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Zacatecas Mi Tierra-1

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Date: 2021 [unknown]
Location: Mexico, Spain, Europe, Americasmap
Surnames/tags: Olmos, Duran, Jauregui, Serna, Ibarra, Rodriguez, Hernandez, Ines, Prieto, Perez, Martinez, Gomez, Moreno, Luna, Estrada, Ramiurez, Medina Zacatecas, Jalisco, Aguascalientes, Nuevo Espana, Nuevo Galicia
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This history of the Olmos Family.

  • La Toma de Zacatecas (The Taking of Zacatecas) wasthe largest and bloodiest battle of the Mexican Revolution. Once a center for silver mining, Zacatecas has earned a reputation as an agricultural center noted for its grains and sugar cane. It’s also a big producer of beverages, like rum, pulque and mescal. Boasting a major university, bustling agriculture and robust commerce, Zacatecas is self-confident and self-contained. The area produces red wines and is the nation’s largest producer of guavas. Due to its fine array of art, cultural and historical museums along with beautiful parks and marvelous architecture, Zacatecas is a favorite destination for Mexican families and tourists.

History Early History Before the arrival of Spanish settlers to the area, Zacateco, Caxcán and Guachichile natives inhabited the region. Because the exact history of Zacatecas’ indigenous tribes is uncertain, the date of the area’s first settlement remains a mystery.

Did you know? On June 1914, the city of Zacatecas became the center of national attention when Pancho Villa and his Dorados stormed the city to clash with Spanish forces commanded by General Victoriano Huerta. The battle, known as La Toma de Zacatecas (The Taking of Zacatecas), was the largest and bloodiest of the revolution, leaving 7,000 soldiers dead and 5,000 wounded; the number of civilian casualties was never recorded.

Evidence suggests that the Zacateco people established well-developed urban areas at La Florida, Alta Vista and La Quemada prior to 500 A.D. The La Quemada settlement was constructed within a hilltop fortress, perhaps as protection against Chichimec invasion. The state’s largest pre-Columbian settlement is located in the southwestern region.[1]</ref>





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La Toma de Zacatecas (The Taking of Zacatecas) wasthe largest and bloodiest battle of the Mexican Revolution. Once a center for silver mining, Zacatecas has earned a reputation as an agricultural center noted for its grains and sugar cane. It’s also a big producer of beverages, like rum, pulque and mescal. Boasting a major university, bustling agriculture and robust commerce, Zacatecas is self-confident and self-contained. The area produces red wines and is the nation’s largest producer of guavas. Due to its fine array of art, cultural and historical museums along with beautiful parks and marvelous architecture, Zacatecas is a favorite destination for Mexican families and tourists.

History Early History Before the arrival of Spanish settlers to the area, Zacateco, Caxcán and Guachichile natives inhabited the region. Because the exact history of Zacatecas’ indigenous tribes is uncertain, the date of the area’s first settlement remains a mystery.

Did you know? On June 1914, the city of Zacatecas became the center of national attention when Pancho Villa and his Dorados stormed the city to clash with Spanish forces commanded by General Victoriano Huerta. The battle, known as La Toma de Zacatecas (The Taking of Zacatecas), was the largest and bloodiest of the revolution, leaving 7,000 soldiers dead and 5,000 wounded; the number of civilian casualties was never recorded.

Evidence suggests that the Zacateco people established well-developed urban areas at La Florida, Alta Vista and La Quemada prior to 500 A.D. The La Quemada settlement was constructed within a hilltop fortress, perhaps as protection against Chichimec invasion. The state’s largest pre-Columbian settlement is located in the southwestern region.

posted 26 Jan 2021 by Armando Oscar Olmos Olmos   [thank Armando Oscar]
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Mexico, Zacatecas
Mexico, Zacatecas

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Categories: Olmos Name Study | Zacatecas