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Johannes Steiner (1673 - 1758)

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Bishop Johannes "Hans" Steiner
Born in Oberdiessbach, Canton Bern, Switzerlandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married in Weuzbrunnen, Reothenbach, Canton Bern, Switzerlandmap
Descendants descendants
Died in Conestoga, Lancaster, Pennsylvaniamap
Profile last modified | Created 18 Oct 2011 | Last significant change: 15 Jan 2019
22:21: Patricia (Prickett) Hickin edited the Death Place for Johannes Steiner (1673-1758). [Thank Patricia for this]
This page has been accessed 2,809 times.

Categories: 52 Ancestors - 2018 Week 23 'Going to the Chapel'.

Contents

Biography

Johannes (Hans) Steiner was born April 13, 1673, in Langnau Im Emmental, Bern, Switzerland, the son of Johannes Christian Steiner and Catharina (Farni) Steiner. He was the brother of Benedict Steiner, Barbli Steiner, Benedict II Steiner, Christian Stoner, Barbara Steiner, Peter Steiner, Madlena Steiner, Catherine Steiner, Anna Steiner and Margaret Steiner, and a half-brother of Ulrich Steiner.[1]
According to Find A Grave, Hans was twice married. His first wife was Barbara Meister - Born 1679 in Sumiswald, Canton of Bern, Switzerland, died June 18, 1751 in Langnau im Emmental, Canton of Bern, Switzerland. A child of Hans and Barbara’s was Johann Steiner (aka John Stoner) born in 1705, in Switzerland, died May 28, 1769, in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, married Catherine Brenneman.
Hans' s second wife was Anna Brenneman - Born 1680 in Canton of Bern, Switzerland, daughter of Abraham Bronimann and Magdalena (Engel) Bronimann, died 1756 in Lancaster County, PA.

Genealogy Center of the Allen County Public Library

Jerry Filbrun database [2004]: 'Name: Johannes (Hans) Steiner, Birth: BET. 1655 - 1662 in Rothenbach, Canton Bern, Switzerland. Death: BET. 1702 - 1767 in Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania
Lived in Upper Emmenthal Valley in the Canton of Bern near the villages of Rothenbach and Eggiwil, Switzerland. Hans Steiner and Anna Brenneman were, shortly after their happy marriage forced by impending persecution and the seizure of their homestead to flee northward into the German Palatinate, which at that time was friendly to Anabaptists. Hans became a preacher in this sect, generally called Mennonites in Germany. Hans moved farther north into the Gronigen area of the Netherlands. Events moved smoothly until the Mennonites became involved in a church division.
Hans Steiner, his wife Anna, and their children made the decision to emigrate to Pennsylvania. There is no record of when they arrived there, whether they came as a group or in separate migrations, or exactly where they settled. In North America, Hans was ordained a Mennonite bishop. Bishop Hans may have served in what is now the Hess and Hammer Creek districts in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, or possibly in the Vincent Mennonite congregation in northern Chester County, Pennsylvania. He may have even been in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania. [2]
Johannes married Anna E. Brenneman (b-1680) on 23 Sep 1697, daughter of Abraham and Magdalena (Engel) Brenneman in Weuzbrunnen, Rothenbach, Canton Bern, Switzerland

From Findagrave.com

Johannes Hans Steiner
Birth: Apr. 13, 1673, Bern, Switzerland; Death: Oct. 29, 1758, Conestoga, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania;
Johannes Hans Steiner, Birthdate: April 13, 1673; Birthplace: Langnau Im Emmental, Bern, Switzerland; Death: Died October 29, 1758 in Conestoga, Lancaster County, PA.
Immediate Family: Son of Johannes Christian Steiner and Catharina Steiner;
Husband of
1. Barbara Meister - Born 1679 in Sumiswald, Canton of Bern, Switzerland. Mother of: Johannes Steiner. Died June 18, 1751 in Langnau im Emmental, Canton of Bern, Switzerland.
2. Anna (Brenneman) Steiner - Born 1690 in Eggiwil, Signau District, Canton of Bern, Switzerland. Died 1756 in Lancaster County, PA. Daughter of Abraham Bronimann and Magdalena Bronimann.
Father of Veronica Leib, John Stoner and Johannes Steiner.
Brother of Benedict Steiner, Barbli Steiner, Benedict II Steiner, Christian Stoner, Barbara Steiner, Peter Steiner, Madlena Steiner, Catherine Steiner, Anna Steiner and Margaret Steiner. Half-brother of Ulrich Steiner.
Family links: Parents: Johannes Christian Steiner (1651 - 1711); Spouse: Barbara Meister Steiner (1679 - 1751); Children: Johann Stoner (1705 - 1769), Veronica Leib (1706 - 1769)[3]; Sibling: Benedict Steiner (1677 - ____).
Burial: Unknown[4]

Notes

Lived in Upper Emmenthal Valley in the Canton of Bern near the villages of Rothenbach and Eggiwil, Switzerland. Hans Steiner and Anna Brenneman were, shortly after their happy marriage forced by impending persecution and the seizure of their homestead to flee northward into the German Palatinate, which at that time was friendly to Anabaptists. Hans became a preacher in this sect, generally called Mennonites in Germany. Hans moved farther north into the Gronigen area of the Netherlands. Events moved smoothly until the Mennonites became involved in a church division.

Hans Steiner, his wife Anna, and their children made the decision to emigrate to Pennsylvania. There is no record of when they arrived there, whether they came as a group or in separate migrations, or exactly where they settled. In North America, Hans was ordained a Mennonite bishop.
Bishop Hans may have served in what is now the Hess and Hammer Creek districts in Lancaster County, PA or possibly in the Vincent Mennonite congregation in northern Chester Co., PA. He might have even been in Lebanon Co., PA
From "An Essay on the Stoner/Steiner Families of Pennsylvania", Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage, Vol. XI, No. 1, January 1988. p.16
[2923723.ged]
Fled to German Palitinate to escape Anabaptist persecution. Moved to
Gronigen, Netherlands. Hans ( Johannas) was a preacher. In America, he
was ordained a Mennonite Bishop.
Arrived in Lancaster Co., PA by 1718
Taxed in Conestoga Township, Lancaster Co., PA 1719
1709 Census for Enkenbach Congregation in Pfalz, Germany. Age listed as
36. Lived on farm 4 at Enkenbach, Germany in 1709
Steiner, a Mennonite family of Swiss origin, was found early on in the communities of Signau, Langnau, Trachselwald, and Eggiwil, in the canton of Bern. The first mention of a member of the family as Anabaptist was in 1538 when Margaret Steiner was brought before the officials at Signau. Members of the family have figured in each of the main Swiss Mennonite migrations. Christian Steiner (b. ca. 1661), a deacon of Diesbach, was one of the emigrants to the Netherlands in 1711. In the early 18th century some of the Steiner family moved to the Jura. By 1750 members of the family had also moved near Florimont in Alsace. A minister of the Swiss Mennonite congregation there, Hans Steiner, made several trips to the Palatinate with other ministers between 1767 and 1780 in an attempt to bring peace to two factions that had arisen in the Mennonite church there.
In the 18th century some Steiners came to Pennsylvania. Most of their descendants have anglicized the name to Stoner. While this family has also moved to Virginia and Iowa, most descendants have lived in Westmoreland, York, and Lancaster counties, Pennsylvania. In 1825-35 several grandchildren of the above Hans Steiner moved with their families from Florimont and settled near Kitchener, ON, the Chippewa (now Crown Hill) settlement in northern Wayne County, Ohio, and Putnam County, Ohio. Daniel Steiner became the first bishop of the Chippewa Swiss Mennonite congregation, and Christian Steiner was the first bishop of the Putnam County Swiss Mennonite congregation.
Christian P. Steiner (1832-1910), minister of the Riley Creek (later called Zion) Mennonite Church, Ohio, was one of the early instigators of a general conference in the Mennonite Church (MC). Menno S. Steiner (1866-1911), a son of Christian P. Steiner, was a Mennonite (MC) evangelist, missionary, leader, author, and first president of the Mennonite Board of Missions and Charities. He lived near Cranberry (now Rockport), Allen County, Ohio, and served with his father as a minister of the Zion Mennonite Church. Another son of Christian P. Steiner was Albert Steiner, a bishop (MC) in Columbiana County, Ohio.
Ulrich Steiner (1806-77) was an influential Mennonite elder in the Emmental Church. He had a glorious vision of heaven and wrote a pamphlet on the topic entitled Angenehme Stunden in Zion. This pamphlet became a part of many Swiss Mennonite homes in the canton of Bern and also in North America.

Acknowledgements

  • WikiTree profile Steiner-133 was created through the import of BaxterFamilyTree.ged on Jan 27, 2012 by Jason Baxter.

Sources

  • Source: S-2130033797 Repository: #R-2146549482 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. Note: This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. Page: Ancestry Family Trees Note: Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=7276982&pid=1135
  • [Miller, K.] “1732 reconstructed census of Mennonites” URL: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kmiller/miller/d54cen1732.pdf. (56 pages). “Here is the reconstructed list of Mennonite males living on the west side of the Rhine River in present day Germany. [Miller] has also added Mennonites who lived in America, France and Switzerland based on [her] family files and on Jura Mennonite lists printed by Delbert Gratz.”
  • WikiTree profile Steiner-68 created through the import of Most 2011_7b.ged on Oct 17, 2011 by Mike Saufley. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Mike and others.
  • WikiTree profile Steiner-202 created through the import of Ancestry Audrey Harrington.ged on Nov 14, 2012 by Kim Myers. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Kim and others.
  • Source: S107 Abbreviation: World Family Tree Vol. 5, Ed. 1 Title: World Family Tree Vol. 5, Ed. 1 Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc. Publication: Release date: August 22, 1996 Note: Customer pedigree. Repository: #R1
  1. https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi/page/gr/http//fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=156633152
  2. From "An Essay on the Stoner/Steiner Families of Pennsylvania", Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage, Vol. XI, No. 1, January 1988. p.16
  3. https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=177899031
  4. “Johannes Hans Steiner,” Findagrave.com Record added: Jan 02, 2016. URL: https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi/page/gr/http//fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=156633152.


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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Johannes by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with Johannes:

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On 26 Apr 2018 at 12:30 GMT Amy (Forstrom) Wiemer wrote:

Steiner-261 and Steiner-68 are not ready to be merged because: More research is needed.

On 25 Mar 2018 at 23:12 GMT Carole (Evans) Fisher wrote:

Steiner-261 and Steiner-68 appear to represent the same person because: same spouse, same birth date

On 3 May 2017 at 15:56 GMT Amy (Forstrom) Wiemer wrote:

Steiner-626 and Steiner-68 appear to represent the same person because: Same parents, same spouse

On 1 May 2017 at 23:54 GMT Janne (Shoults) Gorman wrote:

Steiner-626 and Steiner-133 appear to represent the same person because: Johannes Steiner married Anna E. Brenneman , father of Jacob Steiner, aka Stoner

On 4 Nov 2014 at 14:05 GMT Sharon Casteel wrote:

Steiner-202 and Steiner-68 appear to represent the same person because: Same parents; same birth year and place; same wife; same death place. Death year needs resolving but is close enough to be something like the difference between the date a will was written and the date it was probated.



Johannes is 22 degrees from Robin Helstrom, 20 degrees from Katy Jurado and 19 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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