Charles I Stuart
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Charles Stuart (1600 - 1649)

Charles (Charles I) [uncertain] "King of England, King of Scots, King of Ireland" Stuart
Born in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotlandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married 13 Jun 1625 in Kent, Englandmap
Descendants descendants
Died in Whitehall, London, Englandmap
Profile last modified | Created 23 Nov 2008 | Last significant change: 8 May 2020
00:39: Des Connors edited the Status Indicators for Charles Stuart (1600-1649). [Thank Des for this]
This page has been accessed 17,584 times.
British Aristocracy
Charles I Stuart was a member of aristocracy in the British Isles.
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Preceded by
James I
King of England and Ireland
27 Mar 1625 - 30 Jan 1649
Succeeded by
Charles II (de jure)
Preceded by
James VI
King of Scots
27 Mar 1625 - 30 Jan 1649
Succeeded by
Charles II

Contents

Biography

Charles I (19 Nov 1600 – 30 Jan 1649),[1] was monarch of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution on 30 January 1649 at Whitehall Palace in London.

Early Life

Charles was the second son of James VI of Scotland, but after his father inherited the English throne in 1603, he moved to England, where he spent much of the rest of his life. He became heir apparent to the English, Irish and Scottish thrones on the death of his elder brother, Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales, in 1612.

Charles City in the Virginia Colony was named in his honor in 1619 (when he was still Prince Charles) and from it Charles City Shire and then Charles City County.

Marriage

An unsuccessful and unpopular attempt to marry him to the Spanish Habsburg princess Maria Anna culminated in an eight-month visit to Spain in 1623 that demonstrated the futility of the marriage negotiations. Two years later, he married the Bourbon princess Henrietta Maria of France instead.[2]

Legacy

After his succession, Charles quarreled with Parliament, which sought to curb his royal prerogative. Charles believed in the divine right of kings and thought he could govern according to his own conscience. Many of his subjects opposed his policies, in particular, the levying of taxes without parliamentary consent, and perceived his actions as those of a tyrannical absolute monarch. His religious policies, coupled with his marriage to a Roman Catholic, generated the antipathy and mistrust of reformed groups such as the Puritans and Calvinists, who thought his views too Catholic. He supported high church ecclesiastics, such as Richard Montagu and William Laud, and failed to aid Protestant forces successfully during the Thirty Years' War. His attempts to force the Church of Scotland to adopt high Anglican practices led to the Bishops' Wars, strengthened the position of the English and Scottish parliaments and helped precipitate his own downfall.

Sources

  1. see also: b. 19 Nov 1600 Dunfermline (The blood royal of Britain); d. abt 1648 Whitehall Palace, London; London Metropolitan Archives, St Mary Woolchurch Haw, Composite register: baptisms 1558 - 1699, marriages 1559 - 1666 and burials 1558 - 1665, P69/MRY14/A/001/MS07644; bur. 30 Jan 1648 Windsor, Berkshire (London Metropolitan Archives, St Mary Woolchurch Haw, Composite register: baptisms 1558 - 1699, marriages 1559 - 1666 and burials 1558 - 1665, P69/MRY14/A/001/MS07644)
    more ancestry.com links: North America, Family Histories, 1500-2000; England, Select Marriages, 1538–1973; DNB, 1-20, 22 A; England, Select Births and Christenings, 1538-1975; Find A Grave Index; London, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812; U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900
  2. see also: Marriage 11 May 1625 Paris; Marriage 1646. Marriage Bet. 13–23 Jun 1625 St Augustine's Church, Canterbury, Keny, England (London Metropolitan Archives, St Mary Woolchurch Haw, Composite register: baptisms 1558 - 1699, marriages 1559 - 1666 and burials 1558 - 1665, P69/MRY14/A/001/MS07644

See Also...

  • MacLeod, D. (2007, January 18). Historian exposes secret sex life of Charles I. Guardian. Web.[1]

Notes



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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Charles I by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. Y-chromosome DNA test-takers in his direct paternal line on WikiTree: Mitochondrial DNA test-takers in the direct maternal line:

Have you taken a DNA test? If so, login to add it. If not, see our friends at Ancestry DNA.

Comments: 4

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Stuart I-1 and Stuart-1 appear to represent the same person because: Both profiles are of Charles I Stuart, King of England and Scotland and need to be merged.
posted by John Atkinson
I think the person who has this YDNA "confirmed" as haplogroup I-M223 needs to revisit their tree, since the Stuarts are well known to be R1b-L21.
posted by [Living Buckner]
I-126 and Stuart-1 appear to represent the same person because: Same people same rulers.
posted by N (Sweet) S
Stuart-1 and Stuart-1021 appear to represent the same person because: HELLO: I WAS LOOKING AT ORPHANED PROFILES WHEN I CAME ACROSS THIS Stuart-1021. couldn't believe it. I ALSO CREATED Stuart-1031 FOR JAMES VI. IT SHOULD BE MERGED ALSO. SORRY, GENE ADKINS

Charles I is 18 degrees from Donald Howard, 14 degrees from Julia Howe and 5 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.