangers similar to those which confronted the first group to enter the submarine, performed seemingly impossible tasks in keeping the U-boat afloat until it could be taken in tow by USS Guadalcanal. After three days of ceaseless labor, the captured U-boat was seaworthy and able to withstand, with constant care, the vigors of a twenty-four hundred mile tow to its destination.The Task Group's brilliant achievement in disabling, capturing, and towing to a United States base a modern enemy man-of-war taken in combat on the high seas is a feat unprecedented in individual and group bravery, execution, and accomplishment in the Naval History of the United States.' "From: Dictionary of American Fighting Ships, Vol. III, 1968, Navy Department, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Naval History Division, Washington, D.C. http://www.hazegray.org/danfs/carriers/cve60.txt “GUADALCANAL (CVE-60) dp. 7,800; l. 512'; b. 65'; ew. 108' 1"; dr. 2' 6"; s. 19 k.; cpl. 860; a. 1 5", 16 40-mm., 20 20-mm., 28 ac.; cl. CASABLANCAThe first GUADALCANAL (CVE-60) an escort aircraft carrier, was converted from a Maritime Commission hull by Kaiser Co., Inc., of Vancouver, Wash. Originally ATROLABE BAY (AVG 60), she was reclassified ACV-60, 20 August 1942 and launched as GUADALCANAL (ACV-60) 5 June 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Alvin I. Malstrom. She was reclassified CVE 60 on 15 July 1943; and commissioned at Astoria, Oreg., 25 September 1943, Captain D. V. Gallery in command.After shakedown training, GUADALCANAL performed pilot qualifications out of San Diego, Calif., and then departed 15 November 1943, via the Panama Canal, for Norfolk, Va., arriving 3 December. There she became flagship of antisubmarine task group 21.12, and with her escort destroyers set out from Norfolk 5 January 1944 in search of enemy submarines in the North Atlantic. On 16 January aircraft from GUADALCANAL sighted three submarines fueling on the surface and in a rocket and bombing attack succeeded in sinking German submarine U-544.Re-/Page 172 plenishing at Casablanca, the task group headed back for Norfolk and repairs, arriving 16 February.Departing again with her escorts 7 March, GUADALCANAL sailed without incident to Casablanca and got underway from that port 30 March with a convoy bound for the United States. Scouring the waters around the convoy 8 April northwest of Madeira, the task group discovered German submarine U-515 and closed in for the kill. GUADALCANAL aircraft and destroyers CHATELAIN, FLAHERTY, PILLSBURY, and POPE made several well-coordinated attacks on the intruder with rockets and depth charges throughout the night. Losing depth control on the afternoon of 9 April, the submarine was forced to surface amid the waiting ships, and was immediately devastated by point blank rocket and gunfire. As Wildcat fighters from GUADALCANAL strafed the submarine, her captain, German ace Kapitanleutenant Werner Henke, ordered abandon ship and she went to the bottom.Again on the night of 10 April the task group caught German submarine U-68 on the surfacein broad moonlight 300 miles south of the Azores and sank her with depth charges and rocket fire. The convoy arrived safely at Norfolk 26 April 1944.After voyage repairs at Norfolk, GUADALCANAL and her escorts departed Hampton Roads for sea again 15 May 1944. Two weeks of cruising brought no contacts, and the task force decided to head for the coast of Africa to refuel. Ten minutes after reversing course, however, CHATELAIN detected a submarine, U-505. The destroyer loosed one depth charge attack and, guided in for a more accurate drop by circling Avenger aircraft from GUADALCANAL, soon made a second. This pattern blasted a hole in the outer hull of the submarine and rolled the U-boat on its beam ends. Shouts of panic from the conning tower led her inexperienced captain to believe his boat was doomed, so he blew his tanks and surfaced, barely 700 yards from CHATELAIN. The destroyer fired a torpedo, which missed, and the surfaced submarine then came under the combined fire of the escorts and aircraft, forcing her crew to abandon ship.Captain Gallery had been waiting and planning for such an opportunity, and having already trained and equipped his boarding parties, ordered PILLSBURY's boat to make for the German sub and board her. Under the command of Lt. (jg) A. L. David, the party leaped onto the slowly circling submarine and found it abandoned. Braving unknown dangers below, David and his men quickly captured all important papers and books while closing valves and stopping leaks. As Pillsbury attempted to get a tow-line on her, like acowboy roping a steer, the party managed to stop her engines. By this time a larger salvage group from GUADALCANAL arrived and began the work of preparing U-505 to be towed. After securing the tow-line and picking up the German survivors from the sea, GUADALCANAL started for Bermuda with her priceless prize in tow. Fleet tug ABNAKI rendezvoused with the task group and took over towing duties, the group arriving in Bermuda 19 June.For their daring and skillful teamwork in this remarkable capture, GUADALCANAL and her escorts shared in a Presidential Unit Citation. The captured submarine proved to be of inestimable value to American intelligence, and its true fate was kept secret from the Germans until the end of the war.(U-505 is now on display at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, Illinois, USA. LWJ)Arriving in Norfolk 22 June 1944, GUADALCANAL spent only a short time in port before setting out again on patrol. She departed Norfolk 15 July and between then and 1 December made three anti-submarine cruises in the Western Atlantic. She sailed 1 December for a training period in waters off Bermuda and Cuba that included refresher landings for pilots of her new squadron, gunnery practice, and anti-submarine warfare drills with Italian submarine R-9. GUADALCANAL arrived Mayport, Fla., for carrier qualifications 15 December and subsequently engaged in further training in Cuban water until 13 February 1946 when she arrived back in Norfolk. After another short training cruise to the Caribbean, she steamed into Mayport 15 March for a tour of duty as carrier qualification ship, later moving to Pensacola for similar operations. After qualifying nearly 4,000 pilots, GUADALCANAL returned to Norfolk, Va., and decommissioned there 15 July 1946.GUADALCANAL entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet at Nor folk and was redesignated CVU-60 on 15 July 1955, while still in reserve. Her name was finally stricken from the Navy List 27 May 1958 and she was sold for scrap to the Hugo Neu Corp. of New York 30 April 1959.GUADALCANAL was awarded three battle stars and a Presidential Unit Citation for service inWorld War II.EXCERPT FROM AFTER-ACTION REPORT: ..The sub at this point was running in a tight circle to the right, fully surfaced and it was known that most of her crew had abandoned her.PART III THE CAPTURE At 1135 ComCortDiv 4 ordered the JENKS and CHATELAIN to pick up survivors and sent away the PILLSBURY's boarding party.At 1203 the carrier headed back toward the scene of action to get her boarding parties aboard, having in the meantime recovered the fighter planes which had assisted the CHATELAIN. Carrier's boarding parties were called away at 1230.After lowering her boat the PILLSBURY pursued the sub around the circle trying to get lines aboard. From the carrier's bridge it looked for all the world like rodeo with a cowboy trying to rope a wild horse. The PILLSBURY did rope the sub, several times. The first time she got a line aboard, CTG 22.3 broadcast by TBS: "Bluejay to Dagwood-Ridem Cowboy. Out" But in the struggle alongside the runaway sub the PILLSBURY was holed by the bow planes of the sub, and one engine room was flooded to the water line, forcing her to haul clear and stop.Meantime the PILLSBURY's boarding party, commanded by Lieut. (j.g.) A. L. David, had gotten alongside and leaped from the whaleboat to the deck of the circling sub. There was only one dead man on deck, but the boarders did not know how many men might be below. The sub was still running at about 7 knots, and it seemed highly probable that part of the crew was still below setting demolition charges and scuttling. Without hesitation this party took their lives in their hands and plunged down the conning tower hatch to capture and save the boat. They found no one below and immediately went to work closing valves, 6" in diameter; [water]was pouring into the boat. Then, not knowing at what moment the boat might either blow up or sink, they turned to, seizing all the important-looking papers hey could find and passing them up on deck....CONCLUSION From the time that we sailed from Norfolk the whole task group was determined that we would come back dragging a sub behind us... and they had what it took to do it. When remarkable luck was required, we had it. When perfect cooperation between aircraft and surface vessels was required, it was there. When a clean-cut knock-out punch was needed, the CHATELAIN produced it. When outstanding heroism was required, it was commonplace among the boarding parties.I believe every man in the task group would have volunteered for the boarding parties, and those who could not go were very envious of those who did.It is a great pleasure to report that all hands in the task group did their duty in an exemplary manner in keeping with the highest traditions of the U. S. Navy.D. V. Gallery"“Walker Earl Snodgrass BRANCH OF SERVICE: U.S. Navy HOMETOWN: Mannington, WV HONORED BY: Kathryn S. Schultz, Daughter ACTIVITY DURING WWII: SERVED FROM 1942-1945 AS GUNNERY OFFICER ON THE USS CHATELAIN. SERVED WITH THE USS GUADALCANAL CVE-60. RECEIVED THE BRONZE STAR MEDAL AND THE PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION." Source: National World War II Memorial Registry http://www.wwiimemorial.com/default.asp?page=registry.asp&subpage= search&drawtable=YES&Lastname=Snodgrass&firstname=&hometown=&s tate=&dbcode=&curpage=12Account #:Password:The Veteran Ancestry Registry:http://www.rootsquest.com/cgi-bin/ htmlos.cgi/0025.1.0596157542 "Walker SNODGRASS from Memphis, Shelby Co., Tennessee served in WWII in the unit USS Chatelain, DE 149, DE Division 4, North Atlantic Fleet as a Lieutenant, USNR. This veteran is thus honored by Kathryn Snodgrass Schultz, daughter of Walker E. Snodgrass. The strongest genealogical source for this veteran is Navy Papers, Personal Knowledge, Obituary, Newspaper Article, Photos In Uniform."Copied from the exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago:Excerpts from the Log of the Guadalcanal Hunter-Killer Group that Captured the U-505This excerpt begins on June 4, the day of the capture. (The capitalized phrases are log summaries of the task force’s activities.)CHATELAIN OBTAINS INITIAL SOUND CONTACT APPROXIMATELY 800 YARDS AWAY. 11:10 AM USS Chatelain to Captain Gallery: “Investigating possible sound contact, over.” Commander Gallery to USS Chatelain: “Roger, out.” 11:12 AM Commander Gallery to Escort Commander: “Take another escort and assist Frenchy; leave other escorts with me, out.”CHATELAIN EVALUATES CONTACT AS U-BOAT RANGE TOO CLOSE TO FIRE CAME HARD ABOUT AND REGAINED CONTACT ON STARBOARD QUARTER AT 200 YARDS11:17 AM From Fighter #1: “I’ve spotted sub; I’m going to try. . . . I put a shot right where he is! I could see him at 2500 feet. I’ll put down another burst.” 11:18 AM From Fighter #1: “Just put down another burst. At first I could see him clearly. He is fading now; he is going deeper.” 11.21 AM Commander Gallery to Escort Commander: “Do you wantthe other two escorts, over??CHATELAIN MAKES DEPTH CHARGE ATTACK. 11.21 AM USS Chatelain to USS Jenks: ?We are making attack, over.? From Fighter #1: â??Escort dropping charges, reverse course.? 11:22 AM Fighter #1 to USS Chatelain: ?You struck oil! All destroyer escorts, sub is surfacing!? From Fighter #7: ?Just took a burst.” From Fighter #1: “Let’s get the bastard! I wish I had 10,000 rounds.”U-BOAT SURFACING ON CHATELAIN’S STARBOARD QUARTER ABOUT 700 YARDS DISTANT11:23 AM Commander Gallery to Escort Commander: “I would like to capture that bastard if possible.” From USS Jenks: “He’s been hit several times.” USS Guadalcanal to Fighter #1: “Has sub surfaced?” From Fighter #1: “Affirmative. There’s a lot of oil on the starboard side.”CHATELAIN OPENS FIRE, RANGE ABOUT 500 YARDS. 11:24 AM USS Chatelain to USS Jenks: “Stay clear while we fire torpedoes.” From USS Jenks: “They are all holding their hands up. They are surrendering.”ALL UNITS ORDERED TO CEASE FIRING 11:24 AM From Escort Commander: “Cease firing. Cease firing. Cease firing until further word.”11:28 AM From USS Jenks: “Men are abandoning ship; there are lots of men in the water.” USS Chatelain to USS Jenks: “Get a boat over; we’ll go aboard the baby.” From Fighter #7: “The sub . . . wait . . . looks like the sub is submerging, doesn’t it, Jack?” 11:29 AM Commander Gallery to Escort Commander: “Do you think we can capture this guy?” USS Chatelain to USS Jenks: “Submarine is abandoning ship. Submarine is sinking.” Escort Commander to USS Pope: “You circle the vicinity of submarine at a distance ofabouttwo miles and search for any more submarines in the area.”11:30 AM USS Jenks to Escort Commander” “Request permission to put party aboard and take submarine in tow. Over.” From Escort Commander: “We’ve taken care of that. We have a boat to rail.” 11:32 AM USS Guadalcanal to Fighters #1 and #7: “Go down to altitude and look in water for survivors.” From Fighter #1: “Roger. Several life boats and men in water. More still diving in. Leaving in yellow boats — about 24.” Escort Commander to USS Jenks: “Start picking up survivors. Put boat in water and pick up any evidence.”DECK OF U-BOAT CLEARED OF PERSONNEL 11:33 AM Fighter #7 to USS Guadalcanal: ?Sub seems to be settling; they may save it. All men seem to be off.? 11:40 AM USS Chatelain to Escort Commander: â??We observed a hatch which had previously been open. Now is closed.? [NOTE: I think this is important, as it shows Chatelain party was on board before 11:42.] 11:42 AM Escort Commander to Commander Gallery: “Our boat is alongside of submarine now.” Commander Gallery to Escort Commander: “Roger, nice going.” 11:52 AM USS Guadalcanal toFighter #7: “Boarding party has boarded sub — still picking up survivors.”USS Guadalcanal CVE-60 (Task Group 22.3):Contact for Alumni Verterans Group: Mr. E.Julian Austin(828) 652-2514ejaustin@mcdowell.main.nc.us521 Pinecrest RoadMarlon, NC 28762-3051While serving as the duty officer, he had to enter into the log that they sigtheda Portuguese ship, but he didn’t think he could spell it, so he wrote instead“a ship from Portugal.” Captain Knox asked him the next day, “Mr. Snodgrass,how do you spell ‘Portuguese’?”Ancestry.com: U.S. Department of Veterans AffairsBIRLS Death File, 1850-2010:Walker Snodgrass:Birth Date: 30 Jul 1915Death Date: 5 Nov 1997SSN: 403129357Branch 1: NAVYEnlistment Date 1: 27 Jul 1942Release Date 1: 13 Dec 1945U.S.S. Chatelain: WWII Diaries: “War History”Source: Fold3.com“U.S.S. Chatelain (DE-149)CARE OF FLEET POST OFFICENEW YORK, N.Y.DE149/A7-1/wedSerial: 76230 November 1945From: The Commanding OfficerTo: The Secretary of the Navy (Public Information Office).Subject: History of the USS CHATELAIN - Submittal of.Reference: (a) AlLant 70-45.Enclosure: (A) List of Commanding Officers and Home Addresses.(B) List of Officers and Men who have performedoutstanding actionsm Description of actions,Awards Granted, and Home Addresses.(C) Copy of Pr.



This is an "orphaned" profile — there's no Profile Manager to watch over it. Please adopt this profile.


Collaboration
  • Login to edit this profile and add images.
  • Public Comments: Login to post. (Best for messages specifically directed to those editing this profile. Limit 20 per day.)


Comments

Leave a message for others who see this profile.
There are no comments yet.
Login to post a comment.