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Johann Georg Stoll (abt. 1732)

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Johann Georg (Georg) Stoll
Born about in Durlach, Baden, Germanymap
Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married 1761 [location unknown]
Husband of — married about 1779 in Grimm, Saratov, Russiamap
Descendants descendants
Died [date unknown] in Grimm, Saratov, Russiamap
Profile last modified 24 May 2019 | Created 8 May 2016
This page has been accessed 260 times.

Biography

Volga German
Georg Stoll is a Volga German.
Georg Stoll has German Roots.

Family A 22-64 in The Immigration of German Colonists to Denmark and Their Subsequent Emigration to Russia in the Years 1759-1766.

Family B-1657 in The Immigration of German Colonists to Denmark and Their Subsequent Emigration to Russia in the Years 1759-1766.

Family Rus 14-45 in The Immigration of German Colonists to Denmark and Their Subsequent Emigration to Russia in the Years 1759-1766.


Family #12 in the 1775 Grimm census.
Family #78 in the 1798 Grimm census.
Family #174 in the 1834 Grimm census.


Johann Georg Stoll and his wife Anna Jäger were Evangelical Lutherans from the Margraviate of Baden-Durlach. Stoll, born about 1735, and Jäger, born about 1739, were newly married and looking for a better life than what Germany had to offer in the mid 1700s.

In 1759, the ruler of Denmark issued an invitation to Germans from more impoverished areas to immigrate north to Denmark, to help farm the wetlands in what was then southern Denmark. They were part of a larger group of 64 families who departed from the processing center in the Duchy of Holstein on 26 May 1761 and arrived 4 days later in the Duchy of Schleswig. [1] The couple took their oaths of allegiance on 24 July 1761. [2] Two weeks later they were recorded in their first home at Number 3 Konigs Hulde in Colony G15 Sophiehamm in the region of Gottorf. [3] While living in Denmark, they had at least one child, Johann Georg, who was born with multiple birth defects. [4]

Taming the marshlands of Denmark proved more difficult than anyone realized, and many of the Germans became disenchanted with their new home. In 1763, Catherine the Great issued her edict to selected Germans to immigrate to Russia. Whether they feared they had too much to lose if they remained in Denmark or they thought that the Russian offer was too attractive to pass up, many of the German families in Denmark decided to move on to Russia. By 01 May 1765, the couple had deserted Denmark and was later recorded as settling in the Colony of Grimm. [5]

The journey to Russia and then on to the Volga River region was treacherous and many immigrants did not survive. There is a seven-year gap between the birth of their first child Johann Georg Stoll in Denmark and the next recorded child, Johann Michael Stoll, born in 1767. It's possible that the couple had one or two additional children in Denmark before they left for Russia, and that those children did not survive the journey to Grimm.

Johann Georg Stoll and his wife are not listed in the 1767 Grimm census, but that was probably an oversight. It's also possible they were assigned to live in another village first, but by 1775 they moved to Grimm.


1775 Grimm Census [6]

Family # 12
Head of the Household Johann Georg Stoll, age 43
Wife Anna [Jäger] Stoll, age 39
Child #1 Johann Georg Stoll, age 13 [born in Denmark]
Child #2 Johann Michael Stoll, age 8
Child #3 Johann Tobias Stoll, age 6 months
Child #4 Anna Christina Stoll, age 6
Mother-in-Law Anna Maria Jäger, age 80

This census introduces his mother-in-law to his family: Anna Maria Jäger. I could not find either her or her daughter in any of the traditional immigration sources. [7] [8] [9] [10] It may be that Anna Maria Stoll's mother had remarried after the death of her husband, and Jäger may not be Anna Maria Stoll's last name at birth.


1798 Grimm Census [11]

Family # 78
Head of the Household Georg Stoll, age 63
Wife Margaretha Haas, from Sosnovka [Schilling], age 41
Child #1 Konrad Stoll, age 17
Child #2 Johannes Stoll, age 15
Child #3 Johann Jakob Stoll, age 13
Child #4 Valentin Stoll, age 3 months
Child #5 Katharina Stoll, age 18
Child #6 Maria Elisabeth Stoll, age 11
Child #7 Magdalena Barbara Stoll, age 10
Child #8 Regina Stoll, age 7
Child #9 Anna Maria Regina Stoll, age 2
Child #10 Johann Georg Stoll, age 35, Georg's son from deceased wife, deaf, dumb, and has only one eye


Sources

  1. Eichhorn, Alexander, Dr., and Dr. Jacob and Mary Eichhorn. The Immigration of German Colonists to Denmark and Their Subsequent Emigration to Russia in the Years 1759-1766, Druck and Bindung: Druckerei and Verlap Steinmeier GmbH & Co. KG, 86738, Deiningen, Germany; Published 2012, page 263.
  2. Ibid, page 619.
  3. Ibid, page 619.
  4. The 1775 and 1798 Census of the German Colony on the Volga, Lesnoy Karamysh, also known as Grimm; Published by the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, Lincoln, Nebraska, USA; Published date: 1995; family #78 in the 1798 census.
  5. The Immigration of German Colonists to Denmark and Their Subsequent Emigration to Russia in the Years 1759-1766, page 619.
  6. The 1775 and 1798 Census of the German Colony on the Volga, Lesnoy Karamysh, also known as Grimm; Published by the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, Lincoln, NE, USA; Published 1995; family #12 in the 1775 census.
  7. Eichhorn, Alexander, Dr., and Dr. Jacob and Mary Eichhorn. The Immigration of German Colonists to Denmark and Their Subsequent Emigration to Russia in the Years 1759-1766, Druck and Bindung: Druckerei and Verlap Steinmeier GmbH & Co. KG, 86738, Deiningen, Germany; Published 2012.
  8. Pleve, Igor. List of Colonists to Russia in 1766, "Reports by Ivan Kulberg," Ministry of Education and Science of Russian Federation, Saratov State Technical University; Published in Saratov, Russia 2010.
  9. Rauschenbach, Georg. Deutsche Kolonisten auf dem Weg von St. Petersburg nach Saratow, Transportlisten von 1766-1767, Published in Moscow, Russia, 2017.
  10. Transport of the Volga Germans from Oranienbaum to the Colonies on the Volga 1766-1767. Translated and edited by Brent Alan Mai; Published by the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, Lincoln, Nebraska, 1998.
  11. The 1775 and 1798 Census of the German Colony on the Volga, Lesnoy Karamysh, also known as Grimm; Published by the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, Lincoln, Nebraska, USA; Published date: 1995; family #78 in the 1798 census.


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Categories: Grimm | German Roots