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Contents

Biography

This is the profile for Aquila Chase of Hampton and Newbury in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, who immigrated to New England by 1640.

Relationship to Thomas Chase and William Chase

Aquila Chase and Thomas Chase were brothers, as established by a deed dated May 11, 1667 in which Aquila Chase of Newbury confirmed the conveyance to his "brother" Thomas Chase of Hampton most of his land in Hampton, which he had agreed to convey 20 years earlier.[1][2]

Aquila and Thomas Chase, however, were not related to William Chase of Yarmouth. No reliable evidence of any familial connection between William and either Aquila or Thomas has ever been found.[3] In addition, the YDNA test results in the FamilyTreeDNA Chase Project show that male lineal descendants of William Chase are in an entirely different haplogroup (I-M253) than male lineal descendants of Aquila and Thomas Chase (R-M269),[4] which indicates that William Chase did not share a common male ancestor with Aquila and Thomas Chase for at least 50,000 of years.[5]

Parentage; Origin

Original Origin Tradition: Cornwall

According to Joshua Coffin in his 1845 Sketch of the History of Newbury, family tradition said that Aquila came from Cornwall.[6] No doubt in reliance on Coffin, Savage repeated that claim in his 1860 Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England.[7] Despite a diligent search of the Cornwall records,[8] however, no evidence supporting a Cornwall origin, however, has ever been found.

Disproven Parentage/Origin: Aquila Chaase of Chesham

In the 1860's, investigations in England by H.B. Somerby discovered the record of the baptism of an Aquila Chase, son or Richard Chase and Joan (Bishop) Chase in Chesham, Buckinghamshire on August 14, 1580.[9] (The parish records apparently actually spell the name "Chaase."[10]) As reported by George B. Chase in his 1869 Genealogical Memoir of the Chase Family:

The discover of the unique name of Aquila, found no where else in England, before or since, in any records of families bearing the surname Chase, was deemed conclusive proof by Mr. Somerby, as it has been since by other distinguished antiquarians, of the identity of the American with the English families.[9]

Based on the 1580 baptismal date, Aquila Chaase of Chesham was clearly born too early to have himself been Aquila the immigrant (and, in addition, his brother Thomas was 5 years younger than Aquila, not older). Instead, the theory proposed in Genealogical Memoir of the Chase Family was that Aquila of Chesham was the father of immigrants Thomas Chase and Aquila Chase, although no records were found that showed that Aquila of Chesham had sons by those names.[9] Despite the evidentially thin basis for the claim, from the time of its publication in 1869 until 1928, it was repeated in many published genealogical works containing profiles of immigrant Aquila Chase, including Cutter's 1908 Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts,[11] Stearns' 1908 Genealogical and Family History of the State of New Hampshire[12] and Reynolds' 1911 Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs,[13] and has continued to be repeated in online family trees.

The theory that Aquila Chaase of Chesham was the father of immigrants Thomas and Aquila Chase was shown to be highly questionable, however, by research published in the 1928 Seven Generations of the Descendants of Thomas Chase. The authors of that book found records of the marriage in London in 1606 of an Aquila Chase and Martha Jelliman and the births and deaths of their children there, including a son Aquila, who was born in 1626 and was buried in London in 1649, and asserted that those records related to Aquila Chaase who was baptized in Chesham in 1580.[14] Although the authors did not explain the reasoning behind that assertion, it was presumably based on (1) the close similarity of relatively rare names, (2) a good match between the date of baptism (1580) and the date of marriage (1606), (3) the absence of later records of Aquila Chaase in Chesham or earlier records of Aquila Chase of London, (4) reasonable proximity between Chesham and London (30 miles) and (5) evidence that at least one other member of the Chase family of Chesham (Stephen Chase, a probable cousin of Aquila Chase of Chesham)[15] moved to London.

The probability that Aquila Chase of London was the same person as Aquila Chase of Chesham has recently been substantially strengthened by the discovery of his apprenticeship records. The parish records for Aquila Chase of London refer to him as a "talyor" or "taler" and sometimes as a "marchant tayler".[16] Based on these references, the authors of Seven Generations had reviewed the records of the Company of Merchant Taylors for Aquila's apprenticeship records, but found nothing.[14] A Company of Drapers apprenticeship record has recently been found, however, that shows that Aquila Chase of London, tailor, became a freeman of the Company of Drapers in January 1605/6.[17] Most significantly, the record states that Aquila of London's father's name was Richard Chase, consistent with his being the son of Richard Chase of Chesham. Moreover, Company of Drapers records also that show a Thomas Chase apprenticed with the same master draper and became a freeman in 1611.[18] This Thomas Chase was very probably the Thomas Chase who was the son of Richard Chase (and brother of Aquila Chase), who was baptized in Chesham 1585.[14]

As a result of this new evidence, it seems very probable that Aquila Chaase of Chesham was the same person as Aquila Chase of London, whose son Aquila was buried in London in 1649, and thus very improbable that Aquila Chaase of Chesham was the father of immigrants Thomas Chase and Aquila Chase.

Probable Parentage/Origin: Thomas Chasse of Woolverstone

In 2013, Laurence Chase sent an email to the Chase rootsweb.com email list stating that he had discovered an entry in the Woolverstone parish register for the baptism in January 1619/20 of Aquila, son of Thos. Chaffe. He noted that Woolverstone was the village where Timothy Dalton was rector before he emigrated to Hampton and asked if others had followed up on this line of enquiry. The only response he received suggested that others had not heard of this theory but that it was worth investigating.[19] A google search in August 2019, however, suggests that it was never pursued further. Laurence Chase himself stated that he was not a descendant of Aquila so may have had limited interest and no other Chase researchers seem to have taken it up or discussed it.

A thorough review of the evidence relating to the proposition that immigrant Aquila Chase was the Aquila who was baptized in Woolverstone, Suffolk in January 1619/20 shows that it is even more promising than first appears and is in fact reasonably probable. First, a search on familysearch.org for people with the first name Aquila (or variants thereof) born in England in 1610-1625 shows that the 1619/20 Woolverstone baptismal record for Aquila Chaffe is the ONLY baptismal record for any person with a surname even close to Chase. Second, a close examination of the Woolverstone baptismal record (an image of which is attached to this profile) shows that it is actually for Aquila Chasse, not Aquila Chaffe, as the elongated middle letters are typical of s's during that time period[20] and have none of the crosses or loops that would indicate that they are f's.[21] The entry reads: "Aquila ye sonne of Thos Chasse was bap. ye 7th of January". Third, although no baptismal record has been found in Woolverstone parish register for a son Thomas Chasse, the fact that the father's name is Thomas is consistent with immigrant Aquila Chase having an older brother named Thomas. Fourth, immigrants Thomas and Aquila Chase were seaman and mariners by occupation and Woolverstone, which is located on River Orwell outlet from the port of Ipswich, is an appropriate place for seaman and mariners to come from. Fifth, as Laurence Chase correctly noted, it is well established that Rev. Timothy Dalton was the minister in Woolverstone before emigrating to New England,[22][23] and the authors of Seven Generations concluded that it was likely that Aquila and Thomas Chase came to Hampton with the second company of settlers under Timothy Dalton's leadership. Sixth, not only was Woolverstone the town of origin of Rev. Timothy Dalton, it is also the place of origin of New England immigrants Nathaniel Colburne, John Dwight, Richard Everard, William Goodrich and Humphrey Wythe.[24] As shown in the image attached to this profile, the baptismal record of Aquilla Chasse appears on the same page of the Woolverstone parish register as the baptismal records of children of Rev. Timothy Dalton, Humphrey Wythe and Richard Everard.

It thus seem reasonably plausible, if not probable, that that immigrant Aquila Chase was the Aquila Chasse, son of Thomas Chasse, who was baptized in Woolverstone in January 1619/20. Unfortunately, no record relating Thomas Chasse of Woolverstone has been found beyond that baptismal record.

Date of Birth

Assuming that the January 7, 1619/20 Woolverstone baptismal record relates to this profile's Aquila Chase, Aquila was probably born shortly before that date. Two other pieces of evidence, however, indicate that Aquila claimed to have been born somewhat earlier. First, since Aquila was granted land in Hampton in June 1640,[25] that indicates that it was believed that he was at least 21 at that time and thus born before June 1619. Second, in a deposition on September 25, 1666, Aquila stated that he was about 48 years old, which would mean that he was born about 1618.[26] Possible explanations for the discrepancy between the baptismal record and the estimated dates of birth based on the date of the land grant and his stated age in his deposition include that (1) Aquila was baptized 6-18 months after he was born, (2) Aquila was born in January 1619/20 but thought he was born about 1618 because he was ignorant of his true date of birth, (3) Aquila intentionally lied in 1640 that he was over 21 in order to be old enough to obtain the land grant and, for consistency, maintained that lie in later years, or (4) the Woolverstone baptismal record does not relate to this profile's Aquila Chase.

Immigration; Initial Residency in New England

The first record of Thomas and Aquila Chase in New England was the grant to them by the town of Hampton of house lots in June 1640.[27][25] Thomas and Aquila therefore must have immigrated to New England sometime before that date, but the precise year of immigration is unknown. While Thomas and Aquila could have immigrated in 1639 or early 1640, since all of the known immigrants from Woolverstone immigrated in 1635-1638 (Nathaniel Colburne 1637, Timothy Dalton 1637, John Dwight 1638, Richard Everard 1636, William Goodrich 1636, Humphrey Wythe 1635),[24] it is perhaps more likely that Thomas and Aquila immigrated sometime during that time period, with the absence of records for them prior to 1640 being due perhaps to their being indentured servants/apprentices when they immigrated and/or too young to have acquired land. Since all the known Woolverstone immigrants settled initially in a town other than Hampton (Dedham - Colburne, Dalton, Dwight, Everard; Ipswich - Wythe; Watertown - Goodrich),[24] if Thomas and Aquila immigrated in 1635-1638 with the known Woolverstone immigrants, it is likely that they initially resided in one of those towns. One possible scenario is that Thomas and Aquila were apprentice seaman to Humphrey Wythe (who was a mariner) and immigrated with him in 1635, residing first in Ipswich before removing to Hampton with Rev. Dalton in 1640 after Wythe died in 1639. Many of Wythe's children ended up settling in Hampton, and his daughter Sarah Wythe married Aquila's brother-in-law David Wheeler in Newbury,[28] suggesting a possible connection between the Chases and the Wythes.

Residency in Hampton and Newbury

Wherever Aquila may have been initially in New England, as mentioned above, in June 1640, Aquila was granted a six-acre house lot in Hampton (which was then in Norfolk County of the Massachusetts Bay Colony but is now in Rockingham, New Hampshire),[27][25] and no doubt settled there. In 1644, the town of Hampton granted him an additional six acres of upland meadow and swamp.[25]

Marriage

Aquila married Ann Wheeler. His wife's first name is established by a 1667 deed signed by Aquilla Chase and wife Ann Chase[1] and by Aquila's will, which mentioned "beloved wife Ann."[29][30] Ann's maiden name and parentage are established by the will of John Wheeler of Newbury, which included a bequest to "my daughter Anne Chase."[31][32]

Based on the estimated date of birth of their first child (1645), Aquila and Ann were probably married about 1644. Since both Aquila and Ann's parents lived in Hampton at that time, they were no doubt married there.

Removal to Newbury

In the summer of 1646, Aquila moved from Hampton to Newbury. The time of his move is established by both a court case and a land grant. At a Quarter Court in March of 1646, a presentment was made accusing Aquila, his wife, and his brother-in-law David Wheeler, all then residents of Hampton, of having gathered peas on the Sabbath.[33] At the Quarter Court in March 1647, however, it was reported that the constable of Hampton had been unable to present the summons because they had moved to Newbury.[34] All three were admonished at a court the following March.[35]

Aquila's removal to Newbury in 1646 is also established by a grant to him by the town of Newbury of land "at the new towne" for a house lot, six acres of upland for a planting lot, and six acres of marsh.[2] "New towne" was the part of Newbury that later became Newburyport.[2]

When Aquila moved from Hampton, he sold his land in Hampton, most to his brother Thomas. The original deeds have not been found, but Aquila made a deed in May 1667 confirming the sale 20 years earlier to his brother Thomas Chase of all his land in Hampton excepting one dwelling house and 1-1/2 acres of land "sometime in the possession of Steven Samborn."[1]

Children

Aquila and Ann had the following children:

  1. Sarah, b. probably about 1645 in Hampton,[36] m. May 15, 1666 Charles Annis (alias Curmac Annis) of Newbury[36]
  2. Anne, b. about July 6, 1647 in Newbury,[37][36] m. April 27, 1671 Thomas Barber of Newbury[36]
  3. Prisilla, b. March 14, 1648/9 in Newbury,[38][36] m. February 10, 1670/1 Abel Merrill of Newbury[36]
  4. Mary, b. February 3, 1650/1 in Newbury,[39][36] m. March 9, 1669/70 John Stevens of Newbury and Haverhill[36]
  5. Aquilla, b. September 26, 1652 in Newbury,[37][36] m. about 1673 Esther Bond,[40] d. July 29, 1720 in Newbury[40]
  6. Thomas, b. July 21, 1654 in Newbury,[41][42][36] m. 1st November 22, 1677 Rebecca Follansbee in Newbury,[43] m. 2d August 2, 1714 Elizabeth Moores in Newbury,[43] d. February 25, 1733 in Newbury[43]
  7. John, b. November 2, 1655 in Newbury,[44][45][36] m. 1st May 23, 1677 Elizabeth Bingley in Newbury,[46] m. 2d December 21, 1687 Lydia Challis in Salisbury,[46] d. February 26, 1739/40 in Newbury[46]
  8. Elizabeth, b. September 13, 1657 in Newbury,[47][48][36] m. 1st June 27, 1678 Zachariah Ayer,[36] m. 2d Daniel Favor,[36] living in Newbury in 1696[36]
  9. Ruth, b. March 18, 1659/60 in Newbury,[38][36] d. May 30, 1676[36]
  10. Daniel, b. November 15, 1661 or December 9, 1661 in Newbury. (See discussion and sources in Daniel's profile.)
  11. Moses, b. December 24, 1663 in Newbury,[49][36] m. 1st November 10, 1684 Anne Follansbee,[50] m. 2d December 13, 1713 Sarah Jacobs,[50] d. September 6, 1743 in Newbury[50]

Occupation

The 1646 Newbury land grant to Aquila was made on the condition that he "doe goe to sea and do service in the towne with a boate for four years."[2] This condition suggests that, at least at the time, Aquila was a probably a mariner who provided transportation and freighting services. That assertion is further supported by evidence that his brother Thomas engaged in a similar occupation. Thomas was referred to in deeds in 1646 and 1649 as a seaman;[51] in 1650 he sued Edward Gilman "for not making good a sufficient boat according to bargain";[52] and in 1651 he agreed to pay Edward Gilman for building a vessel by carrying boards from Exeter to Boston.[52]

Will; Death; Estate

Aquila made his will on December 10, 1670.[30] In his will, he was described as "Aquilla Chase of Newbury in the countye of Essex in New England." Aquila made bequests to wife Ann, daughters Ann Chase, Prisilla Chase, Mary and Ruth, sons Aquilla ("Eldest sonn"), Thomas, John, Daniell and Moses, and son-in-law Charles. He appointed his wife Ann as executrix and Ensign Steven Greenleafe and Wm. Chandler as overseers. Aquila signed with a mark. The will was witnessed by Wm. Chandler, Steven Greenlefe and James Ordway.[29][30] Full transcriptions of the (long) will can be found in The Probate Records of Essex County, Massachusetts. Volume II 1665-1674[29] and Seven Generation.[53]

Aquila died in Newbury either on December 17, 1670 (according to Newbury town records submitted to the Quarter Court)[54] or on December 21, 1670 (according to his date of death stated in the record of his inventory submitted to the Ipswich County Court).[29][30]

The inventory of Aquila's estate was appraised on January 21, 1670 by Edward Woodman, Jr. and John Bayley and totaled £336.14.3, including a house, barn and orchard with 24 acres of land (£100), 20 acres of marsh meadow (£60), and one horse, one mare, two oxen, three steers, four cows, two heifers and three calves (£94.15).[29][30] Full transcriptions of the will can be found in The Probate Records of Essex County, Massachusetts. Volume II 1665-1674[29] and Seven Generation.[53] Full transcriptions of the inventory can be found in The Probate Records of Essex County, Massachusetts. Volume II 1665-1674[29] and Seven Generation.[53]

Aquila's will was proved in March 28, 1671 in Ipswich court.[29][30]

Chronology of Records

  • 1640. Thomas and Aquila Chase granted house lots by the town of Hampton in June 1640.[27][25]
  • 1643. Aquila Chase was among 29 inhabitants of Hampton who signed petition to the Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony requesting the William Haward be replaced as head of the local militia.[55]
  • 1644. The town of Hampton granted Aquila Chase six acres of upland meadow and swamp.[25]
  • 1646. A list of shares of the common granted to proprietors of house lots of the town of Hampton as of February 23, 1645/6 included Tho: Chase with 2 shares and Aqull Chase with one share.[56]
  • 1646. At a Quarter Court at Ipswich, a presentment was made on September 29, 1646 for Aquila Chase and his wife and David Wheler of Hampton gathering pease on the Sabbath.[33]
  • 1646. The town of Newbury granted Aquila Chase four acres of land "at the new towne" for a house lot, six acres of upland for a planting lot, and six acres of marsh, on the condition that he "doe goe to sea and do service in the towne with a boate for four years."[2]
  • 1647. At a Quarter Court at Ipswich on March 30, 1647. Aquila Chase and his wife and Davyd Wheelar were presented for gathering pease on the Lord's day. Summons sent to Hampton. Constable returned that they were not at Hampton but were gone to Newbery.[34]
  • 1648. At a Quarter Court at Ipswich on March 28, 1648, Aquila Chase, his wife and David Wheelar were admonished. (Presumably for picking peas on the Sabbath.)[35]
  • 1648. At a Quarter Court at Hampton on September 26, 1648, Tho. Chase and Aquilla Chase v. Willi. Howard. Continued to Salisbury Court.[57]
  • 1651. At a Quarter Court at Salisbury on April 8, 1651, Aquilla Chase allowed 3s. for witness, summoned by Joseph Armitage.[58]
  • 1654. Aquila Chase was included in a list of commoners of the town of Newbury on January 10, 1653/4.[26]
  • 1654. At a Quarter Court at Ipswich on September 26, 1654, a petition of the inhabitants of Newbury to the General Court was record requesting that Lt. Robert Pike of Salsbury, who had been censured by the General Court for "letting fall some words", be restored to his former liberty. The petition was signed by Aquilla Chase and many others.[59]
  • 1659. By deed dated April 4, 1659, Robert Rogers of Newbury, in consideration fo £40, sold to William Moody of Newbury, a dwelling house and related land "lately purchased of Aquilla Chase", bounded by the land of Henry Fay (deceased) on the south, William Morse and David Wheeler on the west, the way next Merrimack River on the north, and the lane on the east.[26]
  • 1663. A March 23, 1663 list of the owners of shares in the cow common of the town of Hampton lists Aquila Chase as an original rights holder and Thomas Chase as having bought one share from Aquila Chase.[60]
  • 1666. In connection with a law suit by John Knight against John Woolcott for debt, Abell Hews, aged about sixty-four years, and Accquilla Chas, aged about forty-eight years, deposed that in the year 1665 a little after Mickellmas, they were at John Knights house when John Woollcott tendered John Knight two oxen then in the cart for the debt, and he offered to have them appraised as corn. Sworn September 25, 1666 before Samuel Symonds.[61]
  • 1667. By deed dated May 15, 1667, Aquilla Chase of Newbury confirming the conveyance to his brother Thomas Chase of Hampton all his land in Hampton excepting one dwelling house and 1-1/2 acres of land sometime in the possession of Steven Samborn, having agreed to convey the same to his said brother 20 years ago. Signed by Aquilla Chase (his A mark) and wife Ann Chase (her B mark). Witnessed by Mehitable Dalton and Hannah Dalton.[1]
  • 1670. Aquila Chase of Newbury made his will on December 10, 1670.[30]
  • 1670. Aquila Chase died in Newbury on either December 17, 1670[54] or December 21, 1670.[30]



A search for Thomas Chase son of Thomas Chase born 1610-1620 in England finds 3 matches, Thomas b 1617 in East Harling, Norfolk, Thomas bpt 1616 in Warbleton, Sussex, and Thomas bpt. 1616 in London. The first 2 can be ruled out because seem to have continued living there after 1620. The London one is possible.


Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 "Old Norfolk County Records." The Essex Antiquarian. Volume VI. p. 134. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Chase, John Carroll & Chamberlain, George Walter. Seven Generations of the Descendants of Thomas Chase. 1928. p. 30. Link to page at archive.org.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Chase, John Carroll & Chamberlain, George Walter. Seven Generations of the Descendants of Thomas Chase. 1928. p. 10. Link to page at archive.org.
  4. 4.0 4.1 "Chase/Chase FamilyTreeDNA Project Website - Y-DNA Colorized Chart," www.familytreedna.com, accessed August 26, 2019.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Estimated ages of Y-haplogroups, eupedia.com. Accessed August 27, 2019.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Coffin, Joshua. A Sketch of the History of Newbury, Newburyport, and West Newbury, from 1635 to 1845. 1845. pp. 297, 323. Link to pages at archive.org.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Savage, James. A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, Showing Three Generations of Those Who Came Before May, 1692, on the Basis of Farmer's Register. Vol. I. Little, Brown and Company, 1860. p. 364. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Chase, George B. A Genealogical Memoir of the Chase Family of Chesham, Bucks, in England, and of Hampton and Newbury in New England, with Notices of Some of Their Descendants. 1869. p. 8. Link to pages at archive.org.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 Chase, George B. A Genealogical Memoir of the Chase Family of Chesham, Bucks, in England, and of Hampton and Newbury in New England, with Notices of Some of Their Descendants. 1869. pp. 8-9. Link to pages at archive.org.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Chase, John Carroll & Chamberlain, George Walter. Seven Generations of the Descendants of Thomas Chase. 1928. p. 17. Link to page at archive.org.
  11. 11.0 11.1 Cutter, William Richard. Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts. Volume I. Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1908. p. 569. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  12. 12.0 12.1 Stearns, Ezra S. Genealogical and Family History of the State of New Hampshire. Vol. IV. Lewis Publishing Company, 1908. p. 1587. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  13. 13.0 13.1 Reynolds, Cuyler. Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs. Volume I. Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911. p. 462. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 Chase, John Carroll & Chamberlain, George Walter. Seven Generations of the Descendants of Thomas Chase. 1928. p. 26. Link to page at archive.org.
  15. 15.0 15.1 Stephen Chase, apthecary of London, was a son of John and Alice Chase of Chesham. See Seven Generations of the Descendants of Thomas Chase, p. 24-25 and Boyds Inhabitants of London, 1616.
  16. 16.0 16.1 Chase, John Carroll & Chamberlain, George Walter. Seven Generations of the Descendants of Thomas Chase. 1928. p. 20. Link to page at archive.org.
  17. 17.0 17.1 Records of London's Livery Companies Online. Apprentices and Freemen 1400-1900. Search Company: Drapers', Forename: Aquila, Year Range: 1600-1640, Event Type: All
  18. 18.0 18.1 Records of London's Livery Companies Online. Apprentices and Freemen 1400-1900. Search Company: Drapers', Forename: Thomas, Surname: Chase, Year Range: 1600-1620, Event Type: All
  19. 19.0 19.1 Re: (CHASE) CHASE Digest, Vol 8, Issue 2, Post by Richard Chase on May 21, 2013, responding to post by Laurence Chase
  20. 20.0 20.1 The baptismal entries on the page in the attached image use a variety of different shapes for S's. For ones in the image that are similar to those used in "Chasse", see the S's "Joseph" in the August 26, 1619 baptism of Joseph Lighton, in occurrences of "August", in "Nicholsonn" in the the 1621 baptism of Sara Nicholsonn, and in "sonne" in the late 1622 baptisms.
  21. 21.0 21.1 The baptismal entries on the page in the attached image use a variety of different shapes for F's, but none similar to the letters in the middle of "Chasse." For examples of F's in the image, see the F's in occurrences of "of", in occurrences of "February", in "Gooffee" in the February 1622 baptism of Marie Gooffee, and in "Ffit" in the 1623 baptism of Maria Ffit.
  22. 22.0 22.1 Blake, John Laurens. The English Home of Mr. Timothy Dalton, B.A.: The teach of the Church of Christ in Hampton, N.H. from 1639 to 1661. 1898. Link to book at hampton.lib.nh.us.
  23. 23.0 23.1 Sanborn, George F. and Sanborn, Melinde Lutz. "The Dalton Cluster: Timothy Dalton, Philemon Dalton, Richard Everard and Deborah (Everard) Blake." New England Historical and Genealogical Register. Volume 154 (2000). p. 259. Link to page at americanancestors.org.
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 24.3 Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Directory: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1640. A Concise Compendium. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 25.3 25.4 25.5 25.6 Chase, John Carroll & Chamberlain, George Walter. Seven Generations of the Descendants of Thomas Chase. 1928. p. 29. Link to page at archive.org.
  26. 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.3 Chase, John Carroll & Chamberlain, George Walter. Seven Generations of the Descendants of Thomas Chase. 1928. p. 31. Link to page at archive.org.
  27. 27.0 27.1 27.2 27.3 Dow, Joseph. History of the Town of Hampton, New Hampshire, from Its Settlement in 1638, to the Autumn of 1892. 1893. p. 18. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  28. 28.0 28.1 Stott, Clifford L., "The English Ancestry of Humphrey and Susan (Pakeman) Wythe of Ipswich, Massachusetts." The American Genealogist. Vol. 68 (1993). p. 220. Link to page at americanancestors.org.
  29. 29.0 29.1 29.2 29.3 29.4 29.5 29.6 29.7 29.8 The Probate Records of Essex County, Massachusetts. Volume II 1665-1674. The Essex Institute. 1917. pp. 217-219. Link to pages at hathitrust.org.
  30. 30.0 30.1 30.2 30.3 30.4 30.5 30.6 30.7 30.8 Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts. Volume IV 1667-1671. The Essex Institute, 1914. pp. 328-9. Link to pages at hathitrust.org.
  31. 31.0 31.1 The Probate Records of Essex County, Massachusetts. Volume II 1665-1674. The Essex Institute. 1917. pp. 200-201. Link to pages at hathitrust.org.
  32. 32.0 32.1 "Old Norfolk County Records." The Essex Anitquarian. Vol. 8. p. 128. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  33. 33.0 33.1 33.2 Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts. Volume I 1636-1656. The Essex Institute, 1911. p. 110. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  34. 34.0 34.1 34.2 Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts. Volume I 1636-1656. The Essex Institute, 1911. p. 113. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  35. 35.0 35.1 35.2 Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts. Volume I 1636-1656. The Essex Institute, 1911. p. 139. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  36. 36.00 36.01 36.02 36.03 36.04 36.05 36.06 36.07 36.08 36.09 36.10 36.11 36.12 36.13 36.14 36.15 36.16 36.17 36.18 Chase, John Carroll & Chamberlain, George Walter. Seven Generations of the Descendants of Thomas Chase. 1928. pp. 34-35. Link to pages at archive.org.
  37. 37.0 37.1 37.2 Vital Records of Newbury, Massachusetts to the End of the Year 1849. Volume I. Births. The Essex Institute. 1911. p. 87. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  38. 38.0 38.1 38.2 Vital Records of Newbury, Massachusetts to the End of the Year 1849. Volume I. Births. The Essex Institute. 1911. p. 95. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  39. 39.0 39.1 Vital Records of Newbury, Massachusetts to the End of the Year 1849. Volume I. Births. The Essex Institute. 1911. p. 93. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  40. 40.0 40.1 40.2 Chase, John Carroll & Chamberlain, George Walter. Seven Generations of the Descendants of Thomas Chase. 1928. p. 35. Link to page at archive.org.
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